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Annual Review UNCOVER

2013/14

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22,000

Estimated attendance at carol services

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Why are Christians so Old-Fashioned About Sex? Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

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31,000

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Living for Jesus, speaking for Jesus

About Us

Contents

UCCF: The Christian Unions is a family of students, staff and supporters. We are passionate about student mission and we are, together, giving every student in Great Britain an opportunity to hear about Jesus.

Strategy Mission

Making disciples of Jesus Christ in the student world.

Vision

To give every student in Great Britain an opportunity to hear and respond to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Values

Confident in the truth: understanding, celebrating and defending the truth of the gospel. Urgent in evangelism: creative, engaging and persuasive proclamation of Christ crucified. Passionate about unity: gathering and uniting all Christians around the essential truths of the gospel. Committed to the local church: believing it is the primary and lifelong place of Christian ministry and discipleship. Motivated by grace: rejoicing in our salvation, serving one another and loving the lost. Generous in world mission: endeavouring to give and send so as to reach the students of the world.

Christian Unions: living for Jesus and speaking for Jesus – Christian Unions are missional communities functioning within the heart of university and college campuses in Great Britain. Led by students: students are best placed to reach other students for Christ – giving maximum integrity with university authorities, maximum creativity and maximum opportunities for evangelism. Together in the gospel: bringing together Christians of all backgrounds and uniting around the core truths of the gospel.

4

Director's Message

6

Reaching Students

CICCU Mission 2013 CU carol services 110 mission weeks

18

Developing Leaders

Essential training for CU leaders Today's students, tomorrow's leaders

24

Resourcing Evangelism

Reaching students, resourcing churches Uncover training days Maximise passion for life with Uncover

32

Going to the World

Reaching the world - short term mission Reaching the world - long term vision

38

Looking Forward

New Bethinking website

42

Investing in Mission

Finances 46 Research


Living for Jesus, speaking for Jesus

About Us

Contents

UCCF: The Christian Unions is a family of students, staff and supporters. We are passionate about student mission and we are, together, giving every student in Great Britain an opportunity to hear about Jesus.

Strategy Mission

Making disciples of Jesus Christ in the student world.

Vision

To give every student in Great Britain an opportunity to hear and respond to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Values

Confident in the truth: understanding, celebrating and defending the truth of the gospel. Urgent in evangelism: creative, engaging and persuasive proclamation of Christ crucified. Passionate about unity: gathering and uniting all Christians around the essential truths of the gospel. Committed to the local church: believing it is the primary and lifelong place of Christian ministry and discipleship. Motivated by grace: rejoicing in our salvation, serving one another and loving the lost. Generous in world mission: endeavouring to give and send so as to reach the students of the world.

Christian Unions: living for Jesus and speaking for Jesus – Christian Unions are missional communities functioning within the heart of university and college campuses in Great Britain. Led by students: students are best placed to reach other students for Christ – giving maximum integrity with university authorities, maximum creativity and maximum opportunities for evangelism. Together in the gospel: bringing together Christians of all backgrounds and uniting around the core truths of the gospel.

4

Director's Message

6

Reaching Students

CICCU Mission 2013 CU carol services 110 mission weeks

18

Developing Leaders

Essential training for CU leaders Today's students, tomorrow's leaders

24

Resourcing Evangelism

Reaching students, resourcing churches Uncover training days Maximise passion for life with Uncover

32

Going to the World

Reaching the world - short term mission Reaching the world - long term vision

38

Looking Forward

New Bethinking website

42

Investing in Mission

Finances 46 Research


Director’s Message Over the past thirty years, people’s view of atheism has shifted from seeing it as being fringe, extreme, and morally suspect. Now, secular, atheistic ideology seems to be at the heart of the British establishment. No one today bats an eyelid that the leaders of two of our main political parties are atheists. Michael Foot, leader of the Labour Party in the early 80s, was seen to be brave and principled, even foolish, for not disguising or tempering his atheistic beliefs. This can’t be waived off with the suggestion that this was simply because ‘everyone used to be Christian’ – even the ruthless sceptic Voltaire admitted, ‘I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God, because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. ... If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him.’ While many find the New Atheists (Dawkins, Miller, Grayling, et al) a tad angry and awkward in their style of presentation, their application of evolutionary biology to religion and ethics is mainstream. Moreover, it is now Christianity which is held to have the extreme, edgy and morally suspect worldview. Christianity is variously accused by aspects of the establishment of being totalising, judgmental, homophobic and threatening to the harmony of our secular state. Christians who wear crosses to work or who publicly express the historic, biblical view on homosexuality, may find themselves arrested by the police or dragged in front of employment tribunals.

4

Aberystwyth CU lunchbar

Things are so bad - they are good Christianity is increasingly portrayed as a threat to the secular vision for a progressive society. A society that embraces gay marriage and shuns faith schools and prayers in civic government must surely be seeking to leave Christianity by the wayside. Within this secular landscape, UCCF staff and students have noticed increasing numbers of unbelieving students coming to lunchbars and carol services. Could it be that Christianity has already gained a radical notoriety? A bunch of ordinary Christians living in hall who, in most respects, seem normal yet insist that Jesus is the only way to God and believe that monogamous, heterosexual marriage is the only legitimate context for sexual activity. Now that the secular student radicals of the 60s have managed to make society in their own image and, like poachers turned gamekeepers, find themselves forming the establishment, it would seem that this current generation of Christian students are the new radicals on campus. Could this be part of the explanation as to why CUs have recently made more of an impression on secular Student Unions (see page 7) and have seen record numbers of students willing to read the Bible oneto-one come along to lunchbars, carol services and missions (see pages 6-17)?

Strathclyde CU lunchbar

It is apparent that secular atheism has over-reached itself and students are beginning to regard its dogmas and attitudes as humourless, lazy and brittle, leaving this current student generation hungry for an authentic alternative. And maybe it is in the Christian Union community that they see students who are unafraid to be counter-cultural in their beliefs and lifestyle. I have reflected on this for some time now and believe, as Os Guinness often says, that 'things are so bad in our post-Christian culture they are good.' Now is an exciting time to be part of the CU witness on our secular campuses. Most students coming up to university have never attended church or had a Christian friend at school and yet find themselves confronted by a vibrant community of Christian peers living and speaking for Jesus. CUs will always be denounced as ‘the God squad’, but increasing numbers of individuals are re-thinking their nominal secularism – school leavers are now so secular that when they start reading Luke’s Gospel they find Jesus and his claims shocking and revolutionary and, at the same time, compellingly attractive. This is not a new position for God’s people to find themselves in. In the first century, Christians were seen to be extreme and disruptive for refusing to worship Caesar and the Roman pantheon. And yet, for all the accusations of being rebels and a disruptive influence on society, the Christians had a positive impact. AN Wilson was first attracted to Christianity at school when he read a book describing how first

century Christians regularly adopted abandoned babies (the fruit of Roman debauchery) and brought them up as their own. When society goes dark even the smallest candle burns brightly. We are so grateful to the Lord for your prayerful support of this work over many long years. It is arguably more uncomfortable now to be a visible Christian on campus than at any point in the past thirty years, and yet the opportunities seem to be growing. Fewer students are rejecting Christianity as part of their refutation of the old-order establishment, simply because Christianity itself is now so revolutionary. This year has been a remarkable testimony to the radical attractiveness of Jesus with record numbers of missions and over 50,000 students attending carol services and missions, many of whom have been invited to study Luke’s Gospel by a Christian friend, and many others have become followers of Jesus this year. It is a huge privilege for me to be partnering with the UCCF family of students, staff and supporters at this strange, hostile and yet wonderfully opportune moment in time. Thank you for praying faithfully, giving generously and encouraging young people to join the CU witness – let’s pray that this coming year will be, by God’s mercy, just as fruitful.

5


Director’s Message Over the past thirty years, people’s view of atheism has shifted from seeing it as being fringe, extreme, and morally suspect. Now, secular, atheistic ideology seems to be at the heart of the British establishment. No one today bats an eyelid that the leaders of two of our main political parties are atheists. Michael Foot, leader of the Labour Party in the early 80s, was seen to be brave and principled, even foolish, for not disguising or tempering his atheistic beliefs. This can’t be waived off with the suggestion that this was simply because ‘everyone used to be Christian’ – even the ruthless sceptic Voltaire admitted, ‘I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God, because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. ... If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him.’ While many find the New Atheists (Dawkins, Miller, Grayling, et al) a tad angry and awkward in their style of presentation, their application of evolutionary biology to religion and ethics is mainstream. Moreover, it is now Christianity which is held to have the extreme, edgy and morally suspect worldview. Christianity is variously accused by aspects of the establishment of being totalising, judgmental, homophobic and threatening to the harmony of our secular state. Christians who wear crosses to work or who publicly express the historic, biblical view on homosexuality, may find themselves arrested by the police or dragged in front of employment tribunals.

4

Aberystwyth CU lunchbar

Things are so bad - they are good Christianity is increasingly portrayed as a threat to the secular vision for a progressive society. A society that embraces gay marriage and shuns faith schools and prayers in civic government must surely be seeking to leave Christianity by the wayside. Within this secular landscape, UCCF staff and students have noticed increasing numbers of unbelieving students coming to lunchbars and carol services. Could it be that Christianity has already gained a radical notoriety? A bunch of ordinary Christians living in hall who, in most respects, seem normal yet insist that Jesus is the only way to God and believe that monogamous, heterosexual marriage is the only legitimate context for sexual activity. Now that the secular student radicals of the 60s have managed to make society in their own image and, like poachers turned gamekeepers, find themselves forming the establishment, it would seem that this current generation of Christian students are the new radicals on campus. Could this be part of the explanation as to why CUs have recently made more of an impression on secular Student Unions (see page 7) and have seen record numbers of students willing to read the Bible oneto-one come along to lunchbars, carol services and missions (see pages 6-17)?

Strathclyde CU lunchbar

It is apparent that secular atheism has over-reached itself and students are beginning to regard its dogmas and attitudes as humourless, lazy and brittle, leaving this current student generation hungry for an authentic alternative. And maybe it is in the Christian Union community that they see students who are unafraid to be counter-cultural in their beliefs and lifestyle. I have reflected on this for some time now and believe, as Os Guinness often says, that 'things are so bad in our post-Christian culture they are good.' Now is an exciting time to be part of the CU witness on our secular campuses. Most students coming up to university have never attended church or had a Christian friend at school and yet find themselves confronted by a vibrant community of Christian peers living and speaking for Jesus. CUs will always be denounced as ‘the God squad’, but increasing numbers of individuals are re-thinking their nominal secularism – school leavers are now so secular that when they start reading Luke’s Gospel they find Jesus and his claims shocking and revolutionary and, at the same time, compellingly attractive. This is not a new position for God’s people to find themselves in. In the first century, Christians were seen to be extreme and disruptive for refusing to worship Caesar and the Roman pantheon. And yet, for all the accusations of being rebels and a disruptive influence on society, the Christians had a positive impact. AN Wilson was first attracted to Christianity at school when he read a book describing how first

century Christians regularly adopted abandoned babies (the fruit of Roman debauchery) and brought them up as their own. When society goes dark even the smallest candle burns brightly. We are so grateful to the Lord for your prayerful support of this work over many long years. It is arguably more uncomfortable now to be a visible Christian on campus than at any point in the past thirty years, and yet the opportunities seem to be growing. Fewer students are rejecting Christianity as part of their refutation of the old-order establishment, simply because Christianity itself is now so revolutionary. This year has been a remarkable testimony to the radical attractiveness of Jesus with record numbers of missions and over 50,000 students attending carol services and missions, many of whom have been invited to study Luke’s Gospel by a Christian friend, and many others have become followers of Jesus this year. It is a huge privilege for me to be partnering with the UCCF family of students, staff and supporters at this strange, hostile and yet wonderfully opportune moment in time. Thank you for praying faithfully, giving generously and encouraging young people to join the CU witness – let’s pray that this coming year will be, by God’s mercy, just as fruitful.

5


Reaching Students

3,000

Students at lunchtime talks

Biggest mission week Cambridge

4,750

Total students

Adrian Holloway, Evangelist, Christ Church London

14,000

CU growth in 2012

>

Small group events

Students at evening events

‘I’m not aware of any other evangelistic initiative whereby 240 un-churched people will respond during one week’

STUDENTS' UNION

110

mission weeks

42% have grown 47% stayed the same

Students at main evening events

1

16,000

Students at lunchtime talks

2

1,600

3

At other events

34

>

>

11%

Students' Union Library

250

1,500

FREE LUNCH & TALK! >

CUs nominated for Students' Union awards

31,000

Estimated mission week attendance

6

7


Reaching Students

3,000

Students at lunchtime talks

Biggest mission week Cambridge

4,750

Total students

Adrian Holloway, Evangelist, Christ Church London

14,000

CU growth in 2012

>

Small group events

Students at evening events

‘I’m not aware of any other evangelistic initiative whereby 240 un-churched people will respond during one week’

STUDENTS' UNION

110

mission weeks

42% have grown 47% stayed the same

Students at main evening events

1

16,000

Students at lunchtime talks

2

1,600

3

At other events

34

>

>

11%

Students' Union Library

250

1,500

FREE LUNCH & TALK! >

CUs nominated for Students' Union awards

31,000

Estimated mission week attendance

6

7


31,000 Students Attend Mission Events This year’s largest mission week was run by Cambridge Inter-Collegiate Christian Union (CICCU). CICCU events week – What Kind Of God? – attracted over 4,750 undergraduate students at its lunchtime and evening events. Dave Gobbett, Associate Pastor of Eden Baptist Church in Cambridge and former CICCU President (1997–98), talks about his experience as a CU guest at this year’s event.

CICCU Mission 2013 Richard Cunningham (Director of UCCF: The Christian Unions) spoke at the university mission in my first year as an undergraduate in Cambridge seventeen years ago and the student evangelism bug caught back then hasn’t left me since. So it was especially thrilling to see him welcomed back by the CICCU to speak at their What Kind of God? mission event from 4th–8th February 2013, alongside Os Guinness (respected author and social critic).

from Bill as to the gospel roots of jazz. The climax was a powerful talk by Richard, continuing the theme of slavery and freedom. Graham Shearer (UCCF Central Team Leader) commented on this more holistic approach to the mission: ‘The main event was shaped by a desire to address students as whole, integrated people, just like Jesus does in the gospels. Os Guinness' talks dealt with the most profound questions human beings can ask; Richard demonstrated from John's Gospel that only Jesus meets our deepest longings and most pressing needs. The inclusion of high-quality jazz from Bill Edgar and his musicians came right under the guard and touched students in a deep and profound way.’

Preparing the ground

As with many Christian Unions around the country, the university was introduced to the mission speaker before Christmas when nearly two thousand students heard Richard speak across the two CICCU carol services at Great St Mary’s Church. All of this – undergirded by many months of prayer and planning – focussed attention on the launch of the CICCU triennial mission.

The main event

Over the course of five days, in St Andrew the Great Church in the heart of Cambridge, Os Guinness gave apologetics talks (with Q&A) at lunchtimes, and Richard Cunningham gave evangelistic expositions from John’s Gospel in the evenings. Furthermore, each night the events were enriched with live music from a stunning jazz trio lead by Bill Edgar (Professor of Apologetics at Westminster Theological Seminary and world-class jazz pianist). The first evening saw the trio take centre stage with a longer sequence of heartrending songs interspersed by brief explanations

8

Social critic Os Guinness addresses Cambridge students

CICCU mission: What Kind of God?

9


31,000 Students Attend Mission Events This year’s largest mission week was run by Cambridge Inter-Collegiate Christian Union (CICCU). CICCU events week – What Kind Of God? – attracted over 4,750 undergraduate students at its lunchtime and evening events. Dave Gobbett, Associate Pastor of Eden Baptist Church in Cambridge and former CICCU President (1997–98), talks about his experience as a CU guest at this year’s event.

CICCU Mission 2013 Richard Cunningham (Director of UCCF: The Christian Unions) spoke at the university mission in my first year as an undergraduate in Cambridge seventeen years ago and the student evangelism bug caught back then hasn’t left me since. So it was especially thrilling to see him welcomed back by the CICCU to speak at their What Kind of God? mission event from 4th–8th February 2013, alongside Os Guinness (respected author and social critic).

from Bill as to the gospel roots of jazz. The climax was a powerful talk by Richard, continuing the theme of slavery and freedom. Graham Shearer (UCCF Central Team Leader) commented on this more holistic approach to the mission: ‘The main event was shaped by a desire to address students as whole, integrated people, just like Jesus does in the gospels. Os Guinness' talks dealt with the most profound questions human beings can ask; Richard demonstrated from John's Gospel that only Jesus meets our deepest longings and most pressing needs. The inclusion of high-quality jazz from Bill Edgar and his musicians came right under the guard and touched students in a deep and profound way.’

Preparing the ground

As with many Christian Unions around the country, the university was introduced to the mission speaker before Christmas when nearly two thousand students heard Richard speak across the two CICCU carol services at Great St Mary’s Church. All of this – undergirded by many months of prayer and planning – focussed attention on the launch of the CICCU triennial mission.

The main event

Over the course of five days, in St Andrew the Great Church in the heart of Cambridge, Os Guinness gave apologetics talks (with Q&A) at lunchtimes, and Richard Cunningham gave evangelistic expositions from John’s Gospel in the evenings. Furthermore, each night the events were enriched with live music from a stunning jazz trio lead by Bill Edgar (Professor of Apologetics at Westminster Theological Seminary and world-class jazz pianist). The first evening saw the trio take centre stage with a longer sequence of heartrending songs interspersed by brief explanations

8

Social critic Os Guinness addresses Cambridge students

CICCU mission: What Kind of God?

9


Part of something bigger

What was so distinctive about the lunchtime apologetics talks was the modesty of their aim. Os was committed to slowing the conversation down, working hard to take each student with him, and encouraging his listeners to take the next step in their quest for truth. The vast majority of today’s students are miles away from a Christian worldview, meaning that just getting someone to stop and ask some of life’s big questions is a cause for celebration. And so, like an experienced rugby player, rather than attempting to score an unlikely try whenever he got the ball, Os’ primary concern was simply to advance the game line. Over the course of the week, more and more ground was gained, as students were urged to make ‘Time for Questions’, ‘Time for Answers’, ‘Time for Evidences’ and ‘Time for Choices’. As Socrates famously said, ‘The unexamined life is not worth living.’ It was wonderful even to hear that unbelieving students were inviting their own unbelieving friends to join the discussion. The lunchtime talks were predicated on the conviction that they were just one part of something bigger, under God’s sovereignty. The background was year-round friendship evangelism – witness through life and lip – and in the foreground were Richard Cunningham’s powerful evening talks from John. Combining gripping exposition, vivid illustrations, and urgent appeal, this was gospel preaching at its finest. A number of students asked Richard for booklets at the end of his talks and indicated that they wanted to become Christians. Many others stayed around and chatted and signed up for the Just Looking follow-up course. Mark Lewis, outgoing CICCU President, added: ‘It was great to have a rich and varied programme each evening, with jazz, interviews and dramatic readings, and a clear and passionate presentation of Jesus right at the heart. The gospel was explained straightforwardly in a welcoming and warm environment with hot drinks and cake following each evening event – delicious!’

Students intrigued to find out more

The What Kind of God? mission has been a huge encouragement to many members of the CICCU. Students were emboldened throughout the week by the truth, beauty and power of the gospel, and thrilled at seeing so many of their friends engage with Jesus: ‘The lunchtime talks were so easy to invite people to because they were just so accessible. Free food, a really stimulating talk from Os, heaps of time to ask him questions and all over in fifty minutes. People became really keen to find out what all the hype was about!’ ‘I really enjoyed the opportunity to stretch out in evangelism and share Jesus with others. The whole week made me more aware of how wonderful it is to know the living God.’

The work continues

Of course, the follow-up to such an event is vital. Charlie Butler (UCCF Staff Worker for Cambridge University) commented: ‘One of the best things about the week was how it prompted many people to begin thinking about Jesus. Christians have been following up on initial conversations with friends in all sorts of different ways – bringing them to the CU's weekly apologetics talks, reading and discussing passages from John's Gospel together, and inviting them to Just Looking, a five week course to investigate Christianity in a bit more detail. We've been encouraged to see around thirty non-Christian guests at the course so far, and it's growing each week!’

Partnership with churches

Students from at least nine different churches in Cambridge were involved in the mission, with many of these churches participating in the project in all sorts of ways: hosting, planning, sending people to give training seminars at the pre-term CICCU house party, changing their weekly schedule to accommodate the week, running evangelism training days in their churches, sending people to assist as CU guests and organising additional follow-up courses. Russell Winfield, Senior Student Pastor at Holy Trinity Church, observed, ‘This year’s mission was a wonderful event from beginning to end. Many students were able to invite their friends to consider the claims of Christianity, as both Os and Richard expounded the truth in compelling ways, sparking conversations that otherwise may not have happened. Students working together from many different churches is proving to be a fantastic witness to the message of Jesus Christ.’ Alasdair Paine, Vicar of St Andrew the Great Church, added, ‘Praise God for the CICCU, with students working so hard for their friends to hear the gospel.’ These are indeed exciting days.

Jazz band with talk

This article first appeared in the February edition of Evangelicals Now (www.e-n.org.uk).

Dave Gobbett Associate Pastor Eden Baptist Church, Cambridge CICCU President (1997–98)

Richard Cunningham speaking at the evening meeting 10

11


Part of something bigger

What was so distinctive about the lunchtime apologetics talks was the modesty of their aim. Os was committed to slowing the conversation down, working hard to take each student with him, and encouraging his listeners to take the next step in their quest for truth. The vast majority of today’s students are miles away from a Christian worldview, meaning that just getting someone to stop and ask some of life’s big questions is a cause for celebration. And so, like an experienced rugby player, rather than attempting to score an unlikely try whenever he got the ball, Os’ primary concern was simply to advance the game line. Over the course of the week, more and more ground was gained, as students were urged to make ‘Time for Questions’, ‘Time for Answers’, ‘Time for Evidences’ and ‘Time for Choices’. As Socrates famously said, ‘The unexamined life is not worth living.’ It was wonderful even to hear that unbelieving students were inviting their own unbelieving friends to join the discussion. The lunchtime talks were predicated on the conviction that they were just one part of something bigger, under God’s sovereignty. The background was year-round friendship evangelism – witness through life and lip – and in the foreground were Richard Cunningham’s powerful evening talks from John. Combining gripping exposition, vivid illustrations, and urgent appeal, this was gospel preaching at its finest. A number of students asked Richard for booklets at the end of his talks and indicated that they wanted to become Christians. Many others stayed around and chatted and signed up for the Just Looking follow-up course. Mark Lewis, outgoing CICCU President, added: ‘It was great to have a rich and varied programme each evening, with jazz, interviews and dramatic readings, and a clear and passionate presentation of Jesus right at the heart. The gospel was explained straightforwardly in a welcoming and warm environment with hot drinks and cake following each evening event – delicious!’

Students intrigued to find out more

The What Kind of God? mission has been a huge encouragement to many members of the CICCU. Students were emboldened throughout the week by the truth, beauty and power of the gospel, and thrilled at seeing so many of their friends engage with Jesus: ‘The lunchtime talks were so easy to invite people to because they were just so accessible. Free food, a really stimulating talk from Os, heaps of time to ask him questions and all over in fifty minutes. People became really keen to find out what all the hype was about!’ ‘I really enjoyed the opportunity to stretch out in evangelism and share Jesus with others. The whole week made me more aware of how wonderful it is to know the living God.’

The work continues

Of course, the follow-up to such an event is vital. Charlie Butler (UCCF Staff Worker for Cambridge University) commented: ‘One of the best things about the week was how it prompted many people to begin thinking about Jesus. Christians have been following up on initial conversations with friends in all sorts of different ways – bringing them to the CU's weekly apologetics talks, reading and discussing passages from John's Gospel together, and inviting them to Just Looking, a five week course to investigate Christianity in a bit more detail. We've been encouraged to see around thirty non-Christian guests at the course so far, and it's growing each week!’

Partnership with churches

Students from at least nine different churches in Cambridge were involved in the mission, with many of these churches participating in the project in all sorts of ways: hosting, planning, sending people to give training seminars at the pre-term CICCU house party, changing their weekly schedule to accommodate the week, running evangelism training days in their churches, sending people to assist as CU guests and organising additional follow-up courses. Russell Winfield, Senior Student Pastor at Holy Trinity Church, observed, ‘This year’s mission was a wonderful event from beginning to end. Many students were able to invite their friends to consider the claims of Christianity, as both Os and Richard expounded the truth in compelling ways, sparking conversations that otherwise may not have happened. Students working together from many different churches is proving to be a fantastic witness to the message of Jesus Christ.’ Alasdair Paine, Vicar of St Andrew the Great Church, added, ‘Praise God for the CICCU, with students working so hard for their friends to hear the gospel.’ These are indeed exciting days.

Jazz band with talk

This article first appeared in the February edition of Evangelicals Now (www.e-n.org.uk).

Dave Gobbett Associate Pastor Eden Baptist Church, Cambridge CICCU President (1997–98)

Richard Cunningham speaking at the evening meeting 10

11


22,000

Over 22,000 Students Attend CU Carol Services An estimated 22,000 students across seventyfour university campuses attended a Christian Union carol service in 2012, the biggest of which – Durham – drew over 3,000 attendees. Evangelist Michael Ots, was the speaker at the Durham Inter-Collegiate Christian Union (DICCU) carol service. He commented, ‘It was awesome to see over 3,000 people packing every corner of the cathedral to hear about Jesus. It’s not unusual for [carol-service] attendance to be at least four times that of the CU. In Durham it was ten times! Student carol services are probably the most effective events of the whole year.’ Adrian Holloway, evangelist and minister at Christ Church London, talks about his experience of CU carol services in 2012. ‘It has been a privilege to speak to thousands of students over the past three years at CU carol services. At some of these we have asked everyone to write something on a feedback form which has tick boxes, one of which says, 'I am not part of any church or Christian Union'. At Birmingham University CU Carol Service, eighty eight people who said they are not part of any church/CU said they prayed the response prayer. Eighty three people who said they are not part of any church/CU prayed the response prayer at

Uncover Christmas gift Gospels

Norwich Cathedral for the UEA carol service, and then eighty six people who said they were not part of any church/CU prayed the response prayer at Christ Church, Clifton in Bristol. I’m not aware of any other evangelistic initiative whereby 240 un-churched people will respond during one week and leave their contact details. There are two encouraging features I can report. The first is huge numbers of non-Christians attending CU carol services. Several such events I have spoken at have been attended by 1,000 people, and in one case by 2,500 people. This shows that there are hundreds of students who will say yes to an invitation. The second feature is that when they do hear the gospel in this context they are willing to respond positively and even leave their contact details. And so once again we find that if people hear the gospel in the right context they are willing to respond. It is not that people have heard the gospel and rejected it. It is that they have never heard it, and if they do hear the gospel, a surprisingly large number are ready to respond positively straight away.’

'It has been a privilege to speak to thousands of students over the past three years at CU carol services. At some of these we have asked everyone to write something on a feedback form which has tick boxes, one of which says, 'I am not part of any church or Christian Union'.

estimated attendance at carol services

3,000

biggest carol service, at Durham University

Durham carol service

12

13


22,000

Over 22,000 Students Attend CU Carol Services An estimated 22,000 students across seventyfour university campuses attended a Christian Union carol service in 2012, the biggest of which – Durham – drew over 3,000 attendees. Evangelist Michael Ots, was the speaker at the Durham Inter-Collegiate Christian Union (DICCU) carol service. He commented, ‘It was awesome to see over 3,000 people packing every corner of the cathedral to hear about Jesus. It’s not unusual for [carol-service] attendance to be at least four times that of the CU. In Durham it was ten times! Student carol services are probably the most effective events of the whole year.’ Adrian Holloway, evangelist and minister at Christ Church London, talks about his experience of CU carol services in 2012. ‘It has been a privilege to speak to thousands of students over the past three years at CU carol services. At some of these we have asked everyone to write something on a feedback form which has tick boxes, one of which says, 'I am not part of any church or Christian Union'. At Birmingham University CU Carol Service, eighty eight people who said they are not part of any church/CU said they prayed the response prayer. Eighty three people who said they are not part of any church/CU prayed the response prayer at

Uncover Christmas gift Gospels

Norwich Cathedral for the UEA carol service, and then eighty six people who said they were not part of any church/CU prayed the response prayer at Christ Church, Clifton in Bristol. I’m not aware of any other evangelistic initiative whereby 240 un-churched people will respond during one week and leave their contact details. There are two encouraging features I can report. The first is huge numbers of non-Christians attending CU carol services. Several such events I have spoken at have been attended by 1,000 people, and in one case by 2,500 people. This shows that there are hundreds of students who will say yes to an invitation. The second feature is that when they do hear the gospel in this context they are willing to respond positively and even leave their contact details. And so once again we find that if people hear the gospel in the right context they are willing to respond. It is not that people have heard the gospel and rejected it. It is that they have never heard it, and if they do hear the gospel, a surprisingly large number are ready to respond positively straight away.’

'It has been a privilege to speak to thousands of students over the past three years at CU carol services. At some of these we have asked everyone to write something on a feedback form which has tick boxes, one of which says, 'I am not part of any church or Christian Union'.

estimated attendance at carol services

3,000

biggest carol service, at Durham University

Durham carol service

12

13


He felt God drawing him closer

I could feel it all just slowly clicking together

During Manchester CU’s Uncover mission week I asked my friend Scott if he'd like to come to an acoustic cafe (in hope rather than expectation) the CU were running and he said yes. He came along to every evening event that week and loved it. He felt really welcomed and by the end of the week he'd talked to most people from our CU. He liked the talks too, finding the way they presented Christianity interesting, and he appreciated being encouraged to look into the evidence for Jesus himself.

My journey began by going to a Christian Union film night. On the walk home, the CU people were having a discussion about Christianity and it ended with one friend giving a personal prayer to another. This was the first time I had witnessed such a thing and it showed me how much this person truly believed God was there.

He gave his life to Jesus on the Tuesday night. He signed up to the follow-up course too, which he's enjoyed so far, and has got involved in a church. It's encouraged me so much that events like these work and our friends can be the ones who get saved off the back of them.

James Birchenough International Co-ordinator, Manchester CU

There was something unsettling me and from then on I knew I had to look into it. I asked a friend for one of the Uncover [Seeker Bible Studies] booklets. Whenever I read it I immediately felt happier, which I didn't quite understand. I then went to the CU Christmas carol service where I realised I really wanted to give this all a go, so I took the Uncover [Gospel] about Jesus' life. Through reading this, being invited to different churches and going to CU, I started praying to God. After reading a chapter of the Uncover book I felt as if [God] was speaking to me. I felt as if I was being guided. I went to the big Friday event of the mission week [called] Love Is..., and when the speaker started talking I could feel it all just slowly clicking together and I realised that Jesus is real. I just started crying, and as the speaker carried on speaking, I started realising everything about Jesus and how much He has done for me. Afterwards, I just felt amazing and so thankful. A lot of things the CU has done, big and small, have truly helped me find God.

Today I became a Christian There are a group of textiles students in Loughborough CU who have been meeting regularly all year and praying for their course mates by name. A number of them came to lunchbars throughout events week and started to read Uncover. Caroline was one who they never imagined would become a Christian. She was the first of four. Caroline was interested in the lame man of Luke 5, knowing that she herself needed forgiveness. On Thursday evening she heard a powerful testimony on the extent of God's forgiveness. By the end of the talk she was in tears, turned to her Christian friends, and said, ‘I'm ready’.

caption

Fiona was next in the department to come to faith. She lives with the CU prayer secretary and read Uncover with her. Obie was third, publically declaring her faith on Facebook, 'I wanted to say that today I became a Christian. It's thanks to the love and encouragement of the people of CU, events week and God's grace.' The fourth – and hopefully not the final – textiles student to come to come to faith was Hannah. She is the only one from a Christian home (her parents must be delighted). She came to a few events during the mission week, and then to a gospel talk at CU where she heard Caroline and Obie give their testimonies. After the meeting she prayed with the textiles students and became a Christian.

Mathew Fox-Lilley CU Staff Worker, Loughborough

Clareece Kerby Maths student, University of Surrey 14

Leicester CU carol service

Leeds CU carol service

15


He felt God drawing him closer

I could feel it all just slowly clicking together

During Manchester CU’s Uncover mission week I asked my friend Scott if he'd like to come to an acoustic cafe (in hope rather than expectation) the CU were running and he said yes. He came along to every evening event that week and loved it. He felt really welcomed and by the end of the week he'd talked to most people from our CU. He liked the talks too, finding the way they presented Christianity interesting, and he appreciated being encouraged to look into the evidence for Jesus himself.

My journey began by going to a Christian Union film night. On the walk home, the CU people were having a discussion about Christianity and it ended with one friend giving a personal prayer to another. This was the first time I had witnessed such a thing and it showed me how much this person truly believed God was there.

He gave his life to Jesus on the Tuesday night. He signed up to the follow-up course too, which he's enjoyed so far, and has got involved in a church. It's encouraged me so much that events like these work and our friends can be the ones who get saved off the back of them.

James Birchenough International Co-ordinator, Manchester CU

There was something unsettling me and from then on I knew I had to look into it. I asked a friend for one of the Uncover [Seeker Bible Studies] booklets. Whenever I read it I immediately felt happier, which I didn't quite understand. I then went to the CU Christmas carol service where I realised I really wanted to give this all a go, so I took the Uncover [Gospel] about Jesus' life. Through reading this, being invited to different churches and going to CU, I started praying to God. After reading a chapter of the Uncover book I felt as if [God] was speaking to me. I felt as if I was being guided. I went to the big Friday event of the mission week [called] Love Is..., and when the speaker started talking I could feel it all just slowly clicking together and I realised that Jesus is real. I just started crying, and as the speaker carried on speaking, I started realising everything about Jesus and how much He has done for me. Afterwards, I just felt amazing and so thankful. A lot of things the CU has done, big and small, have truly helped me find God.

Today I became a Christian There are a group of textiles students in Loughborough CU who have been meeting regularly all year and praying for their course mates by name. A number of them came to lunchbars throughout events week and started to read Uncover. Caroline was one who they never imagined would become a Christian. She was the first of four. Caroline was interested in the lame man of Luke 5, knowing that she herself needed forgiveness. On Thursday evening she heard a powerful testimony on the extent of God's forgiveness. By the end of the talk she was in tears, turned to her Christian friends, and said, ‘I'm ready’.

caption

Fiona was next in the department to come to faith. She lives with the CU prayer secretary and read Uncover with her. Obie was third, publically declaring her faith on Facebook, 'I wanted to say that today I became a Christian. It's thanks to the love and encouragement of the people of CU, events week and God's grace.' The fourth – and hopefully not the final – textiles student to come to come to faith was Hannah. She is the only one from a Christian home (her parents must be delighted). She came to a few events during the mission week, and then to a gospel talk at CU where she heard Caroline and Obie give their testimonies. After the meeting she prayed with the textiles students and became a Christian.

Mathew Fox-Lilley CU Staff Worker, Loughborough

Clareece Kerby Maths student, University of Surrey 14

Leicester CU carol service

Leeds CU carol service

15


2012

12th–16th November Bristol Falmouth 19th–23rd November Bath Hull 26th–30th November York St John Cardiff city-wide

2013

21st–25th January Life Starts Here (big joint London Mission Week) Exeter 28th January–1st February York Liverpool John Moores Lancaster Huddersfield Birmingham Royal Holloway Heriot Watt Imperial College 4th–8th February Loughborough Glasgow Strathclyde Glasgow city-wide Liverpool Hope Galashiels Robert Gordon East Anglia Oxford Reading Cambridge Chester Southampton Kent Essex Warwick Plymouth Birmingham City Lampeter Leeds 11th– 15th February Dundee Durham Edinburgh and Edinburgh College of Art Queen Margaret Napier Aberdeen St Andrews Brunel Stoke Stirling Bristol Swansea Falmouth Bangor Bournemouth Eastbourne

110 Mission Weeks 2012/2013

UCP Marjon Coventry Leeds Met Teesside St Mary’s Aberystwyth Nottingham Trent University of Liverpool Roehampton Anglia Ruskin University Keele Crewe Newcastle Bath Hertfordshire Writtle College Aberystwyth Newport Cardiff Met Writtle Wolverhampton Sunderland MMU Crewe Bishop Grosseteste Sheffield Nottingham Nottingham Trent Lincoln Leicester CU Manchester and Man. Metropolitan Oxford Brookes Sussex Edge Hill Royal Northern College of Music Cumbria, Carlisle Campus Derby Canterbury Christ Church Bradford Southampton Solent De Montfort Chester University Queens Belfast Christ Church Surrey Southampton Solent Salford Sir John Deane’s College UCLan Southampton Solent Sheffield Hallam Kingston St Mary’s Chester, Warrington Campus Bedfordshire Aston Northampton UWS Paisley

18th–22nd February

25th February–1st March

4th–8th March

11th–15th March

18th–22nd March


2012

12th–16th November Bristol Falmouth 19th–23rd November Bath Hull 26th–30th November York St John Cardiff city-wide

2013

21st–25th January Life Starts Here (big joint London Mission Week) Exeter 28th January–1st February York Liverpool John Moores Lancaster Huddersfield Birmingham Royal Holloway Heriot Watt Imperial College 4th–8th February Loughborough Glasgow Strathclyde Glasgow city-wide Liverpool Hope Galashiels Robert Gordon East Anglia Oxford Reading Cambridge Chester Southampton Kent Essex Warwick Plymouth Birmingham City Lampeter Leeds 11th– 15th February Dundee Durham Edinburgh and Edinburgh College of Art Queen Margaret Napier Aberdeen St Andrews Brunel Stoke Stirling Bristol Swansea Falmouth Bangor Bournemouth Eastbourne

110 Mission Weeks 2012/2013

UCP Marjon Coventry Leeds Met Teesside St Mary’s Aberystwyth Nottingham Trent University of Liverpool Roehampton Anglia Ruskin University Keele Crewe Newcastle Bath Hertfordshire Writtle College Aberystwyth Newport Cardiff Met Writtle Wolverhampton Sunderland MMU Crewe Bishop Grosseteste Sheffield Nottingham Nottingham Trent Lincoln Leicester CU Manchester and Man. Metropolitan Oxford Brookes Sussex Edge Hill Royal Northern College of Music Cumbria, Carlisle Campus Derby Canterbury Christ Church Bradford Southampton Solent De Montfort Chester University Queens Belfast Christ Church Surrey Southampton Solent Salford Sir John Deane’s College UCLan Southampton Solent Sheffield Hallam Kingston St Mary’s Chester, Warrington Campus Bedfordshire Aston Northampton UWS Paisley

18th–22nd February

25th February–1st March

4th–8th March

11th–15th March

18th–22nd March


Developing Leaders

Biggest Forum ever 30

‘In the last ten years almost every member of staff and leader in our church has been significantly involved in their CU as a student’

Mission agencies represented

4,550

Total minutes of formal CU leader training delivered

1381

Andrew Evans, Minister, Christ Church Liverpool

Delegates

129

CUs represented

300

Delegates

33

Workshops

14 Forum 2002

18

2002

Forum 2012

Mission equipping training tracks

2012

19


Developing Leaders

Biggest Forum ever 30

‘In the last ten years almost every member of staff and leader in our church has been significantly involved in their CU as a student’

Mission agencies represented

4,550

Total minutes of formal CU leader training delivered

1381

Andrew Evans, Minister, Christ Church Liverpool

Delegates

129

CUs represented

300

Delegates

33

Workshops

14 Forum 2002

18

2002

Forum 2012

Mission equipping training tracks

2012

19


Essential Training for CU Leaders Forum is UCCF’s national conference for CU leaders. It is Europe’s largest gathering of student Christian leaders and is essential training for CU leaders. In 2012 UCCF trained, equipped and released over 1,300 delegates through the five day residential training event. Forum remains one the most important components of UCCF’s CU Leadership Training Programme*. Getting a CU leadership team to Forum can make a critical difference to the missional effectiveness of a CU for the following year. It is not a surprise to us – in UCCF – that our biggest ever Forum intake has coincided with one of the most fruitful CU mission years we have seen in recent times.

Pray, dream, plan

The Forum programme is crafted by a team of experienced UCCF staff and includes Bible teaching, training tracks and workshops that have a very specific training focus. Because Christian Unions can vary in size, internal culture and local context, we are very careful to move from principles to practice when delivering training in order to reflect this diversity. Natasha Kasprowicz, UCCF London Team Leader, commented: ‘At Forum students see the bigger picture of UCCF and it leads to lots of conversation about their own local context and what they want to take forward in the coming year.’ She continued: ‘I have enjoyed conversations with leaders about what [CU] looks like at London’s art colleges or the Royal Veterinary College as well as bigger institutions like King’s College or Imperial. It’s wonderful to come together at an event like Forum to pray, to dream and to plan.’

20

Forum workshops

Investing in future leaders

The training at Forum is delivered through a variety of formats in order to appeal to the different learning styles that are represented at such a large event. Expositional Bible preaching remains central to UCCF’s convictions and in 2012 we were delighted to welcome Tim Chester (Porterbrook Network), Mike Pilavachi (Soul Survivor) and Lindsay Brown (Lausanne Movement) to lead the plenary Bible sessions. These were complemented by in depth training tracks and interactive workshops. In total we estimate a total of 4,550 minutes of formal training was delivered throughout the week. Investing in student leaders at Forum is investing in future leaders for the British and worldwide church. Brian Weaver, Special Projects Manager for UCCF and Forum Chair, concludes: ‘For us in UCCF, it is a wonderful privilege to be able to observe so many who have developed their skills within a CU leadership context who then go on to lead churches, to be experts and a Christian witness in their field of work, to have a passion for reaching their local community and a global vision.’

*CU Leadership Training Programme Camping at Forum

UCCF’s CU Leadership Training Programme is delivered through a number of training components that include residential conferences, small group follow-up courses, one-to-one coaching and training days. • Forum Regions: regional training for CU leaders • Gospel Driven Mission: leadership follow-up course delivered to executive committees by CU Staff Workers at a local level • New Word Alive: plenary meetings, seminars and workshops

21


Essential Training for CU Leaders Forum is UCCF’s national conference for CU leaders. It is Europe’s largest gathering of student Christian leaders and is essential training for CU leaders. In 2012 UCCF trained, equipped and released over 1,300 delegates through the five day residential training event. Forum remains one the most important components of UCCF’s CU Leadership Training Programme*. Getting a CU leadership team to Forum can make a critical difference to the missional effectiveness of a CU for the following year. It is not a surprise to us – in UCCF – that our biggest ever Forum intake has coincided with one of the most fruitful CU mission years we have seen in recent times.

Pray, dream, plan

The Forum programme is crafted by a team of experienced UCCF staff and includes Bible teaching, training tracks and workshops that have a very specific training focus. Because Christian Unions can vary in size, internal culture and local context, we are very careful to move from principles to practice when delivering training in order to reflect this diversity. Natasha Kasprowicz, UCCF London Team Leader, commented: ‘At Forum students see the bigger picture of UCCF and it leads to lots of conversation about their own local context and what they want to take forward in the coming year.’ She continued: ‘I have enjoyed conversations with leaders about what [CU] looks like at London’s art colleges or the Royal Veterinary College as well as bigger institutions like King’s College or Imperial. It’s wonderful to come together at an event like Forum to pray, to dream and to plan.’

20

Forum workshops

Investing in future leaders

The training at Forum is delivered through a variety of formats in order to appeal to the different learning styles that are represented at such a large event. Expositional Bible preaching remains central to UCCF’s convictions and in 2012 we were delighted to welcome Tim Chester (Porterbrook Network), Mike Pilavachi (Soul Survivor) and Lindsay Brown (Lausanne Movement) to lead the plenary Bible sessions. These were complemented by in depth training tracks and interactive workshops. In total we estimate a total of 4,550 minutes of formal training was delivered throughout the week. Investing in student leaders at Forum is investing in future leaders for the British and worldwide church. Brian Weaver, Special Projects Manager for UCCF and Forum Chair, concludes: ‘For us in UCCF, it is a wonderful privilege to be able to observe so many who have developed their skills within a CU leadership context who then go on to lead churches, to be experts and a Christian witness in their field of work, to have a passion for reaching their local community and a global vision.’

*CU Leadership Training Programme Camping at Forum

UCCF’s CU Leadership Training Programme is delivered through a number of training components that include residential conferences, small group follow-up courses, one-to-one coaching and training days. • Forum Regions: regional training for CU leaders • Gospel Driven Mission: leadership follow-up course delivered to executive committees by CU Staff Workers at a local level • New Word Alive: plenary meetings, seminars and workshops

21


Today’s Students, Tomorrow's Leaders

I learned how to run a mission week Forum is aimed specifically at CU leaders, not just general Christians. Forum trained me in how to reach international students, how to run a good mission week and how to engage with my housemates. The training inspired me to keep going. I loved Forum because I left knowing a little bit more than I did when I arrived. I needed help with the task of leading my CU and Forum made my year easier.

Rich Pitt Evangelism Secretary Eastbourne CU, 2009–10

UCCF are delighted that so many leaders of industry, politics, and the church had their first experience of leadership in a CU context. Many look back on their time in CU as their first leadership training opportunity. Andrew Evans, Senior Pastor of Liverpool Christ Church and former UCCF Staff Worker, reflects on his time in CU and the impact it made on him as a church leader.

Forum helped me be a better leader The chance to meet and talk to other CU leaders was great. The thought that there are at least a thousand others with me in this battle for lecture theatres, halls of residence, campuses and libraries of the country turned the insurmountable into something that might be possible. By being reminded of my need for Jesus and my need for the rest of the CU, we ensured that the whole CU bought into the events week.

Chris Balding Evangelism Officer Sheffield CU, 2010-11

‘I became a Christian as a student in freshers' week: in part, because of the CU. The CU at my university was the single most significant influence on my Christian growth during the next three years. After two years as a UCCF Relay Worker in Lancaster and some time in a "proper job" I was privileged to be the CU Staff Worker for the area around Liverpool from 1999–2003. In 2003 two UCCF colleagues and I planted Christ Church Liverpool. We were more or less entirely clueless about church planting. This was probably a good thing as if I'd known then what I know now we might not have done it. But, ten years on, I look back on my days as a member of UCCF staff with great thankfulness to the Lord who provided just about the perfect informal training for church ministry. We had fantastic Bible teaching at our UCCF conferences, great training in apologetics and evangelism from Don Carson, William Lane Craig, Rico Tice and others. We also enjoyed a fantastic sense of a "band of brothers (and sisters!)" in our regional team and the opportunity to learn all sorts of skills (pastoral care, strategic thinking, leading small groups and writing materials) that most formal classroom based training programmes simply can't teach.

22

Forum evening meeting

I'm a great fan of the rigour of degree level theological training we received. But I'm also a huge fan of the amazing "hands on" training that UCCF provides to its staff. In God's good providence my being a CU Staff Worker wasn't just a blessing to the students I worked with but also to the church family I'm now part of. In the last ten years almost every member of staff and leader in our church has been significantly involved in their CU as a student and many have been UCCF Relay or CU Staff Workers. There are only two elders who weren't on CU exec or UCCF Relay/Staff. Christ Church Liverpool has much reason to thank the amazing visionaries who started UCCF eighty five years ago.’

Andrew Evans Minister, Christ Church Liverpool

23


Today’s Students, Tomorrow's Leaders

I learned how to run a mission week Forum is aimed specifically at CU leaders, not just general Christians. Forum trained me in how to reach international students, how to run a good mission week and how to engage with my housemates. The training inspired me to keep going. I loved Forum because I left knowing a little bit more than I did when I arrived. I needed help with the task of leading my CU and Forum made my year easier.

Rich Pitt Evangelism Secretary Eastbourne CU, 2009–10

UCCF are delighted that so many leaders of industry, politics, and the church had their first experience of leadership in a CU context. Many look back on their time in CU as their first leadership training opportunity. Andrew Evans, Senior Pastor of Liverpool Christ Church and former UCCF Staff Worker, reflects on his time in CU and the impact it made on him as a church leader.

Forum helped me be a better leader The chance to meet and talk to other CU leaders was great. The thought that there are at least a thousand others with me in this battle for lecture theatres, halls of residence, campuses and libraries of the country turned the insurmountable into something that might be possible. By being reminded of my need for Jesus and my need for the rest of the CU, we ensured that the whole CU bought into the events week.

Chris Balding Evangelism Officer Sheffield CU, 2010-11

‘I became a Christian as a student in freshers' week: in part, because of the CU. The CU at my university was the single most significant influence on my Christian growth during the next three years. After two years as a UCCF Relay Worker in Lancaster and some time in a "proper job" I was privileged to be the CU Staff Worker for the area around Liverpool from 1999–2003. In 2003 two UCCF colleagues and I planted Christ Church Liverpool. We were more or less entirely clueless about church planting. This was probably a good thing as if I'd known then what I know now we might not have done it. But, ten years on, I look back on my days as a member of UCCF staff with great thankfulness to the Lord who provided just about the perfect informal training for church ministry. We had fantastic Bible teaching at our UCCF conferences, great training in apologetics and evangelism from Don Carson, William Lane Craig, Rico Tice and others. We also enjoyed a fantastic sense of a "band of brothers (and sisters!)" in our regional team and the opportunity to learn all sorts of skills (pastoral care, strategic thinking, leading small groups and writing materials) that most formal classroom based training programmes simply can't teach.

22

Forum evening meeting

I'm a great fan of the rigour of degree level theological training we received. But I'm also a huge fan of the amazing "hands on" training that UCCF provides to its staff. In God's good providence my being a CU Staff Worker wasn't just a blessing to the students I worked with but also to the church family I'm now part of. In the last ten years almost every member of staff and leader in our church has been significantly involved in their CU as a student and many have been UCCF Relay or CU Staff Workers. There are only two elders who weren't on CU exec or UCCF Relay/Staff. Christ Church Liverpool has much reason to thank the amazing visionaries who started UCCF eighty five years ago.’

Andrew Evans Minister, Christ Church Liverpool

23


80,000

Resourcing Evangelism

Number of Gospels in use by CUs

2,600 VER

UNCO

Average monthly visits to uncover.org.uk

UNCOVER

x 10,000

‘Uncover is staggering in terms of its impact. In twenty years, I’ve never seen anything like it’

UNCOVER

x 10,000

UNCOVER

x 10,000

Rico Tice, Evangelist, All Souls Church UNCOVER x 10,000

UNCOVER

x 10,000

50,000

Number of Gospels made available for churches

50,000

Estimated Uncover Seeker Bible Studies distributed to CUs and churches

Seeker Bible Stud

y

UNCOVER UNCOVER x 10 ,000

UNCOVER

UNCOVER

Seeker Bible Stud

y

Seeker UNC OVE Bible Stud R y

UNCOVER

UNCOVER

tablet 7%

UNCOVER

Seeker Bible Stud

y

UNC

OVE

24

R

UNCOVER Seeker Bible Stud

y

UNCOVER

UNCOVER

x 10,000

mobile 34% Views per device:

desktop 59%

25


80,000

Resourcing Evangelism

Number of Gospels in use by CUs

2,600 VER

UNCO

Average monthly visits to uncover.org.uk

UNCOVER

x 10,000

‘Uncover is staggering in terms of its impact. In twenty years, I’ve never seen anything like it’

UNCOVER

x 10,000

UNCOVER

x 10,000

Rico Tice, Evangelist, All Souls Church UNCOVER x 10,000

UNCOVER

x 10,000

50,000

Number of Gospels made available for churches

50,000

Estimated Uncover Seeker Bible Studies distributed to CUs and churches

Seeker Bible Stud

y

UNCOVER UNCOVER x 10 ,000

UNCOVER

UNCOVER

Seeker Bible Stud

y

Seeker UNC OVE Bible Stud R y

UNCOVER

UNCOVER

tablet 7%

UNCOVER

Seeker Bible Stud

y

UNC

OVE

24

R

UNCOVER Seeker Bible Stud

y

UNCOVER

UNCOVER

x 10,000

mobile 34% Views per device:

desktop 59%

25


Reaching Students and Resourcing Churches More students have been coming to faith in the past year than at any time I can remember. 2013 has seen over a hundred UCCF Christian Union missions in our leading universities – at which an estimated 80,000 Uncover Luke Gospels have been used by students. Many thousands of these will be in Uncover Seeker Bible Studies (SBS). We have never seen fruit like it in our time in UCCF. All of this remarkable activity has not gone unnoticed in the churches up and down the UK. Significant church leaders have asked UCCF if we would train their church members to do Uncover Gospel Projects, to lead Uncover Seeker Bible Studies (SBS) and to make available all the Uncover resources as soon as possible. This has been a difficult request to respond to, since we had purchased only enough Uncover Gospels and SBS to supply our mission to the universities. Additionally, we do not wish for our staff to be distracted from their primary mission field amongst students.

Taking the opportunity

At the same time, we realise that this is a key moment in the life of the British church. It has been widely acknowledged in the UK that ordinary church members have lost the confidence to share their faith with unbelieving friends, neighbours and colleagues. This is in some part due to the widespread secular intolerance towards

26

2.

3. Christianity, but probably has more to do with the fact that there has been a profound lack of modelling and resourcing in personal evangelism. This paralysis is adversely impacting the life of the church at all levels. For example, it is increasingly difficult for many churches to attract good numbers of unbelievers to Alpha-type courses and other outreach events, simply because few Christians have been doing personal evangelism with their friends and neighbours and so don’t feel confident to invite them to a church event. If we could rapidly equip ordinary Christians to do everyday, life-onlife, personal witness and be confident in using a high-quality resource like Uncover, we believe that we could witness a rich harvest.

UCCF has teamed up with IVP (thinkivp.com) to make copies of the Uncover resources widely and cheaply available. At the time of going to print, almost 10,000 Luke Uncover Gospels have been distributed to churches who are seeing the potential of Uncover to introduce their own friends to Jesus. In 2013/14, UCCF is going to be running a training event in each of our nine regions of the UK (Scotland, North East, North West, Midlands, Wales, Central, South East, London and South West). Rebecca Manley Pippert will speak at each of these day conferences to which churches in the surrounding area will send their appointed delegates to receive training in using Uncover resources.

By making the Uncover resources available – in the context of vigorous and inspiring training – to the living churches of Britain, we have a unique opportunity to build on the momentum of the students and to help ordinary Christians to be able to read the Bible with a friend and lead them to Christ. The present conditions (which may change quite quickly) make this a unique opportunity to go forward with this nationwide campaign. We believe many thousands of unbelievers will come to faith and that churches will become reinvigorated as they awaken the sleeping giant of every member witness.

Richard Cunningham Director To order Uncover Gospels and Seeker Bible Studies for your church visit thinkivp.com/uncover

We believe that the moment to deal with this is now. There is a buzz across the student world resulting from thousands of excited Christian students who have felt able (through the Uncover Gospel project) to read the Bible with their friends and personally lead them to faith in Jesus. This excitement has communicated to the churches who are pleading with us to do the same for them.

Responding to the need 1.

As an act of faith, UCCF has commissioned another 50,000 Uncover Gospels. Uncover to churches was launched at this year’s (2013) New Word Alive Conferences (with about 6,000 adults present). Rebecca Manley Pippert and the UCCF student team were at both weeks of New Word Alive offering motivation and training in using Uncover.

27


Reaching Students and Resourcing Churches More students have been coming to faith in the past year than at any time I can remember. 2013 has seen over a hundred UCCF Christian Union missions in our leading universities – at which an estimated 80,000 Uncover Luke Gospels have been used by students. Many thousands of these will be in Uncover Seeker Bible Studies (SBS). We have never seen fruit like it in our time in UCCF. All of this remarkable activity has not gone unnoticed in the churches up and down the UK. Significant church leaders have asked UCCF if we would train their church members to do Uncover Gospel Projects, to lead Uncover Seeker Bible Studies (SBS) and to make available all the Uncover resources as soon as possible. This has been a difficult request to respond to, since we had purchased only enough Uncover Gospels and SBS to supply our mission to the universities. Additionally, we do not wish for our staff to be distracted from their primary mission field amongst students.

Taking the opportunity

At the same time, we realise that this is a key moment in the life of the British church. It has been widely acknowledged in the UK that ordinary church members have lost the confidence to share their faith with unbelieving friends, neighbours and colleagues. This is in some part due to the widespread secular intolerance towards

26

2.

3. Christianity, but probably has more to do with the fact that there has been a profound lack of modelling and resourcing in personal evangelism. This paralysis is adversely impacting the life of the church at all levels. For example, it is increasingly difficult for many churches to attract good numbers of unbelievers to Alpha-type courses and other outreach events, simply because few Christians have been doing personal evangelism with their friends and neighbours and so don’t feel confident to invite them to a church event. If we could rapidly equip ordinary Christians to do everyday, life-onlife, personal witness and be confident in using a high-quality resource like Uncover, we believe that we could witness a rich harvest.

UCCF has teamed up with IVP (thinkivp.com) to make copies of the Uncover resources widely and cheaply available. At the time of going to print, almost 10,000 Luke Uncover Gospels have been distributed to churches who are seeing the potential of Uncover to introduce their own friends to Jesus. In 2013/14, UCCF is going to be running a training event in each of our nine regions of the UK (Scotland, North East, North West, Midlands, Wales, Central, South East, London and South West). Rebecca Manley Pippert will speak at each of these day conferences to which churches in the surrounding area will send their appointed delegates to receive training in using Uncover resources.

By making the Uncover resources available – in the context of vigorous and inspiring training – to the living churches of Britain, we have a unique opportunity to build on the momentum of the students and to help ordinary Christians to be able to read the Bible with a friend and lead them to Christ. The present conditions (which may change quite quickly) make this a unique opportunity to go forward with this nationwide campaign. We believe many thousands of unbelievers will come to faith and that churches will become reinvigorated as they awaken the sleeping giant of every member witness.

Richard Cunningham Director To order Uncover Gospels and Seeker Bible Studies for your church visit thinkivp.com/uncover

We believe that the moment to deal with this is now. There is a buzz across the student world resulting from thousands of excited Christian students who have felt able (through the Uncover Gospel project) to read the Bible with their friends and personally lead them to faith in Jesus. This excitement has communicated to the churches who are pleading with us to do the same for them.

Responding to the need 1.

As an act of faith, UCCF has commissioned another 50,000 Uncover Gospels. Uncover to churches was launched at this year’s (2013) New Word Alive Conferences (with about 6,000 adults present). Rebecca Manley Pippert and the UCCF student team were at both weeks of New Word Alive offering motivation and training in using Uncover.

27


Uncover Training Days Uncover Training Days will help churches to use the Uncover suite of resources to introduce their friends to Jesus. We are thrilled that Seeker Bible Study expert and Uncover author Rebecca Manley Pippert will be delivering evangelism training days around Great Britain during 2013/14. Find out more about Uncover Training Days and how to book at uccf.org.uk/uncover-training

21st September 2013 19th October 2013 16th November 2013 25th January 2014 8th February 2014 22nd February 2014 1st March 2014 15th March 2014 22nd March 2014

The carefully thought-through and tested mix of attractive gospel, Seeker Bible Study and online material means that Christians of all ages will be equipped and encouraged to read the Bible with their non-Christians friends.

This short interactive introduction to Christ through Luke’s Gospel, which has caught on like wildfire in the universities around the country, is now released for parish use. The joy of it is that it does not need an experienced leader.

Adrian Reynolds Director of Ministry, Proclamation Trust

Michael Green Evangelist

Canterbury Edinburgh London Bath Oxford Cardiff Newcastle Manchester Birmingham

This excellent suite of tools empowers Christians to get into direct study of Scripture – in this case, Luke's Gospel – with unbelievers. Some multi-media tools seem more concerned to show off the technology than to study the Bible. This is not true of Uncover: the contemporary feel of the material never detracts from studying the biblical text and drawing people to Jesus. Uncover is direct without being intrusive, bold without being pushy, clear without being simplistic, challenging without being condescending. This material deserves wide circulation not only in universities and colleges but in local churches – and then it should be translated and circulated some more.

Don Carson Research Professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

I am so excited by the way the Lord is directing you as an organisation in the use of Uncover. It’s thrilling to know that 80,000 students are involved with reading the Gospel of Luke. My prayer is now that they can hear and read for themselves what they’ve been denied in their education as they grew up [and that this] will now capture their minds and hearts. The possibilities of involving the nation's churches, to mobilise thousands of Christians up and down the land, could bring about a spiritual revival in our society. My prayer for the students up and down the land, including my own grandchildren now studying at Birmingham and Cardiff, [is that they] will be affected and together we shall see God turn our nation back to Himself. How I shall praise Him should He grant me to see it before I move on to glory.

UCCF Supporter

28

Rebecca Manley Pippert at Forum 2012

29


Uncover Training Days Uncover Training Days will help churches to use the Uncover suite of resources to introduce their friends to Jesus. We are thrilled that Seeker Bible Study expert and Uncover author Rebecca Manley Pippert will be delivering evangelism training days around Great Britain during 2013/14. Find out more about Uncover Training Days and how to book at uccf.org.uk/uncover-training

21st September 2013 19th October 2013 16th November 2013 25th January 2014 8th February 2014 22nd February 2014 1st March 2014 15th March 2014 22nd March 2014

The carefully thought-through and tested mix of attractive gospel, Seeker Bible Study and online material means that Christians of all ages will be equipped and encouraged to read the Bible with their non-Christians friends.

This short interactive introduction to Christ through Luke’s Gospel, which has caught on like wildfire in the universities around the country, is now released for parish use. The joy of it is that it does not need an experienced leader.

Adrian Reynolds Director of Ministry, Proclamation Trust

Michael Green Evangelist

Canterbury Edinburgh London Bath Oxford Cardiff Newcastle Manchester Birmingham

This excellent suite of tools empowers Christians to get into direct study of Scripture – in this case, Luke's Gospel – with unbelievers. Some multi-media tools seem more concerned to show off the technology than to study the Bible. This is not true of Uncover: the contemporary feel of the material never detracts from studying the biblical text and drawing people to Jesus. Uncover is direct without being intrusive, bold without being pushy, clear without being simplistic, challenging without being condescending. This material deserves wide circulation not only in universities and colleges but in local churches – and then it should be translated and circulated some more.

Don Carson Research Professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

I am so excited by the way the Lord is directing you as an organisation in the use of Uncover. It’s thrilling to know that 80,000 students are involved with reading the Gospel of Luke. My prayer is now that they can hear and read for themselves what they’ve been denied in their education as they grew up [and that this] will now capture their minds and hearts. The possibilities of involving the nation's churches, to mobilise thousands of Christians up and down the land, could bring about a spiritual revival in our society. My prayer for the students up and down the land, including my own grandchildren now studying at Birmingham and Cardiff, [is that they] will be affected and together we shall see God turn our nation back to Himself. How I shall praise Him should He grant me to see it before I move on to glory.

UCCF Supporter

28

Rebecca Manley Pippert at Forum 2012

29


As we head into Passion for Life* (or any church based missional activity) we have to be aware of the significance of one-to-one evangelism. We can’t just put on events and guest services. It’s got to be that when our friends come along to an event we’re able to say, ‘would you like to look at the Bible?’ as soon as the talk finishes. At this point in time people may often feel very intimidated but something has happened to change things in the last two years. Uncover is six Bible studies, written by Rebecca Manley Pippert, and a gospel featuring QR codes that link to evangelistic and apologetic films. It has been developed by UCCF and it is staggering in terms of its impact. I have nothing to do with this material. Christianity Explored are not publishing it. I am telling you about this because in the twenty years I’ve been doing evangelism, I’ve never seen anything like it. What is happening in the student world in terms of evangelistic one-to-ones is remarkable. Let me give you an example:

30

Five years ago I led the mission in Oxford. It was a tough mission: Dawkins was at the fore and only a few people professed. It was a really a hard mission run by a faithful OICCU. In 2013 I had accepted an invitation to lead a mini-mission in Oxford and I kept thinking, ‘This is going to be brutal.’ About three months before the mission they got in contact and said, ‘I know it’s a three day mission, but we’d like you to come for five and we’re going to do lunchtime talks as well.’ I said, ‘That sounds like a major mission’, and they replied, ‘Oh, yeah’. I arrived for the mission and the numbers had rocketed [from the previous mission]. On the last night, they told me, ‘We’ve got 150 non-Christian students reading Uncover with Christian students in the university. Just please preach so that people will repent and believe.’ We saw professions all week. What was happening was that one-to-one work was going on alongside the guest events. You see this is what we’ve (the church) got to get in place. The events we organise for Passion for Life are just the tip of the iceberg. The key thing is what’s going on underneath and that’s the personal one-to-one work. There was a student when I was in Oxford who was not just the wettest Christian student at Oxford, but the wettest student. On the way back from the Wednesday night talk, she’d managed to get her friend to come along and she said, ‘Would you like to look at the Uncover materials with me?’ The friend said, 'Fine'. What’s been staggering is that non-Christians are willing to look at the primary sources in their hundreds. UNCOVER UNCOVER

Earlier this year I went to Preston. There are twenty one in the Christian Union and eight of them are reading Uncover with their friends. It’s a sea change in the culture that UCCF has managed. Praise God! So now the guest events and guest services are full of people whom you can really preach to because you know the moment it’s finished, they’re going to invite their friends to a one-to-one Bible study. Talking to Richard Cunningham, Director of UCCF, he just says, ‘I’ve not seen anything like this in twenty years. It has been quite remarkable – the non-Christians are hungry to do it.’ People at All Souls whose kids are at university are coming back and talking about reading a gospel with their friends. My brother’s a case in point; his son, who’s at Bristol, is reading Uncover with three people, and my brother says, ‘If my son’s doing it, I better start doing it!’ And I’ll tell you what, in our family we’re thick idiots, so if we can do it, anyone can do it.

Rico Tice, founder of Christianity Explored

The UCCF motto is 5-5-5. Pray for five, give to five, read with five. And at All Souls we’ve been so struck by this that we’ve set a target of having 200 people in the church family reading Uncover. We’re going to run this because we’re so staggered at what God has done in the student world, and we just really hope you’ll do it too.

Rico Tice Evangelist and author of Christianity Explored This is an excerpt from a talk delivered to church leaders at the 2013 Evangelical Ministers Assembly. *Passion for Life is a national church mission initiative

UNCOVER

Maximise Passion for Life 2014 with Uncover

31


As we head into Passion for Life* (or any church based missional activity) we have to be aware of the significance of one-to-one evangelism. We can’t just put on events and guest services. It’s got to be that when our friends come along to an event we’re able to say, ‘would you like to look at the Bible?’ as soon as the talk finishes. At this point in time people may often feel very intimidated but something has happened to change things in the last two years. Uncover is six Bible studies, written by Rebecca Manley Pippert, and a gospel featuring QR codes that link to evangelistic and apologetic films. It has been developed by UCCF and it is staggering in terms of its impact. I have nothing to do with this material. Christianity Explored are not publishing it. I am telling you about this because in the twenty years I’ve been doing evangelism, I’ve never seen anything like it. What is happening in the student world in terms of evangelistic one-to-ones is remarkable. Let me give you an example:

30

Five years ago I led the mission in Oxford. It was a tough mission: Dawkins was at the fore and only a few people professed. It was a really a hard mission run by a faithful OICCU. In 2013 I had accepted an invitation to lead a mini-mission in Oxford and I kept thinking, ‘This is going to be brutal.’ About three months before the mission they got in contact and said, ‘I know it’s a three day mission, but we’d like you to come for five and we’re going to do lunchtime talks as well.’ I said, ‘That sounds like a major mission’, and they replied, ‘Oh, yeah’. I arrived for the mission and the numbers had rocketed [from the previous mission]. On the last night, they told me, ‘We’ve got 150 non-Christian students reading Uncover with Christian students in the university. Just please preach so that people will repent and believe.’ We saw professions all week. What was happening was that one-to-one work was going on alongside the guest events. You see this is what we’ve (the church) got to get in place. The events we organise for Passion for Life are just the tip of the iceberg. The key thing is what’s going on underneath and that’s the personal one-to-one work. There was a student when I was in Oxford who was not just the wettest Christian student at Oxford, but the wettest student. On the way back from the Wednesday night talk, she’d managed to get her friend to come along and she said, ‘Would you like to look at the Uncover materials with me?’ The friend said, 'Fine'. What’s been staggering is that non-Christians are willing to look at the primary sources in their hundreds. UNCOVER UNCOVER

Earlier this year I went to Preston. There are twenty one in the Christian Union and eight of them are reading Uncover with their friends. It’s a sea change in the culture that UCCF has managed. Praise God! So now the guest events and guest services are full of people whom you can really preach to because you know the moment it’s finished, they’re going to invite their friends to a one-to-one Bible study. Talking to Richard Cunningham, Director of UCCF, he just says, ‘I’ve not seen anything like this in twenty years. It has been quite remarkable – the non-Christians are hungry to do it.’ People at All Souls whose kids are at university are coming back and talking about reading a gospel with their friends. My brother’s a case in point; his son, who’s at Bristol, is reading Uncover with three people, and my brother says, ‘If my son’s doing it, I better start doing it!’ And I’ll tell you what, in our family we’re thick idiots, so if we can do it, anyone can do it.

Rico Tice, founder of Christianity Explored

The UCCF motto is 5-5-5. Pray for five, give to five, read with five. And at All Souls we’ve been so struck by this that we’ve set a target of having 200 people in the church family reading Uncover. We’re going to run this because we’re so staggered at what God has done in the student world, and we just really hope you’ll do it too.

Rico Tice Evangelist and author of Christianity Explored This is an excerpt from a talk delivered to church leaders at the 2013 Evangelical Ministers Assembly. *Passion for Life is a national church mission initiative

UNCOVER

Maximise Passion for Life 2014 with Uncover

31


Going to the World

outh Bournem

Manchester

‘Carrying on in long-term mission would not have been possible without the foundations that were laid by our UCCF Staff Workers and Team Leaders’

6

International outreach events

rbury Cante

2

Oxford

Urban teams

Edinburgh

Grimsby

h urg inb Ed

Jonathan Clarke, IFES Greece

10

overseas mission teams ntry ropean cou Eastern Eu

Paris

Dublin

Slovakia

Ukraine

Malawi

32

Moldova

try South-east Asian coun

Montenegro

Albania

Muslim ma jority

country

33


Going to the World

outh Bournem

Manchester

‘Carrying on in long-term mission would not have been possible without the foundations that were laid by our UCCF Staff Workers and Team Leaders’

6

International outreach events

rbury Cante

2

Oxford

Urban teams

Edinburgh

Grimsby

h urg inb Ed

Jonathan Clarke, IFES Greece

10

overseas mission teams ntry ropean cou Eastern Eu

Paris

Dublin

Slovakia

Ukraine

Malawi

32

Moldova

try South-east Asian coun

Montenegro

Albania

Muslim ma jority

country

33


Eastern European Country*

Grimsby Urban Team

Reaching the World with ShortTerm Mission Trips UCCF has a rich tradition of sending students into the world for mission. In 1928 Howard Guinness, a student at London University, was commissioned by his fellow students to establish a CU movement in Canada. From here he travelled to Australia. In 1947 UCCF was one of ten founding members of the International Fellowship of Evangelical Students. UCCF’s continuing commitment to our global vision: to give every student – not only in Great Britain but also the world – an opportunity to hear the gospel, has meant that in 2013 UCCF have sent over a hundred students, staff and Relay Workers on eighteen short-term summer mission trips. Here are some highlights:

During the [summer] camp we put on a host of activities and made ourselves look ridiculous for the sake of the gospel. Memorable activities ranged from corgijousting to a never-ending game of bench ball. We used what we have been given to befriend the EEC students and to serve them. It was wonderful to see shy students gradually opening up and freely sharing their lives with us. We felt very welcomed into their community.

Moldova

It was great to be able to share Jesus through reading Uncover with the students. This posed challenges: at first, many were scared of reading the Bible and reluctant to contribute. As students encountered Jesus in Luke’s Gospel they were drawn to him and saw for themselves the great love Jesus has for them. It was great to see students have insights into the text we might not have considered. One girl noticed that when the sun stops shining at Jesus’ crucifixion it is because Jesus (the Son) has himself stopped shining – surely a sign of the Spirit’s work in her. We saw students warming to Jesus and many were keen to continue Bible studies when they return to university. Overall, it was a challenging but wonderful time of sharing our lives and Christ’s love with such different people, despite our many weaknesses.

There were some difficult times too, with the language barrier and dominant background of Orthodox Christianity. One student I spent some time with told me he had been put off by Christianity and said he didn’t want to study the Bible because God was dead.

Lois Kelly Relay Worker *Country name withheld due to the sensitive nature of the location.

We partnered with CSC (the Moldovan IFES movement) to run a Bible and English camp for Moldovan students. They really enjoyed learning English and studying Mark’s Gospel. Many seemed to grasp the gospel of free grace for the first time. Our Bible study groups doubled up as activity teams and we had great fun competing in a variety of challenges: from a photo caption competition to balancing coins on a coffee stirrer. Lots of the team members had great conversations with people throughout the week especially after a panel evening where the students submitted questions. We also had good opportunities to encourage some of the few Christian students who attended the camp, especially two younger lads from a very poor village who really grew in their understanding of what Jesus has done for them.

We came away sad at some of the distortions we witnessed and heard about, but also rejoicing that we have free access to the Father in the Spirit because of the work of the Son.

Pete Gower Christian Union Staff Worker, Liverpool

Grimsby Urban Team

A team of seven students, a Relay Worker and a Staff Worker spent a fortnight to the East Marsh of Grimsby in early July. We were partnering with Grimsby Neighbourhood Church (a member of the Elim church family) in their mission to one of the most deprived areas in the UK. We were incredibly warmly welcomed by the church family, and took part in everything that the church does, from serving in the charity shop they run, working in their community garden and taking part in sessions in their community centre. Isaac, one of the student team members said, 'The gardens give something to do for people who cannot or simply haven’t got anything else to do. People afflicted with disabilities or broken by addiction or disillusioned by unemployment can volunteer in the gardens and are able to work there in a productive, positive way. Like the garden, volunteers play a role in the charity shop, providing them an otherwise scarce opportunity to feel included in something to which they can contribute. It’s a real privilege to see the church blessing the locality with God’s love in such practical, meaningful ways.' We saw students growing in their convictions about Scripture, mission in the UK and abroad, and having a broader and deeper vision of local church life: it was a huge blessing.

Hamish Sneddon Christian Union Staff Worker, Durham 34

British culture evening with students from Moldova

35


Eastern European Country*

Grimsby Urban Team

Reaching the World with ShortTerm Mission Trips UCCF has a rich tradition of sending students into the world for mission. In 1928 Howard Guinness, a student at London University, was commissioned by his fellow students to establish a CU movement in Canada. From here he travelled to Australia. In 1947 UCCF was one of ten founding members of the International Fellowship of Evangelical Students. UCCF’s continuing commitment to our global vision: to give every student – not only in Great Britain but also the world – an opportunity to hear the gospel, has meant that in 2013 UCCF have sent over a hundred students, staff and Relay Workers on eighteen short-term summer mission trips. Here are some highlights:

During the [summer] camp we put on a host of activities and made ourselves look ridiculous for the sake of the gospel. Memorable activities ranged from corgijousting to a never-ending game of bench ball. We used what we have been given to befriend the EEC students and to serve them. It was wonderful to see shy students gradually opening up and freely sharing their lives with us. We felt very welcomed into their community.

Moldova

It was great to be able to share Jesus through reading Uncover with the students. This posed challenges: at first, many were scared of reading the Bible and reluctant to contribute. As students encountered Jesus in Luke’s Gospel they were drawn to him and saw for themselves the great love Jesus has for them. It was great to see students have insights into the text we might not have considered. One girl noticed that when the sun stops shining at Jesus’ crucifixion it is because Jesus (the Son) has himself stopped shining – surely a sign of the Spirit’s work in her. We saw students warming to Jesus and many were keen to continue Bible studies when they return to university. Overall, it was a challenging but wonderful time of sharing our lives and Christ’s love with such different people, despite our many weaknesses.

There were some difficult times too, with the language barrier and dominant background of Orthodox Christianity. One student I spent some time with told me he had been put off by Christianity and said he didn’t want to study the Bible because God was dead.

Lois Kelly Relay Worker *Country name withheld due to the sensitive nature of the location.

We partnered with CSC (the Moldovan IFES movement) to run a Bible and English camp for Moldovan students. They really enjoyed learning English and studying Mark’s Gospel. Many seemed to grasp the gospel of free grace for the first time. Our Bible study groups doubled up as activity teams and we had great fun competing in a variety of challenges: from a photo caption competition to balancing coins on a coffee stirrer. Lots of the team members had great conversations with people throughout the week especially after a panel evening where the students submitted questions. We also had good opportunities to encourage some of the few Christian students who attended the camp, especially two younger lads from a very poor village who really grew in their understanding of what Jesus has done for them.

We came away sad at some of the distortions we witnessed and heard about, but also rejoicing that we have free access to the Father in the Spirit because of the work of the Son.

Pete Gower Christian Union Staff Worker, Liverpool

Grimsby Urban Team

A team of seven students, a Relay Worker and a Staff Worker spent a fortnight to the East Marsh of Grimsby in early July. We were partnering with Grimsby Neighbourhood Church (a member of the Elim church family) in their mission to one of the most deprived areas in the UK. We were incredibly warmly welcomed by the church family, and took part in everything that the church does, from serving in the charity shop they run, working in their community garden and taking part in sessions in their community centre. Isaac, one of the student team members said, 'The gardens give something to do for people who cannot or simply haven’t got anything else to do. People afflicted with disabilities or broken by addiction or disillusioned by unemployment can volunteer in the gardens and are able to work there in a productive, positive way. Like the garden, volunteers play a role in the charity shop, providing them an otherwise scarce opportunity to feel included in something to which they can contribute. It’s a real privilege to see the church blessing the locality with God’s love in such practical, meaningful ways.' We saw students growing in their convictions about Scripture, mission in the UK and abroad, and having a broader and deeper vision of local church life: it was a huge blessing.

Hamish Sneddon Christian Union Staff Worker, Durham 34

British culture evening with students from Moldova

35


Reaching the World with Long-Term Vision Short term summer teams play a significant part in fulfilling our global vision. However, many former UCCF Staff, Relay and students have gone on to commit to long-term overseas work. Jonathan and Dawn Clark were on UCCF staff from 1999–2004. They have been planting a CU movement in Greece since 2007. Pod Bhogal, UCCF’s Head of Communications, talks to Jonathan about how being involved with CU was instrumental in leading them to Greece.

How did UCCF help? How were you involved with CU as students?

We look back with fondness and deep gratitude to God for our Christian Unions in the mid 90s. We arrived as Christians but it was the CU (and later, Relay) that shaped and honed our convictions and set us on our path of service ever since. Both of us found ourselves welcomed into a vibrant community of students who had been given – perhaps for the first time – a vision of the gospel that was global, biblical, Christ-centered and gripping. We grew to love the weekly Bible teaching, the training in evangelism and the outward-looking fellowship in small groups. We had the privilege leading for a couple of years, benefiting from regional and national Forum, and applied to do Relay to continue our training.

Did you always want to do long-term mission? Jonathan Clark in Athens

36

Not a week goes by without a conscious recollection of things learned, enjoyed and grasped during our time with UCCF. Carrying on in longterm mission would not have been possible without the foundations that were laid by our UCCF Staff Workers and Team Leaders in the Midlands and the North East, and by our partnership with fellow students in our CUs. It’s a privilege to work with IFES – but it’s slow, with more frustrations and obstacles (funds for staff, Christians reluctant to live in the world and a local culture immunised against Christ) than breakthroughs and visible progress. There are signs of gathering momentum. We’ve planted new groups in two northern towns, one of which saw a young man converted before Christmas. This is so rare in Greece. We have a new director, two young graduates formally starting as associate staff this term and a nucleus of undergraduates who are beginning to get the vision. We are so glad that UCCF trained us to believe in doing the right things, not the quick and easy things.

I’d been thinking seriously about long-term cross-cultural mission for a decade by the time we ended our stint on UCCF staff. We were sent by We miss England, we miss our home church, we our church in Beeston, Nottingham, to IFES Greece miss Cheddar cheese and real ale. But there are in 2007 to help establish a student movement great things and people in Greece that we love, effective in evangelism and discipleship. We’re and we know with deep conviction that in the end planning to be here as long as it takes to equip it’s not really about where one is but who one Greek believers to lead a movement that reaches listens to. And the great thing is that we know all of this spiritually barren nation’s universities with that the weak-looking seed of the Word will in the the good news. Dawn’s path was different: in her end bring a great harvest, because the one who own words, she’d always thought missionaries speaks it will do exactly as He intends through that were losers who just wanted an escape from weak-looking Word. That’s a lesson we began to British culture. This was challenged head-on at learn in CU. Relay 2, Edinburgh 1997, and from then on she Jonathan and was able to say gladly that living for God’s glory Dawn Clark and being shaped by his agenda meant not ruling & family. anything out, including going overseas.

37


Reaching the World with Long-Term Vision Short term summer teams play a significant part in fulfilling our global vision. However, many former UCCF Staff, Relay and students have gone on to commit to long-term overseas work. Jonathan and Dawn Clark were on UCCF staff from 1999–2004. They have been planting a CU movement in Greece since 2007. Pod Bhogal, UCCF’s Head of Communications, talks to Jonathan about how being involved with CU was instrumental in leading them to Greece.

How did UCCF help? How were you involved with CU as students?

We look back with fondness and deep gratitude to God for our Christian Unions in the mid 90s. We arrived as Christians but it was the CU (and later, Relay) that shaped and honed our convictions and set us on our path of service ever since. Both of us found ourselves welcomed into a vibrant community of students who had been given – perhaps for the first time – a vision of the gospel that was global, biblical, Christ-centered and gripping. We grew to love the weekly Bible teaching, the training in evangelism and the outward-looking fellowship in small groups. We had the privilege leading for a couple of years, benefiting from regional and national Forum, and applied to do Relay to continue our training.

Did you always want to do long-term mission? Jonathan Clark in Athens

36

Not a week goes by without a conscious recollection of things learned, enjoyed and grasped during our time with UCCF. Carrying on in longterm mission would not have been possible without the foundations that were laid by our UCCF Staff Workers and Team Leaders in the Midlands and the North East, and by our partnership with fellow students in our CUs. It’s a privilege to work with IFES – but it’s slow, with more frustrations and obstacles (funds for staff, Christians reluctant to live in the world and a local culture immunised against Christ) than breakthroughs and visible progress. There are signs of gathering momentum. We’ve planted new groups in two northern towns, one of which saw a young man converted before Christmas. This is so rare in Greece. We have a new director, two young graduates formally starting as associate staff this term and a nucleus of undergraduates who are beginning to get the vision. We are so glad that UCCF trained us to believe in doing the right things, not the quick and easy things.

I’d been thinking seriously about long-term cross-cultural mission for a decade by the time we ended our stint on UCCF staff. We were sent by We miss England, we miss our home church, we our church in Beeston, Nottingham, to IFES Greece miss Cheddar cheese and real ale. But there are in 2007 to help establish a student movement great things and people in Greece that we love, effective in evangelism and discipleship. We’re and we know with deep conviction that in the end planning to be here as long as it takes to equip it’s not really about where one is but who one Greek believers to lead a movement that reaches listens to. And the great thing is that we know all of this spiritually barren nation’s universities with that the weak-looking seed of the Word will in the the good news. Dawn’s path was different: in her end bring a great harvest, because the one who own words, she’d always thought missionaries speaks it will do exactly as He intends through that were losers who just wanted an escape from weak-looking Word. That’s a lesson we began to British culture. This was challenged head-on at learn in CU. Relay 2, Edinburgh 1997, and from then on she Jonathan and was able to say gladly that living for God’s glory Dawn Clark and being shaped by his agenda meant not ruling & family. anything out, including going overseas.

37


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from? d come o G id d 1. Where d? 2. Can we believe in Go

What have you been thinking about?

10 most popular search questions

4 Index

B Learn about the core principles of the christian faith

j Relate these principles to your everyday life E Discover how the Christian faith sits against other worldviews b Discuss with us about key issues

new design launching 2013

Featured

Trending

o

Latest

o

o

old design

9. What is apologetics?

Bethinking Event Author Name

Why are Christians so Old-Fashioned About Sex? Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. 10. Who made God?

38

Who is Jesus? Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

Feature, Event, Science

Dawkins, Atheism, Science

God, Truth, History, News

39


Looking Forward ‘I had a crisis of faith several months ago. In large part, it was bethinking.org that enabled me to overcome this challenge and restore my faith in Jesus’

858

226

Resources

Resources by difficulty

Authors

Since launch:

1,123,792

Resources by media type

Unique visits

Advanced 187

Other 15

Video 43

Beginner 375

4,876,011

Audio 239

Page views

Intermediate 266

text 561

24,200

Average number of visitors per month

UCCF Supporter

bethinking

B Learn

j Relate

E Discover

b Discuss

Advanced Search

BjEb

This is a library of the best resources to explore the Christian faith.

8. Did J esus ex ist?

evil?

disprove God?

7. Does Science

6. Why does God allow

5. Did Einstein believe in God?

3. Who am I? 4. Does religion cause war?

from? d come o G id d 1. Where d? 2. Can we believe in Go

What have you been thinking about?

10 most popular search questions

4 Index

B Learn about the core principles of the christian faith

j Relate these principles to your everyday life E Discover how the Christian faith sits against other worldviews b Discuss with us about key issues

new design launching 2013

Featured

Trending

o

Latest

o

o

old design

9. What is apologetics?

Bethinking Event Author Name

Why are Christians so Old-Fashioned About Sex? Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. 10. Who made God?

38

Who is Jesus? Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

Feature, Event, Science

Dawkins, Atheism, Science

God, Truth, History, News

39


UCCF Redevelops World-Class Apologetics Website Bethinking.org is UCCF’s worldclass apologetics website that has generated over a million visits and almost five million page views since its launch in 2004. The site hosts thousands of resources that help Christian students (and non-students) think through, and be able to respond to, contemporary objections to the Christian faith. In 2012 the site attracted 450,000 visits from more than 290,000 people. However, the growth in the sheer number of resources now available on the website has meant finding, and easily accessing, these resources has become increasingly difficult. Advances in mobile and tablet technology and the changes in the way in which media is consumed has meant that in 2013 UCCF started a process of significant website redevelopment in order to maintain its status as a world-class online apologetics library. Michael Gough, Director of Sparks Studio, has been helping UCCF with the website rebuild. He explains, ‘Before starting on the design of a new site it was important that we took the time to consider how the existing one was being used. This helped us to identify the key objectives for the new design.’ He continues, ‘We noticed that the search results page was the second most popular section of the site after the homepage, and the visitors only looked at around two pages before leaving. So we learnt that having arrived at the homepage the majority of visitors used the search box to find the resource they wanted, found it and then left.’

Pod Bhogal, UCCF’s Head of Communications and project leader continues, ‘It has been important for us to respond to the way people are using the website. The result is that – with Sparks Studio – we’ve made the search facility much easier to use and have worked hard to encourage users to explore more of the different types of content the website features beyond their initial enquiry.’ Michael Gough adds, ‘Bethinking has over eight hundred resources available so it was clear the site needed to work better at opening up the breadth of resources and encourage users to look at more than two pages. The old site split the resources across fourteen categories which seemed too many and needed to be simplified. The number of categories sought to provide the breadth of content but in reality it felt cumbersome, unwieldy and made it difficult for users to find what they wanted.’ Ollie Brown, UCCF’s Web Developer said, ‘We’ve been able to apply a more contemporary design to the website and develop a navigation system that is better able to help users find what they want and not get lost in the thousands of resources that are available.’ He continues, ‘Since the original site was launched in 2004, more people are using mobile phones and tablets to access material. We’ve been able to take this into account and using bethinking.org on a mobile phone or iPad will be a much better experience now.’ Chris Knight, bethinking.org Co-ordinator, added, ‘The new site should be up and running around December 2013. We will monitor usage and make changes according to the data as it comes in.’ Michael agrees concluding, ‘It will be important to continue to measure and review how the new site is used to see if more material is being accessed and disseminated. The great thing about digital resources is that unlike printed ones, they are not fixed in time. There is the possibility of continual improvement and refinement building on the strengths of what is working well while adapting and developing what is weak.’

I just wanted to thank you for such an outstanding website and the excellent resources you offer to the ministry of God's Word. I am a rather new older (age) student who also happens to be a pastor and I am currently completing some seminary work. The information I have found throughout your site has been immensely invaluable.

What the punters say

I'm definitely going to be utilising this for my campus training night we're currently working through the typical apologetic questions that a Christian faces at University. Your site is perfect for providing some food for thought on such questions.

site ed on your web I have stumbl ld. go have struck and feel that I ur rried by yo The ar ticles ca eat fidelity to gr website show e ox y, while at th biblical or thod ly al or ey are past same time, th sensitive.

bethinking

B Learn

bethinking.org was redesigned by Sparks, a design agency for free thinkers and independent minds, that help clients engage new audiences and build businesses. They have enjoyed a collaborative working partnership with UCCF for over six years.

www.sparks-branding.com

j Relate

E Discover

b Discuss

4 Index Advanced Search

What have you been thinking about?

bethinking

o

Been thinking?

BjEb

This is a library of the best resources to explore the Christian faith.

Has Science Disproved God? Peter May

Featured

o

Peter May served on the General Synod of the Church of England from 1985 to 2010 and was Chair of the UCCF Trust Board from 2003 to 2010. He is a retired GP.

Dawkins, Atheism, Science

Bethinking Event Author Name

You might also be interested in

o

o

Easier navigation

o

Clearer search facility

find and access articles quickly Bethinking Event Author Name

40 In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

search for topics your friends are Why are Christians so talking about Who is Jesus? Old-Fashioned About Sex? Peter May

Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian

itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

Responsive design Feature, Event, Science

Trending attractive, contemporary and accessible for mobile, tablets and desktops

o 41


UCCF Redevelops World-Class Apologetics Website Bethinking.org is UCCF’s worldclass apologetics website that has generated over a million visits and almost five million page views since its launch in 2004. The site hosts thousands of resources that help Christian students (and non-students) think through, and be able to respond to, contemporary objections to the Christian faith. In 2012 the site attracted 450,000 visits from more than 290,000 people. However, the growth in the sheer number of resources now available on the website has meant finding, and easily accessing, these resources has become increasingly difficult. Advances in mobile and tablet technology and the changes in the way in which media is consumed has meant that in 2013 UCCF started a process of significant website redevelopment in order to maintain its status as a world-class online apologetics library. Michael Gough, Director of Sparks Studio, has been helping UCCF with the website rebuild. He explains, ‘Before starting on the design of a new site it was important that we took the time to consider how the existing one was being used. This helped us to identify the key objectives for the new design.’ He continues, ‘We noticed that the search results page was the second most popular section of the site after the homepage, and the visitors only looked at around two pages before leaving. So we learnt that having arrived at the homepage the majority of visitors used the search box to find the resource they wanted, found it and then left.’

Pod Bhogal, UCCF’s Head of Communications and project leader continues, ‘It has been important for us to respond to the way people are using the website. The result is that – with Sparks Studio – we’ve made the search facility much easier to use and have worked hard to encourage users to explore more of the different types of content the website features beyond their initial enquiry.’ Michael Gough adds, ‘Bethinking has over eight hundred resources available so it was clear the site needed to work better at opening up the breadth of resources and encourage users to look at more than two pages. The old site split the resources across fourteen categories which seemed too many and needed to be simplified. The number of categories sought to provide the breadth of content but in reality it felt cumbersome, unwieldy and made it difficult for users to find what they wanted.’ Ollie Brown, UCCF’s Web Developer said, ‘We’ve been able to apply a more contemporary design to the website and develop a navigation system that is better able to help users find what they want and not get lost in the thousands of resources that are available.’ He continues, ‘Since the original site was launched in 2004, more people are using mobile phones and tablets to access material. We’ve been able to take this into account and using bethinking.org on a mobile phone or iPad will be a much better experience now.’ Chris Knight, bethinking.org Co-ordinator, added, ‘The new site should be up and running around December 2013. We will monitor usage and make changes according to the data as it comes in.’ Michael agrees concluding, ‘It will be important to continue to measure and review how the new site is used to see if more material is being accessed and disseminated. The great thing about digital resources is that unlike printed ones, they are not fixed in time. There is the possibility of continual improvement and refinement building on the strengths of what is working well while adapting and developing what is weak.’

I just wanted to thank you for such an outstanding website and the excellent resources you offer to the ministry of God's Word. I am a rather new older (age) student who also happens to be a pastor and I am currently completing some seminary work. The information I have found throughout your site has been immensely invaluable.

What the punters say

I'm definitely going to be utilising this for my campus training night we're currently working through the typical apologetic questions that a Christian faces at University. Your site is perfect for providing some food for thought on such questions.

site ed on your web I have stumbl ld. go have struck and feel that I ur rried by yo The ar ticles ca eat fidelity to gr website show e ox y, while at th biblical or thod ly al or ey are past same time, th sensitive.

bethinking

B Learn

bethinking.org was redesigned by Sparks, a design agency for free thinkers and independent minds, that help clients engage new audiences and build businesses. They have enjoyed a collaborative working partnership with UCCF for over six years.

www.sparks-branding.com

j Relate

E Discover

b Discuss

4 Index Advanced Search

What have you been thinking about?

bethinking

o

Been thinking?

BjEb

This is a library of the best resources to explore the Christian faith.

Has Science Disproved God? Peter May

Featured

o

Peter May served on the General Synod of the Church of England from 1985 to 2010 and was Chair of the UCCF Trust Board from 2003 to 2010. He is a retired GP.

Dawkins, Atheism, Science

Bethinking Event Author Name

You might also be interested in

o

o

Easier navigation

o

Clearer search facility

find and access articles quickly Bethinking Event Author Name

40 In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

search for topics your friends are Why are Christians so talking about Who is Jesus? Old-Fashioned About Sex? Peter May

Peter May

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian

itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

In January 2005, two remarkable events occurred. The first was that Oxford atheist and Darwinian itatia qui blanimus a veria incil esti veribusdae in.

Responsive design Feature, Event, Science

Trending attractive, contemporary and accessible for mobile, tablets and desktops

o 41


Investing in mission As we look back over this last year of UCCF’s finances, we are both thankful and persistent in our prayers. Through you, our faithful supporters, God has provided for our ministry needs, yet we are aware that we are in challenging times and there is much more for which we need your support. Big picture finances

You will notice from the accompanying summary of our income and expenditure that we have been both blessed and challenged in our finances over the course of the last year. In particular, gifts from individuals and trusts have fallen from the year before. This is due largely to the exceptional circumstances of a specialised project that we raised funds for in 2011/12. We received a number of significant gifts from specific trusts and individuals whom we targeted with a capital appeal for our office move to Blue Boar House. Our income from individuals and trusts is therefore a healthier picture than at first it might appear. Nonetheless, the charitable sector continues to struggle somewhat, with many charities feeling the ongoing effects of the recession and high inflation rates. In this climate and with such factors to consider, we give thanks for the strength and stability of individual giving, which remains our largest source of income. Our annual appeal, which last year raised support for our Uncover Gospel Project, saw an increase on the previous year, and for this we thank God and all those generous supporters who joined with our students and staff to make this possible. Alongside this, you can see that there has been a 42

growth in our giving from churches and legacies. While we are unable to foresee or plan for the way that God provides through the legacies of longstanding supporters, we are deeply grateful and so encouraged by these special gifts.

Lancashire post from part-time to full-time, and we recruited a second Staff Worker to work alongside CUs in Oxford, which filled a vacancy from the year before. As you will have noticed throughout this Annual Review, there has been a greater level of ministry activity in this last year. Training events have grown, Uncover resources have multiplied and hands-on support has continued to be as important as ever. It has been perhaps our most effective year yet, and all of this has only been possible through your prayerful and financial support.

Getting involved

In all of this, we are, as ever, dependent on the generosity of you, our supporters. In many ways, our finances remain constant and strong, and so we thank you for the vital part that you play in this ministry.

I hope that you too have been rejoicing as you’ve read this Annual Review and seen the ways that God has been working to further his Kingdom through the Christian Unions, supported by your prayers and gifts. With all that we as a fellowship have achieved, we are spurred on to maintain and grow the impact of this gospel work in the new academic year. Increasingly, students starting at university have had no previous contact with church or Christians. The CUs are well-prepared and well-placed to engage them, especially after the encouragements of this last year. If you are considering making a gift to this ministry please see the enclosed annual appeal or give online at www.uccf.org.uk/give

What have we been able to do with your gifts?

Thank you again for your faithful support and gospel partnership.

With our biggest ever Forum and the Saltshaker training days that Rebecca Manley Pippert has held across Great Britain, we are continuing to invest in training and equipping Christian students for evangelism. This is reflected in the increased income and expenditure you can see for UCCF’s conferences and training. Income from book sales has also risen considerably since Uncover has been taken on board by the UK’s churches.

We saw a marginal increase in our charitable expenditure last year due to our increased level of activity on the mission field. Despite this, our total expenditure has in fact dropped a little, indicating that a greater proportion of our spending has gone towards our direct ministry. This represents the ongoing growth of our work and the wonderful fruit we’ve seen as a result. Your gifts have enabled us to do more by way of training, resourcing and supporting the CUs. We were able to add two new part-time posts to our Wales Team – an arts Wales post and a Welsh-speaking post. Additionally, we were able to increase our Cumbria and North

'When I arrived the CU was small and membership stood at about twelve. By the time I left this has grown to more than 120 with at least one conversion a week. A number of my friends were converted and I still keep up with them these many, many years later. Is it any wonder that I support the UCCF whole heartedly! 'In the photo I sent to you I am to the extreme right, behind the row standing, between heads two and three, you will see my face. About two thirds of those in the picture had been converted since coming up to university. 'To God alone be the glory! Happy memories.'

Arthur Port, UCCF Supporter

Richard Cunningham Director

Loughborough CU, June, 1954

43


Investing in mission As we look back over this last year of UCCF’s finances, we are both thankful and persistent in our prayers. Through you, our faithful supporters, God has provided for our ministry needs, yet we are aware that we are in challenging times and there is much more for which we need your support. Big picture finances

You will notice from the accompanying summary of our income and expenditure that we have been both blessed and challenged in our finances over the course of the last year. In particular, gifts from individuals and trusts have fallen from the year before. This is due largely to the exceptional circumstances of a specialised project that we raised funds for in 2011/12. We received a number of significant gifts from specific trusts and individuals whom we targeted with a capital appeal for our office move to Blue Boar House. Our income from individuals and trusts is therefore a healthier picture than at first it might appear. Nonetheless, the charitable sector continues to struggle somewhat, with many charities feeling the ongoing effects of the recession and high inflation rates. In this climate and with such factors to consider, we give thanks for the strength and stability of individual giving, which remains our largest source of income. Our annual appeal, which last year raised support for our Uncover Gospel Project, saw an increase on the previous year, and for this we thank God and all those generous supporters who joined with our students and staff to make this possible. Alongside this, you can see that there has been a 42

growth in our giving from churches and legacies. While we are unable to foresee or plan for the way that God provides through the legacies of longstanding supporters, we are deeply grateful and so encouraged by these special gifts.

Lancashire post from part-time to full-time, and we recruited a second Staff Worker to work alongside CUs in Oxford, which filled a vacancy from the year before. As you will have noticed throughout this Annual Review, there has been a greater level of ministry activity in this last year. Training events have grown, Uncover resources have multiplied and hands-on support has continued to be as important as ever. It has been perhaps our most effective year yet, and all of this has only been possible through your prayerful and financial support.

Getting involved

In all of this, we are, as ever, dependent on the generosity of you, our supporters. In many ways, our finances remain constant and strong, and so we thank you for the vital part that you play in this ministry.

I hope that you too have been rejoicing as you’ve read this Annual Review and seen the ways that God has been working to further his Kingdom through the Christian Unions, supported by your prayers and gifts. With all that we as a fellowship have achieved, we are spurred on to maintain and grow the impact of this gospel work in the new academic year. Increasingly, students starting at university have had no previous contact with church or Christians. The CUs are well-prepared and well-placed to engage them, especially after the encouragements of this last year. If you are considering making a gift to this ministry please see the enclosed annual appeal or give online at www.uccf.org.uk/give

What have we been able to do with your gifts?

Thank you again for your faithful support and gospel partnership.

With our biggest ever Forum and the Saltshaker training days that Rebecca Manley Pippert has held across Great Britain, we are continuing to invest in training and equipping Christian students for evangelism. This is reflected in the increased income and expenditure you can see for UCCF’s conferences and training. Income from book sales has also risen considerably since Uncover has been taken on board by the UK’s churches.

We saw a marginal increase in our charitable expenditure last year due to our increased level of activity on the mission field. Despite this, our total expenditure has in fact dropped a little, indicating that a greater proportion of our spending has gone towards our direct ministry. This represents the ongoing growth of our work and the wonderful fruit we’ve seen as a result. Your gifts have enabled us to do more by way of training, resourcing and supporting the CUs. We were able to add two new part-time posts to our Wales Team – an arts Wales post and a Welsh-speaking post. Additionally, we were able to increase our Cumbria and North

'When I arrived the CU was small and membership stood at about twelve. By the time I left this has grown to more than 120 with at least one conversion a week. A number of my friends were converted and I still keep up with them these many, many years later. Is it any wonder that I support the UCCF whole heartedly! 'In the photo I sent to you I am to the extreme right, behind the row standing, between heads two and three, you will see my face. About two thirds of those in the picture had been converted since coming up to university. 'To God alone be the glory! Happy memories.'

Arthur Port, UCCF Supporter

Richard Cunningham Director

Loughborough CU, June, 1954

43


Expenditure Income Investment Income Book Sales

Governance Conferences & Training

Miscellaneous Income

Conferences & Training

Development & Communications

Legacies Office Relocation Trusts Charitable Expenditure

In the early 1960s the Christian Union of Gipsy Hill Training College and Borough Road, Isleworth Teacher Training College met together fortnightly on Sunday afternoons, shared bible study and tea, and visited and led services at two nursing homes in the area. The close and supportive friendships that developed through those formative years have remained very strong and on June 22, 2013 we gathered for a reunion. Our student days were very important in the growth of our Christian lives and many students went into full-time ministry after a short time in teaching, others staying in the profession to be a witness in schools. We took an offering which was shared between the church that hosted the day and UCCF. In great thankfulness for the work of IVF [then UCCF] in those days 50 years ago, we are glad to support the vital work among students in today’s world.

Gwen Metcalf UCCF Supporter Individuals Churches

Income (£'000)

Donated Income Individuals Churches Trusts Legacies Subtotal Other Income Conferences & Training Book sales Investment Income Miscellaneous Income Subtotal Total Income

2012/13 2011/12

2012/13

2011/12

Expenditure (£'000) 1,863 303 758 216 3,140

2,170 299 1,281 209 3,959

279 43 5 7 334

191 11 5 2 209

3,474

4,168

Charitable Expenditure 2,643 2,514 Governance 16 20 Development & Communications 286 295 Conferences & Training 293 210 Office Relocation 36 277

Total Expenditure 3,274

3,316

Surplus for Period 200 852 * † * this surplus represents just 3 weeks of ministry costs † this figure is connected to monies received for the purchase of Blue Boar House and in no way reflects the available cash for our day-to-day ministry.

The 2012–13 figures are provisional and subject to audit.

44

45


Expenditure Income Investment Income Book Sales

Governance Conferences & Training

Miscellaneous Income

Conferences & Training

Development & Communications

Legacies Office Relocation Trusts Charitable Expenditure

In the early 1960s the Christian Union of Gipsy Hill Training College and Borough Road, Isleworth Teacher Training College met together fortnightly on Sunday afternoons, shared bible study and tea, and visited and led services at two nursing homes in the area. The close and supportive friendships that developed through those formative years have remained very strong and on June 22, 2013 we gathered for a reunion. Our student days were very important in the growth of our Christian lives and many students went into full-time ministry after a short time in teaching, others staying in the profession to be a witness in schools. We took an offering which was shared between the church that hosted the day and UCCF. In great thankfulness for the work of IVF [then UCCF] in those days 50 years ago, we are glad to support the vital work among students in today’s world.

Gwen Metcalf UCCF Supporter Individuals Churches

Income (£'000)

Donated Income Individuals Churches Trusts Legacies Subtotal Other Income Conferences & Training Book sales Investment Income Miscellaneous Income Subtotal Total Income

2012/13 2011/12

2012/13

2011/12

Expenditure (£'000) 1,863 303 758 216 3,140

2,170 299 1,281 209 3,959

279 43 5 7 334

191 11 5 2 209

3,474

4,168

Charitable Expenditure 2,643 2,514 Governance 16 20 Development & Communications 286 295 Conferences & Training 293 210 Office Relocation 36 277

Total Expenditure 3,274

3,316

Surplus for Period 200 852 * † * this surplus represents just 3 weeks of ministry costs † this figure is connected to monies received for the purchase of Blue Boar House and in no way reflects the available cash for our day-to-day ministry.

The 2012–13 figures are provisional and subject to audit.

44

45


Research Kirby Laing Institute for Christian Ethics (KLICE) Over the last year, the Public Leadership Programme (PLP) of KLICE has continued to flourish with Andrew Goddard building on the work done as associate director by Joshua Hordern. We have had three successful seminars with postgraduate students from a number of universities across the UK. They are able to share their own research work with each other and be equipped to communicate a Christian vision in the public square through the input of distinguished guest speakers including Jolyon Mitchell and Elaine Storkey. The Ethics in Brief publications continue to provide excellent accessible resources for all interested in developing Christian thinking and apologetics across a range of issues (in the last year these have included such areas as human personhood, samesex marriage, the Haiti earthquake and freedom of conscience). The monthly KLICE comments provide shorter more up-to-the-minute Christian reflections. All of these are freely available on the KLICE website.

This summer we partnered with the Lawyers’ Christian Fellowship and Christian Medical Fellowship to run two summer schools. The lawyers focused on the important area of commercial law and banking while the CMF Summer School – which was particularly seeking to attract medical students this year – helped equip Christians to serve Christ in secular medicine.

Tyndale House Tyndale House in Cambridge has continued to be a resource for postgraduates (and a few budding undergraduates!) from UK universities carrying out research on the Bible. We possess Britain’s leading library of the Bible, and this attracts about fifty researchers at graduate level or above at any one time.

We also continue to make awards to students, this year launching (with Transforming Business) an Economics and Business Award for students doing doctoral research on the purpose of business. Mark Sampson, studying at King’s College, London, is the first recipient and we are advertising for a second award-holder.

We find that new dissertations, books and resources are being constantly produced, and our staff have spoken to around twenty thousand people in high-level seminars during the year. We have been proactive in providing scholarships and study resources for people from China, Cuba, and eastern Europe and in providing our research fellows for speaking, writing and videos aimed at students of all levels and those who enjoy an intellectual challenge.

Both KLICE Director, Jonathan Chaplin, and Associate Director, Andrew Goddard, have spoken at various events, including Jonathan contributing in March to the Developing A Christian Mind course for postgrads at Oxford and Andrew involved in a Westminster Faith Debate on the family which will be part of a forthcoming book aimed at students and young people.

Using a network of close to a hundred volunteers we have recently launched Bible software at www. stepbible.org which is free and enables people in a number of the world’s major languages to have interlinear Bibles in their own language and the original languages of the Bible. Now every student in Britain, and many elsewhere, can get the meaning of the original word of any part of the Bible with a click.

The Revd Dr Andrew Goddard Associate Director, KLICE

Peter Williams Warden, Tyndale House

46

Peter Williams filmed for Uncover

47


Research Kirby Laing Institute for Christian Ethics (KLICE) Over the last year, the Public Leadership Programme (PLP) of KLICE has continued to flourish with Andrew Goddard building on the work done as associate director by Joshua Hordern. We have had three successful seminars with postgraduate students from a number of universities across the UK. They are able to share their own research work with each other and be equipped to communicate a Christian vision in the public square through the input of distinguished guest speakers including Jolyon Mitchell and Elaine Storkey. The Ethics in Brief publications continue to provide excellent accessible resources for all interested in developing Christian thinking and apologetics across a range of issues (in the last year these have included such areas as human personhood, samesex marriage, the Haiti earthquake and freedom of conscience). The monthly KLICE comments provide shorter more up-to-the-minute Christian reflections. All of these are freely available on the KLICE website.

This summer we partnered with the Lawyers’ Christian Fellowship and Christian Medical Fellowship to run two summer schools. The lawyers focused on the important area of commercial law and banking while the CMF Summer School – which was particularly seeking to attract medical students this year – helped equip Christians to serve Christ in secular medicine.

Tyndale House Tyndale House in Cambridge has continued to be a resource for postgraduates (and a few budding undergraduates!) from UK universities carrying out research on the Bible. We possess Britain’s leading library of the Bible, and this attracts about fifty researchers at graduate level or above at any one time.

We also continue to make awards to students, this year launching (with Transforming Business) an Economics and Business Award for students doing doctoral research on the purpose of business. Mark Sampson, studying at King’s College, London, is the first recipient and we are advertising for a second award-holder.

We find that new dissertations, books and resources are being constantly produced, and our staff have spoken to around twenty thousand people in high-level seminars during the year. We have been proactive in providing scholarships and study resources for people from China, Cuba, and eastern Europe and in providing our research fellows for speaking, writing and videos aimed at students of all levels and those who enjoy an intellectual challenge.

Both KLICE Director, Jonathan Chaplin, and Associate Director, Andrew Goddard, have spoken at various events, including Jonathan contributing in March to the Developing A Christian Mind course for postgrads at Oxford and Andrew involved in a Westminster Faith Debate on the family which will be part of a forthcoming book aimed at students and young people.

Using a network of close to a hundred volunteers we have recently launched Bible software at www. stepbible.org which is free and enables people in a number of the world’s major languages to have interlinear Bibles in their own language and the original languages of the Bible. Now every student in Britain, and many elsewhere, can get the meaning of the original word of any part of the Bible with a click.

The Revd Dr Andrew Goddard Associate Director, KLICE

Peter Williams Warden, Tyndale House

46

Peter Williams filmed for Uncover

47


1 million visitors to bethinking.org

34

Students’ Union award nominations Biggest Forum ever

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UCCF Annual Review 2013-14