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Graduate School UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate Courses


UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies’ Graduate School is the leading graduate humanities school in Ireland.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


Contents

Cover & inside front cover image: Ken Williams/Shadowsandstone.com

Welcome

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What skills will I learn?

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How employers see us

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What should I study?

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Our degrees

7

Student Life

57

Dublin

59

Career Development Centre

61

Admissions and Entrance Qualifications

62

Scholarship Opportunities

63

Contacts

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Incoming graduate students enjoying the welcome BBQ, September 2012

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


Welcome to UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies, Ireland’s International Graduate School UCD is one of the most distinctive universities in Europe for the study of the humanities. Located in Ireland’s cosmopolitan capital city, our graduate community has come to us from a multiplicity of backgrounds and from almost every continent. The UCD experience is an international one. Consistently, the humanities in UCD are ranked highly. Our faculty have attracted some of the most competitive research grants and awards available, and have played a significant and recognised role in shaping their respective fields of study. In addition to the pride we take in remaining at the forefront of research, we are equally committed to the quality of our teaching, and to the portfolio of world-class graduate courses we offer. The transition to graduate study can be at once challenging and profoundly rewarding. Our courses will hone critical skills that you will have acquired during your undergraduate degree, but above all value and foster independent thinking and intellectual curiosity. UCD is an environment that promotes the testing of established ideas and assumptions.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

While the value of the humanities in a civic society is unquestionable, the skills acquired at university empower our students not only to secure positions in a wide range of sectors, but also to flourish over the course of their careers. Some of our most recent graduates have gone on to positions in areas as diverse as film production, journalism, management and accountancy. More generally, our alumni are to be found in a truly astonishing breadth of posts in many of the world’s leading companies and organisations. I am proud of our College’s teaching and research credentials and of the success of our alumni. A real testament to UCD, however, is the fact that it has always remained a genuinely friendly place to study and to research. I hope that you will take time to browse the graduate courses listed in this prospectus, and that you consider applying to join our graduate community. Dr Alexander S. Wilkinson Director of the Graduate School, UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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What skills will I learn?

How employers see our graduates

Research skills and awareness

‘Accenture seeks bright, innovative and highly motivated candidates,

- Exhibit knowledge of advances and developments in your field

who will excel in a fast paced, competitive and client-facing

- Comprehend and effectively employ appropriate research methodologies

environment. Experience has shown UCD graduates from all

- Critically analyse and synthesise new and complex information from diverse sources

and skills needed to thrive in our business and deliver the high quality

- Formulate and apply solutions to research problems - Exercise critical judgement and thinking - Appreciate basic principles of project and time management

disciplines, including Arts and Humanities, to possess the attributes and innovative solutions for which Accenture is renowned’. Hilary O’Meara, Head of Accenture’s Technology Growth Platform in Ireland ‘Arts Students tend to be more adaptable and open minded. I believe that this adaptability is a result of the diversity of their studies’.

Ethics and Social Understanding

Sean Cooney, SABIS

- Understand, and apply, principles of ethical conduct of research, including avoidance of plagiarism, allocation of credit and authorship

‘As a large employer of graduates, KPMG places specific focus on

- Understand the relevance of research in society

attracting UCD students to the firm. Arts and Humanities students bring a holistic perspective which is a valuable trait when it comes to

Communication skills - Demonstrate effective writing and communication skills - Effectively use and decide on appropriate forms and levels of communication

issue resolution, relationship management and we have found them to be ‘employer ready’ at interview. As employees, they are highly confident, articulate and successful - our Managing Partner is a UCD Arts graduate as are many more throughout the firm’. Paul Vance, Director, Human Resources, KPMG

Personal effectiveness/development

‘Think about a career in the EU if you’re an arts graduate with a good

- Operate in an independent and self-directed manner

knowledge of European languages; it’s no secret that Irish graduates

- Demonstrate an ability to handle difficulties in research or other professional activities in an appropriate way

are popular in European affairs and in the EU institutions, with our informal nature, good negotiating skills and fluent English’. Lucinda Creighton, TD Minister of State, Department of Foreign Affairs

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


What should I study? Masters (Full-Time, 1 Year): If you have a good BA and wish to specialise. Masters (Part-Time, 2 Years): If you are working or for other reasons wish to study over two years rather than one. Teaching and supervision are conducted during the working day. Diploma: If your undergraduate qualification is in a non-cognate discipline, you are returning to education after many years, or if you did not perform quite as strongly in your BA and would like a ‘top-up’ qualification. MLitt (Research): If you want to carry out specialist research. The MLitt normally take two years of full-time study to complete. Dissertations are normally 40,000 – 50,000 words in length. Doctoral Studies and Research: If you wish to carry out specialist research and prepare for a career in academia. PhD degrees normally involve three or four years of full-time study. You can also undertake a PhD on a part-time basis over five or six years.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Our Graduate Degrees (Diploma and Masters) Full-time Fees 2013-2014 (For part-time fees, see www.ucd.ie/fees)

Interview/additional application requirements

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MA in American Literature

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

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Graduate Diploma in American Studies

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

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MA in American Studies

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

13 Y

MA in Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Graduate Diploma in Archaeology

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

Y

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

Y

Higher Diploma in Archaeology MA in Archaeology MA in Archives and Record Management

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU €7,600 EU €14,900 non EU

MA in Art History

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

MA in Classics

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

MA in Creative Writing

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Available part-time

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

€6,300 EU €13,000 non EU

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Y 19 20

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Graduate School


Full-time Fees 2013-2014 (For part-time fees, see www.ucd.ie/fees)

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing MA in Cultural Policy and Arts Management MA in Diaspora Studies MA in Directing for Theatre Higher Diploma in Drama and Performance Studies MA in Drama and Performance Studies

€6,300 EU €13,000 non EU

Available part-time

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22 Y

€7,600 EU €14,900 non EU €6,900 EU €14,000 non EU

Interview/additional application requirements

23 Y 24 Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

25 Y

Y

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

Y

Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Y

Y

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MA in Film Studies

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

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MA in European Regional and Minority Cultures

€6,300 EU €13,000 non EU

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MA in Gender, Sexuality and Culture

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Graduate Diploma in History

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

MA in History

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Y 30 31 Y 32 Y

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Our Graduate Degrees contd. Full-time Fees 2013-2014 (For part-time fees, see www.ucd.ie/fees)

MA in History of the Media

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€6,300 EU €13,000 non EU

Available part-time

Interview/additional application requirements

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Graduate Diploma in Irish Folklore

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

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Higher Diploma in Irish Folklore

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

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MA in Irish Studies

€5,800 EU €13,000 non EU

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Higher Diploma in Linguistics

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

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MA in Linguistics

€5,800 EU €14,000 non EU

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Graduate Diploma in Media and International Conflict

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

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MA in Media and International Conflict

€6,300 EU €14,000 non EU

40 Y

MA in Medieval Celtic Languages and Literatures

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

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MA in Medieval History

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

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MA in Medieval Literature and Culture

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

MA in Medieval Studies

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Graduate School


Full-time Fees 2013-2014 (For part-time fees, see www.ucd.ie/fees)

MA in Modern Languages MA in Modernity Literature and Culture Master in Musicology MA sa Nua-Ghaeilge MA in Renaissance Literature and Culture Dioplóma Iarchéime i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid MA i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid na Gaeilge MA in Second Language Studies MA in Social and Cultural History of Medicine

Available part-time

€5,800 EU €13,000 non EU

Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

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€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Y

€5,000 EU €10,000 non EU

Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Interview/additional application requirements

48 49 50 51 Y

€6,300 EU €14,000 non EU

52 Y

€5,800 EU €12,500 non EU

Y

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Graduate Diploma in TESOL

€3,800 EU €7,600 non EU

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MA in TESOL

€5,800 EU €14,000 non EU

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www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in American Literature What is the course about? This course focuses on the literature of the United States of America. The literature associated with and drawn from the USA establishes as it reflects the nation’s complexity. This MA seeks to examine a number of representative areas of American literary achievement. From drama to poetry, from prose to fiction, you will investigate the exceptional qualities of American literature and seek to test such notions to introduce questions about identity and nationhood: America and transAmerica. Seminar-based classes are led by specialists in the field, and you will be expected to present papers to classes and to participate in discussions. In addition, you will have the opportunity to develop an independent research project—the dissertation. These elements of the course provide a framework of structured study in which students can gain the confidence to define and develop their own areas of interest, to learn and apply the conceptual and methodological skills necessary for postgraduate study, and to produce extended essays and a dissertation related to American literature. How will I benefit? You will be introduced to a broad range of literature and contexts in order to examine the complexity and diversity of American literature. The MA will provide you with a sophisticated account of a substantial corpus of work, and the means to develop your skills in discussion, presentations, research, and academic writing. It will also provide you with specialist supervision to enable you to research and write a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words. Where can I go? • Continued study to doctoral level, leading to career in third-level education • Continued postgraduate study in Education and career in primary- or second-level education • Career in publishing or editing • Broad range of public or private sector careers

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Literary Research Methods American Theatre: Structure and Strategies Postmodern Writing Contemporary American Fiction Nineteenth-Century American Writing Dissertation

‘The Master’s in American Literature was a decisive moment for me. While introducing me to key aspects of the American literary canon, the MA also provided me with an opportunity to delve deeply into minority literatures and cultural formations. The faculty in the UCD School of English, Drama and Film were a crucial part of this process. As well as insisting on intellectual rigor and critical dynamism, the Americanists are as approachable as they are inspiring. It was a wonderful year.’ Dr Padraig Kirwan, Lecturer in the Literature of the Americas, University of London

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


Graduate Diploma in American Studies What is the course about? This course offers you the opportunity to study the US across a range of disciplines – including history, literature, media and visual studies, politics and international relations – and to develop skills in analysis, critical thinking and primary research techniques. It also offers considerable flexibility in shaping a course of study based upon your own interests. You can select modules from a number of Schools as well as from the UCD Clinton Institute for American Studies. The Graduate Diploma introduces students to advanced study of the United States and its global relations. Because of the United States’ unrivalled status in the world today, debates on American values and the mission of American democracy have become a matter of global concern. This course introduces you to advanced study of American culture and politics, in both domestic and international contexts. It is a multidisciplinary programme that promotes study of the interactions of cultural, social and political factors. It aims to deepen and widen your knowledge of major topics and issues as well as to enable you to develop a significant measure of expertise in the subject. This course is aimed at those seeking critical understanding of the United States and its role in the world.

How will I benefit? You will benefit from a dynamic interdisciplinary environment which nurtures both a collegiate atmosphere and independent learning. Modules are taught on a variety of topics by a highly experienced staff with varied interests and the contribution of visiting scholars. The UCD Clinton Institute has attracted key scholarly figures from around the world to speak at a variety of events, enriching student experiences far beyond the classroom. Where can I go? This course develops a range of analytical and research skills that aid students in pursuing careers in diverse fields. These include: • teaching • government administration and civil service • public relations • museum and gallery work • publishing

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules America and Globalization America in the 21st Century American Literature and Culture American Political Tradition American Studies Seminar Research skills Optional modules are available from the UCD School of History and Archives and the UCD School of English, Drama and Film.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in American Studies What is the course about? This course offers you the opportunity to study the US across a range of disciplines – including history, literature, media and visual studies, politics and international relations – and to develop skills in analysis, critical thinking and primary research techniques. It offers a considerable degree of flexibility to map a course of study based upon your own interests. Students can select modules from a number of Schools as well as from the UCD Clinton Institute for American Studies, and work with core and affiliate faculty (including visiting scholars) in developing their dissertation (12,000-15,000 words).

Where can I go? This Masters course develops a range of analytical and research skills that will help you to pursue your chosen career. In the past, our graduates have gone onto positions in • teaching • government administration and civil service • public relations • museum and gallery work • publishing

This course introduces students to advanced study of American culture and politics, in both domestic and international contexts. It is a multidisciplinary programme that promotes study of the interactions of cultural, social and political factors. It aims to deepen and widen your knowledge of major topics and issues as well as to enable you to develop a significant measure of expertise in the subject chosen for your dissertation.

Several of our graduates have also gone forward to undertake doctoral research.

This course will interest those seeking a critical understanding of the United States and its role in the world. How will I benefit? You will benefit from being part of a dynamic interdisciplinary environment which nurtures both a collegiate atmosphere and independent learning. Modules are taught on a variety of topics by a highly experienced staff with varied interests and the contribution of visiting scholars. Our graduate students are an essential and valued element of the Institute’s research culture; we encourage participation in research projects, conferences and seminars and through the publication of scholarly work.

Curriculum The Masters Programme is a 90 credit programme made up of 60 taught credits and a 30 credit dissertation.

Indicative Module List: Core Modules America and Globalization America in 21st Century American Literature and Culture American Political Tradition American Studies Seminar Research Skills Dissertation 12,000-15,000 words

‘Studying at the UCD Clinton Institute was the best academic decision I ever made. It has enriched my understanding of US, European, and international issues. The structure of lectures are superb and stimulate discussion.’

Optional modules are available from the UCD School of History and Archives and the UCD School of English, Drama and Film. A limited number of internships will be available in the US

Cllr Stephen Stokes, Deputy Mayor, Greystones, Class of 2012

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama What is the course about? If you are interested in Irish literature and theatre what better way to study it than at a university that has been at the heart of Irish writing for more than 150 years? Among our staff we include: colleagues who are committed and engaging teachers; distinguished scholars who are leaders in the field; and internationally acclaimed writers. Recent Writers-in-Residence have included Claire Keegan, Joseph O’Connor and Hugo Hamilton. The MA in Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama fosters a unique class atmosphere in which Irish and international students can mix and engage in dynamic conversations about the issues facing Irish writing in the contemporary world. Our seminars are conducted in a friendly environment by passionate and experienced professors. At UCD you will have the opportunity to take part in a lively literary scene that has earned Dublin the accolade of UNESCO City of Literature. Whatever your literary preferences you will encounter a wide range of readings, debates, conferences, lectures, book launches and workshops, as well as a lively program of fringe and mainstream theatre that will enhance your experience and compliment your studies. Where can I go? The MA is highly esteemed by employers as well as providing a sound basis for those who wish to take doctorates and become teachers and scholars at third-level colleges. Our recent graduates have gone onto positions in a range of fields, not least: • teaching • theatre • journalism • electronic media • librarianship • further study • arts administration • civil service

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Curriculum The course is taught primarily by weekly seminars over two semesters.

Indicative Module List: Core Modules Theorizing Ireland Literary Research Methods Yeats Early Theatre Movement Gender and Irish Poetry Beckett and Contemporary Irish Theatre The Novel and the Story Joyce, Ulysses Dissertation

‘Coming to Ireland from Italy to pursue the MA in Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama has been a rewarding and life-changing experience. I found a most supportive and thriving academic community that helped me to develop invaluable research skills and perspectives on a range of Irish literary texts and traditions. The intellectual calibre and scholarly expertise of the School faculty, as well as their passionate and committed teaching, nurtured my interest in Anglo-Irish Literature and sustained me throughout the MA year. Now as I progress in my own academic career I look back with fondness on my experience during the MA in Anglo-Irish Literature & Drama. It has proven to be a great model and continuing source of inspiration for me, as a scholar and teacher.’ Giulia Bruna, Current PhD Student in Anglo-Irish Literature

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Graduate Diploma in Archaeology What is the course about? Archaeology is the reconstruction of past societies through their material remains and through the evidence of people’s interactions with their environments. The Graduate Diploma is a high level taught graduate course with an emphasis on the practice of archaeology in the modern world. The course will give you the opportunity to learn how archaeologists design, implement and assess research programmes, to create stronger understanding of past and present human societies. It will demonstrate how archaeological theory and practice interplay, enabling you to reconstruct people’s lives in the past, in Ireland and across the world. This course is designed both for those with prior training in archaeology and such cognate disciplines as anthropology, geography, history, art history, classics and more. It offers a specialised knowledge and understanding of archaeology, its advanced theories, concepts and methods. You will acquire a detailed knowledge of key issues in archaeology, and will participate in seminars, field trips and active learning tasks. How will I benefit? Modules emphasise a range of skills, and focus on the application of practice in the context of research. Our taught graduate programmes emphasize small class sizes and seminar-based learning, with an exclusive reliance on continuous assessment. We provide training in a range of key transferable skills: making effective presentations, report and essay writing, designing and managing research projects, and working in groups.

Curriculum You will take four core modules (30 credits) Advanced Archaeological Fieldwork

Where can I go? In recent years, our students have primarily used the course as a gateway into the MA in Archaeology. The Graduate Diploma provides a solid foundation for pursuing an archaeological career. However, the transferrable skills acquired are critical to a wide range of careers.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Researching Archaeology Archaeological Fieldtrip Extended Essay You will then select 30 credits, at least 25 of which will be chosen from one of the following dedicated pathways: Landscapes and Environments, Cultural Heritage and Professional Practice, The Prehistoric World, Human Osteology, or Archaeologies of the Historical Past.

Graduate School


Higher Diploma in Archaeology What is the course about? Archaeology can be defined as the reconstruction of past societies through their material remains and through the evidence of people’s interactions with their environments. It incorporates practical, intellectual, creative and scientific aspects. This course is structured to suit the needs both of recent graduates who have taken a degree in another discipline and those who have completed foundation courses and wish to broaden their range of skills and their understanding of archaeology.

Curriculum You will take four core modules (35 credits) Interpreting Archaeology Interpreting Sites and Landscapes Studying Material Culture

The course will give you an introduction to the varied aspects of archaeological practice today, from considering key issues in global archaeology, through discussion of archaeological practice in Ireland and consideration of the strengths and weaknesses of field work techniques of different kinds. Your choice of optional modules will enable you to design the flavour of the Higher Diploma course in terms of your own emphases on particular places and times. The course is designed principally for those without any prior training in Archaeology, but with an Honours Degree in another subject. Its main objective is to provide you with a detailed knowledge and understanding of the core skills, themes and debates in archaeology. This will be delivered in the context of courses dealing with various themes, regions and chronological periods.

Irish Archaeology Today Key Issues in World Archaeology Supervised Research Project You will then select 25 credits, at least 15 of which will be in one of the following dedicated pathways: Archaeological Sciences, Cultural Heritage and Professional Practice, The Prehistoric World, Historical Archaeology.

How will I benefit? The School is committed to ensuring that classroom teaching in the HDip is of the highest quality, and that all its graduate students enjoy the experience of being part of a lively and vibrant School research community. Modules on the course are drawn from the full range of the undergraduate programme, and emphasise a range of skills across an exceptionally broad array of subjects. Where can I go? The course will provide you with a foundation for further archaeological graduate study, or entry to the archaeological profession. Beyond these, the range of disciplines incorporated into the archaeological degree encourages students to learn to critically assess data of different kinds, providing valuable transferable skills.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Archaeology What is the course about? Archaeology is the reconstruction of past societies through their material remains and through evidence of people’s interactions with their environments. The course will give you the opportunity to learn how archaeologists design, implement and assess research programmes, to create stronger understanding of past and present human societies. It will demonstrate how archaeological theory and practice interplay, enabling you to reconstruct people’s lives in the past, in Ireland and across the world. The course culminates in a significant piece of independent research, either a Research Placement or an MA Dissertation, which you will produce under the supervision of one of the School’s expert staff. There are five principal streams in the MA, which will enable you to concentrate on the area that interests you most. These streams are: Landscapes and Environments, Cultural Heritage and Professional Practice, The Prehistoric World, Human Osteology, or Archaeologies of the Historical Past. This course is designed both for those with prior training in archaeology and such cognate disciplines as anthropology, geography, history, art history, classics and more. It offers a specialised knowledge and understanding of archaeology, its advanced theories, concepts and methods. You will acquire a detailed knowledge of key issues in archaeology, and will participate in seminars, field trips and active learning tasks. How will I benefit? The School is committed to ensuring that classroom teaching and research supervision in the MA is of the highest international quality and that all its graduate students enjoy the experience of being part of a lively and vibrant research community. Our taught graduate programmes emphasize small class sizes and seminar-based learning. We provide training in a range of key transferable skills: making effective presentations, report and essay writing, designing and managing research projects, and working in groups. Where can I go? Graduates of the course have gone on to pursue very successful professional careers in archaeology – either within the commercial or government archaeological sectors. Others have taken their studies further, enrolling on

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

doctoral programmes in UCD or in higher learning institutions worldwide; our graduates have a strong track record of attracting PhD funding. Many of our students, however, have exploited the range of transferrable skills they have gained in the MA and have pursued a wide variety of careers.

Curriculum Four core modules in archaeological skills (25 credits) Advanced Archaeological Fieldwork Researching Archaeology Research and Thesis Skills Archaeological Fieldtrip And either MA Dissertation OR MA Research Placement (40 credits) You can then select a further 25 credits, primarily taken in one of the following areas: Landscapes and Environments, Cultural Heritage and Professional Practice, The Prehistoric World, Human Osteology, or Archaeologies of the Historical Past.

‘In my current job as a project manager for a Fortune 500 company, I leverage the skills I developed at the UCD School of Archaeology on a daily basis. From day one, my enthusiastic and highly-skilled professors taught me to embrace innovation and always question the status quo. While working on my thesis, they helped me develop strong analytical capabilities and project management skills. My experience studying in a different country, hugely enjoyable and memorable, gave me the invaluable experience of learning in a different culture. Thanks to my experience with the UCD School of Archaeology, I developed a unique skill set that allows me to design and manage projects across the corporate cultural divide and create sustainable solutions that work.’ Elizabeth Elliott, Class of 2009, Project Manager, Fortune 500 company, USA

Graduate School


MA in Archives and Record Management What is the course about? This MA provides an education in the management of records and archives. What will I learn? You will learn the skills to enable you: • to work as a professional archivist in archives services and in other organisations which require professional expertise in corporate record services • to contribute to government and corporate accountability regimes • to contribute to the expansion of the profession in Ireland and elsewhere by establishing and managing new archives services and new corporate record services • to contribute to a sustainable environment for research and exploration in archivistics • to meet the challenges posed by technology, to work with records and archives in a variety of media and to address the demands of their capture, use and retention • to recognise gaps in collective memory, to develop inclusive collecting policies and to implement ways of reconstructing or supplementing archival sources • to encourage and provide access services to a range of stakeholders in the knowledge economy

‘This is an excellent postgraduate course. The teaching is second to none, resources are provided to students without reserve, and the small numbers in each class mean that there is a real sense that students are involved in a professionally rewarding learning experience. Throughout the year there are frequent site visits to archive and heritage institutions, and the work placement provides an excellent opportunity for the student to choose the type of environment they would ideally like to work in, however fleetingly! Our class of twelve completed the course in early July. To date, all class members are in paid employment. Though the length and permanency of contracts varies enormously, this figure still highlights the confidence employers have in graduates from this course.’ Lorraine McLoughlin, Class of 2012

Curriculum Indicative Module List:

Applications are generally sought from arts and humanities students although graduates of other faculties and disciplines such as law, life and human sciences would also be suitable. How will I benefit? You will receive an accredited qualification which allows you to work as a professional archivist and to join a dynamic profession which has repositioned itself to meet the curatorial and accountability challenges of the 21st century. Where can I go? Our graduates have gone onto pursue doctoral studies and academic careers in the education of archivists and records managers. Others have embarked on a variety of different careers, both in the public and private sectors.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Core Modules Corporate Record Services: Management Keeping and Accountability Archives and Their Users Archival Representation Archives Sustainability and Preservation Management Deciding What to Keep: Archival Acquisition and Appraisal Perspectives on Practice Archival Science Research Methods and Theory Optional Modules Digital Archives Latin DISC: Managing Digital, Image, Sound and Cartographic Archives Introduction to Palaeography

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Art History What is the course about? This course examines the art and architecture produced in different cities across space and time, the context out of which they emerged, and the culture and society they in turn helped to define. Features of this course include collaborations with academics drawn from other schools within UCD and from other institutions in Dublin. Most important is the emphasis placed upon works of art on view in Dublin and access to the staff of the institutions that house them. A field trip to Venice and Rome further heightens the range of works of art and architecture that can be studied in situ, while writing a dissertation hones research and writing skills. You will learn about the history of art and architecture, and about the way in which they are often tied to urban politics, patronage, and institutions. You will be exposed to the way in which art and cultural history have been written about by several generations of outstanding scholars across a number of humanistic disciplines. You will thus increase your own analytical and research skills, in particular your ability to derive evidence about a culture from visual as well as archival sources. You will also master the latest digital databases in the field.

Where can I go? Graduates of this course are highly regarded by prospective employers and find placements and employment in museums, galleries, in heritage conservation, educational institutions at all levels, libraries and information services, publishing journalism, marketing and tourism. A number of our graduates have gone onto to compete successfully for IRCHSS funding to pursue doctoral study.

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Approaches to Art History The Myth of Venice Illustrating the City Istanbul through the Ages MA Field Trip MA Dissertation

The course is directed at postgraduate students of art history and of cognate subjects such as art, architecture and geography as well as those with experience in the art world and in the cultural heritage sector who seek to enhance their knowledge of the history of art and architecture and are interested in cities as locii of creativity and communal as well as individual expression. How will I benefit? The MA in Art History encourages critical thinking about both the visual arts and cities. It thus prepares you to develop original insights into two of the defining characteristics of the contemporary situation: the increasing importance of both imagery and urban centres and the creative relationship between the two.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Classics What is the course about? You will not only deepen your understanding of the ancient world but also develop transferable skills in research, group discussion, oral presentation, and academic writing. You will be able to choose from a range of seminar topics, and so specialise in areas which interest you. You will research and write a thesis of 12,000-15,000 words on a topic related to the ancient world, supervised by a member of the faculty. You will also have the opportunity either to begin Greek or Latin or to study them at a more advanced level. This course is suitable for graduates with degrees in classics or related subjects, for instance philosophy, history, or archaeology, who want a deeper understanding of the ancient world. It can serve as an end in itself or as a preparation for more advanced research. How will I benefit? You will benefit from small-group teaching and individual supervision by internationally respected specialists, which will develop both your understanding of the subject and your study and presentation skills. UCD School of Classics is a friendly and lively community, which organises a wide range of events – for instance, we host a regular Dublin Classics Seminar, we are associated with the student Classical Society, and we hold workshops in the Classical Museum. Entrance Requirements Standard entrance requirements apply. Please note, however, that the School may consider applicants with 2:2 degrees, subject to references and availability of places.

'When I started my undergraduate studies I knew nothing about Classics but quickly fell in love with it and realised I wanted to pursue it further. UCD School of Classics in particular was the right fit for me because the varied interests of the teaching staff meant no matter what aspect of Classics I wanted to work on, there was someone there to help guide me. The Masters was an amazing experience as I got to produce my own research and meet so many others with the same interests as myself.'

Where can I go? For students who are inspired to continue their study of classics, the MA is an ideal preparation for the PhD. However, the quality and flexibility of the MA has allowed the majority of our graduates to pursue careers in a wide range of professions, including: • teaching • librarianship • heritage management • journalism • advertising and public relations • banking and business • public service

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Thesis Research Skills I Research Skills II Options Warfare and Society Perceptions of Classical Antiquity in the Italian Renaissance Rome and the Natural World Plays of Euripides Writing History in Antiquity Language Options Beginners' Latin Beginners' Greek Intermediate Latin Intermediate Greek Advanced Latin Advanced Greek

Fiona Murphy, MA Classics. Class of 2009

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Creative Writing What is the course about? This course builds on the well-established commitment of the UCD School of English, Drama and Film to fostering and supporting new writing. Precisely what you learn will, of course, depend on the area of creative writing in which you specialise. The lectures, seminars, workshops and supervision meetings aim to provide committed writers with taught classes on theories and practices of writing, presentation and editing techniques, creative reading of selected texts, and supervision of a major writing project. Among the important issues addressed on an on-going basis are voice and structure. Every effort is made to ensure that a student progresses on these as well as many other fronts.

Curriculum The Creative Writing MA programme is updated annually.

Indicative Module List: Reading and Writing the Novel The Archive of Imagination: Myth & Folklore in Fiction Poetry in Progress Craft & Composition

Our current cohort of students come from a variety of backgrounds and countries, mainly Ireland, the United Kingdom, the US and Canada. Most have a good deal of writing experience and wish to pursue professional careers in writing, with specialisations in novel writing, poetry and short stories. The age profile ranges from those in their early twenties to those in their mid-sixties. Some have had work published. How will I benefit? The benefits are manifold. The opportunity to spend a dedicated year in an internationally renowned school with a proven track record in facilitating the development of creative writing ensures benefits across a broad range of writing related skills. Arguably, the most succinct way of rating the benefits is to regard the course as a means of accelerating, in most cases dramatically, the development of a student’s capacity to write creatively. Equally there is the benefit from engaging with many visiting guests across the arts and publishing sectors. Seamus Heaney, Salman Rushdie, J.K. Rowling are among the many writers who have read at the college in recent years. Where can I go? • A professional, or semi-professional writing career is the most common goal of students on this course • Other goals include publishing/editing and teaching creative writing • For most it is the first step towards the publication of their work

Peer Reviewing Sessions Single Text The Library of Imagination: Short Fiction 20th Century Irish Poetry in Context Peer Reviewing or Visiting Speaker Workshop with Writer-in-Residence 2012-13 Ireland Professor of Poetry: Harry Clifton Seminar Series Writer-in-Residence Consultation [by appointment] Writing Project

‘My experience in the MA program at UCD was transformative. The classes were tailored so I could immediately start developing my skills and broadening my perspectives. I was able to form close relationships with the instructors, all of whom consistently made time to meet outside of class. And now as a graduate - fickle as the publishing industry is - I feel prepared because UCD engrained in me the habits of a writer, bringing discipline to the way I read, observe, and make time for writing. UCD has helped me accept myself not just as a writer by profession but orientation, preparing me not just for employment but life as a writer.’ Sean Griffith Class of 2011/2012

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing What is the course about? This course will offer you close supervision and direction to write a novel or collection of short stories for the duration of an academic year. Structural and line editing of the work in progress is a core module in both semesters. A maximum of three students participate in each two hour session. All elements of novel and short story writing are treated in these sessions. The approach is wholly student centred so the individual requirements of each student largely dictates the emphasis in each session. This course is suited to students who have already acquired the skills associated with a full course in creative writing and have a work in progress to which they now wish to devote the greater part of an academic year with a view to offering that work for publication. How will I benefit? • One to one supervision in the writing of a novel /collection of short stories • Small dedicated teaching staff of well-established writers • An opportunity to study in a university which has long been associated with some of Ireland’s greatest writers, including James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, Mary Lavin, Anthony Cronin, John McGahern, Neil Jordan, Frank McGuinness [Currently Professor Creative Writing ] Marina Carr, Colm Tóibín [Currently Adjunct Professor Creative Writing] Emma Donoghue and many others. Where can I go? • Novelist • Short Story Writer • Fiction Editor • Publishing • Teaching Creative Writing • Literary Editor

Curriculum The Creative Writing MFA programme is updated annually.

Indicative Module List (2013-2014): Single Text Frank McGuinness Line & Structural Editing 1. James Ryan Line & Structural Editing 2. Éilís Ní Dhuibhne & James Ryan Writing for Theatre

Conor McPearson & Eamonn Jordan

Line & Structural Editing 1. Éilís Ní Dhuibhne Pedagogic Strategies 1. Theory Éilis Ni Dhuibhne & James Ryan Pedagogic Strategies 2. Practice Éilis Ni Dhuibhne & James Ryan Workshop with Writer-in Residence Writer-in-Residence Consultation [by appointment] End of Course Writing Project: Novel or Collection of Short Stories

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Cultural Policy and Arts Management What is the course about? The course is about producing graduates who can perform effectively as managers in cultural (primarily arts and heritage) organisations. It will build in you the capacity to be a ‘reflective practitioner’, that is, the ability to think deeply about cultural issues, to assess the policy environment that governs much of what cultural organisations do, and to develop effective policies for your organisation. It will develop your strategic planning skills while providing you with specific skills in management, finance, law and marketing.

Indicative Module List: Business 1 (Management) Cultural Policy 1 (Ireland) Research Methods/Seminar

You will emerge with a balanced understanding of cultural theory and cultural policy on the one hand, and a set of practical management skills on the other. You will be able to research and think strategically about issues in the cultural field that interests you, and be an effective manager of a cultural organisation.

Arts Marketing

The course is directed at graduate students and experienced cultural sector practitioners seeking to acquire or enhance their skills to be effective managers in their chosen fields.

Business 3 (Strategic Plan)

How will I benefit? You will be able to apply practical management skills while working for a cultural organisation, and be able to understand and respond to changing policy environments, and to manage arts or heritage organisations effectively on both a strategic and day-to-day basis.

Finance

Where can I go? Because the course is not art-form specific, graduates end up working for a wide variety of cultural organisations: arts organisations, museums, galleries, policy bodies, film companies, government organisations and so on. Some graduates work for themselves, for instance as consultants, curators, musicians or running small cultural businesses. Those with a strong academic interest in a policy field may choose to pursue further research at doctoral level. The highly valuable transferable skills provided on the course (especially in management, marketing, law and finance) make students eligible for a much wider range of job opportunities in the broader field of the creative industries.

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Curriculum

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Business 4 (Law) Cultural Policy 2 (Comparative) Cultural Policy 3 Arts Lives Dissertation Work Experience

‘After the degree I moved to France where I am now working as Internship Coordinator at the American University of Paris. My Masters degree in an Anglophone environment and my knowledge in management and administration helped a lot in obtaining this professional opportunity.’ Maggie Pazderski-Martin is the Internship coordinator at the American University, Paris

Graduate School


MA in Diaspora Studies What is the course about? The MA in Diaspora Studies offers a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of diaspora – understood as groups of migrant origin residing in host countries but maintaining strong material and affective lines with countries of origin. In recent years there has been a fresh interest in diaspora within policy and academic sectors. Increasingly, states are seeking to understand the forms and functions of diasporas and leverage them to provide new opportunities for knowledge transfer, tourism, conflict resolution and many other matters. By the end of the course, you will achieve an understanding of the cultures, dynamics and strategies of modern and contemporary diasporas in relations with host and origin countries. Drawing on varied methodologies and theoretical perspectives, the course will develop your abilities to produce interdisciplinary work, combining human sciences and humanities disciplines. Presentations, discussions and essay preparation will aid you in developing further skills in researching, oral communication of ideas, textual/visual analysis and critical interpretation. You can choose to undertake a dissertation or engage in an accredited internship programme which will provide first-hand experience of working in a sector/organisation strongly invested in diaspora matters, developing skills necessary for working in a professional environment. Where can I go? This programme develops a range of analytical and research skills that aid students in pursuing careers in diverse fields such as: • government administration • NGOs • cultural institutions

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Studying Diaspora Internship or Dissertation Optional modules include Ethnicity and Nationalism Race, Space and Place Global Migration America & Globalization Ireland and the World

‘The ethos of the Clinton Institute has developed my critical thinking and portfolio of interests in diaspora studies. I was proud to represent the Institute at US Secretary of State Clinton's Global Diaspora Forum and on IdEA, the diaspora knowledge resource of the US State Dept, USAID, and MPI. I would encourage all to choose the Clinton Institute and I look forward to engaging a new generation with their MA in Diaspora Studies.’ Martin Russell, PhD.

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Directing for Theatre What is the course about? This course provides a range of advanced theoretical and practical strategies for directing, and develops students’ skills in critical reflection on contemporary theatre practices. You will learn techniques in reading text for performance, explore a range of approaches to the role of the director, and develop your own practice through process work and mentoring. Leading professional directors and theatre practitioners, such as Frank McGuinness, Patrick Mason and Kellie Hughes are key contributors to teaching. Fishamble Theatre Company (Drama Studies Theatre Company in Association), offer specific placement opportunities to suitably qualified students, and other placements are regularly available with professional companies/productions in Ireland. Directing students follow core modules in Directing, and also share modules with the wider MA groups. Learning includes seminars, process, laboratory sessions, feedback, theatre visits, critical appraisals, and supervised research. How will I benefit? You will • develop techniques in directing practice, and in critical reflection on process and performance • enhance your skills in reading a variety of theatre texts for performance. • explore the complex processes of choice, evaluation, reflection and collaboration that directing for theatre involves • learn from leading professional practitioners, and to develop links with the theatre sector • analyse and critique contemporary performance: style, language, space, body, dramaturgy, scenography and audiences.

Where can I go? Graduates have returned to professional theatre in both independent and statefunded sectors to develop their careers further. Others have taken up teaching in drama and performance in school, theatre training, and community contexts. Graduates can be found in arts management, in the cultural sector, television and film, and in further research. Some graduates have established independent companies based on their contacts in the MA course. UCD Directing for Theatre MA graduates have made careers in such well-known Irish organisations as the Abbey Theatre, Project Arts Centre, Performance Corporation, Tinderbox Theatre Company, Gaiety School of Acting, as well as in the UK and elsewhere.

Curriculum You may follow either Route 1, or Route 2. Route 1 comprises a balance between five taught modules (50 credits) and research/dissertation (40 credits). Route 2 offers a strong emphasis on independent research (60 credits), with three selected core taught modules (30 credits).

Indicative Module List: Cores Text Analysis and Performance Research and Analysis in Drama and Performance The Body in Performance Rehearsal Techniques and Evaluation Issues and Perspectives in Drama and Performance

Admission Requirements We welcome applicants with academic qualifications and/or professional experience and expertise. The deadline for applications is 30th June. Please apply as early as possible. Applicants will be called for interview, or may be interviewed by video conference call or by phone.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Thesis (40 credits)

Graduate School


Higher Diploma in Drama Studies What is the course about? This course will introduce you to a variety of issues concerning drama, theatre and performance. It provides a useful transition between undergraduate study and research, and can offer access to the MA course for students who do not fully satisfy the MA admission requirements. Many students who have successfully completed the Diploma have gone on to do the MA course. The course will allow you to develop your skills in analysing and evaluating theatre writing and performance, and invites you to engage with current theoretical and practical philosophies of performance. All students are offered the opportunity to develop their research and analytical skills, and their presentation and teamwork skills.

Curriculum A seminar module from the MA course A selection of modules from the undergraduate programme A dedicated small group teaching module, focused on methodology and essay writing Diploma students may take part in other activities, notably the programme of theatre visits.

The Higher Diploma is a full-time one-year course (in exceptional cases parttime over two-years) which combines elements from the undergraduate and Masters courses. How will I benefit? You will learn a range of skills from research skills to performance analysis. Where can I go? • theatre sector • media and cultural sectors • to pursue further graduate study • to teach drama and performance in a variety of settings

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Drama and Performance Studies What is the course about? This course gives you the opportunity to analyse, explore, and reflect on modern and contemporary theatre and performance in theory and practice. It invites you to engage with current theoretical and practical philosophies of performance. Depending on your choice of modules, you may tailor your course to develop theoretical and/or process fields. Teaching throughout the MA includes seminars, process, laboratory sessions, theatre visits, critical appraisals, and supervised research. You will be offered the opportunity to develop research and analytical skills, and presentation and teamwork skills.

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Thesis (12-14000 words) or Creative Playwriting Project Writing for Theatre (For those on the Playwriting Strand) Choreographing the Body in Performance Research and Analysis in Drama and Performance

The course is suitable for those with undergraduate degrees in Theatre, English or in an equivalent subject area, with a substantial interest in theatre/performance. We welcome applicants with academic qualifications and/or professional experience and expertise.

Issues and Perspectives in Theatre

How will I benefit? You will learn a range of skills from research skills to performance analysis. Modules are taught by a combination of experienced academic staff and theatre professionals. You will have skills that will position you for work in theatre, media, teaching and related fields.

Gender and Identity in Performance

Where can I go? Many of our graduates have pursued careers in second and third level education. Some have established professional theatre companies. Others have pursued careers in a variety of different sectors, including the theatre and associated media and cultural sectors and teaching.

Options Contemporary Irish Theatre in Performance European Theatre in Context Beckett & Contemporary Irish Theatre

‘Working with Conor McPherson was such an interesting and rewarding experience, to have the opportunity to have someone of that calibre look over your work and advise you really was invaluable. I would one hundred percent recommend the module to anyone interested in theatre on any level. It’s an excellent opportunity to get involved creatively with theatre texts within an academic framework.’ Ciara Murphy, Class of 2011

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Film Studies What is the course about? The focus of this MA is on critical and historical studies of film and television with an emphasis on issues of gender, class, race/ethnicity, consumerism and citizenship within national, international and transnational contexts. The aim of the course is to provide you with an opportunity to engage at an advanced level with particular topics in screen culture and also to provide you with an opportunity to identify, pursue and develop your own particular research interest. The course will give you the opportunity to deepen your understanding of film and television from within and beyond the canon in a variety of genres, periods and forms. You will acquire transferable analytical and practical skills which will be of benefit to you in whatever career path you may choose.

‘I can't recommend the MA in Film Studies at UCD highly enough. You'll meet intelligent, like-minded people, you'll learn to think about film in entirely new and interesting ways, and most importantly, you'll have a department of academics who will go above and beyond to make sure you get the most valuable education possible. The lecturers were so passionate about their topic. If you love cinema and want to learn from the leaders in their field, the MA in Film Studies is a year very well spent.’ Jon Hozier-Byrne, Class of 2011

The course is aimed primarily but not exclusively at those who have done some formal study of screen cultural practices at undergraduate level. This MA would be good preparation for research work.

How will I benefit? You will acquire critical media literacy skills and put these into use in the writing of essays and in the writing and presentation of a minor thesis. Where can I go? Some students will see this MA as a preparation for PhD research and an academic career in film/television/screen and cultural studies. Most will see it as a way of acquiring knowledge and skills which will help them to pursue careers • in the public and private sectors • in archives and libraries • arts administration • second-level teaching • journalism • broadcast media • the film industry

Curriculum Indicative Module List Modules are worth 10 credits unless otherwise stated. Core Modules Thesis (45 credits) Media Theory & Culture Research Skills (Film specific) (5 credits) Option modules (Select 3 from) Early & Silent Film Chick Flicks: Women and Hollywood Cinema Reality Television Stardom, Celebrity and Media Culture Documentary Postwar Italian Cinema Contemporary Irish Cinema

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in European Regional and Minority Cultures What is the course about? This course will help you explore the cultures, histories and politics of Europe from the perspective of its ethnic and linguistic minorities. It will cultivate an understanding of how and why historical developments in the nineteenth and twentieth century continue to pose challenges for contemporary Europe. It is multi-disciplinary and draws on the research strength of academics from across the University, from areas such as History, Languages, Philosophy, Sociology, Linguistics, and Irish. You will be encouraged to specialise in areas that interest you and which will help develop your professional career. Where can I go? The course equips students not just with insight into, and critical knowledge of the individual and collective identities of European peoples, but also with robust transferrable skills in analysis and communication. After successfully completing the MA, some students may choose to pursue doctoral study. Others will pursue careers in a variety of governmental and non-governmental organisations worldwide, cultural organisations, professions such as teaching and journalism, and a commercial sector eager to develop and expand their competitive position within the European marketplace.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Curriculum There are two central modules on the course, taken by all students: From nationalism to regionalism in Europe and The development of policies for minority protection. Students can then choose from a broad and diverse range of modules to complement their understanding of methodologies or particular fields of studies. For many, however, the highlight of the course is when the skills acquired over the taught components can be applied to the research and writing of a thesis. From April-August, students work on a research thesis and receive one-to-one supervision throughout the process.

Graduate School


MA in Gender, Sexuality and Culture What is the course about? This course is the only Humanities-based programme of its kind in the country. You will have the opportunity to work with some of the top national and international lecturers and scholars working in the field from a variety of disciplines: literary studies, film and television studies, cultural studies, drama studies, Irish studies and more.

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules

You will explore the theory, history and representation of gender and sexuality in literature, film, drama and popular culture. From psychoanalysis to queer theory, from medieval sainthood to modernist cross dressing, from the intersections of nation, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality to the diverse understandings of gender and sexuality across history and transnationally, this course will provide you with an in-depth, challenging, and exhilarating exploration and interrogation of some fascinating, crucially important questions, issues, and texts.

Theory of Gender and Sexuality

This MA is suitable for Humanities graduates, particularly graduates of Literature, Cultural Studies, Film and/or Visual Culture with a particular interest in Feminist, Gender and Sexuality studies.

Chick Flicks: Women and Hollywood Storytelling

How will I benefit? The course provides: • In-depth analysis of the representation of gender and sexuality in a wide range of texts and disciplines • In-depth critical and analytical understanding of the importance of gender & sexuality in culture, politics and society • A challenging and exhilarating exploration of the variety of theories of gender and sexuality • Lively, intensive seminars delivered by top scholars in the field of gender & sexuality studies • The opportunity to choose options from Literature, Film, Drama, or Television Studies according to your interests • The opportunity to work closely with a dedicated supervisor on your dissertation on a topic of your choice

Gender and Identity in Performance

Historical Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality and Writing Literary Research Methods Dissertation 2 Optional Modules from: Gender and Irish Poetry Race, Sex and Nation Women’s Autobiographical Writing Stardom, Celebrity and Media Culture Contemporary Irish Film Reality TV From September 2013, students will also have the opportunity (if they wish) to take one of their option modules from a range of modules on offer in the UCD Equality Studies/Women Studies’ and in NUI Maynooth These option modules include:

Where can I go? This course provides an excellent bridge to doctoral-level work. In a highly-competitive job market, the MA is well-regarded by employers. Recent graduates have gone onto positions in the following sectors: • Education/Teaching • Media & Broadcasting • Publishing • Research • Administration

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Postcolonial Text and Queer Theory (NUIM) Queer Beings: Writing Gender, Writing Sexuality (NUIM) Reconstructing Slavery (NUIM) Space, Place and Gender (UCD WS) International Human Rights Law (UCD Equal) Masculinities, Gender & Equality (UCD Equal) First Wave Feminism: Literature & Politics (UCD WS)

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Graduate Diploma in History What is the course about? The course will offer you the opportunity to acquire specialized knowledge and deepen their understanding of history, its advanced theories, concepts and methods. It is taught by senior members of the teaching staff, and will focus on critical skills such as dealing with a complex historiography, primary source analysis, research and writing. In many cases, the Graduate Diploma will be taken as a stand-alone programme of study. However, students may also apply for transfer to the taught MA course towards the end of the first semester. Applications will be considered by an academic transfer panel for any student achieving consistently high grades. Who is it for? This course is aimed primarily at students who have an undergraduate qualification in a non-cognate discipline or those who are returning to education after a long period of absence who wish to ease themselves gently into graduate study. However, for those students who feel that they did not quite reach their full potential in their BA in History, the programme also offers the opportunity to acquire an additional 'top-up' qualification. Where can I go? A good many students on the programme have gone on to undertake the MA in History, and in some cases have gone onto develop their academic careers further by pursuing graduate study. Others have gone into teacher training programmes, or a variety of careers in the public and private sector. Entry requirements A good undergraduate degree (2:2 or above) in any subject. Standard Englishlanguage requirements apply.

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Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Renaissance Europe Making History: Working with Documents Research Skills Project Option Courses can be selected from a range of modules on the undergraduate and graduate syllabus.

‘The course offers many of the same advantages as the taught MA such as small tutorial groups and excellent teaching, though the real selling point for me was the option the course offered in gaining entry into the Masters programme after the first semester. The Graduate Diploma offers the perfect stepping stone into the full Masters course as it encourages and allows you to begin to develop your own thoughts and opinions on the course of history and crucial skills in the successful writing of a thesis.’ John Simpson, Class of 2012

Graduate School


MA in History What is the course about? The MA in History builds on the key skills of thinking, evaluation and writing that you will have begun to develop at undergraduate level. In addition, particular stress is placed on deepening skills needed to analyse data and documentation, research, developing original approaches and interpretations, debating, presenting and communicating ideas. All of our classes are taught via small-group seminars led by members of the academic staff. Each graduate is mentored by a supervisor who offers professional advice and guidance on the dissertation element of the course. How will I benefit? You will learn advanced research techniques. You will deepen your knowledge of your chosen specialism, your sense and understanding of the past and how it has been interpreted over time. By successfully acquiring or honing skills, such as the ability to write persuasively or deal adeptly with frequently conflicting versions of events, you will acquire an advanced graduate qualification valued across the professions. Where can I go? Some of our graduates have gone onto pursue doctoral-level work in their chosen fields, both in UCD and in other leading universities worldwide. However, the majority of graduates on the MA have used the qualification to help them gain employment, and develop their careers, with a range of employers globally. Our graduates are particularly sought after in the following areas: • civil service • teaching • journalism • management consultancy • accountancy • publishing

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

‘It was a great opportunity to pursue in-depth research of personal interest and to take control of my own learning. The regular discussion and interaction in class with lecturers and fellow students complements the individual thesis work. The research and writing skills have proven valuable in the workplace in terms of communication and information dissemination. The course offers great opportunities for research and learning with the constant support and direction of approachable and friendly lecturers.’ Lucy Ní Chearúil, MA in History, 2011

Curriculum All students will research and write a 15,000 word dissertation (50 credits) under dedicated supervision by a member of the School. You will also take a research skills module (10 credits). The remaining 30 credits will be acquired by pursuing a distinct specialism. The following specialist areas are taught in the School: American History Early Irish History Early Modern History History of International Relations History of Totalitarianism Irish History and Civilisation Modern Irish History Nineteenth-Century Ireland: Politics, Culture and Society Public Diplomacy Religion and Society

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in the History of the Media What is the course about? This course will introduce you to the history of communication and the role it has played in shaping the modern world. It is run within the UCD Centre for the History of the Media and UCD School of History and Archives. It offers the opportunity to explore the variety of different approaches and subjects that characterise the field. It is a programme that stresses interdisciplinarity, broad contextual thinking and comparative investigation.

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules How to Make an Historical Documentary Media History Research Seminar Series

There is also a practical dimension to the course. The first core module, Making Historical Documentaries, will introduce you to basic techniques of historical documentary-making, film archive research, filming and interviewing, and scripting and editing. As documentaries are built on all manner of primary evidence and require the development of a strong point of view to sustain their coherence, students will develop and expand a range of vital transferable skills. How will I benefit? You will deepen your range of academic and transferable skills. You will also be encouraged to reflect on the value of advanced scholarship in contemporary society, and how it might best be communicated to a broader public. Where can I go? Some of the graduates of this programme have gone onto pursue doctoral work, both in UCD and in other leading research universities worldwide. Most have gone on to pursue a variety of careers, with major multinational corporations, other private sector companies, in journalism and the media, in education, and in the civil service. Internship Programme UCD – in partnership with the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Boston College Ireland, RTÉ, the National Archives, the National Library, the national University of Ireland Galway – is producing a major commemorative website to mark the centenary of a decade of revolution in Ireland. At the heart of this website is a digital newspaper, drawing on the newspapers, photographs, newsreels and original documents of the era. The MA in the History of the Media offers an internship programme to students who will create their own short video pieces, podcasts, research briefs and articles for this website.

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Dissertation Research Skills Options One option course from range on offer within the UCD School of History and Archives. It is also possible, subject to availability, to select a graduate module from other Schools in the University.

‘This course is the perfect choice for anyone keen to advance their interest in History to graduate-level with the opportunity to gain practical experience and knowledge of contemporary Irish media. Key skills in communication and research developed at undergraduate level will be improved and refined to a professional standard. This MA is, in my opinion, unparalleled with any other graduate course offered in an Irish third-level institute. The opportunity to combine academic learning with practical skills, such as learning how to script and edit an historical documentary provides the student with a variety of skills that will set them apart in the eyes of employers.’ Leanne Blaney, Class of 2012

Graduate School


Graduate Diploma in Irish Folklore What is the course about? The course focuses on a range of topics including research theories, the study of oral narrative, traditional song and music, social tradition, popular belief systems, material culture, fieldwork and archival methods, and Irish and European ethnology. Students engage in guided research on an agreed topic, involving both archival investigation and fieldwork, as well as the use of printed sources, and present their findings in the form of an end-of-year dissertation. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: • demonstrate an understanding of basic analytical techniques and theoretical issues in folkloristics • abstract and analyse information from a range of sources, including lectures, seminars, archival and library holdings, the internet and fieldwork, identifying those ideas or findings which are most significant for their research • use the study of folklore as a means of enabling them to think critically about social and cultural issues, and thereby to understand the complex ways in which people use expressive culture to impose meaning on experience. The Graduate Diploma in Irish Folklore is two-semester examined postgraduate course, designed for advanced students and scholars usually with a background in folkloristics or cognate subjects. How will I benefit? The course should provide students with self-motivation for further research and study, including an ability to organise appropriate resources, to identify relevant material, and to familiarise themselves with new theoretical approaches and techniques. Where can I go? The course can provide you with a pathway to higher degrees in Folklore. Graduates can be found across a range of occupations, including teaching, research, museums and other heritage institutions, the media and journalism.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Higher Diploma in Irish Folklore What is the course about? The course focuses on a range of topics including research theories, the study of oral narrative, traditional song and music, social tradition, popular belief systems, material culture, fieldwork and archival methods, and Irish and European ethnology. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to • identify and show a familiarity with the various forms and genres of folklore, i.e. material culture, folk song and music, traditional belief systems and social tradition • demonstrate a clear grasp of the basic principles of folklore studies, and to describe/evaluate the more influential and important schools of folkloristic theory, both historical and contemporary • analyse and interpret information of a folkloristic nature from oral, archival and published sources The course is designed for students and scholars without any previous background in general folkloristics or comparative ethnology, with the aim of providing them with a broad knowledge of the essentials of these subjects. The course is suitable as a conversion course which could provide a pathway to higher degrees in Irish Folklore. How will I benefit? The course will provide students with the requisite skills, knowledge and experience to enable them to formulate and complete their own research projects in the field of folklore studies. The course will also provide them with a broad basis in a variety of subject areas appropriate to careers in a number of specialised fields, from heritage-related matters to work involving popular and contemporary culture and society. Where can I go? Our graduates can be found across a very broad range of occupations, including: • teaching • research • museums and other heritage institutions • the media and journalism

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Irish Studies What is the programme about? At a time of unprecedented change in Ireland, this course will introduce you to a wide range of issues and debates relating to the historical, material, cultural, social and political experiences of the peoples who have inhabited the island of Ireland from the earliest period through to today. This exciting new learning and research opportunity assembles a unique group of leading UCD experts in the humanities and social sciences to offer diverse insights and perspectives on Ireland’s cultures and societies. Because of this nationally and internationally unrivalled concentration of expertise, students are able to participate in two thematic Irish Studies seminars which serve as an intellectual platform for the programme. Alongside a further core module in contemporary Irish culture, students also take option modules from a wide range on offer in politics, Irish history, literary studies in both the English and Irish languages, folklore, drama, archaeology, music, material and visual cultures, and sociology. UCD’s location in Dublin also provides students with easy access to many of Ireland’s key cultural institutions and libraries. How will I benefit? The course will introduce you to the state of the art in academic scholarship and research in subjects relevant to the cultural, material and social, historical and political experiences of the peoples who have inhabited the island of Ireland from the earliest period. You will be trained to acquire, manage and communicate detailed knowledge in a creative, supportive and productive environment. You will be trained to compare and contrast differing sources of information (both primary and secondary sources) derived from archival, printed, visual and electronic formats. Enhancement of communication skills will be a key element. Students will acquire employment-relevant skills.

Where can I go? Some graduates have gone on to undertake further specialist research, while others have gone on to more specific vocational training (especially in law and teaching). However, the majority have pursued a broad range of careers.

Curriculum This is a 90-credit degree. Cores People, Place and Identity Are the Irish Different? Contemporary Irish Culture Dissertation (30 credits) Options 30 credits to be chosen with advice of a staff mentor from a wide range of relevant modules provided by the contributing Schools: UCD School of Sociology, UCD School of Politics and International Relations, UCD School of History and Archives, UCD School of English, Drama and Film, UCD School of Archaeology, UCD School of Irish, Celtic Studies, Irish Folklore and Linguistics, UCD School of Art History and Cultural Policy, and the UCD School of Music.

Teaching is conducted via small group seminars, research-driven learning, peer interaction learning through seminar presentations and structural discussion at the end of modules and through individually-focused supervision of research projects. Each student also undertakes a 10,000-word supervised research dissertation.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Higher Diploma in Linguistics What is the course about? You will develop an in-depth understanding of the structure of language. You will be introduced to contemporary theoretical approaches to Linguistics and the analytical methods used in research on language. The core areas include Syntax, Phonology, Meaning and Sociolinguistics. How will I benefit? You will get solid training in a range of core areas of Linguistics. Modules are taught by experienced and respected researchers in the field. You will • gain a solid grounding in core areas of Linguistics • develop analytical skills and pattern recognition skills • learn how Linguistics interfaces with other areas within the Humanities & Sciences This course is suitable for those who have a BA and wish to learn more about language either for a professional degree in areas such as Speech and Hearing or who want to develop research skills for postgraduate work on language-related fields or in Linguistics. Where can I go? Linguistics interfaces with a range of areas. It can lead to careers in • language teaching • computer science • cognitive science • education • speech processing • artificial intelligence • media An HDip in Linguistics is also a valuable addition to an application portfolio for Speech and Language Therapy.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Linguistics What is the course about? You will develop an in depth understanding of the structure of language, including contemporary theoretical approaches to Linguistics and the analytical methods used in research on language, and the relationship of language to society. The knowledge and skills that you will acquire are essential for carrying out research in Linguistics. This course is designed for students with little or no prior background in Linguistics. It aims to provide a thorough grounding in the core area of Linguistics and to introduce students to current research issues and contemporary theoretical approaches and practices. How will I benefit? You will get training in a range of core areas. Modules are taught by experienced and respected researchers in the field. You will: • gain a solid grounding in core research areas of Linguistics • develop your research skills in Linguistics • gain a greater appreciation for interdisciplinary research Where can I go? Linguistics interfaces with a range of areas. It can lead to careers in: • language teaching • computer science • cognitive science • education • speech processing • artificial intelligence • publishing and media

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules LING 40110 Syntax LING 40090 Sociolinguistics LING 40020 Meaning LING 40050 Phonology LING 40320 Literature Review LING 40240 MA Thesis Option Modules Students select two further modules from the list below, subject to availability. SLL 40040 Second Language Acquisition for Linguists LING 40250 Graduate Language Impairment LING 40220 Minority Languages LING 40260 Global English SLL 40070 Second Language Acquisition 2 PSY 40350 Current Issues in Language Development

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Graduate Diploma in Media and International Conflict What is the course about? This course is designed to enable you to develop an understanding of the ways in which media interact with war, conflict and security in international contexts. It analyzes the complex roles played by the media in the enactment and representation of conflict situations and addresses the relationships among media, governments, the military, and NGOs in framing perceptions of international conflict. It provides an interdisciplinary approach that considers both cultural and political dimensions of media responses to international conflicts, focusing on issues such as: public diplomacy as soft power, human rights and representation, distinctions between information and propaganda, the ethics of depicting human suffering, the role of new media in perceptions of conflict, the visual economy of the production, circulation and reception of imagery of conflict, and the effects of news reporting on government policy and NGO activity. Modules in this course are taught by resident UCD faculty and by external speakers, both academics and practitioners, who will broaden intellectual discussion and speak to examples of media work.

Curriculum This is a 60 credit programme

Indicative Module List: Core Modules Media & US Foreign Policy Public Diplomacy Journalism: Reporting Conflict America and Contemporary World Affairs Reporting Conflict in the Middle East Research Skills Optional modules are available from the UCD School of Politics and International Relations, UCD School of History and Archives and the UCD School of Sociology.

The course will interest those seeking a career in international communications, professionals seeking more critical understanding of the international dimensions of their industry, and those wishing to prepare for advanced research in this area Where can I go? Recent graduates from this programme have pursued careers in areas such as: • journalism • media • IT • NGOs • government administration • communication agencies

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Media and International Conflict What is the course about? This course will develop your understanding of the ways in which media interact with war, conflict and security in international contexts. It focuses on the complex roles played by the media in the enactment and representation of conflict situations and addresses the relationships among media, governments, the military, and NGOs in framing perceptions of international conflict. The MA provides an interdisciplinary approach that considers both cultural and political dimensions of media responses to international conflicts, considering issues such as: public diplomacy as soft power, human rights and representation, distinctions between information and propaganda, the ethics of depicting human suffering, the role of new media in perceptions of conflict, the visual economy of the production, circulation and reception of imagery of conflict, and the effects of news reporting on government policy and NGO activity. Modules on this course are taught by resident UCD faculty and by external speakers, both academics and practitioners (such as journalists and diplomats), who will broaden intellectual discussion and speak to examples of media work. The course will interest those seeking a career in international communications, professionals seeking more critical understanding of the international dimensions of their industry, and those wishing to prepare for advanced research in this area. Where can I go? This MA course develops a range of analytical and research skills that aid students in pursuing careers in diverse fields. Our graduates have gone on to enjoy careers in areas such as: • government administration and civil service • public relations • advertising • journalism • media and publishing • Doctoral research

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Employers of our graduates include: • RTE • Microsoft • SAP • Google • Webfactory • Mediamind

‘Studying in the Clinton Institute was a wonderful experience. The classes are small, which means you really get to know everybody, and there is a very comfortable atmosphere. A wide range of topics ensured that everybody got a chance to study and discuss areas that they are passionate about. Lively debates were the norm! This MA was a fascinating journey through history, current affairs, politics and media. It offered a great opportunity to build strong research, writing and presenting skills, with the help of the diligent and engaging staff of the Institute. I would do it all over again if I could!’ Karen Dunne, Class of 2011.

Curriculum Indicative Module List Core Modules Media & US Foreign Policy Public Diplomacy Journalism: Reporting Conflict America and Contemporary World Affairs Reporting Conflict in the Middle East Research Skills Dissertation 12,000-15,000 words Optional modules are available from the UCD School of Politics and International Relations, UCD School of History and Archives and UCD School of Sociology. A limited number of internships will be available in the USA

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Medieval Celtic Languages and Literature What is the course about? This course is designed for all who wish to acquire a working competence in Early Irish and Medieval Welsh. It requires no previous knowledge of the modern or medieval Celtic languages.

Curriculum 2 core modules taken each semester in Early Irish and Medieval Welsh. Minor dissertation of 10,000 to 12,000 words.

The medieval Celtic languages are an important but often overlooked source for knowledge about the medieval world. A first-hand access to their extensive literatures throws valuable light on the early histories of Ireland and Britain, their continental forebears, and the societies which developed after their heyday. You will be guided through representative texts in the major genres in the two literatures, and their historical and cultural background. On successful completion of the course, you will be able to read Early Irish & Medieval Welsh and be familiar with the current issues of scholarship in the field. How will I benefit? The MA opens a gateway to the richly-documented early Insular Celtic cultures. This can lead to research in the field of Celtic Studies itself, or provide a valuable adjunct to work in cognate disciplines, in literature, history, archaeology and linguistics. For those with knowledge of the modern languages, this course of study will deepen their understanding of the roots of the modern cultures. Where can I go? Graduates of Early Irish and Medieval Welsh can be found in • university teaching • research and administration • heritage sector and cultural institutions • the media • the civil service

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA in Medieval History What is the course about? This course will deepen your knowledge of the Middle Ages. You will learn about the methodology of medieval history, and the types of sources available to the medieval historian. You will learn the basics of medieval Latin and palaeography; and you will put all these skills to use in producing a piece of original research. The course is taught in small classes, with a great deal of individual attention from members of the teaching staff, who currently include five medieval historians in the UCD School of History and Archives, but also the distinguished Professor Emeritus, Howard Clarke, who is an urban historian and the world expert on medieval Dublin. The aim of the course is not to provide you with a superficial knowledge of the whole of the Middle Ages, but an in-depth knowledge of certain areas (including Medieval Dublin) and an ability to pursue your own particular research interest in depth as well. The MA in Medieval History is aimed primarily at those who have studied History at undergraduate level and who wish to deepen their knowledge of the history of the European Middle Ages (between roughly AD 500 and 1500). This MA would be a good preparation for research work.

'I was drawn to the Medieval History MA in UCD firstly because of the university’s academic and research reputation, and also beacuse of the wide variety of course subjects and the option to pursue a dissertation topic of my own choosing . I found the cotaught modules created a unique opportunity to learn about different research and teaching styles, and the small classes lead to more discussion with the lecturers about their fields of expertise. The dissertation element of the degree was well structured and I was provided with excellent guidance in my research.' Shayna Devlin Class of 2011-12

How will I benefit? You will learn more about a period you find interesting, and you will acquire critical academic and transferable skills. Where can I go? Some students see this MA as a preparation for PhD research, and an academic career. However, the majority of graduates of this course go onto pursue active and successful careers across a wide range of sectors, such as: • the media • administration and management • finance • teaching • civil service

Curriculum Indicative Module List Core Modules Approaches to Medieval History Medieval Dublin Latin Palaeography Research Skills Dissertation

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Medieval Literature and Culture What is the course about? This course will enhance your understanding of medieval and Renaissance literature and culture. It will also equip you with transferable analytical skills that are valued by any professional field. Designed around small-group sessions, students will be equipped to develop and shape their particular areas of interest and research skills to produce a dissertation. Topics on offer as part of the course include the history of handwriting and book production, the relationship between history and literature, the cultural location of writing, whether it be supportive or subversive of dominant ideologies of writing, the formation of a literary canon, and the whole issue of writing in the vernacular. We examine a wide spectrum of genres from across the greater medieval period such as the epic, heroic, romantic, religious, historic, beast fable and hagiographic. This MA course is suitable for anyone proposing to pursue an academic career, for anyone interested in a career in the heritage industry, and for anyone returning to education whether for professional purposes or for the pure pleasure of learning more about the medieval period (with options in the Renaissance).

Curriculum 90 credits are required for the MA. All modules are worth 10 credits unless otherwise stated.

Indicative Module List: Core Modules Introduction to Literary Research Methods Hands, Quills, Pens and Parchments: Study of Script and Manuscripts Medieval Dissertation (30 credits) Four modules from the following list Approaches to the Middle Ages Old English: Route A (i) Unlocking the Wordhoard: an Introduction to Old English Old English: Route B (ii): Battling with Belief: the Literature of Anglo-Saxon England Chaucer and Fourteenth-Century English Literature

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How will I benefit? You will deepen your understanding of the nature of medieval literature and culture and raise your awareness of the continuing power of their influence upon present-day culture; you will acquire fundamental research skills for engaging with the medieval period; and you will hone your critical and analytical skills, skills which serve both as essential tools for medieval studies and provide transferable skills for any career or walk of life.

Beginner's Latin

Where can I go? The MA has several potentialities • it provides a sound basis for further study at PhD level • it develops the transferable qualities of critical independence and originality • it introduces students interested in the heritage industry to some of the issues relevant to that industry • by enhancing a student’s cultural fluency, it extends their adaptability to and eligibility for the general job market.

Poetry, Piety and Patronage in the Renaissance

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Introduction to Literary Research Methods Perceptions of Antiquity in Renaissance Italy Old English A (ii) Old English B (ii) Making or Breaking the Tradition: English Literature in the Fifteenth Century Writing Conflict in Early Modern Ireland Medievalism: The Reception of the Medieval in Modern and Postmodern Culture

Graduate School


MA in Medieval Studies What is the course about? This course is designed for those students who have encountered the European Middle Ages in their undergraduate studies, and wish to broaden and deepen their knowledge and experience. This MA gives you the opportunity to choose from over thirty different modules, ranging from medieval languages such as Latin or Old Irish, through disciplines such as Archaeology, Art History or Musicology, to topics such as Chaucer, Early Irish Hero Tales, the Vikings, or Medieval Florence. How will I benefit? You will • deepen your understanding of the Middle Ages • learn about how interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies work • develop an understanding of medieval society, culture and politics • develop the technical skills necessary to interpret medieval documents and materials • develop the research and interpretive skills necessary to produce a scholarly piece of research

Curriculum Indicative Module List Core Modules Approaches to the Middle Ages 1 (10 credits) Approaches to the Middle Ages 2 (10 credits) Dissertation (30 credits) Options You will be able to select a further forty credits from a broad range of medieval modules taught across the College by the UCD Schools of Archaeology, Art History and Cultural Policy, Classics, English, Drama and Film, History and Archives, Irish, Celtic Studies, Irish Folklore and Linguistics, Languages and Literatures, and Music.

Where can I go? Some students will see this MA as an ideal preparation for future research work in the medieval area. Most, however, will see this as a way of developing the kind of critical skills that are needed in a wide variety of sectors, such as • the media • administration and management • finance

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Modern Languages What is the course about? The study of a language subject at postgraduate level can provide you with key competencies both linguistically and culturally, that are widely beneficial in our modern world. In Europe and beyond, intercultural and cross-cultural connections matter more than ever. This programme will equip you to understand and participate in these interactions. Taught modules are led by members of the School whose research areas range from literature, film and the visual arts to cultural theory, translation studies, history and linguistics. Students will acquire independent research skills as well as communicational proficiency, qualities which are highly valued by employers in many sectors of society, ranging from professional and cultural organisations to the field of education as well as other, more specialized areas. The MA in Modern Languages is mainly intended for students who have completed a primary degree in at least one of the Modern Language subject areas French, German, Italian or Spanish. It is ideal for students who would like to intensify their studies of at least one language subject at graduate level. It constitutes a logical progression from the BA in Modern Languages degree, offering a comparative dimension, with a number of interdisciplinary and crosssubject modules. How will I benefit? Students will intensify their knowledge and proficiency in their chosen language subject or subjects. At the same time, they will be introduced to contemporary research on how we understand culture, and shifting cultural paradigms. They will benefit from an intercultural and interdisciplinary environment which nurtures independent and informed thinking. Excellence in the communication of ideas and in the negotiation of cultural difference provides a firm basis for seeking employment across geographical boundaries, as well as for further academic or professional specialization. Where can I go? Graduates in modern languages in recent years have found employment in a wide range of areas including: • Cultural institutions in Europe • Multinational companies • Broadcasting and journalism • Doctoral research; academia • The teaching profession • The civil service • Translation.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

‘I’m delighted with this course as it challenges me to acquire a deeper level of knowledge, analysis and reflexion. The tutors are always on hand to guide me and my fellow students. The tutorials are engaging and enjoyable; every research method I learn can be quickly applied. I benefit from the interdisciplinary nature of the course so that while I explore my own academic interests, I gain exposure to new horizons. Above all, the course provides me with a rewarding and fulfilling experience.’ Edward O’Sullivan

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Introduction to Cultural Theory Introduction to Literary Theory Minor Thesis (30 credits) Option Modules (four of) French Cinema Voltaire Pirandello Italian Cinema Griselda Literary Autobiography (and Murderous Thoughts) Writing Women in Europe post-1945 19th Century Spanish Novel Advanced Spanish Translation

Fifty Years of Formalism L’Écriture migrante Advanced Italian Italian Linguistics Teaching Experience in Italian Translation Theory Literature and Opera The Apocryphal Machado

Graduate School


MA in Modernity, Literature and Culture What is the course about? ‘To be modern is to find ourselves in an environment that promises adventure, power, joy, growth, transformation of ourselves and the world – and, at the same time, that threatens to destroy everything we have, everything we know, everything we are’ (Marshall Berman). How did literature respond to the new environments and promises of modernity? What forms does English literature take in the modern period? Can we relate the history of literary forms in the modern period to the transformative powers of modernity? How do we characterise the textual forms of the modern? Has the modern in literature come to an end? If so, how did it feel to be modern? And what is it like to be postmodern? These are some of the questions which we will ask of English literature from the eighteenth century to the present day on this course. The focus of the course is the relationship between the distinctive forms of modern writing and the social, cultural, and philosophical enterprise of modernity. You will study literature and cultural history from the Romantics to the present, using ‘modernity’ as a common thread. You will further develop your analytical skills, and sense of literary history, but also expand your historical knowledge and theoretical grasp.

Curriculum Indicative Module List

How will I benefit? In a highly-competitive job market, the MA is well-regarded by employers. The minor thesis gives you a chance to show you are capable of a substantial piece of independent research. It also provides an excellent bridge to doctoral-level work.

Core Modules

Where can I go? Some of our graduates opt to stay on for doctoral work with a view to a career in academia. The majority, however, follow a wide range of careers, including • teaching • journalism • broadcasting • the civil service • banking • business • arts administration

Options:

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Concepts of Modernity Metropolis: Modernism and After Dissertation

Mind and Body in Modern Literature Post-war British Theatre Peripheral Modernisms in World Literature Approaches to Joyce I

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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Master in Musicology (MMUS) What is the course about? This course, the only one of its kind in Ireland, fosters an historical, cultural, theoretical, and analytical understanding of a wide range of musical repertoires, including Western art music, popular and vernacular musics, and non-Western traditions. You will be encouraged to pursue a wide range of interests, and will have the opportunity to work closely with some of the leading musical scholars in the country. How will I benefit? You will gain a comprehensive grounding in the core disciplinary strengths of historical musicology, music analysis and ethnomusicology. Where can I go? Some graduates of the course have chosen to pursue doctoral research both in UCD and in other leading research universities worldwide. Many more, however, have gone onto enjoy successful careers across a range of sectors, not least: • • • • • • •

academia journalism (print, radio and TV) teaching (primary & secondary level, instrumental) arts administration performance & composition music criticism the recording industry

‘The MMus exposed me to a broad range of seminars across disciplinary boundaries in a way that both challenged my preconceptions about the academic study of music and altered the way I approached my own work. I was encouraged to think critically, constantly question and find my own voice as a student and music scholar. What I find remarkable about the UCD School of Music, is that it manages to uphold its national and international reputation as a centre for rigorous musicological scholarship but also retains a certain warmth and strong sense of community.’

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Group 1: Foundation Modules Musicology Strand - Musicology, Criticism and Cultural History Analysis Strand - Modes of Close Reading Ethnomusicology Strand - Ethnomusicology: Theory and Method Group 2: Case Studies Musicology Strand: - Authenticity of Irish Music - Medieval Chant: From Memory to Written Record - Death in Music Analysis Strand: - Models of Symphonic Analysis - Medieval and Renaissance Music Theory: Tone System, Mode and Notation Ethnomusicology Strand: - Vernacular Music of the USA - Ethnographic Methods - Music and Religion Group 3: Research-Based Modules Colloquium and Seminar Series Dissertation

Ms Karishmeh Felfeli, PhD student, UCD School of Music

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


MA sa Nua-Ghaeilge Cé Dóibh? Feiliúnach dóibh siúd a bhain bunchéim amach le gairid nó atá fostaithe le tamall i bpoist ina n-éilítear saineolas suntasach ar theanga nó ar litríocht na Gaeilge, nó dóibh siúd ar mhaith leo a spéis sna hábhair sin a fhorbairt. Cad a Fhoghlaimeoidh mé? Cuirfidh tú eolas domhain ar theanga na Gaeilge, idir eolas teoiriciúil agus eolas praiticiúil. Déanfaidh tú staidéar ar go leor seánraí éagsúla de chuid litríocht an lae inniu agus de chuid na litríochta stairiúla, agus beidh deis agat léitheoireacht fhairsing a dhéanamh sna réimsí is fearr leat. Gheobhaidh tú tuiscint ar thraidisiúin theangúla agus shamhlaíocha na Gaeilge, agus foghlaimeoidh tú scileanna córa anailíse. Oilfear tú le píosa réasúnta fada taighde de do chuid féin a chur le chéile i miontráchtas. Cén leas dom é? Is fiú an fhorbairt intleachtúil a ghabhann leis an MANG ar a son féín. Is iomaí mac léinn a thugann faoin gcúrsa seo ar mhaithe leis an bhforbairt phearsanta amháin. Baineann scileanna inaistrithe leis an bhforbairt seo freisin. Ina theannta sin, beidh deiseanna fostaíochta níos fearr agat de bharr na scileanna teangúla, anailíse agus scríbhneoireachta a fhorbraítear le linn an chúrsa seo, go háirithe i gcás na bpost is airde i ndomhan na Gaeilge. Scileanna inaistrithe iad seo freisin a rachadh chun sochair duit in earnálacha eile. Réiteoidh an MANG tú le tabhairt faoina thuilleadh staidéir amach anseo, ar mhaithe le cáilíochtaí foirmiúla eile a bhaint amach, nó cúrsaí príobháideacha léinn a leanúint. Aighm an Chúrsa? Tá sé d’aidhm ag an gcúrsa seo na mic léinn a fhorbairt chun ról sár-oilte, cruthaitheach, criticiúil a chomhlíonadh i ndomhan na Gaeilge, mar léitheoirí, mar lucht labhartha na Gaeilge, nó mar fhostaithe. Leathbhádóirí iad an chéim seo agus an MA i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid. An chéad chéim eile • Oideachas • Aistriúchán • Meáin leictreonacha agus meáin chlóite • Fostaíocht in Éirinn, san Eoraip agus i dtíortha eile ar fud an domhain

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Renaissance Literature and Culture What is the course about? This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the literary and cultural world of Shakespeare and his Renaissance contemporaries. Examining a range of texts from c.1500-1700, you will develop a deep understanding of the literary culture of the Renaissance in Britain and Ireland, as well as the technical skills for reading and handling early modern books and manuscripts. The MA is currently offered in collaboration with the MA in Reconceiving the Renaissance at Queen's University Belfast. This means that QUB option modules are also on offer to our students, and our workshop-based skills module, Material Worlds, is team-taught in Dublin and Belfast. Key figures such as Shakespeare, Spenser and Milton will be read alongside less well-known writers like Aemilia Lanyer, Barnabe Rich, Katherine Philips and many others. At the same time as giving a thorough grounding in canonical texts of the period, this course draws on the latest research in the field, exploring in particular, early modern Ireland, gender and sexuality and national and international cultural encounters. The emphasis throughout is upon detailed close reading in context, placing these fascinating texts in their historical, political and cultural contexts, as well as upon the material aspects of textual production in the early modern period (manuscript, print, paper, handwriting, coteries, scribal culture).

Where can I go? Recent graduates of the MA in Renaissance Literature and Culture have gone on to: • doctoral research • teaching posts • to posts at arts and cultural organisations, both in Ireland and beyond.

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Introduction to Literary Research Methods Material Worlds Re-Reading the Renaissance: Texts and Contexts Dissertation Option Modules Writing Conflict in Early Modern Ireland

This course is aimed at graduates of English with high marks and a strong interest in the literature of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

Poetry, Piety, Patronage New Worlds, Old Worlds

How will I benefit? The MA in Renaissance Literature and Culture is a highly regarded Masters course, taught by internationally-respected staff who regularly publish books and articles in the area. Whether or not you decide to use it as the best course of preparation to undertaking a PhD in the area, it will give you a competitive advantage in any job market thanks to the many transferable skills of writing, reasoning, analysis, expression and self-management that it develops.

Making or Breaking the Tradition: Literature in the Fifteenth Century Shakespearean Childhoods (at QUB) Writing Women, 1600-1660 (at QUB) Shakespeare and World Cinema (at QUB) Literature, Religion and Politics in Renaissance England (at QUB)

You will develop a deep understanding of the literary culture of the Renaissance in England and Ireland, as well as the technical skills for reading and handling early modern books and manuscripts. You will develop your critical reasoning in a small-group teaching environment with leading experts in the field. You will acquire the skills and initiative required for independent research.

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

Graduate School


Dioplóma Iarchéime i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid Ce do an cursa seo? Tá an clár seo feiliúnach do mhic léinn a bhfuil bunchéim acu nó dóibh siúd atá fostaithe cheana in earnáil na Gaeilge. Dírítear aird ar leith ar chéimithe ar mian leo speisialtóireacht a dhéanamh in aistriúchán, in iriseoireacht, in eagarthóireacht / cóipeagarthóireacht, i riarachán, i dtéarmeolaíocht, nó in aistriúchán dlíthiúil trí mheán na Gaeilge. Forbraíodh an cúrsa seo le freastal ar na riachtanais do chéimithe le sainscileanna teanga san Aontas Eorpach mar thoradh ar Acht na dTeangacha Oifigiúla 2003. Cad a fhoghlaimeoidh mé? • Scileanna aistriúcháin, scileanna eagarthóireachta/ cóipeagarthóireachta, scileanna riaracháin, scileanna iriseoireachta, scileanna téarmeolaíochta • An Ghaeilge • Teicneolaíocht an eolais • Scileanna scríbhneoireachta • Stair na meán agus anailís théacsúil Cén tairbhe a bhainfidh mé as seo? Foghlaim ó dhaoine acadúla aitheanta a bhfuil leibhéal ard saineolais acu sna réimsí seo ar fad; Traenáil ghairmiúil ó shaineolaithe atá ag obair sna réimsí seo ag an leibhéal is airde riaracháin ag leibhéal náisiúnta, a chinntíonn go bhforbraítear úsáid, tuiscintí, agus scileanna teanga, taobh le coincheapanna teoiriciúla ag na caighdeáin is airde; Leathnaíonn an cur chuige idirdhisciplíneach a bhfuil scileanna teicneolaíochta trí mheán an Bhéarla mar chuid de, scóip na traenála agus aistriú eolais do sféar poiblí leathan an Bhéarla; Leibhéal ard cumais sa Ghaeilge. Cad is bunús leis an gClár? Díríonn an clár ar fhorbairt shainscileanna teanga le cinntiú go mbainfear úsáid as an nGaeilge i ngach gné den phobal agus ag na leibhéil is airde riaracháin ag leibhéal náisiúnta agus Eorpach.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

An chéad chéim eile • Tograí téarmaíochta (Fiontar DCU) • Na Meáin Ghaeilge (TG4, RTÉ, RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, Raidió na Life) • Comhlachtaí foilsitheoireachta (An Gúm, Cois Life, Cló Iar-Chonnachta) • Comhlachtaí poiblí agus príobháideacha aistriúcháin (Rannóg an Aistriúcháin, Lár-Aonad an Aistriúcháin, Rannóg na Gaeilge san Aontas Eorpach) • Státseirbhís (An Roinn Ealaíon, Oidhreachta agus Gaeltachta; Roinn Oideachais agus Scileanna agus rannóga táit eile)

Curriculum Liosta modúl: Croímhodúl: Teanga na Gaeilge IV Modúil roghnacha: Athbheochan agus na Meáin Cóipeagarthóireacht I Aistriúchán Gairmiúil I Scileanna Taighde Ateangaireacht Teanga na Gaeilge V Cóipeagarthóireacht Ghairmiúil II Dlí agus Aistriúchán II Teanga na Gaeilge 3

Ceird na Scríbhneoireachta Riarachán Gaeilge I Dlí agus Aistriúchán I Scileanna Aistriúcháin An Béal Beo Na Meáin Ghaeilge Riarachán Gairmiúil II Teanga na Gaeilge 2 Saoréisteacht sa Teanglann

Modúil roghnacha ó Applied Language Centre French General Purposes 4 French General Purposes 5 German General Purposes 4 German General Purposes 5 Spanish General Purposes 4 Spanish General Purposes 5

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MA i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid na Gaeilge Cé dó an cúrsa seo? Tá an clár seo feiliúnach do mhic léinn a bhfuil an Ghaeilge mar chuid dá mbunchéim acu nó dóibh siúd atá fostaithe cheana in earnáil na Gaeilge. Dírítear aird ar leith ar chéimithe ar mian leo speisialtóireacht a dhéanamh in aistriúchán, in iriseoireacht, in eagarthóireacht / cóipeagarthóireacht, i riarachán, i dtéarmeolaíocht, nó in aistriúchán dlíthiúil trí mheán na Gaeilge. Forbraíodh an cúrsa seo dóibh siúd ar spéis leo réimsí nuálacha na Gaeilge, mar aon le freastal ar na riachtanais do chéimithe le sainscileanna teanga san Aontas Eorpach mar thoradh ar Acht na dTeangacha Oifigiúla 2003. Cad a fhoghlaimeoidh mé? • An Ghaeilge • Scileanna aistriúcháin, scileanna eagarthóireachta/ cóipeagarthóireachta, scileanna riaracháin, scileanna iriseoireachta, scileanna téarmeolaíochta, scileanna aistriúcháin i gcomhthéacs dlíthiúil • Stair na meán agus anailís théacsúil • Scileanna scríbhneoireachta • Teicneolaíocht an eolais (mar rogha) • Teanga Eorpach ag leibhéal feidhmeach (mar rogha) Cén tairbhe a bhainfidh mée as seo? Taithí oibre agus traenáil le daoine gairmiúla ag leibhéal náisiúnta agus Eorpach atá ag obair sna réimsí speisialta ar fad, agus beidh áiteanna oibre in eagraíochtaí stáit agus príobháideacha lárnach sa taithí sin. Tabharfaidh sé seo deis do mhic léinn feidhmiú i suíomh oibre ag baint úsáide as na scileanna atá foghlamtha acu fad agus atá teagmhálaithe inláimhsithe á ndéanamh acu i suíomh oibre. Cuirfear leis an tuiscint ar thábhacht na réimsí seo mar réimsí nuálacha i gcomhthéacs acadúil trí léachtaí ó dhaoine acadúla aitheanta a bhfuil leibhéal ard saineolais acu sna réimsí seo ar fad. Leathnaíonn an cur chuige idirdhisciplíneach a bhfuil scileanna teicneolaíochta trí mheán an Bhéarla mar chuid de, mar aon le teanga Eorpach ag leibhéal feidhmeach, scóip na traenála agus aistriú eolais do réimse poiblí leathan an Bhéarla. Bainfear amach leibhéal ard cumais sa Ghaeilge. An chéad chéim eile • Tograí téarmaíochta (Fiontar DCU) • Na Meáin Ghaeilge (TG4, RTÉ, RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, Raidió na Life)

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• Comhlachtaí foilsitheoireachta (An Gúm, Cois Life, Cló Iar-Chonnachta) • Comhlachtaí poiblí agus príobháideacha aistriúcháin agus cóipeagarthóireach ta (Rannóg an Aistriúcháin, Lár-Aonad an Aistriúcháin, Rannóg na Gaeilge san Aontas Eorpach) • Státseirbhís ('An Roinn Ealaíon, Oidhreachta agus Gaeltachta, Comhionannais agus Gaeltachta; Roinn Oideachais agus Scileanna, agus rannóga eile stáit) • Múinteoireacht • Taighde

Curriculum Liosta modúl: Croímhodúl: Teanga na Gaeilge IV Modúil roghnacha: Athbheochan agus na Meáin

Ceird na Scríbhneoireachta

Cóipeagarthóireacht I

Riarachán Gaeilge I

Aistriúchán Gairmiúil I

Dlí agus Aistriúchán I

Scileanna Taighde

Scileanna Aistriúcháin

Ateangaireacht

An Béal Beo

Teanga na Gaeilge V

Na Meáin Ghaeilge

Cóipeagarthóireacht Ghairmiúil II

Riarachán Gairmiúil II

Dlí agus Aistriúchán II Modúil roghnacha ó scoileanna eile (Seim 1 agus 2): How to make a historical documentary French General Purposes 4 French General Purposes 5 German General Purposes 4 German General Purposes 5 Spanish General Purposes 4 Spanish General Purposes 5 Rogha ó liosta ar shuíomh SILS

Graduate School


MA/GDip/GCert Second Languages Studies What is the course about? This course investigates current theory and debate in Second Language Acquisition (SLA), as well as issues of the teachability and learnability of languages. It is an interdisciplinary programme with input from linguistics, psychology, sociology and education. The course combines core elements in SLA theory and research skills with an array of more specialized modules on Second Language, Applied Linguistics, Psychology and Sociology. Delivery is in English. In addition to the completion of taught modules, students are required to write a 15,000 word minor thesis on a topic of their own choosing, under supervision. In parallel with the MA, the School also offers a (60 credit) Graduate Diploma which contains the course elements of the MA, but without a final thesis. The MA may be viewed as an end in itself or as a springboard for higher research. How will I benefit? Students are trained in the fundamental research skills through practical tasks which aid in the development of a critical approach to primary and secondary sources and provide them with the necessary skills for the formulation of research proposals, and, for independent research. Modules are taught in small group seminars. A variety of assessment methods are employed, including individual presentations and term essays. These are designed to enhance reflective learning and good communication skills. Where can I go? Graduates can expect to acquire the skills and knowledge for careers in second language related fields in teaching, administration, business and government. Global interdependence has led to need for the skills necessary to negotiate a multilingual world. Third level institutions increasingly seek expertise in SLA. There are many opportunities in non-academic spheres for SLA graduates also in business technology and government. Previous MA graduates have had a broad range of career paths at home and abroad including second-level teaching, the civil service and PhD research.

Curriculum Core modules: SLL 40010 Second Language Acquisition 1 [12.5 credits] LIN 40030 General Linguistics – [7.5 credits] SLL 40070 Second Language Acquisition 2 [10 credits] SLL 40180 Second Language Teaching and Learning [10 credits] Thesis (30 credits) Options (students have to take 20 credits) LING 40220 Minority Languages [10 credits] LING 40090 Sociolinguistics [7.5 credits] LING 40110 Syntax [7.5 credits] PSY 40530 Language Endangerment [10 credits] ITAL 40120 Advanced Italian Language [10 credits] ITAL 40290 Teaching Experience [10 credits] FR 30160 Sociolinguistics [5 credits] GER 40040 Translation Theory [10 credits] - (semester 1) SOC 30200 Sociology of Migration [5 credits] - plus 1 tutorial (several options) LING 40020 Meaning [7.5 credits] LING 40050 Phonology [7.5 credits] PSY 40350 Current Issues in Lang. Development [10 credits] SPOL 30020 Migration, Ethnicity and Social Change [5 credits] SPAN 40190 Advanced Translation ****Only 1 option from Italian, German or Spanish language ‘I found the MA in Second Language Studies to be a broad programme appealing to a wide variety of interests, including First and Second Language Acquisition, Sociolinguistics, Bilingualism and Second Language Teaching. The MA is unique in that it is cross-disciplinary and students can register for modules across different schools and departments within UCD. Students on this programme can benefit from a small class sizes and a close rapport with the lecturers involved. The MA led me to continue with a PhD in the area of Second Language Studies, so I can highly recommend it both for its standard of teaching and its potential to lead on to more research.’

Chloe Diskin (January 2012)

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

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MA in the Social and Cultural History of Medicine What is the course about? Medicine, illness and welfare occupies a central place in all our lives. The MA, based within the UCD Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland and the UCD School of History and Archives, will help you understand the place of medicine and welfare in society and history (c1750-1980) and to engage with critical debates in the field. You will have the opportunity to explore themes through various media not least film, literature and art, and acquire the practical and conceptual skills needed in the academic and non-academic workplace.

Curriculum Indicative Module List: Core Modules Approaches to Medical History Medicine and Gender Research Seminar

This course is designed for high calibre graduates who want to pursue an innovative MA degree. It is suitable for graduates with a BA degree or a primary degree in the Humanities or in a cognate field such as medicine or nursing. While some background in the history of medicine and welfare is helpful, it is not mandatory. How will I benefit? You will develop an understanding of the importance of the history of medicine and welfare in Ireland and internationally, and its contribution to the field of social, gender, and post-colonial history. You will also develop an insight into patients’ experiences of illness throughout history and of the relationship between history and the development of current health policy. Through the development of presentations skills, peer-review, and engaging in lively intellectual debates, you will develop core skills. You will graduate with an MA from a leading international School of History and from a centre of excellence in medical history giving you a competitive advantage. Where can I go? This MA offers broad-based knowledge and expertise, providing important theoretical and practical skills needed in a wide range of occupations. Recent graduates have gone onto positions in sectors such as: • accountancy • media • law • academia • teaching Many of our graduates have also been very successful in securing funding to pursue PhDs in the field.

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Dissertation Options Religions and Societies Reason and Faith Totalitarianism: State, Culture and Identity Case Studies (Modern Ireland) Ireland and Irishness CHOMI Seminar Series Ireland and the World Reading and Writing 20thC Ireland Totalitarianism: Self and Society

‘I found the MA an exciting and stimulating programme which allowed an understanding of medical ideas, practices and institutions within particular social and cultural contexts. The course was centred on small seminar groups, and provided a supportive and friendly environment in which to work and research. The annual seminar series also brought to the Centre interesting and exciting national and international scholars. Ultimately I found the Masters interesting, exciting, challenging and dynamic.’ Jane Hand, Class of 2010, is currently a Wellcome Trust funded PhD candidate at the University of Warwick

Graduate School


Graduate Diploma in TESOL What is the course about? The Graduate Diploma in TESOL aims to: • further develop ability to teach in a wide range of ESOL specialist and general contexts both nationally and internationally • provide enhanced knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice in the field of TESOL • deepen participants’ capacity to reflect critically on theory and practice with a view to managing their own professional and academic development You will extend your knowledge of key concepts in TESOL, you will enhance your existing ability in the practice of English language teaching to speakers of other languages, and you will learn how to plan and develop a successful career in this field. This course is suitable for teachers of English as a second, foreign or additional language who have an appropriate initial teaching qualification and a minimum of two years’ relevant teaching experience. Applicants should be native or nearnative speakers of English.

Where can I go? The Graduate Diploma in TESOL will be of interest to English language educators who wish to advance their careers in TESOL in the public and private education sectors nationally and internationally. The international field of TESOL continues to expand and there are exciting opportunities for graduates with advanced qualifications. Graduates of the course aim to apply for senior positions within TESOL – posts of responsibility such as • directors of study • examiners • senior teachers • managers • course designers • textbook writers • teacher educators

How will I benefit? The Graduate Diploma in TESOL is an internationally-recognised qualification in the field of English language education. You will acquire the necessary knowledge and professional skills to work at a higher level in TESOL and assume posts of responsibility across a wide range of areas, e.g. directors of study, learning advisers, managers, examiners, course developers or others. Admission Requirements In addition to the standard entrance requirements required by the College, applicants should hold an appropriate initial training qualification in TESOL, and have a minimum of two years’ relevant teaching experience in Ireland or overseas. The number of places on the course is strictly limited and selection is based on written application and interview

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

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MA in TESOL What is the course about? The MA in TESOL aims to: • further develop ability to teach in a wide range of ESOL contexts both national and international • extend knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of TESOL as they apply in diverse contexts nationally and internationally • deepen participants’ capacity to reflect critically on theory and practice with a view to managing their own professional and academic development • develop research skills for TESOL through the investigation of a chosen specialist field and with a view to further research and study This course is suitable for teachers of English as a second, foreign or additional language who have an appropriate initial teaching qualification and a minimum of two years’ relevant teaching experience. Applicants should be native or nearnative speakers of English.

Where can I go? The MA in TESOL will be of interest to English language educators who wish to advance their careers in TESOL in the public and private education sectors nationally and internationally. The international field of TESOL continues to expand and there are exciting opportunities for graduates with advanced qualifications. Graduates of the course aim to apply for senior positions within TESOL – posts of responsibility such as • directors of study • curriculum advisers • managers • examiners • course developers

You will extend your knowledge of key concepts in TESOL, you will enhance your existing ability in the practice of English language teaching to speakers of other languages, you will learn how to develop a successful career in English language education, and you will acquire research skills to enable you plan further courses of study in the field of TESOL. How will I benefit? The MA in TESOL is an internationally recognised qualification in the field of English language education. You will acquire the necessary knowledge and professional skills to work at a higher level in TESOL and assume posts of responsibility across a wide range of areas. Admission Requirements In addition to the standard entrance requirements for the MA, applicants should hold an appropriate initial training qualification in TESOL, and have a minimum of two years’ relevant teaching experience in Ireland or overseas. The number of places on the course is strictly limited and selection is based on written application and interview.

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Graduate School


www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

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Student life at UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies The Campus Located 10km south of Dublin City Centre, our dedicated and intimate campus exudes charm and character. Surrounded by 25 acres of mature parkland, the campus has an exclusive feel. The local seaside village of Blackrock is one of the most prestigious addresses in Dublin with all necessary amenities and facilities close to the campus.

Facilities The UCD James Joyce Library is located on campus and spans four floors. It has dedicated postgraduate research spaces and breakout areas. Wi-fi is available throughout. The library contains over a million print volumes, as well as supporting around the same number of titles in non-print formats, including e-books and online academic journals. The library also houses an important special collections department, with over 30,000 early printed books.

Sports and Clubs Sporting facilities at the nearly UCD Belfield campus include tennis courts, rugby and soccer pitches and a new sports centre. The sports centre, which opened its doors in June 2012, includes a gym, an Olympic standard 50 metre swimming pool, a sauna, steam room and a jacuzzi. For more details visit www.ucd.ie/sport/facilities Rugby, canoeing, sailing, golf and soccer are popular pursuits amongst our students. Students also have access to the vast array of active clubs and societies at the UCD Belfield campus. Accommodation The university offers some accommodation in its dedicated residence. For further information, see http://www.ucd.ie/residences/ However, the majority of our students prefer to rent locally. For more information, visit www.daft.ie IT Services Wi-fi internet is available throughout the campus. Blackboard is the College’s main e-learning tool used by staff and students as a central area to provide and retrieve course material, communicate announcements and undertake group work.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

The National Folklore Collection is also available to students, home to one of the largest collections of oral and ethnological material in the world. The College also houses an important Classical Museum. There are also a range of internationally-significant archives and libraries in Dublin, not least the National Archives of Ireland, the National Library of Ireland, the library of Trinity College Dublin, Marsh’s Library and the Chester Beatty Library. International Community When you study at UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies you will mix with the best and brightest students from across the globe. In 2011-2012, around 60% of applications to graduate programmes in the College came from non-Irish students.

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Dublin ‘When I die Dublin will be written in my heart.’ James Joyce

Dublin is one of Europe’s oldest cities and has a long history of academic excellence. A vibrant and multi-cultural city, it was recently voted as the world's 8th best city to study in by QS. www.topuniversities.com Dublin brings together the best of traditional Ireland as well as modern Europe and is currently home to the European Headquarters for many multinational organisations including Google, Facebook, Pfizer, Apple and Intel, to name just a few.

Part of Dublin’s charm is its friendly scale. You can walk across it in an hour, that’s if you don’t meet someone you know on the way! While renowned for its pubs, cafés and nightlife, you are never far from the sea or the green rolling hills of the countryside. For more information about Dublin, go to www.visitdublin.com For details on Dublin transport visit www.dublinbus.ie and www.dart.ie

The cultivating place of James Joyce, Beckett, Shaw, Yeats, the Chieftains, U2, Riverdance and more artists and writers than you could count, it’s the capital city of the country with the youngest and finest educated population in Europe. Few capital cities combine learning, enterprise and culture in such a small area.

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Graduate School


www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

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Developing your career Available to all our students, the Career Development Centre provides high quality careers information, advice and guidance. They can help you: • Develop career management and employability skills. • In your search for a job - including listing job vacancies, work experience and internships, job applications and interviews. • Identify further graduate study options. As well as having access to advice from advisors, and other printed and online resources, the Centre runs regular skill development workshops, CV clinics and hosts employment and internship fairs. The Career Development Centre will help set you on the right course for whatever career you wish to pursue, and also help put you in touch with some of the world’s leading employers.

‘We work with graduate students, enabling them to develop the skills employers tell us they want, relate career management and employability skills to their chosen field of work or study and to then make an effective transition from UCD to the next stage in their career development. Visit our Centre, explore career options and move forward in your career.” Dr David Foster, Director, Career Development Centre

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Graduate School


Admissions and Entrance Requirements How to apply For the Diploma and Masters courses, application can be made immediately through our online admissions system www.ucd.ie/apply For Research Degrees, it is advisable to talk through your proposal with a prospective supervisor before submitting a formal application. Full faculty listings can be found on School websites - see www.ucd.ie/colleges.htm for more information. The majority of our courses operate a rolling system of admissions, which means that you can expect to receive a response to your application within a month. Unless otherwise stated, applications can be made up to the beginning of the academic term. However, early application is advisable, as demand on some courses can be very high. Qualifications Required The normal entrance requirement for our Masters programmes is a 2.1 in a primary degree (or 3.2 UCD GPA or equivalent). Some programmes have slightly different requirements; these are indicated in the listings. Some programmes may consider applicants with slightly lower qualifications. If you have any questions about your eligibility for a programme, it would be worth speaking in the first instance with the relevant admissions tutor prior to submitting a full application. A list of contacts can be found at the end of this prospectus.

English Language Requirements If your first language is not English, or you did not achieve your degree in an English-speaking university, you will also need to submit evidence of your language proficiency. As the majority of our programmes require high-level skills in comprehension and writing, the College will normally expect students to have reached an overall 7.0 in the IELTS Academic Module (with no individual band lower than 6.5) or an A in the Cambridge ESOL - CAE prior to commencing graduate study. The minimum entry requirement for TOEFL iBt is a score of 100, whilst applicants with PTE (Academic) need an overall score of 68. If you have not attained this level, it may be worth speaking with the contact for the course you are interested in before submitting an application. The UCD Applied Language Centre run pre-sessional language programmes, which may be helpful in raising your proficiency. More information those programmes can be found at www.ucd.ie/alc/

For our diploma programmes, a good 2:2 result in the BA is normally the minimum entrance requirement. For our research degrees, prospective students will normally hold at least a 2:1 in their BA qualification, with a similar level of performance in a Masters programme.

www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

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Scholarship Opportunities For Irish Students There are two principal schemes designed to assist Irish students pursue postgraduate study: www.studentfinance.ie - The Irish Government through the Higher Education Authority offers means-tested fee awards for Irish students, or students satisfying minimum Irish residency requirements. For Citizens of Ireland or another European Member State www.irchss.ie – The Irish Research Council offers a number of competitive postgraduate and postdoctoral scholarship awards. For International Students UCD Global Excellence Graduate Scholarship – V.V. Giri Award (INDIA) In 2013-2014, UCD International is offering two full Masters Scholarships (covering tuition fees) to Indian Students studying graduate taught Masters in UCD. UCD Global Graduate Scholarship - INDIA In 2013-2014, UCD International is offering fifty-five Masters Scholarships to Indian Students studying graduate taught Masters in UCD. 5 scholarships will cover 50 per cent of the tuition fee, and fifty scholarships will cover €2,000. For further information, application forms, or a copy of the terms and conditions of both schemes listed above, please email Kate O’Hanlon, International Student Scholarships and Funding Coordinator, UCD International Office, Gerard Manley Hopkins Centre, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4, email: kate.ohanlon@ucd.ie

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The Irish Fulbright Commission – USA Fulbright US student awards (worth approximately €16,000) enable US graduate students to spend one academic year studying or researching in Ireland. Further details and information on how to apply can be found at http://www.fulbright.ie/uscitizensawards/fulbrightusstudentawards The Mitchell Scholars Program - USA Sponsored by the US-Ireland Alliance, The Mitchell Scholars Program is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to the island of Ireland, while recognising and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to community and public service. Up to twelve Mitchell Scholars between the ages of 18 and 30 are chosen annually for one year of graduate study in Irish Universities, including UCD. For further details and information on how to apply please visit http://www.us-irelandalliance.org UCD CSC Scholarship Scheme - CHINA University College Dublin (UCD) and the China Scholarship Council (CSC) affiliated with the Ministry of Education of China have established a unique scholarship scheme to assist Chinese students to pursue PhD programmes in UCD. For further details and information on how to apply please visit http://www.ucd.ie/graduatestudies/coursefinder/researchprogrammes/ chinascholarshipscheme

Graduate School


Contacts

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

Programme Enquiries: Graduate School Manager Barbara Gannon Graduate School, College of Arts and Celtic Studies University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland Telephone: +353 1 716 8241 Email: gs.artsceltic@ucd.ie

Higher Diploma in Archaeology Angela McAteer Telephone: +353 1 716 8312 Email: archaeology@ucd.ie

MA in American Literature Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

MA in Archives and Record Management Jennifer O’Reilly Telephone: +353 1 716 7549 Email: jennifer.oreilly@ucd.ie

MA in Archaeology Angela McAteer Telephone: +353 1 716 8312 Email: archaeology@ucd.ie

Graduate Diploma in American Studies Catherine Carey Telephone: +353 1 716 1560 Email: catherine.carey@ucd.ie

MA in Art History Elizabeth Varley Telephone: +353 1 716 8162 Email: elizabeth.varley@ucd.ie

MA in American Studies Catherine Carey Telephone: +353 1 716 1560 Email: catherine.carey@ucd.ie

MA in Classics Alexander Thein Telephone: +353 1 716 8662 Email: alexander.thein@ucd.ie

MA in Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

MA in Creative Writing Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

Graduate Diploma in Archaeology Angela McAteer Telephone: +353 1 716 8312 Email: archaeology@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/artsceltic/graduateschool

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

MA in Cultural Policy and Arts Management Elizabeth Varley Telephone: +353 1 716 8162 Email: elizabeth.varley@ucd.ie

MA in Film Studies Karen Jackman Telephone: +353 1 716 8604 Email: karen.jackman@ucd.ie

MA in Diaspora Studies Catherine Carey Telephone: +353 1 716 1560 Email: catherine.carey@ucd.ie

MA in Gender, Sexuality and Culture Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

MA in Directing for Theatre Karen Jackman Telephone: +353 1 716 8604 Email: karen.jackman@ucd.ie

Graduate Diploma in History Kate Breslin Telephone: +353 1 716 8371 Email: kate.breslin@ucd.ie

Higher Diploma in Drama and Performance Studies Karen Jackman Telephone: +353 1 716 8604 Email: karen.jackman@ucd.ie

MA in History Kate Breslin Telephone: +353 1 716 8371 Email: kate.breslin@ucd.ie

MA in Drama and Performance Studies Karen Jackman Telephone: +353 1 716 8604 Email: karen.jackman@ucd.ie MA in European Regional and Minority Cultures Bronwyn Salmon Telephone: +353 1 716 8306 Email: bronwyn.salmon@ucd.ie

MA in History of the Media Kate Breslin Telephone: +353 1 716 8371 Email: kate.breslin@ucd.ie Graduate Diploma in Irish Folklore Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie Higher Diploma in Irish Folklore Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie

UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

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MA in Irish Studies Marc Caball Telephone: +353 1 716 8371 [School Office] Email: marc.caball@ucd.ie

MA in Medieval Literature and Culture Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

Dioplóma Iarchéime i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie

Higher Diploma in Linguistics Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie

MA in Medieval Studies Kate Breslin Telephone: +353 1 716 8371 Email: kate.breslin@ucd.ie

MA i Scríobh agus Cumarsáid na Gaeilge Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie

MA in Linguistics Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie

MA in Modern Languages Bronwyn Salmon Telephone: +353 1 716 8306 Email: bronwyn.salmon@ucd.ie

MA in Media and International Conflict Catherine Carey Telephone: +353 1 716 1560 Email: catherine.carey@ucd.ie

MA in Modernity Literature and Culture Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

MA in Medieval Celtic Languages and Literatures Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie

Master in Musicology Lisa Bennett Telephone: +353 1 716 8178 Email: music@ucd.ie

MA in Medieval History Kate Breslin Telephone: +353 1 716 8371 Email: kate.breslin@ucd.ie

MA sa Nua-Ghaeilge Anna Germaine Telephone: +353 1 716 8200 Email: anna.germaine@ucd.ie MA in Renaissance Literature and Culture Hilary Gow Telephone: +353 1 716 8480 Email: hilary.gow@ucd.ie

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UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

MA/GDip/GCert in Second Language Studies Bronwyn Salmon Telephone: +353 1 716 8306 Email: bronwyn.salmon@ucd.ie MA in Social and Cultural History of Medicine Catherine Cox Telephone: +353 1 716 8100 Email: catherine.cox@ucd.ie Graduate Diploma in TESOL Jenny Doyle Telephone: +353 1 716 7900 Email: tesol@alc.ucd.ie

Additional Offices Accommodation Student Residences (Belfield Campus) Telephone: +353 1 716 1274 Email: residences@ucd.ie http://www.ucd.ie/residences/ Career Development Centre Telephone: +353 1 716 7574 Email: careers@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/careers UCD Sport Telephone: +353 1 716 2183 Email: sport@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/sport UCD International Telephone: +353 1 716 8500 Email: international@ucd.ie www.ucd.ie/international Mature Student Advisor Ronan Murphy Telephone: +353 1 716 8245 Email: Ronan.Murphy@ucd.ie

MA in TESOL Jenny Doyle Telephone: +353 1 716 7900 Email: tesol@alc.ucd.ie

Graduate School


UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies’ Graduate School is the leading graduate humanities school in Ireland.


Graduate School UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies

College of Arts and Celtic Studies, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland Telephone: +353 1 716 8241 Email: gs.artsceltic@ucd.ie


UCD College of Arts and Celtic Studies -Graduate Courses