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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 Table of Contents by Area of Study

LITERATURE AND CULTURE Buenos Aires — Music, Film and Culture in the Global City....................4 Brazilian Literature, Culture and the Arts ..............................................4 Cuba — Narratives of Resistance........................................................4 Americans in Paris.............................................................................5 Travelers in Greece............................................................................5 Palaces of the Gods — Texts and Temples in South India.......................5 Celtic Connections.............................................................................6 Italy and the Birth of Modern Europe...................................................6 The Grand Tour.................................................................................6 Oxford — Portal to Fantasy................................................................7 Scottish Tales.....................................................................................7 Shakespeare — Live!..........................................................................7

THE ARTS AND VISUAL CULTURE Art Studio in Paris & the French Riviera.................................................8 World Cinema and the European Film Festival......................................8 Documentary Filmmaking in Ireland.....................................................8 Spanish Art.......................................................................................9 Design in Britain — Inside and Outside Museum Walls..........................9


GLOBAL ANDCOMMUNITY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT GLOBAL AND DEVELOPMENT

HISTORY CULTURE HISTORY AND AND CULTURE

Teaching English as a Global Language in Chile.................................10 Costa Rican Communities.................................................................10 Sustainable Ecuador — From the Andes to the Amazon.......................10 Community Politics and Development in the European Union................ 11 Arab-Israeli Relations....................................................................... 11 Community Development in the New South Africa............................... 11 Sustainable Cities of Northern Europe................................................14 Housing and Community Development in Barcelona [CANCELED].......14 The Politics of Global Inequality........................................................14

Vienna — Crossroads of Central Europe............................................ 15 Italian Culture & Institutions............................................................... 15 Berlin Culture Before and After the Wall............................................. 16 Japanese Popular Culture in Tradition................................................. 16 Peru — History of the Andean Region................................................ 16 Turkey — Classical & Underwater Archaeology.................................. 17 Castles and Cathedrals in Northern Britain......................................... 17 At the Crossroads of Gender and Communication............................... 18 London Burning — Journalism from the Great Fire to the Digital Age.....18 Vietnam — Then and Now [CANCELED]........................................... 18

SCIENCE ANDENGINEERING ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND A Taste of China.............................................................................. 19 Introduction to Winemaking..............................................................19 Ecological and Social Issues at Lake Atitlan, Guatemala...................... 19 What’s In Your Water?.....................................................................20 Sustainable Energy Technologies.......................................................20 Thailand — Microbiology Lab in the Kingdom of Smiles....................... 21 Genetics — From Mendel to Genomes............................................... 21 Engineering of Historic Roman Construction........................................22 UK — Brewing Science....................................................................22

OTHER ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES UC Davis Quarter Abroad...........................................................12–13 Summer Abroad Health Internships....................................................23

COURSE AND COUNTRY INDEX..................................25

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

STUDY ABROAD AWARDS

To be eligible to participate in a UC Davis Summer Abroad program, you must

All enrolled students are eligible to apply for a Study Abroad Award. This year, approximately 100 awards will be distributed with each award ranging from $500 to $2000. To qualify, you must submit an award application and be enrolled in a Summer Abroad program by March 6, 2014.

• be 18 years or older • be in good academic standing with a GPA of 2.0 or higher • have completed 15 accredited college units • be in good disciplinary standing with your academic institution Programs are open to students from other US institutions and to graduate students.

NEXT STEPS

APPLICATION AND ENROLLMENT

Visit the Summer Abroad website to learn more about program excursions, instructor(s), course requirements and prerequisites, fees, accommodations and activities. Create a UC Davis Summer Abroad account online to access enrollment forms and register for email updates about specific programs.

To enroll in a UC Davis Summer Abroad program, you must complete an online application at http://summerabroad.ucdavis.edu The enrollment period is January 8 – April 4, 2014. Please note that programs fill on a first-completed, first-reserved basis and that many programs reach maximum enrollment as early as January. If you do not have a valid passport, apply for one or renew your current one as soon as possible. Your passport must be valid for at least six months after the program end date. Please keep your post office receipt as proof of application.

Other UC Davis campus-based programs include Quarter Abroad options in Argentina, Australia, France, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom (p. 12-13), and new summer health internship opportunities (p. 23). Explore all your study abroad options at http://studyabroad.ucdavis.edu

Program details are subject to change. Please consult the UC Davis Summer Abroad website for the most current program information.

FEES Fees vary by program and include the program fee, course fee, and campusbased fee as well as the cost of accommodations, excursions, select meals, and other program materials and services abroad. Airfare, textbooks, and spending money are not included. A complete enrollment packet including a $300 non-refundable deposit secures your space in the program. FINANCIAL AID Financial Aid is available to qualified students. To be eligible for Summer Aid, students must have submitted a FAFSA for the 2013–2014 academic year. Work with the Financial Aid office on your home campus regarding eligibility, supplemental applications for summer aid, deadlines, etc. Do not expect award levels to be the same as during the academic year.

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

“Studying abroad has introduced me to a new world and to a new way of life. Watching those around me, comparing cultures and lifestyles, learning each day — a truly impactful experience and I’m now even considering living abroad after my time at UC Davis!” — Summer Abroad Alum ’13, History of the Andean Region — Peru


SUMMER ABROAD 2014 Programs by Location

AFRICA South Africa Durban — Community Development........................11

ASIA China Wuxi & More — A Taste of China............................19 India Pondicherry — Texts and Temples............................. 5 Israel Jerusalem, Tel Aviv — Arab-Israeli Relations.............11 Japan Okazaki — Popular Culture in Tradition....................16 South Korea Seoul — Sustainable Energy Technologies............... 20 Thailand Bangkok — Microbiology Lab..................................21 Vietnam Hanoi, Saigon — Then and Now [CANCELED].......18

EUROPE Austria Vienna — Crossroads of Central Europe...................15 France Dijon — Introduction to Winemaking........................19 Paris — Americans in Paris....................................... 5 Paris, French Riviera — Art Studio............................. 8 Germany Berlin — Before and After the Wall..........................16

Greece Athens, Hydra, Nafplion, Olympia, Kefalonia — Travelers in Greece.................................................. 5 Ireland Galway — What’s In Your Water? ......................... 20 Dublin, Galway, Belfast — Documentary Filmmaking.. 8 Italy Florence — Birth of Modern Europe.......................... 6 Rome — Engineering of Roman Construction........... 22 Rome — Italian Culture & Institutions........................15 Spain Barcelona — Housing & Com Dev. [CANCELED]......14 Burgos — Spanish Art.............................................. 9 Switzerland Geneva — The Politics of Global Inequality...............14 Turkey Various — Classical & Underwater Archaeology.......17 UK (England, Scotland) London — Shakespeare—Live!.................................. 7 London — Gender and Communication....................18 London — British Journalism....................................18 Nottingham — Brewing Science.............................. 22 Oxford — Portal to Fantasy...................................... 7 York, Edinburgh, London — Design in Britain............. 9 York, Durham — Castles and Cathedrals..................17 Edinburgh — Scottish Tales....................................... 7

EUROPE — MULTI-COUNTRY

Germany, Italy Freiburg, Treviso — Community Politics.....................11 Ireland, Scotland, Wales, France Various — Celtic Connections................................... 6 Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland Various — Sustainable Cities of Europe....................14 UK, Austria, Czech Republic Brno, Cambridge — From Mendel to Genomes.........21 UK, France, Italy London, Paris, Alps, Rome — The Grand Tour............ 6

LATIN AMERICA Argentina Buenos Aires — Music, Film and Culture.................... 4 Brazil Salvador — Literature, Culture and Art...................... 4 Chile Arica — Teaching English as a Global Language......10 Costa Rica San Jose — Costa Rican Communities......................10 Cuba Havana — Narratives of Resistance........................... 4 Ecuador Quito, Amazon Basin — Sustainable Ecuador...........10 Guatemala Lake Atitlan — Ecological and Social Issues..............19 Peru Cuzco — History of the Andean Region....................16

France, Switzerland La Napoule, Locarno — World Cinema..................... 8 summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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LITERATURE AND CULTURE 4

Buenos Aires — Music, Film and Culture in the Global City JUNE 29 – JULY 27, 2014 ANA PELUFFO (aopeluffo@ucdavis.edu) & PABLO ORTIZ (pvortiz@ucdavis.edu)

Spanish 175 & 198 (Taught in English) Argentina—Buenos Aires In recent years, Buenos Aires has become a hub for street artists, musicians, and filmmakers from around the world. Through immersion in the urban experience, students will study the history of Buenos Aires’ artistic movements. Moving freely in and out of the classroom setting, we will encounter firsthand the city’s many cultural offerings: eclectic architecture, world famous graffiti, avant-garde films, concert halls, and street performances. Close study of the city’s vibrant culture as a response to the country’s economic and military traumas will allow for a better understanding of Argentina’s complex history and politics.

Brazilian Literature, Culture, and the Arts

Cuba — Narratives of Resistance

AUGUST 9 – SEPTEMBER 7, 2014

AUGUST 9 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2014

LEO BERNUCCI (lmbernucci@ucdavis.edu)

RAQUEL SCHERR* (rlscherr@ucdavis.edu)

Portuguese 161 & 198 Brazil—Salvador

Comparative Literature 165S & 198 Cuba—Havana

This program introduces students to Brazil’s literature, music, painting, dance, film and architecture. During our stay in Salvador, Bahia, students will learn about the local and national history. This 500-year-old city is Brazil’s first capital and the crib of Afro-Brazilian culture. Built over a spectacular bay, Salvador is known for its pleasant climate, friendly people, and fine beaches. As a repository of colonial art and historical buildings, it offers a unique opportunity for students to appreciate Baroque sculpture, painting, and architecture. As the “music state” of Brazil, Bahia has produced many talented musicians and singers such as João Gilberto, Maria Bethânia, Caetano Veloso, Gal Costa, and Gilberto Gil. This program features day and overnight trips to points of natural and historical interest.

Since the Spanish conquest, Cuba has been a major site of resistance—first against Spain and later against the U.S. This course will examine narratives of resistance as they have been articulated in themes of slavery, rebellion, and revolution. We will read Cuban literature, listen to Afro-Cuban music, watch Cuban films, and visit locations and institutions that shed light on Cuba’s political and cultural history of resistance. We also examine how U.S. thinkers and writers have used Cuba and its revolution as a model of resistance against racism and oppression.

SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

*Recipient, Academic Federation Award for Excellence in Teaching


JULY 1–29, 2014 RAQUEL SCHERR* (rlscherr@ucdavis.edu)

Comparative Literature 180S & 198 France—Paris

“I definitely learned a lot about Greek history, language, and culture. Absorbing the culture, seeing different lifestyles, meeting new people — all helped me learn more about myself and the person I want to be.” — Summer Abroad Alum ’13, Travelers in Greece

Palaces of the Gods — Texts and Temples in South India

This program examines representations of Paris in the 19th and 20th centuries and of its role as the capital of modern culture. We will discuss major texts from Jefferson to Baldwin, listen to key musicians (e.g. Sidney Bechet, Josephine Baker), view major films (e.g. An American in Paris), and learn to read the city and report on its politics from the vantage point of young 21st-century Americans. Classes and student housing will be located near Luxembourg Gardens. Assignments include required readings, visits to museums and jazz clubs, and independent walks throughout the city.

JULY 6 – AUGUST 6, 2014 ARCHANA VENKATESAN

(avenkatesan@ucdavis.edu)

Comparative Literature 180S & 198 units in either Comparative Literature, Middle East/South Asia Studies or Religious Studies India—Pondicherry

*Recipient, Academic Federation Award for Excellence in Teaching

Travelers in Greece JULY 1–29, 2014 ALIKI DRAGONA* (apdragona@ucdavis.edu)

English 139 & 198 Greece—Athens, Hydra, Nafplion, Olympia, Kefalonia We’ll explore the culture and history of Greece through a dozen field trips to archeological sites and museums. We’ll travel to five breath-taking locations around Greece and learn about a beautiful and sophisticated country through its complex past. We’ll read American and Greek writers in translation while you live in Athens, where democracy was born; enjoy the laid-back island life of Hydra; explore the prehistoric sites of the great Myceneans and the medieval castles and monasteries of the Peloponnese; immerse ourselves in the rich history of the island of Kefalonia; and swim in the waters of Ithaca, where Odysseus sailed from for Troy. *Recipient, Academic Federation Award for Excellence in Teaching

LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Americans in Paris

This program examines the rich textual and visual cultures of India with a specific focus on South India. Students will stay in the French colonial sea-side city of Pondicherry, the home of a cosmopolitan and international population. Since India can be overwhelming for the first-time visitor, Pondicherry presents a happy medium, a fact reflected in the city’s urban planning. The French Quarter is European in architecture and urban design, while the Tamil Quarter, like most Indian cities, is busy, crowded and noisy. Activities include field trips to some of the most important and earliest archaeological sites in South India. Many of these monuments are UNESCO world heritage sites.

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Celtic Connections — Ireland, Scotland, Wales & France

The Grand Tour

AUGUST 5 – SEPTEMBER 3, 2014

VICTOR SQUITIERI* (vsquitieri@ucdavis.edu)

JAMES MCELROY (jpmcelroy@ucdavis.edu)

Humanities 180 & 198 United Kingdom, France, Italy

English 138 & 198 Ireland, Scotland , Wales, France This program will introduce students to that Celtic strain—in literature, culture, language, music, and politics—that characterizes four different countries. By visiting and living in all four countries—Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and France—over a four-week period, students will get an opportunity to see, up-close and personal, some of the most stunning landscapes in Europe and to meet some of the most interesting people around: people who love to celebrate their unique Celtic heritage in an assembly of words and music.

JUNE 25 – JULY 23, 2014

This program introduces you to the Grand Tour—a voyage through France and Italy undertaken by young Englishmen and, eventually, women of the 17th and 18th centuries. The Grand Tour was designed to broaden the horizons of elite British youth by introducing them to continental languages and diplomacy, art and architecture, nature, culture and geography—it was, in short, the culmination of an aristocratic education. We start in London and, following in the footsteps of the young men and women of a bygone era, we will make stops in Paris, Mont Blanc, Rome and Pompeii. At each stage of our journey, we will retrace the literary, cultural and artistic itinerary of the young people who took the Grand Tour centuries ago to learn more about the wide, wild world and their own privileged place within it. *Recipient, Academic Federation Award for Excellence in Teaching

Italy and the Birth of Modern Europe JUNE 26 – JULY 25, 2014 JULIANA SCHIESARI (jkschiesari@ucdavis.edu)

Comparative Literature 180S & 198 Italy—Florence The explosion in economics, arts, science, poetry, and politics that occurred in Florence in what we have come to call the Italian Renaissance was unprecedented in the history of Europe. This course will focus on major Renaissance and Florentine figures who emerged from the economic growth and political turmoil that accompanied this cultural transformation: Petrarch and the Petrarchists, Renaissance poetic tradition; Machiavelli, a political theorist; Michelangelo, artist and poet; and Galileo, scientist and writer. Making full use of Florence and its environs, we will read central works of all writers and visit places they lived, including a trip to Machiavelli’s vineyard and inn where he played cards while writing The Prince as an exile from Florence, a special visit to Galileo’s house, where he was under house-arrest, with a night viewing from the Observatory where he worked. We will also visit some other Renaissance cities in the Tuscany vicinity.

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu


LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Oxford — Portal to Fantasy JUNE 28 – JULY 26, 2014 AMY CLARKE (amclarke@ucdavis.edu)

English 163S & 198 United Kingdom—Oxford Ever since Alice fell down the rabbit-hole on the grounds of Christ Church College, Oxford has been at the center of modern fantasy literature. Oxford was home not only to Lewis Carroll, but also to C. S. Lewis, Kenneth Grahame, J. R. R. Tolkien, Diana Wynne Jones, and Philip Pullman. Even J. K. Rowling is rolled up in the Oxford mythos, since the Potter films use many Oxford locations. We will read novels from each author, considering how the “City of Dreaming Spires” has shaped their work. We also question how these fantasies themselves have shaped the modern imagination and why they have become so central to our times.

Scottish Tales

Shakespeare — Live!

JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014

JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014

SCOTT HERRING (srherring@ucdavis.edu)

JOHN BOE* (jdboe@ucdavis.edu)

English 163S & 198 United Kingdom—Edinburgh

English 117 & 198 United Kingdom—London

The supernatural figures largely in Scotland’s literature and culture. Scottish ballads are filled with stories of strange creatures and weird doings. Scottish castles are filled with ghosts and spirits. Witches wander through Shakespeare’s Macbeth and the poetry of Robert Burns. There is a Scottish Frankenstein. Jekyll becomes Hyde. And the devil lurks everywhere. Scottish Tales will study the literature, films, and culture of Scotland, examining its supernatural component from the earliest ballads to contemporary cinema. Set in Edinburgh, one of Europe’s most beautiful cities, the program will include visits to castles, tours of the city, a ghost walk at night, and a field trip to Glasgow. We’ll also spend two nights in the Scottish Highlands and take a cruise on Loch Ness.

This summer in London we will be living the Shakespearean life, enjoying performances of Shakespeare’s plays. During our four-week stay in London, we will read and see five plays (mostly at the Globe Theatre). We will also spend a day in Stratford-upon-Avon, touring the Shakespeare houses. We will watch and discuss video versions of some of the plays we see. We will take a walking tour of Shakespeare-related sites in London’s South Bank, tour the Globe Theatre, and talk with one or more Shakespearean actors/ directors. The class meetings and the plays will take place Monday through Thursday, so weekends will be free to explore London and to travel elsewhere in the British Isles or on the continent. Readings and performances for 2014 will be announced online in the winter. *Recipient, Academic Federation Excellence in Teaching Award

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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ARTS AND VISUAL CULTURE

Art Studio in Paris and the French Riviera

World Cinema & the European Film Festival

JULY 1–29, 2014

JAIMEY FISHER (jrfisher@ucdavis.edu)

GINA WERFEL (gswerfel@ucdavis.edu) & HEARNE PARDEE (whpardee@ucdavis.edu)

Film Studies 125 & 198 France, Switzerland

Art Studio 103B or 105A & 198 France—Paris, French Riviera In this program students will explore the French countryside, architecture and art by drawing and painting on site, in museums, and from live models. We begin the program in a beautiful chateau situated on a sandy beach overlooking the Mediterranean—a landscape that inspired the Impressionists. There will be field trips to Le Cannet, Antibes and Vence—focusing on the works of Matisse, Bonnard and Picasso. We then move to Paris where we will have access to its rich store of painting, sculpture and architecture, visiting museums such as the Louvre, Centre Pompidou and Musee d’Orsay; drawing from works in the museums will be combined with work in the studio and around the city. Students will work on paper or boards with drawing materials and acrylic paints.

JULY 22 – AUGUST 19, 2014

Starting on the French Riviera three miles from Cannes, this program examines contemporary cinema by considering the role of film festivals in producing and distributing films around the world. While studying film festivals and their history, the highlight of our time will be the Locarno Film Festival, set in the lovely lake region of southern Switzerland/ northern Italy (near Lake Como). Perched between Cannes (in the spring) and Venice (in the fall), Locarno’s is the most important festival of the summer. Students will have a full pass to the festival and much of the writing and learning in the course will concern the films at the festival. The class will consider the relationship between conventional national filmmaking and the transnational film festival as well as the relationship between Hollywood film and more independent/smaller scale productions around the world. We will examine a series of contemporary filmmakers whose reputations were established at film festivals, including Pedro Almodovar (Talk to Her), Michael Haneke (Funny Games), Wong Kar Wai (In the Mood for Love) and Lars von Trier (Dogville).

Documentary Filmmaking in Ireland JUNE 22 – JULY 20, 2014 GLENDA DREW (gadrew@ucdavis.edu) & JESSE DREW (jdrew@ucdavis.edu)

“Being able to see a world-famous film festival in such a beautiful country, meeting new friends — this was the best month of my life and an experience I’ll never forget.” — Summer Abroad Alum ’13, World Cinema

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

Cinema and Technocultural Studies 104 & 198 Ireland—Dublin, Belfast, Galway This program will explore the concepts and practices of documentary media production focusing on the use of video and new media tools to illustrate social and cultural issues and promote international understanding. Students will utilize basic video, sound, lighting, and computer software as they develop a short documentary project on Ireland. Completed work will be exhibited publicly and hosted on a Documentary Ireland video website. The class will explore the major centers of Irish culture and geographic beauty, including Belfast, Galway, Cork, Giant’s Causeway and the Cliffs of Moher.


ARTS AND VISUAL CULTURE

Spanish Art JUNE 29 – JULY 26, 2014 CRISTINA MARTINEZ-CARAZO (cmmartinezcarazo@ucdavis.edu)

Spanish 143 & 198 Spain—Burgos This program explores the multiple legacies of Spanish art. The arrival of the Romans, Greeks, Arabs, and Northern Europeans shaped Spain’s highly diverse architecture. The traces of Arab art in Christian monuments are a clear testimony of Spain’s multicultural profile. The works of painters like El Greco, Velázquez, Picasso and Dalí are shaped by their cultural heritage and their extensive travels. Some of the most emblematic manifestations of Spanish culture—flamenco dance and bullfighting—owe their features to this plural past. We will experience Spanish art and culture by visiting the Burgos monasteries and Cathedral, traveling to Salamanca to see the legacy of Spanish Renaissance architecture, to Madrid to visit the Museos del Prado and Reina Sofía, and to Bilbao to explore the Guggenheim museum. We will also enjoy a flamenco show and a bullfight.

Design in Britain — Inside and Outside Museum Walls JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014 TIM MCNEIL (tjmcneil@ucdavis.edu)

Design 187 & 198 United Kingdom—York, Edinburgh, London Britain is steeped in history—it’s the ultimate museum without walls and a record of over one thousand years of influential architecture and design. Starting in the Northern English city of York, this program will travel to Edinburgh in Scotland and cumulate in the capitol city of London. These three very different cities are equidistant from each other and represent a cultural and historical “design slice” through the heart of the British Isles. The program will follow two main tracks: (1) the design of products and multi-sensory experiences for cultural, commercial and public spaces, called “narrative design,” and (2) the history and evolution of modern British design expression, from the iconic Mini Cooper and the mini skirt, to the graphic identity for the London Underground. summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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GLOBAL AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Teaching English as a Global Language in Chile AUGUST 16 – SEPTEMBER 13, 2014 JULIA MENARD-WARWICK (jemwarwick@ucdavis.edu)

Linguistics 180, Linguistics 192, Linguistics 198, Linguistics 105 Chile—Arica Teaching English abroad is a popular career choice for recent college graduates and this program offers the chance to experience this for yourself. We will discuss psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic theories of second language learning while examining the practices, pedagogies, and ideologies of English language teaching in Arica, Chile—a relaxed, inexpensive, off-the-beaten-track beach town at the edge of the Atacama Desert. You will have the opportunity to live in the home of a local family (optional); for the internship component, you will serve as a conversation partner, classroom assistant or tutor for students studying English at a local school or university. Field trips will explore a variety of English classes around Arica and includes a weekend excursion to the nearby Andes.

Costa Rican Communities JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014

Sustainable Ecuador — From the Andes to the Amazon

YVETTE FLORES (ygfloresortiz@ucdavis.edu)

JULY 1–29, 2014

Chicano/a Studies 125S & 198 Costa Rica—San Jose Costa Rica is described as the Switzerland of Central America due to its long democratic history and magnificent terrain. It has emerged as a pioneer of progressive social policies that protect the rights of women and children. In the past decade, it has also become a favorite destination for ecotourism. Less known is its ethnic and racial diversity. The program will explore the impact of transnational migrations on community development and racial/ethnic identity formations. Through instruction and field trips to indigenous, Afro-Caribbean and other immigrant communities, the program will offer an opportunity to study complex identity formations in a global context.

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

STEFANO VARESE (svarese@ucdavis.edu)

Native American Studies 120 & 198 Ecuador—Quito, Amazon Basin This course examines the historical development and current situation of Ecuador’s indigenous peoples, with special emphasis on issues of environmental sustainability. Using lectures, seminar discussions, and fieldwork, the course underscores the impact that economic and political factors have on the process of indigenous cultural adaptation. Students will develop individual research/creative projects and they will have the opportunity to interact with indigenous Amazonian youth with whom they will share knowledge and the community life-style of the tropical rain forest.


Arab-Israeli Relations

JULY 12 – AUGUST 9, 2014

Political Science 136 & 198 Israel—Jerusalem, Tel Aviv

FRANK HIRTZ* (fwhirtz@ucdavis.edu)

Community and Regional Development 153B & 198 Germany & Italy—Freiburg, Treviso This program will expose students to alternatives to the American/Californian model of community development, governance, and citizens’ participation. Based in Freiburg and the northern Italian town of Treviso, students will study the four different types of community governance of Germany, France, Italy and Switzerland, as well as the European Union’s overarching influence. Working in small groups, students will undertake case studies of topical areas of local concern (e.g. environment, youth, city and regional planning, public transport, culture, poverty, local politics, immigration and asylum). * Recipient, ASUCD Excellence in Education Award

JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014

Community Development in the New South Africa

ZEEV MAOZ (zmaoz@ucdavis.edu)

JUNE 22 – JULY 19, 2014

This program focuses on Arab-Israeli relations from World War I to the present. It examines the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, comparing the narratives of the Palestinians, the Arab States, and Israel. We will analyze the relationships among Arabs and Israelis, as well as inter-Arab relations and the relations between the rivals and external powers. Field trips will visit ancient sites and also many of the places in which historical turning points in the peace process have taken place, including Jerusalem, the Golan Heights, Masada, and Eilat. We will also meet a number of Israeli and Palestinian policy makers and activists who will discuss past, present, and future efforts at conflict resolution.

CHRIS BENNER (ccbenner@ucdavis.edu)

Community and Regional Development 153C & 198 South Africa—Durban This course examines processes of community and regional development in the post-apartheid period in South Africa. Based in the multi-cultural city of Durban on the Indian Ocean, this course examines both urban and rural community development challenges and opportunities, with a particular focus on issues of racial justice and sustainability. Developed in collaboration with the Community Development program at the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, the course is very handson. Working closely with local non-governmental organizations and government development initiatives, students will have the opportunity to engage firsthand in development initiatives and with residents of historically disadvantaged communities. The course also includes extended field visits to development projects in and around the iSimangaliso (St. Lucia) Wetlands Park (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), Mkhuze Game Reserve, and the Drakensberg Mountains.

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

GLOBAL AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Community Politics and Development in the European Union

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Italy

UC DAVIS QUARTER ABROAD 2014 Quarter Abroad is unique to the UC Davis campus and offers students a chance to earn UC Davis units while participating in quarter-length programs designed by UC Davis faculty and taught in an international setting. Programs run 10–16 weeks and allow students to earn 12–27 quarter units while doing intensive language training or participating in an international internship.

Japan

Mexico

France

Argentina Australia France Italy Japan Mexico Spain Taiwan UK

Spain

United Kingdom

Australia

Taiwan

Argentina

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu


Spring Quarter 2014 Programs

Fall Quarter 2014 Programs

JAPAN Attend Kyoto Seika University and take multi-level accelerated language and culture courses while exploring the cultural riches that Kyoto and the surrounding regions have to offer.

ARGENTINA Let your adventurous spirit soar in beautiful Mendoza, Argentina. At the Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, take intensive courses in multi-level Spanish language and Latin American culture.

SPAIN The unique spirit of Madrid is both serene and lively, making it a captivating place to study abroad, live, intern, and learn Spanish. Students have the option of the intensive language and culture track or the professional internship track. TAIWAN Study pharmaceutical chemistry at one of the top 20 research institutions in the world. On this specialized program, you’ll explore Taipei, earn UC Davis chemistry units, and participate in optional research internships at Academia Sinica. UNITED KINGDOM Spend spring quarter in the heart of London while you complete a professional internship in the career field of your choice and take two upper division English courses focusing on the rich culture, literature, and history of England—with a special focus this year on filmmaking.

quarterabroad.ucdavis.edu

AUSTRALIA Live, work, travel and study in Sydney, Australia. Complete an intensive internship in the career field of your choice while taking three upper division University Writing Program (UWP) courses. FRANCE Fall in love with Paris while taking accelerated language, literature, and culture courses. Electives include art history, human rights, architecture, and more. ITALY Explore Florence as you take accelerated language, Italian film, and culture courses. Electives include art history, studio art, food science, and more. Optional internships in many fields are also offered. MEXICO Gain a better understanding of your health profession career goals while taking classes on transnational (US-Mexico) health issues. Participate in internships in hospitals and clinics in Oaxaca.

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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GLOBAL AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Housing and Development in Barcelona [CANCELED] JULY 6 – AUGUST 2, 2014 ROB WIENER (rob@calruralhousing.org)

Community and Regional Development 153B & 198 Spain—Barcelona

Sustainable Cities of Northern Europe JULY 5 – AUGUST 4, 2014 JEFF LOUX* (jdloux@ucdavis.edu)

Landscape Architecture 191 & Environmental Science and Policy 173 Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland

The Politics of Global Inequality

This course examines the features, systems and designs for sustainable cities ranging from transit, bike and ped circulation to renewable energy systems to waste management and urban planning and design. Relying on lectures, field trips, guest lectures, bike tours, design and planning problems, and readingthe-city exercises, the course shows what lessons can be taken from Europe back to US cities. We will visit 8-10 cities—large and small—in 4 countries that have demonstrated a commitment and success in becoming more sustainable; this includes looking in depth at various eco-districts and neighborhoods like Vauban, Rieselfeld, Trekonner, Vestra Hamnen, and Hammarby in places like Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, Freiburg and elsewhere. Strong urban planning principles and strong urban design approaches are studied throughout the program.

Political Science 124 & 198 Switzerland—Geneva

*Recipient of the James H. Meyer Distinguished Achievement Award

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This field course examines housing and community development in Spain, with a focus on Barcelona and Catalonia. Through lectures and daily field trips, we will learn about critical housing problems and solutions, current efforts to regenerate older neighborhoods, and integration of the Gypsy population, as well as immigrants from Africa, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. We will study the political, ideological, and cultural factors that inform housing policy and the role state and community organizations have in community development and planning.

SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

JULY 1–31, 2014 JEANNETTE MONEY (jnmoney@ucdavis.edu)

The long-standing division of the global system into richer and poorer regions poses many important problems in international political economy. This course presents a theoretical background to North-South issues and analyzes current problems in economic and political relations. After defining inequality, the course examines the sources of inequality emanating from the international system as well as from domestic political systems. The course also examines specific problems poor countries face, such as agricultural reform, population growth, levels of international trade and foreign direct investment. The course integrates these issues with an exploration of the role that intergovernmental agencies play in facilitating development. We visit organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Trade Organization (WTO), which are headquartered in Geneva and provide many of the prescriptions for development.


HISTORY AND CULTURE

Vienna — Crossroads of Central Europe AUGUST 1–31, 2014 KATHY STUART (kestuart@ucdavis.edu)

History 102S & 198 Austria—Vienna Vienna, one of Europe’s great imperial capitals, is our classroom. A gateway to Eastern Europe, Vienna was the scene of epic battles between Christians and Muslims when Ottoman Turks besieged the city. A musical capital, Vienna was home to Mozart and Beethoven. Sigmund Freud and Gustav Klimt contributed to the birth of “modernity” in Vienna. The city of Adolf Hitler’s youth, Vienna saw the destruction of its flourishing Jewish community during WWII. In the Cold War, Vienna, officially “neutral,” became a headquarters of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency—and a hotbed of international espionage. With the fall of the iron curtain, it is again a meeting point between East and West.

Italian Culture & Institutions JUNE 22 – JULY 19, 2014 JAY GROSSI (jgrossi@ucdavis.edu)

Italian 107S & 198 Italy—Rome Through lecture, discussion, and field trips, we will explore Italian civilization and culture. The emphasis of the course will be on Italian culture, art, and history, especially the Roman contributions to these fields. Rome, the “Eternal City,” will be the classroom for study in this hands-on cultural and educational experience. The course also includes a two-night field trip to the Amalfi coast, where students will visit Pompeii and other sites near the coast. summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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HISTORY AND CULTURE

Berlin Culture Before and After the Wall

Japanese Popular Culture in Tradition

AUGUST 9 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2014

JUNE 21 – JULY 20, 2014

GAIL FINNEY (gefinney@ucdavis.edu)

MIYO UCHIDA (myuchida@ucdavis.edu)

German 118E & 198 Germany—Berlin

Japanese 109 & 198 Japan—Okazaki

The forty-year division of Germany (1949-1989)—into a democratic country with a capitalist economy in the West and a communist economy in the East—represents a unique chapter in world history. The symbol of this arbitrary division of one population and one nation into two is the Berlin Wall and, more broadly, the city of Berlin. This course seeks to explore the political conditions which led to the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961, the twofold circumstances it created, the events that brought about its fall in 1989, and the aftermath of German unification. The course will illustrate the historical and political background of the divided Berlin, as a microcosm of the divided Germany, through literary, cinematic, artistic, and musical works.

This program examines how contemporary Japanese culture has developed from traditional culture. It explores Japanese 20th-century popular culture including film, animation, and comics. The program examines how a culture grows and shifts its focus. It includes field trips to contemporary and historical sites and activities such as Japanese calligraphy, tea ceremony and flower arrangement. The program includes three major fieldtrips to Kyoto, the Ise Shrine and the Toyota auto factory and is designed so that students can taste the essence of Japan within a month. Those who participate should expect a strict Japanese living environment.

Peru — History of the Andean Region JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014 JORDAN LAUHON (jlauhon@ucdavis.edu)

History 162 & 198 Peru—Cuzco This program examines the history of Andean people from pre-Hispanic time to the present. Readings and lectures will be complemented by various trips including a three-day trip to Machu Picchu. Visits to Inca ruins, lectures by leading specialists, and discussions of contemporary Peru will increase students’ understanding of the region and its people. Optional Spanish and Quechua lessons will be available.

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu


HISTORY AND CULTURE

Turkey — Classical & Underwater Archaeology JULY 4 – AUGUST 2, 2014 CAI THORMAN (cthorman@ucdavis.edu)

Classics 101A & 198 or Art History 175 & 198 Turkey—Various Sites With a backdrop of gorgeous beaches, lively resort towns, and the Mediterranean Sea, this program will introduce students to a variety of fascinating archaeological sites found along the western and southern coastlines of Turkey. These include ancient Greek settlements (of Ionia and the Dorian Hexapolis), well-preserved Roman cities (in the imperial provinces of Asia, Lycia and Pamphylia), indigenous kingdoms (Phrygian, Carian, Lycian), as well as sunken cities and shipwrecks. Lectures will cover the history, mythology, religion, and art history of Asia Minor, as well as techniques of terrestrial and underwater excavation. Students will explore over 30 famous archaeological sites, with an endof-course tour of historical Istanbul. The abundance of archaeological material in western Turkey provides an opportunity to study the wide range of archaeological approaches being used today, as well as to ponder controversial interpretations of Classical, Near Eastern, and underwater archaeological discoveries.

Castles and Cathedrals in Northern Britain JULY 7 – AUGUST 3, 2014 KEVIN RODDY (kproddy@ucdavis.edu)

Medieval Studies 130A & 198 United Kingdom—York and Durham Northern England—especially the counties of Durham and Yorkshire—is fortunate to have preserved exceptional fortifications and magnificent cathedrals. The program will begin in York, where we see the cathedral and ancient town walls, and from there we’ll make trips to Barnard Castle, Richmond Castle, Middleham Castle, and Castle Bolton. Next we’ll move to Durham, to live on the Castle grounds; nearby Durham Cathedral is one of the most spectacular structures in England. We’ll make field trips to Hadrian’s Wall, and two of the best excavated Roman fortified camps in Britain, Housesteads and Vindolanda, as well as Alnwick, site of Harry Potter films, and Fountains Abbey. We’ll study the architectural features of these structures that are associated with the complexities of medieval life, culture, and daily routines. Classes and field trips are on a Monday-to-Thursday schedule, allowing for long-weekend explorations of the British Isles and beyond.

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HISTORY AND CULTURE 18

At the Crossroads of Gender and Communication JUNE 21 – JULY 19, 2014

London Burning— Journalism from the Great Fire to the Digital Age

NICHOLAS A. PALOMARES

JUNE 29 – JULY 26, 2014

Communication 103 & 198 United Kingdom—London

SASHA ABRAMSKY (sabramsky@ucdavis.edu)

(napalomares@ucdavis.edu)

The program introduces students to the relationship between gender and communication in a locale with a deep history and culture that is intellectually and experientially stimulating. We will study concepts related to gender and communication, contemplate evidence, and immerse ourselves in our surroundings to gather experiences related to class material. The course will compare and contrast gender and communication in the US with that in the UK. Topics include gender roles in society; language differences; stereotypes; friendships and romantic relationships; leadership; glass ceilings; text messaging, Facebook, and computer-mediated communication; and gendered representations on TV and other media. We will visit the British Museum, National Gallery, Hampton Court, Science Museum, and the Geffrye Museum of the Home (most providing guided tours crafted for the class).

History 102S & 198 United Kingdom—London Students will be taken on a journey through British history, from the Great Fire of London, in 1666, to the Wapping Riots in the 1980s, from the birth of modern journalism to the emergence of our hightech, media-saturated world. Students will use London’s museums, its libraries, its newspaper and electronic media offices, its architecture and its cultural centers to explore seminal moments in modern British history, and ways in which the British story has been shaped by its journalists. From the iconic world of Fleet Street to the Houses of Parliament, from the Museum of London to the Imperial War Museum, participants in this course will utilize London to the fullest. We will explore how the media covered major events, such as the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, Queen Victoria’s accession and Queen Victoria’s death, the terrors visited on the East End by Jack the Ripper, the World Wars of the twentieth century, and the social strife of the Thatcher era; and how that coverage in turn shaped British political discourse and British actions.

SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

Vietnam — Then and Now [CANCELED] AUGUST 16 – SEPTEMBER 13, 2014 ERIC SCHROEDER* (ejschroeder@ucdavis.edu) J. CHUONG H. CHUNG (cchung@ccsf.edu)

Comparative Literature 157 & 198 Vietnam—Hanoi, Saigon This program begins by examining the Vietnam most Americans know—the one synonymous with war. We’ll look at the roots of the war, how it was fought, and how it ended. Next we’ll look at the legacies of the war—the boat people and the rise of Vietnamese-American communities in U.S. cities. Finally, we’ll turn our attention to Viet Nam today—its politics, its culture, and its people. Our journey will begin in Ha Noi, continue to central Viet Nam with a visit to Hue, the ancient imperial capital, and end in Ho Chi Minh City (or Saigon as many still call it), a modern, thriving metropolis. Along the way we’ll use various lenses—history, literature, film, and social science—to study this fascinating country. *Recipient, Academic Federation Excellence in Teaching Award


JUNE 29 – JULY 26, 2014 CHARLES BRENNEMAN (cabrenneman@ucdavis.edu)

“The best decision I’ve made so far in college — a very humbling, thought-provoking, and gratifying experience.” — Summer Abroad Alum ’13, A Taste of China

A Taste of China JUNE 18 – JULY 17, 2014 CHARLES SHOEMAKER (cfshoemaker@ucdavis.edu)

Food Science and Technology 10 & 198 China—Wuxi, Shanghai, & More This program will explore world cultures, science, and health through the eyes of food. Of special interest will be the development of Chinese food culture. In addition to the classroom, the course will consist of visits and local presentations on the historical development of Chinese food production. Students will also be presented with the basic sciences that modern food science uses in its study of food and culture. The course will be located at Jiangnan University, Wuxi. Its School of Food Science & Technology is the #1 food science program in China. Wuxi is located midway between Shanghai and Nanjing and is just south of the Yangtze River. It has a rich history of over 3,000 years and is the birthplace of the Wu culture. Wuxi is also dubbed “little Shanghai” because of its close proximity to the city and its fast urbanization and booming economy.

Viticulture and Enology 3 & 198 France—Dijon This well-known UC Davis course introduces students to winemaking and covers grape types and grape production, the science of fermentation and wine styles, alcohol and health, sensory evaluation, wine history, and the major wine regions of the world. The first half of the course describes the technology of making red and white wines and includes material related to sparkling wine production. The second half of the course covers the geography of wine production with an emphasis on grape varieties used in various regions around the world, processing techniques unique to certain regions and the wine laws that govern production in those areas. We will use the opportunity of being in France to visit many of the major French wine regions, including Alsace, Burgundy, Beaujolais, the northern and southern Rhone, and Provence. These trips will include visits to producers as well as special tastings and meals.

SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Introduction to Winemaking

Ecological and Social Issues in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala JUNE 26 – JULY 24, 2014 ELISKA REJMANKOVA (erejmankova@ucdavis.edu)

Environmental Science and Policy 101 & 155L Guatemala—Lake Atitlan This program brings students to the beautiful Lake Atitlan in the highlands of Guatemala and exposes them to a variety of complex ecological, social and political issues related to the lake and surrounding communities. Lectures and readings for ecology, nature and society will be complemented by several field trips to local communities, various NGO projects, and the University del Valle campus. The hands-on Aquatic and Wetland Ecology class will allow students to gain an understanding of lake-ecosystem processes through several small experiments and observational studies. summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

What’s In Your Water? JUNE 28 – JULY 26, 2014 JEANNIE DARBY* (jdarby@ucdavis.edu)

Civil & Environmental Engineering 148A** & 198 Ireland—Galway This program is based at the National University of Ireland in Galway, the cultural center of the west of Ireland, and provides students with a practical and scientific understanding of water quality. Students will study the principles that can guide sustainable development of water resources. The course is aimed at engineering and science students who wish to improve their understanding of how human activities affect water and to acquire a foundation in environmental engineering. The focus will be on the quantitative aspects of water quality management and public health. Field trips to the Aran Islands, the Burren National Park, water and wastewater treatment plants and other nearby sites of interest as well as guest seminars by Irish scientists and engineers will be included in the program. * Recipient, Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award ** Prerequisite: Chemistry 2B (or consent of instructor)

Sustainable Energy Technologies JUNE 27 – JULY 26, 2014 SANGTAE KIM (chmkim@ucdavis.edu)

Engineering: Materials Science 170 & 198 South Korea—Seoul

“You organized an incredible program that I will never forget about. Without your work, my dreams would never have been accomplished.” — Summer Abroad Alum ‘13

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

On this program we’ll study sustainable energy technologies such as lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells and photovoltaic cells. The program will explore the basic chemical and physical principles of these energy storage and generation systems, as well as scientific, technological and environmental challenges. Field trips are planned to several hi-tech companies and cultural excursions are also planned to historic sites in Seoul and other cities, including UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The program is designed so that students will learn cutting-edge energy technologies as well as the history, traditions and culture of Korea. The program is open to all Engineering, or related, majors.


SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Thailand — Microbiology Lab in the Kingdom of Smiles JULY 4 – AUGUST 1, 2014 GLENN YOUNG (gmyoung@ucdavis.edu)

Food Science and Technology 104L & 198 or Microbiology 101 & 198* Thailand—Bangkok This laboratory program will introduce microbiology to students wishing to explore the enchanting and exotic Kingdom of Thailand. Hand-on activities will complement lecture and laboratory exercises as we explore the microbiology of Thai food, international health issues, and the changing environment. Students will explore microbial diversity from samples they obtain from a variety of places, ranging from open-air night markets and urban canals to pristine jungles and beaches. Knowledge and hands-on experience will be gained about bacteriology, infectious disease, food safety, fermentation, applied science and molecular biology. Excursions will take us through urban and rural locations to examine microbiology at the crossroads of public health, food safety, and the environment. We will travel to Bangkok, to the United Nation’s World Heritage Historic City of Ayutthaya and to the Phuket Island by the Andaman Sea. This program will be hosted at Assumption University, which is among Southeast Asia’s top comprehensive international universities. Upper division laboratory class credit is earned that serves majors in the life sciences, agricultural sciences and preprofessional programs. *Prerequisite: Biological Sciences (BIS) 2A: Introduction to Biology (or equivalent).

Genetics — From Mendel to Genomes AUGUST 16 – SEPTEMBER 13, 2014 MARK SANDERS (mfsanders@ucdavis.edu)

Biological Sciences 101* or Molecular and Cellular Biology 197T & 198 Austria, Czech Republic, United Kingdom Study genetic principles and analysis where Mendel did his ground-breaking work and where Watson and Crick discovered DNA’s structure. The program begins in Vienna, Austria where we will use facilities at the Max Planck Laboratory of the University of Vienna during our first week. Week one includes two day-long excursions into the neighboring Czech Republic to visit and study at the Mendel Museum in Brno and to visit the internationally recognized Centre for Structural and Functional Plant Genomics in Olomouc. From Vienna we travel to the University of Cambridge, living and studying at Clare College where James Watson lived during his time at Cambridge. In Cambridge, research presentations and excursions will expose you to world-class genetics research in a truly unique academic environment. Students who have already taken BIS 101 or a similar genetics course are eligible to apply as tutors: two positions available, courses MCB 197T & MCB 198. Interested students should contact the instructor for more information. Enrollment as a tutor is by consent of instructor. *Prerequisite: BIS 2A, BIS 2B, and either CHE 8A or CHE 118A (cannot be waived)

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Engineering of Historic Roman Construction JUNE 17 – JULY 15, 2014 SASHI KUNNATH (skkunnath@ucdavis.edu) & GIORGIO MONTI (gmonti@ucdavis.edu)

Engineering 104* & Civil and Environmental Engineering 198 Italy—Rome This program is designed for serious students who are fascinated by ancient art and architecture, in general, and the science and engineering of ancient Roman and Etruscan construction in particular. Lectures will focus primarily on concepts in structural mechanics which provide the necessary background for designing buildings and bridges. Field trips complement the lectures so that students can gain an appreciation for simple engineering concepts that have survived the test of time. Field trips are planned to several incredible historic and archeological sites in and outside Rome. A few lectures are currently scheduled outside Rome while most of the course material will be covered in the architectural facility of Valle Giulia, located opposite the public park of Villa Borghese. *Prerequisites: Engineering (ENG) 35. Statics; Mathematics (MAT) 22B. Differential Equations (or equivalent)

UK — Brewing Science JULY 5 – AUGUST 2, 2014 CHARLES BAMFORTH (cwbamforth@ucdavis.edu)

“Sashi is one of the best professors I’ve ever had. I’m so happy that UC Davis has study abroad programs for engineering majors. Everyone needs to study abroad!” — Summer Abroad Alum ’13, Engineering of Historic Roman Construction

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SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu

Food Science and Technology 003 & 198 United Kingdom—Nottingham The brewing of beer is not only humankind’s oldest biotechnology, it is likely the basis of static civilization and also a major factor in the survival of the species. Even if you think that is a tad exaggerated, there is absolutely no doubt that beer represents the most exquisite convergence of diverse sciences (botany, plant physiology, chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, chemical engineering and more) in pursuit of a product that is as complex as it is delightful. Beer has a proud history as a dietary imperative in many societies. This course considers the raw materials of brewing (primarily malt, hops, yeast and water) and how they are processed to produce drinks of consistent excellence. It explores the quality considerations of beer (foam, color, clarity, flavor, healthfulness) and investigates the nature of the global beer business. All this in the heart of England—one of the world’s historic leaders in beer and brewing.


SUMMER ABROAD HEALTH INTERNSHIPS 6 Units • 5 Specialized Programs • 4 Weeks • 3 Continents • 2 Trusted Providers • 1 UC Davis Instructor

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COSTA RICA AND NICARAGUA Global Community and Health, July 5 – August 2 Participants will experience a dual country comparative global health program in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Students will select an emphasis in one of the following areas: veterinary, medical, nursing, education/special education, public health, community service, dental, optometry and pharmacy. INDIA Public Health and Community Medicine in Delhi, July 2 – August 2 This site will focus on learning about public health issues facing India and how local NGO’s are working to improve these public health concerns. Students will be exposed to key public health challenges facing India such as immunizations, environmental sanitation, waste management, safe drinking water practices, and social reforms through education, training and awareness campaigns.

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The summer abroad internship program provides students interested in global health the opportunity to gain hands-on clinical and public health experience while being immersed in a local community for four weeks. Students will earn 6 units of credit from UC Davis as they intern 30-35 hours per week at one of five specialized global health program sites. There will be 24/7 on-site support from our trusted program providers, Child Family Health International (CFHI) and International Service Learning (ISL). The academic course associated with the internship is intended as a forum to connect the work students do at their internship to its broader social and cultural context.  Online discussions will provide a place to reflect on the realities and ethics of health care in the host programs and a community with whom to share those reflections. BOLIVIA Pediatric Health and Adolescent Medicine in La Paz, Bolivia, July 5 – August 2 Participants will rotate through various pediatric clinics and hospitals experiencing firsthand the challenges of providing children services in resource-poor settings while gaining an understanding of the socioeconomic and cultural barriers mothers face in accessing those services for their children. Language Requirement: Minimal Spanish or above.

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INDIA Rural/Urban Himalayan Rotation, July 2 – August 2 Students will have the opportunity to study various diseases in clinical environments that represent the rural and urban healthcare systems in the developing country of India. The program focuses on primary care and public health issues, with an emphasis on the needs of rural communities in India that lack access to healthcare and how this affects urban areas as well. SOUTH AFRICA Healthcare Challenges in Cape Town, July 5 – August 2 Participants learn about the healthcare challenges facing South Africa firsthand, where, under the Apartheid regime, the vast majority of people had limited or non-existent healthcare until the 1990s. Since then, South Africa’s health care system has made great strides under majority rule, especially in its efforts to reach underserved communities.

PROGRAM INSTRUCTOR Dale Flynn (dbflynn@ucdavis.edu) summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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24 GE credit available

SUMMER ABROAD 2014 | summerabroad.ucdavis.edu 7 7 7

Portal to Fantasy — Oxford Scottish Tales Shakespeare-Live! — London

19 8

What’s in Your Water - Ireland Winemaking - France World Cinema - Europe

Page

20

Vietnam—Then and Now

Program

5 18

Travelers in Greece

19 10

Teaching English in Chile

Sustainable Energy - S. Korea Taste of China

10 20

Sustainable Ecuador

9

5

Palaces of the Gods — India

14

4

Narratives — Cuba

Sustainable Cities — Europe

4

Music, Film, Culture — Argentina

Spanish Art — Spain

16 21

15

Italian Culture — Rome Microbiology — Thailand

14

Housing in Barcelona Japanese Popular Culture

6 16

History of Andean Region — Peru

14

Global Inequality — Switzerland Grand Tour — Europe

18 21

Genetics — Mendel

22

Engineering of Roman Construction Gender Comm. — London

8

Design in Britain

19

9

Crossroads — Vienna

Ecology in Guatemala

15

Costa Rican Communities

Documentary Film in Ireland

11 10

Comm. Develop. — South Africa

6 11

Comm. Develop. — E.U.

17

Castles — Northern Britain Celtic Connections — Europe

18

British Journalism — London

16

Berlin Culture

4

6

Birth of Modern Europe — Italy

22

8

Art Studio in Paris

Brewing Science — England

17

Archaeology in Turkey

Brazilian Literature, Culture, Arts

5 11

Arab-Israeli Relations — Israel

Page

Americans in Paris

Program

General Education Courses for UC Davis Students

AH AH

SE SE

SS SS

OL OL

QL QL

SL SL

VL VL

WC WC

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GE credit available for one of two possible courses - confirm in General Catalogue

PLEASE NOTE: GE credits are not available for 198 or 199 courses • Students matriculating before Fall, 2011 should consult former GE requirements • Units may be counted towards the satisfaction of only one Core Literacy and one Topical Breadth Area

AH=Arts and Humanities; SE=Science and Engineering; SS=Social Sciences; OL=Oral Skill; QL=Quantitative; SL=Scientific; VL=Visual; WC=World Cultures; WE= Writing Experience


Course Index

Country Index

Art History..................................................... 17 Art Studio........................................................ 8 Biological Sciences......................................... 21 Biological Sciences: Molecular & Cellular......... 21 Chicana/o Studies.......................................... 10 Cinema & Technocultural Studies........................ 8 Classics......................................................... 17 Communication.............................................. 18 Community & Regional Development........... 11, 14 Comparative Literature.........................4, 5, 6, 18 Design............................................................. 9 Engineering.................................................... 22 Engineering: Civil and Environmental.......... 20, 22 Engineering: Materials Science........................ 20 English..................................................... 5, 6, 7 Environmental Science and Policy................14, 19 Film Studies...................................................... 8 Food Science and Technology............... 19, 21, 22 German......................................................... 16 History............................................... 15, 16, 18 Humanities....................................................... 6 Italian............................................................ 15 Japanese....................................................... 16 Landscape Architecture................................... 14 Linguistics...................................................... 10 Medieval Studies............................................ 17 Microbiology................................................. 21 Middle East/South Asia Studies.......................... 5 Native American Studies................................. 10 Political Science......................................... 11, 14 Portuguese....................................................... 4 Religious Studies............................................... 5 Spanish....................................................... 4, 9 Viticulture and Enology.................................... 19

Argentina........................................................ 4 Australia........................................................ 13 Austria......................................................15, 21 Bolivia........................................................... 23 Brazil.............................................................. 4 Chile............................................................. 10 China............................................................ 19 Costa Rica............................................... 10, 23 Cuba............................................................... 4 Czech Republic.............................................. 21 Denmark........................................................ 14 Ecuador......................................................... 10 France.......................................... 5, 6, 8, 13, 19 Germany............................................ 11, 14, 16 Greece............................................................ 5 Guatemala..................................................... 19 India......................................................... 5, 23 Ireland................................................... 6, 8, 20 Israel............................................................. 11 Italy...........................................6, 11, 13, 15, 22 Japan.......................................................13, 16 Mexico.......................................................... 13 Nicaraqua..................................................... 23 Peru.............................................................. 16 South Africa..............................................11, 23 South Korea................................................... 20 Spain................................................... 9, 13, 14 Sweden......................................................... 14 Switzerland................................................ 8, 14 Taiwan.......................................................... 13 Thailand........................................................ 21 Turkey........................................................... 17 UK (England).......................6, 7, 9, 13, 17, 18, 21 UK (Scotland)............................................6, 7, 9 UK (Wales)...................................................... 6 Vietnam......................................................... 18

The Universit y of California, in accordance with applicable federal and state law and universit y policy, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, physical or mental disabilit y, age, medical condition (cancer-related or genetic characteristics), ancestr y, marital status, citizenship, sexual orientation or status as a covered veteran (special disabled veteran, Vietnam- era veteran or any other veteran who ser ved on active dut y during a war or campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized). The Universit y prohibits sexual harassment. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and treatment in universit y programs and activities. Inquiries regarding the universit y’s student-related nondiscrimination policies may be directed to Student Judicial Affairs Director Don Dudley, (530) 752-1128.

summerabroad.ucdavis.edu | SUMMER ABROAD 2014

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14SA Non Profit Org. US Postage PAID UC Davis Permit #3

UC DAVIS STUDY ABROAD 207 Third Street, Suite 120 Davis, CA 95616 PHONE: (530) 297-4633 studyabroad.ucdavis.edu studyabroad@ucdavis.edu

Enrollment Deadline: April 4, 2014 Open to students at all UC campuses


UC Davis Summer Abroad 2014