Page 1

University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

2012/13

Annual Report


Facult y of Medicine

2012/13 Annual Report — 01

Our Vision

Creating the future of health. Our Mission

An innovative medical school committed to excellence and leadership in education, research and service to society.

Contents University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine 3330 Hospital Drive NW Calgary, AB T2N 4N1

medicine.ucalgary.ca

twitter @ UofCMedicine

facebook.com/ucalgarymedicine

youtube.com/ucalgarymedicine

403 220 2232

02 — Message from the Dean 03 — Research 11 — Education 17 — Connecting with the community 23 — Institute overviews


Facult y of Medicine

2012/13 Annual Report — 01

Our Vision

Creating the future of health. Our Mission

An innovative medical school committed to excellence and leadership in education, research and service to society.

Contents University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine 3330 Hospital Drive NW Calgary, AB T2N 4N1

medicine.ucalgary.ca

twitter @ UofCMedicine

facebook.com/ucalgarymedicine

youtube.com/ucalgarymedicine

403 220 2232

02 — Message from the Dean 03 — Research 11 — Education 17 — Connecting with the community 23 — Institute overviews


Me s sage f rom t he DE a N

02 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Jon Meddings, MD Dean, Faculty of Medicine University of Calgary

Message from the Dean It’s been nearly a year since I stepped into my new role as dean of the Faculty of Medicine and in that time the faculty has once again seen tremendous growth in each of our goal areas: research, education and service to society.

I

’ve said it before, but having a medical school located in the centre of Calgary is a real and tangible benefit to Calgarians. We are extremely proud to have made such a measurable contribution to addressing the family physician shortage in this province with the expansion of our family medicine residency training program, this year. The initiative places resident trainees in three different clinic sites across Calgary, including the newly opened South Health Campus. As a result, thousands of new patients —an estimated 6,000—now have access to family doctor resources in our city. Of course, this also provides an expanded opportunity for our students to get the hands on experience they need to become the health-care leaders of tomorrow. We have also solidified our commitment to the University of Calgary’s Eyes High strategic direction to become one of the top

five research universities in Canada by 2016. As leaders in the strategy, this year we have further focused and brought our faculty research priorities in line with those of Eyes High: brain and mental health, chronic disease, and cardiovascular sciences. These are areas in which the Faculty of Medicine already has proven leadership, state-of the-art supporting technologies and myriad opportunities for researchers and students to innovate and inspire. One of the highlights of that leadership is the appointment of Samuel Weiss, director of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, to lead the university-wide brain and mental health scholars’ initiative. Our clinical and basic science research, through a bench-to-bedside lens, is explored through all seven of our research institutes as we strengthen our ongoing commitment to creating the future of health in Alberta.

Further validating our alignment with Eyes High, I’m proud to say that the Faculty of Medicine has moved up to the top 100 in the 2013 QS World University Rankings. The rankings reveal the top 200 universities in the world by subject, and is the only tool that allows prospective students to compare universities internationally, by subject area. This is a great achievement for the faculty, as we commit ourselves to attracting the best and brightest students. As you review just some of the faculty’s highlights from the past year, presented in this annual report, I would also like to say thank you—thank you to all of those who generously support the researchers, students, and trainees at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary—together we are making great advancements in health sciences knowledge and helping to improve people’s health and the health care they receive each and every year. Sincerely, Jon Meddings, MD Dean, Faculty of Medicine University of Calgary

Research p.0 4  A

useful prediction tool for osteoarthritis patients

p.0 4 Childhood p.05 Lead

of brain and mental health initiative appointed

p.06 Cardiac p.06 Large p.07 An

cancer collaborative

registry benefits research

investment for glioblastoma research

eye on sepsis

p.0 8 Leadership

for genomics facility

p.0 8 Researching

physician wellness

Re se a rch

2012/13 Anuual Report — 03


Me s sage f rom t he DE a N

02 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Jon Meddings, MD Dean, Faculty of Medicine University of Calgary

Message from the Dean It’s been nearly a year since I stepped into my new role as dean of the Faculty of Medicine and in that time the faculty has once again seen tremendous growth in each of our goal areas: research, education and service to society.

I

’ve said it before, but having a medical school located in the centre of Calgary is a real and tangible benefit to Calgarians. We are extremely proud to have made such a measurable contribution to addressing the family physician shortage in this province with the expansion of our family medicine residency training program, this year. The initiative places resident trainees in three different clinic sites across Calgary, including the newly opened South Health Campus. As a result, thousands of new patients —an estimated 6,000—now have access to family doctor resources in our city. Of course, this also provides an expanded opportunity for our students to get the hands on experience they need to become the health-care leaders of tomorrow. We have also solidified our commitment to the University of Calgary’s Eyes High strategic direction to become one of the top

five research universities in Canada by 2016. As leaders in the strategy, this year we have further focused and brought our faculty research priorities in line with those of Eyes High: brain and mental health, chronic disease, and cardiovascular sciences. These are areas in which the Faculty of Medicine already has proven leadership, state-of the-art supporting technologies and myriad opportunities for researchers and students to innovate and inspire. One of the highlights of that leadership is the appointment of Samuel Weiss, director of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, to lead the university-wide brain and mental health scholars’ initiative. Our clinical and basic science research, through a bench-to-bedside lens, is explored through all seven of our research institutes as we strengthen our ongoing commitment to creating the future of health in Alberta.

Further validating our alignment with Eyes High, I’m proud to say that the Faculty of Medicine has moved up to the top 100 in the 2013 QS World University Rankings. The rankings reveal the top 200 universities in the world by subject, and is the only tool that allows prospective students to compare universities internationally, by subject area. This is a great achievement for the faculty, as we commit ourselves to attracting the best and brightest students. As you review just some of the faculty’s highlights from the past year, presented in this annual report, I would also like to say thank you—thank you to all of those who generously support the researchers, students, and trainees at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary—together we are making great advancements in health sciences knowledge and helping to improve people’s health and the health care they receive each and every year. Sincerely, Jon Meddings, MD Dean, Faculty of Medicine University of Calgary

Research p.0 4  A

useful prediction tool for osteoarthritis patients

p.0 4 Childhood p.05 Lead

of brain and mental health initiative appointed

p.06 Cardiac p.06 Large p.07 An

cancer collaborative

registry benefits research

investment for glioblastoma research

eye on sepsis

p.0 8 Leadership

for genomics facility

p.0 8 Researching

physician wellness

Re se a rch

2012/13 Anuual Report — 03


Re se a rch

Re se a rch

04 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

2012/13 Anuual Report — 05

Samuel Weiss, PhD.

A useful prediction tool  Using a high resolution computed tomography (micro-CT) scanner to analyze the architecture of the bone, University of Calgary researchers have demonstrated that the machine could identify bone micro-architecture, density and strength information making it a useful tool in predicting which patients with osteoporosis are more likely to fracture their bones. “Currently, it’s hard to determine who needs a medical intervention for osteoporosis. This new assessment tool may provide us with information to help us make better decisions,” says study author Steven Boyd, PhD, a member of the McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health and also the inaugural Bob and Nola Rintoul Chair in Bone and Joint Research. In Alberta, nearly one million people suffer from bone and joint health issues, including Bob and Nola Rintoul. The Rintouls both live with osteoarthritis, a form of arthritis that causes the deterioration of cartilage around bones, resulting in pain and inflammation. They have chosen to support research at the University of Calgary through a $1.3-million donation to establish the chair which Boyd now holds. Steven Boyd, PhD, is an Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions Senior Scholar.

Currently, it’s hard to determine who needs a medical intervention for osteoporosis. This new assessment tool may provide us with information to help us make better decisions.

Taking the lead  Samuel Weiss, PhD, director of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), has been appointed to lead the University of Calgary’s brain and mental health initiative, one of six research themes outlined in the university’s Strategic Research Plan. From left to right: Nola Rintoul, Bob Rintoul, Steven Boyd, PhD.

—Steven Boyd, PhD

Weiss will lead a committee of leaders brought together to connect and elevate the research capacity in brain and mental health from all corners of campus. He will also continue in his current role as director of the HBI.

Funding for new research facility A funding injection of $4,739,000 from the Government of Canada, through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), will lead to the creation of the new Mobility and Joint Health research facility at the University of Calgary. This is a cross-campus success story, with a multidisciplinary team of researchers representing several different faculties including medicine, engineering and kinesiology, working in one shared space. The facility will utilize a diversity of technologies and focus on three areas of research: biomarker analysis, motion analysis and imaging. The research facility will concentrate on musculoskeletal diseases including osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis which currently have no cures. Early diagnosis and intervention can alter the long-term outcome

Childhood Cancer collaborative A bone marrow transplant gave Dale Dusterhoft’s son Bryan the gift of a life free from childhood leukemia. More than a decade later, his company, Trican Well Service Ltd., was excited to offer more children the same opportunity with a $5-million gift to the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation and the University of Calgary, in order to support the efforts of the Childhood Cancer Collaborative. Ignited as a concept in 2006, the partnership between the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health (ACHRI), the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI), Alberta Health Services and the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation has become a collaborative effort to find new cures and better treatments for children fighting cancer—

the leading cause of death among kids with disease. “This partnership allows for the collaboration of world-class researchers, creating a much stronger research component than we previosuly had,” says Dr. Brent Scott, executive director of ACHRI. Dusterhoft, Trican’s CEO, anticipates there will be positive outcomes and happy endings for more families like his own. His son was first diagnosed with leukemia at three, had a bone marrow transplant at six, and is now graduating from the University of Calgary at 24. “With bone marrow transplants at that time, there was a lot of risk,” says Dusterhoft. “One thing I noticed was the children’s hospital we were working with had some of the best people in North America. They are leading the research, and are also leading the clinical care in this area.”

of these chronic conditions.

Research Gets New Boost The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) has invested $1.25-million in continued support of diabetes research through the Julia McFarlane Chair in Diabetes Research at the University of Calgary, currently held by Dr. Pere Santamaria. Announced last fall, Santamaria’s lab is now officially the Canadian Diabetes Association Laboratory, Honouring the Diabetes Association Foothills Legacy. 

A member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, Santamaria studies autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Dr. Pere Santamaria is supported by Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions.

Dr. Pere Santamaria in his lab.

Once the entire facility is built and operational, there will be more than 50 researchers and 150 student trainees working in the centre. This facility will also be instrumental in attracting new faculty members to the McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health which will lead to better clinical care for Calgarians.


Re se a rch

Re se a rch

04 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

2012/13 Anuual Report — 05

Samuel Weiss, PhD.

A useful prediction tool  Using a high resolution computed tomography (micro-CT) scanner to analyze the architecture of the bone, University of Calgary researchers have demonstrated that the machine could identify bone micro-architecture, density and strength information making it a useful tool in predicting which patients with osteoporosis are more likely to fracture their bones. “Currently, it’s hard to determine who needs a medical intervention for osteoporosis. This new assessment tool may provide us with information to help us make better decisions,” says study author Steven Boyd, PhD, a member of the McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health and also the inaugural Bob and Nola Rintoul Chair in Bone and Joint Research. In Alberta, nearly one million people suffer from bone and joint health issues, including Bob and Nola Rintoul. The Rintouls both live with osteoarthritis, a form of arthritis that causes the deterioration of cartilage around bones, resulting in pain and inflammation. They have chosen to support research at the University of Calgary through a $1.3-million donation to establish the chair which Boyd now holds. Steven Boyd, PhD, is an Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions Senior Scholar.

Currently, it’s hard to determine who needs a medical intervention for osteoporosis. This new assessment tool may provide us with information to help us make better decisions.

Taking the lead  Samuel Weiss, PhD, director of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), has been appointed to lead the University of Calgary’s brain and mental health initiative, one of six research themes outlined in the university’s Strategic Research Plan. From left to right: Nola Rintoul, Bob Rintoul, Steven Boyd, PhD.

—Steven Boyd, PhD

Weiss will lead a committee of leaders brought together to connect and elevate the research capacity in brain and mental health from all corners of campus. He will also continue in his current role as director of the HBI.

Funding for new research facility A funding injection of $4,739,000 from the Government of Canada, through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), will lead to the creation of the new Mobility and Joint Health research facility at the University of Calgary. This is a cross-campus success story, with a multidisciplinary team of researchers representing several different faculties including medicine, engineering and kinesiology, working in one shared space. The facility will utilize a diversity of technologies and focus on three areas of research: biomarker analysis, motion analysis and imaging. The research facility will concentrate on musculoskeletal diseases including osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis which currently have no cures. Early diagnosis and intervention can alter the long-term outcome

Childhood Cancer collaborative A bone marrow transplant gave Dale Dusterhoft’s son Bryan the gift of a life free from childhood leukemia. More than a decade later, his company, Trican Well Service Ltd., was excited to offer more children the same opportunity with a $5-million gift to the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation and the University of Calgary, in order to support the efforts of the Childhood Cancer Collaborative. Ignited as a concept in 2006, the partnership between the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health (ACHRI), the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI), Alberta Health Services and the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation has become a collaborative effort to find new cures and better treatments for children fighting cancer—

the leading cause of death among kids with disease. “This partnership allows for the collaboration of world-class researchers, creating a much stronger research component than we previosuly had,” says Dr. Brent Scott, executive director of ACHRI. Dusterhoft, Trican’s CEO, anticipates there will be positive outcomes and happy endings for more families like his own. His son was first diagnosed with leukemia at three, had a bone marrow transplant at six, and is now graduating from the University of Calgary at 24. “With bone marrow transplants at that time, there was a lot of risk,” says Dusterhoft. “One thing I noticed was the children’s hospital we were working with had some of the best people in North America. They are leading the research, and are also leading the clinical care in this area.”

of these chronic conditions.

Research Gets New Boost The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) has invested $1.25-million in continued support of diabetes research through the Julia McFarlane Chair in Diabetes Research at the University of Calgary, currently held by Dr. Pere Santamaria. Announced last fall, Santamaria’s lab is now officially the Canadian Diabetes Association Laboratory, Honouring the Diabetes Association Foothills Legacy. 

A member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, Santamaria studies autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Dr. Pere Santamaria is supported by Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions.

Dr. Pere Santamaria in his lab.

Once the entire facility is built and operational, there will be more than 50 researchers and 150 student trainees working in the centre. This facility will also be instrumental in attracting new faculty members to the McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health which will lead to better clinical care for Calgarians.


Re se a rch

A focus on brain cancer

Paul Kubes, PhD.

 Did you know?

The investment—one of the largest ever made in Canada to research glioblastoma— was received from the Terry Fox Research Institute, the Terry Fox Foundation, Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, the Alberta Cancer Foundation, Genome Canada, Genome BC and the BC Cancer Foundation.

A unique APPROACH What started out in 1995 as Dr. Merril Knudtson’s vision for a provincial database, to collect and process health information to improve cardiac care, has now grown into one of the world’s largest and most-encompassing cardiac registries. APPROACH (Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessments in Coronary Heart Disease) currently tracks more than 200,000 patients with chronic heart disease in Alberta. The tool pioneered a way to monitor and electronically record important data such as hospital readmission stats, death rates and quality of life questionnaires. There have been 150 peer-reviewed publications by APPROACH investigators and more than 40 people who’ve done their Masters and PhD theses using data from the registry. Currently, more than 18 major cardiovascular centres across Canada have adopted the model in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador. This year, new partnerships are anticipated to start in Manitoba and New Brunswick as well as new sites in Quebec and extra sites in Ontario. Recently, APPROACH was recognized with a national CIHR-CMAJ award.

2012/13 Anuual Report — 07

An eye on sepsis

From left to right: Glioblastoma survivor Bradley Virginillo and Dr. Gregory Cairncross.

 An $8.2-million investment to research glioblastoma, the most common and deadly form of brain cancer among adults, will harness the talents and technologies of some of the country’s top minds in cancer research to focus on the development of new drugs. Dr. Gregory Cairncross, a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, will lead the project. Approximately 2,600 Canadians are diagnosed with glioblastoma annually, a disease for which treatment options have remained largely unchanged over the last three decades.

Re se a rch

06 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Sepsis is an inflammatory response generally triggered by an infection. The disease affects approximately 750,000 North Americans annually— severe cases can be fatal.

Landmark clinical trial A team of Canadian scientists and physicians, led by Dr. Michael Hill of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and the Calgary Stroke Program at Foothills Medical Centre, have demonstrated that a neuroprotectant drug, developed at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre at Toronto’s Western Hospital, protects the human brain against the damaging effects of stroke. The study evaluated the effectiveness of NA-1[Tat-NR2B9c] when it was administered after the onset of small strokes incurred by patients who undergo specific procedures to repair brain aneurysms. This type of small ischemic stroke occurs in more than 90 per cent of aneurysm patients after such a procedure, but usually does not cause overt neurological disability. In the trial, those treated with Tat-NR2B9c showed a reduction in the amount of brain damage sustained as a result of the aneurysm repair procedure. Additionally, in patients who had a ruptured brain aneurysm, those treated with Tat-NR2B9c all had good neurological outcomes. Dr. Michael Hill is supported by Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions and is also a member of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta and the Institute for Public Health.

Creating awareness

Sepsis discovery made  A recent study has discovered one of the ways the body clears bacteria from the blood stream, which could potentially help researchers understand why some people become septic and others do not. The study, which was conducted in animal models, found neutrophils —a type of white blood cell—releases large spider-like webs that help catch the bacteria. The nets are covered in toxic chemicals that not only destroy the bacteria, but can be harmful to the human body. Study author Paul Kubes, PhD, director of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, says that even though this process has been shown to be an essential part of fighting off sepsis, it’s now thought that it may also contribute to the damaging and potentially fatal effects of the disease.

Kubes says that based on this research, he and his team, in collaboration with the Centre for Drug and Research Development in Vancouver, are now in the process of screening thousands of different compounds to see if they can come up with a drug that could act as an inhibitor and/or activator of this process. The hope is to eventually find a drug that will allow them to ‘tweak’ the net release process as is needed to effectively fight off sepsis with minimal harm to the body. This research was supported by Alberta Innovates−Health Solutions, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The Alberta Sepsis Network (ASN) hosted a series of events for the University of Calgary community to mark the inaugural International World Sepsis Day on September 13, 2012— a day designated to create awareness surrounding the disease. The ASN is a provincial research team funded by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, and made up of 25 physicians and researchers from the University's of Calgary, Alberta, and Lethbridge. One project the team is working on is a registry of patients admitted to the Calgary and Edmonton adult and paediatric intensive care units. Dr. Chip Doig, a member of the Snyder Institute and the Institute for Public Health, and also a co-team leader for ASN, says the patient registry will help change the lives of sepsis sufferers. “By identifying a large group of sepsis patients, we can examine risk factors or treatment interventions that have worsened or improved outcomes,” he says.


Re se a rch

A focus on brain cancer

Paul Kubes, PhD.

 Did you know?

The investment—one of the largest ever made in Canada to research glioblastoma— was received from the Terry Fox Research Institute, the Terry Fox Foundation, Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, the Alberta Cancer Foundation, Genome Canada, Genome BC and the BC Cancer Foundation.

A unique APPROACH What started out in 1995 as Dr. Merril Knudtson’s vision for a provincial database, to collect and process health information to improve cardiac care, has now grown into one of the world’s largest and most-encompassing cardiac registries. APPROACH (Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessments in Coronary Heart Disease) currently tracks more than 200,000 patients with chronic heart disease in Alberta. The tool pioneered a way to monitor and electronically record important data such as hospital readmission stats, death rates and quality of life questionnaires. There have been 150 peer-reviewed publications by APPROACH investigators and more than 40 people who’ve done their Masters and PhD theses using data from the registry. Currently, more than 18 major cardiovascular centres across Canada have adopted the model in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador. This year, new partnerships are anticipated to start in Manitoba and New Brunswick as well as new sites in Quebec and extra sites in Ontario. Recently, APPROACH was recognized with a national CIHR-CMAJ award.

2012/13 Anuual Report — 07

An eye on sepsis

From left to right: Glioblastoma survivor Bradley Virginillo and Dr. Gregory Cairncross.

 An $8.2-million investment to research glioblastoma, the most common and deadly form of brain cancer among adults, will harness the talents and technologies of some of the country’s top minds in cancer research to focus on the development of new drugs. Dr. Gregory Cairncross, a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, will lead the project. Approximately 2,600 Canadians are diagnosed with glioblastoma annually, a disease for which treatment options have remained largely unchanged over the last three decades.

Re se a rch

06 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Sepsis is an inflammatory response generally triggered by an infection. The disease affects approximately 750,000 North Americans annually— severe cases can be fatal.

Landmark clinical trial A team of Canadian scientists and physicians, led by Dr. Michael Hill of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and the Calgary Stroke Program at Foothills Medical Centre, have demonstrated that a neuroprotectant drug, developed at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre at Toronto’s Western Hospital, protects the human brain against the damaging effects of stroke. The study evaluated the effectiveness of NA-1[Tat-NR2B9c] when it was administered after the onset of small strokes incurred by patients who undergo specific procedures to repair brain aneurysms. This type of small ischemic stroke occurs in more than 90 per cent of aneurysm patients after such a procedure, but usually does not cause overt neurological disability. In the trial, those treated with Tat-NR2B9c showed a reduction in the amount of brain damage sustained as a result of the aneurysm repair procedure. Additionally, in patients who had a ruptured brain aneurysm, those treated with Tat-NR2B9c all had good neurological outcomes. Dr. Michael Hill is supported by Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions and is also a member of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta and the Institute for Public Health.

Creating awareness

Sepsis discovery made  A recent study has discovered one of the ways the body clears bacteria from the blood stream, which could potentially help researchers understand why some people become septic and others do not. The study, which was conducted in animal models, found neutrophils —a type of white blood cell—releases large spider-like webs that help catch the bacteria. The nets are covered in toxic chemicals that not only destroy the bacteria, but can be harmful to the human body. Study author Paul Kubes, PhD, director of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, says that even though this process has been shown to be an essential part of fighting off sepsis, it’s now thought that it may also contribute to the damaging and potentially fatal effects of the disease.

Kubes says that based on this research, he and his team, in collaboration with the Centre for Drug and Research Development in Vancouver, are now in the process of screening thousands of different compounds to see if they can come up with a drug that could act as an inhibitor and/or activator of this process. The hope is to eventually find a drug that will allow them to ‘tweak’ the net release process as is needed to effectively fight off sepsis with minimal harm to the body. This research was supported by Alberta Innovates−Health Solutions, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The Alberta Sepsis Network (ASN) hosted a series of events for the University of Calgary community to mark the inaugural International World Sepsis Day on September 13, 2012— a day designated to create awareness surrounding the disease. The ASN is a provincial research team funded by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, and made up of 25 physicians and researchers from the University's of Calgary, Alberta, and Lethbridge. One project the team is working on is a registry of patients admitted to the Calgary and Edmonton adult and paediatric intensive care units. Dr. Chip Doig, a member of the Snyder Institute and the Institute for Public Health, and also a co-team leader for ASN, says the patient registry will help change the lives of sepsis sufferers. “By identifying a large group of sepsis patients, we can examine risk factors or treatment interventions that have worsened or improved outcomes,” he says.


Re se a rch

08 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Chair created to honour family member

Doug Mahoney, PhD.

 Just as her mother and grandmother before her, Katthy Taylor struggled with vascular dementia before passing away.

 Did you know?

ACHRI’s genome facility sequenced the first whole genome of a patient in Alberta in March, 2012.

And like Taylor, hundreds of thousands of Canadians suffer from dementia. As our population ages over the next few decades, that number will increase. Commonly caused by stroke, vascular dementia is the second most prevalent dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Together, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s are responsible for more than 80 per cent of age-related illnesses.

Leadership for genomics facility Researchers at the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI) are participating in a national research effort to find the causes behind rare disorders. Sharing a $12-million ‘Care for Rare’ grant awarded by Genome Canada, University of Calgary researchers will join colleagues across Canada working towards discovering 60 new rare genetic disorders. Dr. Francois Bernier is the lead of the Calgary team and he will focus on clinical exomes—which are part of the genome—to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients. As part of ongoing research at ACHRI, Bernier has already fully or partially sequenced at least two dozen patients to try to solve the genetic puzzle of their particular conditions. The genomics facility, housed at both the University of Calgary and the Alberta Children’s Hospital, is equipped with three advanced DNA sequencers and operates under the direction of a team of specialists recruited by ACHRI.

Researching physician wellness  Dr. Jane Lemaire and sociologist Jean Wallace, PhD, both members of the Institute for Public Health (IPH) and wellness leads at the Ward of the 21st Century (W21C) Research and Innovation Centre, have been studying physician wellness for the past eight years—a concept that health-care workers rarely acknowledge. Factors such as difficulties coping with the pressures of the job, access

Re se a rch

2012/13 Anuual Report — 09

to poor nutrition in the workplace and long hours could all potentially put physicians at risk. While this may impact their personal lives, it could also impact the quality of patient care. Lemaire and Wallace have published numerous studies on the topic and they have been invited to several high-profile speaking events to share their knowledge, including a speaking event at Stanford University in 2012. The team recently received a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) operating grant to continue and expand their research.

New recruit welcomed  Doug Mahoney, PhD, was recruited by the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI) and the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI) in July 2012 from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. Mahoney has established a lab to study oncolytic viruses—viruses that attack cancer cells without harming the patient— for the treatment of childhood cancers. His team has begun preliminary experiments with a focus on paediatric soft tissue and bone sarcomas. Mahoney also became the first Canadian to receive the Young Investigator Award from the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy earlier this year. Doug Mahoney, PhD, is also an associate member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. ACHRI is a partnership with the Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation.

The Taylor family is committed to making a difference in improving health outcomes for those with dementia. Thanks to their generous gift of $5-million to the University of Calgary, the new Katthy Taylor Chair in Vascular Dementia has been created to support research looking to improve the lives of so many affected by these health issues. As the first chair holder, Dr. Eric Smith, a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, is looking at ways to treat and prevent the disease before it can devastate families as it has affected the Taylors. Katthy’s son David Taylor saw firsthand the effects of the terrible disease and is dedicated to helping others avoid it. “My family is committed to this Chair because we believe that research opens the door to the understanding and treatment of vascular dementia, so that ultimately others in the family and the community will be spared from enduring this difficult disease,” says Taylor.

 Did you know?

Dr. Eric Smith.

Dementia affects half a million Canadians and their families— that number is expected to grow to more than one million in the next 25 years. additional measures on top of usual tests your doctor performs, such as blood pressure, cholesterol and family history, says Libin Institute director Dr. Todd Anderson.

Donation funds new equipment  Generously giving more than

$6-million to the University of Calgary’s Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta over the last decade, J.L. (Sam) and Beverley Mozell have become integral partners in advancing cardiac health. Their contributions have helped clinicians and scientists discover new ways to fix heart problems and create new tools to help predict who may be at a higher risk of developing those problems later in life. Through the Mozells’ support, a new ultrasound machine has become a key tool in ongoing studies of blood vessel structure and function in the vascular physiology laboratory. Researchers use ultrasound technology to measure the amount of plaque in the carotid artery in the neck as well as to measure blood vessel function in the arm. Both of these are key

He began researching heart health assessment more than a decade ago when he embarked on a 10-year study of 1,600 middle-aged men. Anderson is studying whether new tests give doctors more information to predict the likelihood of heart problems down the road. “When we looked back, we found the traditional risk assessments were important,” he says. “But our special measures were additive on top of that: how much plaque you had in your carotid artery was predictive, as well as the function of the blood vessel in your arm.” If additional research confirms Anderson’s findings, this Calgarydeveloped testing could become a useful tool for doctors around the globe. Contributions from the Mozells to the Libin Institute are providing health-care practitioners with the tools to better predict health in the future, and creating improved outcomes for people in the Calgary area and throughout the province.


Re se a rch

08 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Chair created to honour family member

Doug Mahoney, PhD.

 Just as her mother and grandmother before her, Katthy Taylor struggled with vascular dementia before passing away.

 Did you know?

ACHRI’s genome facility sequenced the first whole genome of a patient in Alberta in March, 2012.

And like Taylor, hundreds of thousands of Canadians suffer from dementia. As our population ages over the next few decades, that number will increase. Commonly caused by stroke, vascular dementia is the second most prevalent dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Together, vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s are responsible for more than 80 per cent of age-related illnesses.

Leadership for genomics facility Researchers at the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI) are participating in a national research effort to find the causes behind rare disorders. Sharing a $12-million ‘Care for Rare’ grant awarded by Genome Canada, University of Calgary researchers will join colleagues across Canada working towards discovering 60 new rare genetic disorders. Dr. Francois Bernier is the lead of the Calgary team and he will focus on clinical exomes—which are part of the genome—to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients. As part of ongoing research at ACHRI, Bernier has already fully or partially sequenced at least two dozen patients to try to solve the genetic puzzle of their particular conditions. The genomics facility, housed at both the University of Calgary and the Alberta Children’s Hospital, is equipped with three advanced DNA sequencers and operates under the direction of a team of specialists recruited by ACHRI.

Researching physician wellness  Dr. Jane Lemaire and sociologist Jean Wallace, PhD, both members of the Institute for Public Health (IPH) and wellness leads at the Ward of the 21st Century (W21C) Research and Innovation Centre, have been studying physician wellness for the past eight years—a concept that health-care workers rarely acknowledge. Factors such as difficulties coping with the pressures of the job, access

Re se a rch

2012/13 Anuual Report — 09

to poor nutrition in the workplace and long hours could all potentially put physicians at risk. While this may impact their personal lives, it could also impact the quality of patient care. Lemaire and Wallace have published numerous studies on the topic and they have been invited to several high-profile speaking events to share their knowledge, including a speaking event at Stanford University in 2012. The team recently received a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) operating grant to continue and expand their research.

New recruit welcomed  Doug Mahoney, PhD, was recruited by the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI) and the Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI) in July 2012 from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. Mahoney has established a lab to study oncolytic viruses—viruses that attack cancer cells without harming the patient— for the treatment of childhood cancers. His team has begun preliminary experiments with a focus on paediatric soft tissue and bone sarcomas. Mahoney also became the first Canadian to receive the Young Investigator Award from the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy earlier this year. Doug Mahoney, PhD, is also an associate member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. ACHRI is a partnership with the Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation.

The Taylor family is committed to making a difference in improving health outcomes for those with dementia. Thanks to their generous gift of $5-million to the University of Calgary, the new Katthy Taylor Chair in Vascular Dementia has been created to support research looking to improve the lives of so many affected by these health issues. As the first chair holder, Dr. Eric Smith, a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, is looking at ways to treat and prevent the disease before it can devastate families as it has affected the Taylors. Katthy’s son David Taylor saw firsthand the effects of the terrible disease and is dedicated to helping others avoid it. “My family is committed to this Chair because we believe that research opens the door to the understanding and treatment of vascular dementia, so that ultimately others in the family and the community will be spared from enduring this difficult disease,” says Taylor.

 Did you know?

Dr. Eric Smith.

Dementia affects half a million Canadians and their families— that number is expected to grow to more than one million in the next 25 years. additional measures on top of usual tests your doctor performs, such as blood pressure, cholesterol and family history, says Libin Institute director Dr. Todd Anderson.

Donation funds new equipment  Generously giving more than

$6-million to the University of Calgary’s Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta over the last decade, J.L. (Sam) and Beverley Mozell have become integral partners in advancing cardiac health. Their contributions have helped clinicians and scientists discover new ways to fix heart problems and create new tools to help predict who may be at a higher risk of developing those problems later in life. Through the Mozells’ support, a new ultrasound machine has become a key tool in ongoing studies of blood vessel structure and function in the vascular physiology laboratory. Researchers use ultrasound technology to measure the amount of plaque in the carotid artery in the neck as well as to measure blood vessel function in the arm. Both of these are key

He began researching heart health assessment more than a decade ago when he embarked on a 10-year study of 1,600 middle-aged men. Anderson is studying whether new tests give doctors more information to predict the likelihood of heart problems down the road. “When we looked back, we found the traditional risk assessments were important,” he says. “But our special measures were additive on top of that: how much plaque you had in your carotid artery was predictive, as well as the function of the blood vessel in your arm.” If additional research confirms Anderson’s findings, this Calgarydeveloped testing could become a useful tool for doctors around the globe. Contributions from the Mozells to the Libin Institute are providing health-care practitioners with the tools to better predict health in the future, and creating improved outcomes for people in the Calgary area and throughout the province.


Me s sage f rom t he DE a N

10 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Research Revenue (unaudited)

by Sources of Revenue for Fiscal Year ending March 2013 Federal Government Tri-Council (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC)

$

25,035,188

Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI)

5,305,564

Canada Research Chair

3,858,333

Other Federal Government

1,446,917

Total Amount

35,646,002

Provincial, Regional or Municipal Governments Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions

$

24,026,017

Alberta Enterprise and Advanced Education

4,637,244

Alberta Health & Wellness

5,378,864

Alberta Health Services (includes Cancer Board)

11,148,131

Other Alberta Provincial Government

1,034,900

Other Canadian Provincial Governments

186,285

Total Amount

46,411,441

$

14,723,296

National Not-for-Profit Organizations

12,702,290

Provincial Not-for-Profit Organizations

15,316,812

Universities and Hospitals

1,362,110

Endowments, Local Not-for-Profit and Internal Sources

34,861,791

Total Amount

78,966,299

Foreign Sources (Public and Private) U.S.A. Sources

$

Other Foreign Sources Total Amount

T O TA L

p.12  The

medicine menagerie

p.13  Animals p.14 A

6,503,875 509,788 7,013,663

$ 168,037,405

on campus

win for iGem

p.14 Family p.15 New

Other Canadian Sources Business

Education medicine program expansion

simulation lab

p.15 Rural

medicine program shows promise

p.16 Student p.16 BHSc

awards

scholarship created

Re se a rch

2012/13 Anuual Report — 11


Me s sage f rom t he DE a N

10 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Research Revenue (unaudited)

by Sources of Revenue for Fiscal Year ending March 2013 Federal Government Tri-Council (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC)

$

25,035,188

Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI)

5,305,564

Canada Research Chair

3,858,333

Other Federal Government

1,446,917

Total Amount

35,646,002

Provincial, Regional or Municipal Governments Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions

$

24,026,017

Alberta Enterprise and Advanced Education

4,637,244

Alberta Health & Wellness

5,378,864

Alberta Health Services (includes Cancer Board)

11,148,131

Other Alberta Provincial Government

1,034,900

Other Canadian Provincial Governments

186,285

Total Amount

46,411,441

$

14,723,296

National Not-for-Profit Organizations

12,702,290

Provincial Not-for-Profit Organizations

15,316,812

Universities and Hospitals

1,362,110

Endowments, Local Not-for-Profit and Internal Sources

34,861,791

Total Amount

78,966,299

Foreign Sources (Public and Private) U.S.A. Sources

$

Other Foreign Sources Total Amount

T O TA L

p.12  The

medicine menagerie

p.13  Animals p.14 A

6,503,875 509,788 7,013,663

$ 168,037,405

on campus

win for iGem

p.14 Family p.15 New

Other Canadian Sources Business

Education medicine program expansion

simulation lab

p.15 Rural

medicine program shows promise

p.16 Student p.16 BHSc

awards

scholarship created

Re se a rch

2012/13 Anuual Report — 11


Educat ion

Educat ion

12 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

The medicine menagerie

A

The University of Calgary's Faculty of Medicine began formally naming its MD classes after animals in 1975 when a professor became frustrated with his class and called them “a bunch of turkeys”. The name stuck and so did the tradition, with each medical class naming the class behind them. For obvious reasons, the inaugural medical class, the Class of 1973, identify themselves as Guinea Pigs. The animals from each year are added to the Faculty of Medicine’s menagerie—the most recent addition being the Class of 2015, the Cows. The Class of 2016 will arrive and join the menagerie in July.

 On December 13, 2012 high

school students from Calgary and surrounding rural areas got a firsthand glimpse of where a career in medicine begins—as a med student. A Day in the Life of a Medical Student is an annual event organized by the Calgary Medical Student Association’s Student Affairs, which invites high school students to the faculty to participate in various medical school-related activities. In December, led by first-year medical students, participants got to experience small group sessions—where small groups of students meet to discuss various lecture topics, and to learn about physical exam components such as measuring blood pressure. 150 high school students attended the event—21 of which came from rural locations.

for high school students (left). B Student involved in the Vulcan Skills Days. C First-year medical student Corinne McDonald and her son who helped cut her hair.

Cow – Class of 2015

The aye-aye is a small primate. It has one long, thin finger that it uses to search for bugs in hard to get places.

Hellbenders are a species of giant salamander averaging approximately 60 cm in length.

Cows are large domesticated mammals often raised on farms.

B

Medical skills day  Medical students from the

C

A Medical students (right) conduct a demonstration

Hellbender – Class of 2014

Animals on campus

Med student for a day

Take a look at the animals currently at the Faculty of Medicine.

Aye-Aye – Class of 2013

2012/13 Anuual Report — 13

Head Shave  The annual head shave raised

$21,500 for the Canadian Cancer Society towards the research and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. The event, organized by firstyear med students, is part of a larger annual initiative by the Canadian Federation of Medical Students where medical schools across Canada raise funds for a cancer charity.

University of Calgary along with nursing students from Mount Royal University travelled to a local health centre in the community of Vulcan for Vulcan Skills Days in August 2012. Skills trips like this one are designed to introduce students to rural practice opportunities and rural communities as potential practice sites. Working with other students in different specialization areas provides an added benefit to everyone as well.


Educat ion

Educat ion

12 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

The medicine menagerie

A

The University of Calgary's Faculty of Medicine began formally naming its MD classes after animals in 1975 when a professor became frustrated with his class and called them “a bunch of turkeys”. The name stuck and so did the tradition, with each medical class naming the class behind them. For obvious reasons, the inaugural medical class, the Class of 1973, identify themselves as Guinea Pigs. The animals from each year are added to the Faculty of Medicine’s menagerie—the most recent addition being the Class of 2015, the Cows. The Class of 2016 will arrive and join the menagerie in July.

 On December 13, 2012 high

school students from Calgary and surrounding rural areas got a firsthand glimpse of where a career in medicine begins—as a med student. A Day in the Life of a Medical Student is an annual event organized by the Calgary Medical Student Association’s Student Affairs, which invites high school students to the faculty to participate in various medical school-related activities. In December, led by first-year medical students, participants got to experience small group sessions—where small groups of students meet to discuss various lecture topics, and to learn about physical exam components such as measuring blood pressure. 150 high school students attended the event—21 of which came from rural locations.

for high school students (left). B Student involved in the Vulcan Skills Days. C First-year medical student Corinne McDonald and her son who helped cut her hair.

Cow – Class of 2015

The aye-aye is a small primate. It has one long, thin finger that it uses to search for bugs in hard to get places.

Hellbenders are a species of giant salamander averaging approximately 60 cm in length.

Cows are large domesticated mammals often raised on farms.

B

Medical skills day  Medical students from the

C

A Medical students (right) conduct a demonstration

Hellbender – Class of 2014

Animals on campus

Med student for a day

Take a look at the animals currently at the Faculty of Medicine.

Aye-Aye – Class of 2013

2012/13 Anuual Report — 13

Head Shave  The annual head shave raised

$21,500 for the Canadian Cancer Society towards the research and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. The event, organized by firstyear med students, is part of a larger annual initiative by the Canadian Federation of Medical Students where medical schools across Canada raise funds for a cancer charity.

University of Calgary along with nursing students from Mount Royal University travelled to a local health centre in the community of Vulcan for Vulcan Skills Days in August 2012. Skills trips like this one are designed to introduce students to rural practice opportunities and rural communities as potential practice sites. Working with other students in different specialization areas provides an added benefit to everyone as well.


Educat ion

14 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Educat ion

2012/13 Anuual Report — 15

Simulation lab to provide state-of-the-art training A state-of-the-art facility that will provide health-care professionals in Alberta advanced training in a variety of medical procedures is a step closer to reality. Construction officially began in March on the Advanced Technical Skills Simulation Lab (ATSSL). Supported by lead donations from a number of faculty members and clinicians, the ATSSL is a partner project involving Alberta Health Services-eSIM Provincial Simulation, the University of Calgary – Faculty of Medicine, and Calgary Health Trust. When it’s complete, the facility will allow medical staff and trainees to hone their surgical skills, practice procedures such as bronchoscopies and starting intravenous lines, and learn how to manage medical crises. The iGem team.

A win for iGem

The expanded family medicine residency program is the result of a $10.3-million grant from the Government of Alberta in 2011-12.

Family medicine program expansion  Albertans now have access to

more primary health care thanks to 34 additional family medicine residents and 10 more family medicine teaching physicians at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine. The additional positions have been added to the urban stream, expanding the university’s first-year family medicine residency program to 92 residents— which also includes 14 positions in the rural stream. The students will spend their two-year family medicine residency at Calgary’s South Health

Campus, Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre, and Sunridge Family Medicine Teaching Centre. The funding was used to expand training space and add teaching staff in preparation for the extra students, who started their residency training on July 1, 2012. The grant was also used to increase training opportunities outside of Calgary for post-graduate specialty residents. The residents are in a number of specialty programs ranging from general internal medicine and emergency family medicine to general surgery and paediatrics.

 The University of Calgary’s iGem team took the Best Human Practices Award at the 2012 world championship held at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in Boston. The team was named one of the top 16 teams in the international competition which included 72 finalists from some of the world’s most prestigious universities. The award-winning project is the result of the creation of FRED and OSCAR, two biological systems designed to detect and destroy toxins in Alberta’s tailings ponds. FRED (Functional and Robust Electrochemical Detector) measures the level of toxins in a more cost effective way than conventional chemical methods, while OSCAR (Optimized System for Carboxylic Acid Remediation) removes the toxic components from tailings and converts them to hydrocarbons such as diesel.

“Having the Advanced Technical Skills Simulation Lab at the Foothills campus will help the faculty attract, recruit and retain the brightest students and the best staff,” says Jocelyn Lockyer, PhD, senior associate dean of education in the Faculty of Medicine. “Calgary will be one of the most innovative places in the country to teach and practice medicine.”

“Calgary will be one of the most innovative places in the country to teach and practice medicine.” —Jocelyn Lockyer, PhD. There are several different components to the ATSSL, which will be located in the basement of the Faculty of Medicine’s Health Research Innovation Centre and the Health Sciences Centre at the Foothills campus. In the first phase of development, a surgical skills simulation lab will allow doctors to practice on human cadavers and animal models. A clinical simulation lab will be constructed in a future phase.

 Did you know?

81 residents were part of the DistRCI during this past fiscal year.

Rural medicine program shows promise  Recent research has shown

that The Distributed Royal College Initiative (DistRCI) at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine is helping to shift attitudes towards rural practice. The program, that comes in response to the nation-wide shortage of specialist physicians in rural areas, gives medical residents an opportunity to experience rural medical practice through rural and regional rotations. “Programs like this were perceived by the residents as educationally valuable and they may be critical in helping shift attitudes towards rural practice,” says Dr. Doug Myhre, associate dean for Distributed Learning and Rural Initiatives. “The next step is to follow the residents to determine if the attitude change is sustained and is followed by a behavioural change as well”. The DistRCI program includes residents in many sub specialties of medicine, including general surgery, paediatrics, general internal medicine and anesthesia.


Educat ion

14 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Educat ion

2012/13 Anuual Report — 15

Simulation lab to provide state-of-the-art training A state-of-the-art facility that will provide health-care professionals in Alberta advanced training in a variety of medical procedures is a step closer to reality. Construction officially began in March on the Advanced Technical Skills Simulation Lab (ATSSL). Supported by lead donations from a number of faculty members and clinicians, the ATSSL is a partner project involving Alberta Health Services-eSIM Provincial Simulation, the University of Calgary – Faculty of Medicine, and Calgary Health Trust. When it’s complete, the facility will allow medical staff and trainees to hone their surgical skills, practice procedures such as bronchoscopies and starting intravenous lines, and learn how to manage medical crises. The iGem team.

A win for iGem

The expanded family medicine residency program is the result of a $10.3-million grant from the Government of Alberta in 2011-12.

Family medicine program expansion  Albertans now have access to

more primary health care thanks to 34 additional family medicine residents and 10 more family medicine teaching physicians at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine. The additional positions have been added to the urban stream, expanding the university’s first-year family medicine residency program to 92 residents— which also includes 14 positions in the rural stream. The students will spend their two-year family medicine residency at Calgary’s South Health

Campus, Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre, and Sunridge Family Medicine Teaching Centre. The funding was used to expand training space and add teaching staff in preparation for the extra students, who started their residency training on July 1, 2012. The grant was also used to increase training opportunities outside of Calgary for post-graduate specialty residents. The residents are in a number of specialty programs ranging from general internal medicine and emergency family medicine to general surgery and paediatrics.

 The University of Calgary’s iGem team took the Best Human Practices Award at the 2012 world championship held at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) in Boston. The team was named one of the top 16 teams in the international competition which included 72 finalists from some of the world’s most prestigious universities. The award-winning project is the result of the creation of FRED and OSCAR, two biological systems designed to detect and destroy toxins in Alberta’s tailings ponds. FRED (Functional and Robust Electrochemical Detector) measures the level of toxins in a more cost effective way than conventional chemical methods, while OSCAR (Optimized System for Carboxylic Acid Remediation) removes the toxic components from tailings and converts them to hydrocarbons such as diesel.

“Having the Advanced Technical Skills Simulation Lab at the Foothills campus will help the faculty attract, recruit and retain the brightest students and the best staff,” says Jocelyn Lockyer, PhD, senior associate dean of education in the Faculty of Medicine. “Calgary will be one of the most innovative places in the country to teach and practice medicine.”

“Calgary will be one of the most innovative places in the country to teach and practice medicine.” —Jocelyn Lockyer, PhD. There are several different components to the ATSSL, which will be located in the basement of the Faculty of Medicine’s Health Research Innovation Centre and the Health Sciences Centre at the Foothills campus. In the first phase of development, a surgical skills simulation lab will allow doctors to practice on human cadavers and animal models. A clinical simulation lab will be constructed in a future phase.

 Did you know?

81 residents were part of the DistRCI during this past fiscal year.

Rural medicine program shows promise  Recent research has shown

that The Distributed Royal College Initiative (DistRCI) at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine is helping to shift attitudes towards rural practice. The program, that comes in response to the nation-wide shortage of specialist physicians in rural areas, gives medical residents an opportunity to experience rural medical practice through rural and regional rotations. “Programs like this were perceived by the residents as educationally valuable and they may be critical in helping shift attitudes towards rural practice,” says Dr. Doug Myhre, associate dean for Distributed Learning and Rural Initiatives. “The next step is to follow the residents to determine if the attitude change is sustained and is followed by a behavioural change as well”. The DistRCI program includes residents in many sub specialties of medicine, including general surgery, paediatrics, general internal medicine and anesthesia.


Educat ion

16 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

2012/13 Anuual Report — 17

Student Awards he was, and hope that I, too, am able to make such a positive contribution to my community and the field of medicine.” 2012 recipient Jen Wild, MD’13, rural family medicine residency program participant

Dr. Robert Wickson Memorial Award  Offered annually to a continuing undergraduate student entering third year in the Faculty of Medicine MD program, the Dr. Robert Wickson Memorial Award was established to recognize the physician’s long and distinguished career as a valued practitioner and teacher of rural family medicine and of pharmacology. Medical student Jen Wild is honoured to receive the award that bears Dr. Wickson’s name for her own interest in practicing as a full service family physician in a rural community. “Prior to entering medical school, I lived and worked in rural Canada for eight years and I know that this is where I can make a positive contribution to both the field of medicine and to my community. I believe that as a rural physician I will have the opportunity to form long-term relationships with my patients, allowing me to understand their personal health context, support them to make positive health choices, and work in a preventative capacity. I believe that it was a similar passion that allowed Dr. Robert Wickson to be the exceptional physician that

“I’m very grateful to have received this scholarship and am passionate about the research field I work in. This scholarship helps to finance my education, and I appreciate being able to have met the Zaslavsky family and hear their emotional and inspirational story about how their family was affected by cancer. It was a very humbling and motivational experience. My next step is medical school— I have always been interested in cancer and would like to remain in that field, and connected to research.” 2012 recipient Connor Wells, fourth-year BHSc student (biomedical stream)

Nicolle Sabine Zaslavsky Memorial Scholarship

New scholarship promotes excellence

 There may be no more painful

The new Leadership in Health Sciences entrance scholarships will provide select incoming first-year students to the O’Brien Centre for the Bachelor of Health Sciences’ program, with the funding necessary to complete their education in the program and – following graduation – an assured admission spot into the MD program, subject to a number of conditions. Incoming students will receive $15,000 in annual support over a four-year period.

struggle than having to watch your child battle illness. After Greg and Elona Zaslavsky lost their young daughter following a lengthy and courageous fight against brain cancer, they established a scholarship in her name to support students who share the same dream Nicolle had— to study medicine. Based on academic merit, the Nicolle Sabine Zaslavsky Memorial Scholarship is offered annually to a continuing undergraduate student entering third or fourth year in the Faculty of Medicine’s Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) program, supporting the advancement of a blossoming career which could one day help lead to new ways to prevent or better treat illnesses like the one that affected the Zaslavsky’s daughter.

Connecting with the community p.18

Global health and international partnerships

p.20 Institute

publishes history book

p.20 Physician

takes on prestigious role

p.20 Researcher p.21 New

recognized by NASA

Dean’s Advisory Board Committee

p.22 Awards p.23 Endowment

report


Educat ion

16 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

2012/13 Anuual Report — 17

Student Awards he was, and hope that I, too, am able to make such a positive contribution to my community and the field of medicine.” 2012 recipient Jen Wild, MD’13, rural family medicine residency program participant

Dr. Robert Wickson Memorial Award  Offered annually to a continuing undergraduate student entering third year in the Faculty of Medicine MD program, the Dr. Robert Wickson Memorial Award was established to recognize the physician’s long and distinguished career as a valued practitioner and teacher of rural family medicine and of pharmacology. Medical student Jen Wild is honoured to receive the award that bears Dr. Wickson’s name for her own interest in practicing as a full service family physician in a rural community. “Prior to entering medical school, I lived and worked in rural Canada for eight years and I know that this is where I can make a positive contribution to both the field of medicine and to my community. I believe that as a rural physician I will have the opportunity to form long-term relationships with my patients, allowing me to understand their personal health context, support them to make positive health choices, and work in a preventative capacity. I believe that it was a similar passion that allowed Dr. Robert Wickson to be the exceptional physician that

“I’m very grateful to have received this scholarship and am passionate about the research field I work in. This scholarship helps to finance my education, and I appreciate being able to have met the Zaslavsky family and hear their emotional and inspirational story about how their family was affected by cancer. It was a very humbling and motivational experience. My next step is medical school— I have always been interested in cancer and would like to remain in that field, and connected to research.” 2012 recipient Connor Wells, fourth-year BHSc student (biomedical stream)

Nicolle Sabine Zaslavsky Memorial Scholarship

New scholarship promotes excellence

 There may be no more painful

The new Leadership in Health Sciences entrance scholarships will provide select incoming first-year students to the O’Brien Centre for the Bachelor of Health Sciences’ program, with the funding necessary to complete their education in the program and – following graduation – an assured admission spot into the MD program, subject to a number of conditions. Incoming students will receive $15,000 in annual support over a four-year period.

struggle than having to watch your child battle illness. After Greg and Elona Zaslavsky lost their young daughter following a lengthy and courageous fight against brain cancer, they established a scholarship in her name to support students who share the same dream Nicolle had— to study medicine. Based on academic merit, the Nicolle Sabine Zaslavsky Memorial Scholarship is offered annually to a continuing undergraduate student entering third or fourth year in the Faculty of Medicine’s Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) program, supporting the advancement of a blossoming career which could one day help lead to new ways to prevent or better treat illnesses like the one that affected the Zaslavsky’s daughter.

Connecting with the community p.18

Global health and international partnerships

p.20 Institute

publishes history book

p.20 Physician

takes on prestigious role

p.20 Researcher p.21 New

recognized by NASA

Dean’s Advisory Board Committee

p.22 Awards p.23 Endowment

report


Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

18 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

2012/13 Anuual Report — 19

 Did you know?

In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported almost seven million children died before their fifth birthday, worldwide.

Global health and international partnerships

Joint Liver Institute opens

The Office of Global Health and International Partnerships (GHIP) is a window on the world for the Faculty of Medicine.

Healthy Child Uganda  Physicians and scientists from Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda, the University of Calgary and the Canadian Paediatric Society are working together to find practical, low-cost solutions to prevent needless deaths in a partnership known as Healthy Child Uganda (HCU). Under a maternal, newborn and child health project funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), HCU research revealed some major health service gaps for women and their children:  alnutrition is common— M 35 per cent of children are stunted. Potentially killer diseases are frequent—approximately 20 per cent of children experienced fever/ malaria, presumed pneumonia and diarrhea in the two weeks prior to survey alone. Health centres delivering babies are severely under resourced— one-third lack critical delivery equipment and 82 per cent do not have key supplies to resuscitate a newborn.

The HCU project addresses gaps in accessing care by training volunteers to recognize and treat sick children within their own communities. Field research is informing health outreach programs, health policy, and clinical services. Findings from studies on community health worker retention are helping HCU to revise curricula and incentives for volunteers, deemed community health workers, who have minimal formal education but receive training in health promotion and basic illness management. HCU provides specialized training of rural health staff in emergency obstetrics and newborn care­— both major gaps identified during our studies. Since HCU’s inception 10 years ago, achievements in research, teaching, and service include:

40 Ugandan faculty and postgraduate students have been trained in research methods. Four significant health intervention studies have been completed, resulting in 20 research reports including two publications in major international health journals this past year.

 More than 100 types of liver

More than 5,000 community health workers have been trained. Approximately 86 per cent remain active after five years. 21 UCalgary faculty members and 23 students have been involved in HCU activities. 93 health workers were trained in obstetrics and paediatrics courses in 2012. Approximately 500,000 people have been reached by HCU interventions. Dramatic declines in child deaths and a one-third decrease in fever/ malaria, diarrhea and malnutrition have been reported. Additional highlights in global health this year include collaborations with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine on animalhuman disease field research in Tanzania, BHSc (Bachelor of Health Sciences) summer student research projects in Tanzania, Ethiopia and the Dominican Republic, UME (Undergraduate Medical Education) and PGME (Postgraduate Medical Education) global health electives in more than 20 countries.

disease, such as hepatitis and cancer, affect men, women and children in Canada. The Joint Liver Institute, a partnership between the Faculty of Medicine and Capital Medical University (CMU) in Beijing, China, aims to advance research and patient care for those affected by liver disease in both countries. The institute has created opportunities for collaborative research and training exchanges. It is currently working to create joint biobank access between UCalgary and CMU. Biobanks house large numbers of biological samples necessary for research and allow for faster access to necessary data by multiple researchers. The institute officially opened in Calgary in December 2012 and in Beijing in June 2011.

From left to right: Dr. Ning Li, president of YouAn Hospital in Beijing, and Dr. Sam Lee, Calgary Head of the Joint Liver Institute.


Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

18 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

2012/13 Anuual Report — 19

 Did you know?

In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported almost seven million children died before their fifth birthday, worldwide.

Global health and international partnerships

Joint Liver Institute opens

The Office of Global Health and International Partnerships (GHIP) is a window on the world for the Faculty of Medicine.

Healthy Child Uganda  Physicians and scientists from Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda, the University of Calgary and the Canadian Paediatric Society are working together to find practical, low-cost solutions to prevent needless deaths in a partnership known as Healthy Child Uganda (HCU). Under a maternal, newborn and child health project funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), HCU research revealed some major health service gaps for women and their children:  alnutrition is common— M 35 per cent of children are stunted. Potentially killer diseases are frequent—approximately 20 per cent of children experienced fever/ malaria, presumed pneumonia and diarrhea in the two weeks prior to survey alone. Health centres delivering babies are severely under resourced— one-third lack critical delivery equipment and 82 per cent do not have key supplies to resuscitate a newborn.

The HCU project addresses gaps in accessing care by training volunteers to recognize and treat sick children within their own communities. Field research is informing health outreach programs, health policy, and clinical services. Findings from studies on community health worker retention are helping HCU to revise curricula and incentives for volunteers, deemed community health workers, who have minimal formal education but receive training in health promotion and basic illness management. HCU provides specialized training of rural health staff in emergency obstetrics and newborn care­— both major gaps identified during our studies. Since HCU’s inception 10 years ago, achievements in research, teaching, and service include:

40 Ugandan faculty and postgraduate students have been trained in research methods. Four significant health intervention studies have been completed, resulting in 20 research reports including two publications in major international health journals this past year.

 More than 100 types of liver

More than 5,000 community health workers have been trained. Approximately 86 per cent remain active after five years. 21 UCalgary faculty members and 23 students have been involved in HCU activities. 93 health workers were trained in obstetrics and paediatrics courses in 2012. Approximately 500,000 people have been reached by HCU interventions. Dramatic declines in child deaths and a one-third decrease in fever/ malaria, diarrhea and malnutrition have been reported. Additional highlights in global health this year include collaborations with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine on animalhuman disease field research in Tanzania, BHSc (Bachelor of Health Sciences) summer student research projects in Tanzania, Ethiopia and the Dominican Republic, UME (Undergraduate Medical Education) and PGME (Postgraduate Medical Education) global health electives in more than 20 countries.

disease, such as hepatitis and cancer, affect men, women and children in Canada. The Joint Liver Institute, a partnership between the Faculty of Medicine and Capital Medical University (CMU) in Beijing, China, aims to advance research and patient care for those affected by liver disease in both countries. The institute has created opportunities for collaborative research and training exchanges. It is currently working to create joint biobank access between UCalgary and CMU. Biobanks house large numbers of biological samples necessary for research and allow for faster access to necessary data by multiple researchers. The institute officially opened in Calgary in December 2012 and in Beijing in June 2011.

From left to right: Dr. Ning Li, president of YouAn Hospital in Beijing, and Dr. Sam Lee, Calgary Head of the Joint Liver Institute.


Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

20 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

2012/13 Anuual Report — 21

Students involved in the Apple a Day Program.

Researcher recognized by NASA Dr. Douglas Hamilton, former NASA Flight Surgeon and now a member of the Institute for Public Health (IPH) and Ward of the 21st Century (W21C) was awarded the Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medal by NASA in September 2012. Hamilton received this award for his work in identifying and clarifying the potential risk of electric shock that could happen to astronauts who were performing spacewalks (also referred to as extra-vehicular activities or EVAs) on the International Space Station.

Institute publishes history book

An apple a day

 Trace the fact that over the last decade Calgary has had the lowest death rate in Canada from heart attacks and you’ll find the reason behind this city’s world-class reputation in cardiovascular sciences stems from the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta—an entity of both the University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services.

hood obesity rates and the increase of unhealthy food choices available to children, medical students from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine created the Apple a Day program—a program designed to teach children about the importance

Released in September 2012, Hearts, Minds & Vision: Roots of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, tells the story of Libin researchers and physicians who dedicate themselves to saving, extending and improving the health and lives of southern Albertans. Authors Dr. D. George Wyse, Dr. J. Robert Lampard, Barbara KermodeScott and Al-Karim Walli capture 80 years of changes in the local cardiovascular landscape and share inspiring stories of the people behind the diagnoses, treat ments and lifesaving research. Hearts, Minds & Vision: Roots of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, 1930 – 2010 (Kingsley Publishing, 2012), $24.95, is available through the University of Calgary bookstore and online at amazon.ca.

 In response to the rise of child-

Gillis is an internationally recognized clinician who has published many studies contributing to the world’s understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac physician takes on prestigious role  Dr. Anne M. Gillis, a member

of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, was named the new president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in May 2012. Having recently completed her one year term, Gillis served as the society's 34th president, and the second international president.

Gillis is an internationally recognized clinician who has published many studies contributing to the world’s understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias (an irregular heartbeat) and the development of new treatments for arrhythmias.

of making healthy food choices. The initiative sends student volunteers into elementary school classrooms where they use fun and interactive tools to teach students about nutrition. The program visited several classrooms in the Calgary area this past fall and spring.

New unit creates opportunities The faculty is developing a new Unit for Clinical Analytics and Research Support (UCARS). The unit, which will offer initial services later this year, will provide researchers with access to research data acquisition, management and analytics, opportunities for collaboration and education in clinical research, and will allow them to access support with methodological and statistical support, and study design. UCARS will also streamline the process of implementing clinical research projects of all types, subsequently giving our community even better access to the most cutting edge health care. UCARS is modeled after the Clinical Research Unit at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, which was founded by Samuel Wiebe six years ago. The Clinical Research Unit, has been very successful in implementing clinical research for brain and mental health issues and the same successes more widely are anticipated with the development of UCARS.

2013 Dean’s Advisory Board Committee The Dean's Advisory Board Committee consists of a collection of highly dedicated and experienced community leaders. They provide invaluable advice on how the faculty can best interact with our communities.

Ms. Gail O’Brien Chair Mr. William Sembo V ice- Chair Mr. John Dielwart Dr. Chen Fong Mr. Al Monaco Mr. Matt Brister Mr. Keith MacPhail Mr. Bob Sartor Dr. Kabir Jivraj Ms. Brenda Mackie Mr. Shawn Abbott Ms. Maureen Cormier Jackson


Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

20 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

2012/13 Anuual Report — 21

Students involved in the Apple a Day Program.

Researcher recognized by NASA Dr. Douglas Hamilton, former NASA Flight Surgeon and now a member of the Institute for Public Health (IPH) and Ward of the 21st Century (W21C) was awarded the Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medal by NASA in September 2012. Hamilton received this award for his work in identifying and clarifying the potential risk of electric shock that could happen to astronauts who were performing spacewalks (also referred to as extra-vehicular activities or EVAs) on the International Space Station.

Institute publishes history book

An apple a day

 Trace the fact that over the last decade Calgary has had the lowest death rate in Canada from heart attacks and you’ll find the reason behind this city’s world-class reputation in cardiovascular sciences stems from the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta—an entity of both the University of Calgary and Alberta Health Services.

hood obesity rates and the increase of unhealthy food choices available to children, medical students from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine created the Apple a Day program—a program designed to teach children about the importance

Released in September 2012, Hearts, Minds & Vision: Roots of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, tells the story of Libin researchers and physicians who dedicate themselves to saving, extending and improving the health and lives of southern Albertans. Authors Dr. D. George Wyse, Dr. J. Robert Lampard, Barbara KermodeScott and Al-Karim Walli capture 80 years of changes in the local cardiovascular landscape and share inspiring stories of the people behind the diagnoses, treat ments and lifesaving research. Hearts, Minds & Vision: Roots of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, 1930 – 2010 (Kingsley Publishing, 2012), $24.95, is available through the University of Calgary bookstore and online at amazon.ca.

 In response to the rise of child-

Gillis is an internationally recognized clinician who has published many studies contributing to the world’s understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac physician takes on prestigious role  Dr. Anne M. Gillis, a member

of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, was named the new president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in May 2012. Having recently completed her one year term, Gillis served as the society's 34th president, and the second international president.

Gillis is an internationally recognized clinician who has published many studies contributing to the world’s understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias (an irregular heartbeat) and the development of new treatments for arrhythmias.

of making healthy food choices. The initiative sends student volunteers into elementary school classrooms where they use fun and interactive tools to teach students about nutrition. The program visited several classrooms in the Calgary area this past fall and spring.

New unit creates opportunities The faculty is developing a new Unit for Clinical Analytics and Research Support (UCARS). The unit, which will offer initial services later this year, will provide researchers with access to research data acquisition, management and analytics, opportunities for collaboration and education in clinical research, and will allow them to access support with methodological and statistical support, and study design. UCARS will also streamline the process of implementing clinical research projects of all types, subsequently giving our community even better access to the most cutting edge health care. UCARS is modeled after the Clinical Research Unit at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, which was founded by Samuel Wiebe six years ago. The Clinical Research Unit, has been very successful in implementing clinical research for brain and mental health issues and the same successes more widely are anticipated with the development of UCARS.

2013 Dean’s Advisory Board Committee The Dean's Advisory Board Committee consists of a collection of highly dedicated and experienced community leaders. They provide invaluable advice on how the faculty can best interact with our communities.

Ms. Gail O’Brien Chair Mr. William Sembo V ice- Chair Mr. John Dielwart Dr. Chen Fong Mr. Al Monaco Mr. Matt Brister Mr. Keith MacPhail Mr. Bob Sartor Dr. Kabir Jivraj Ms. Brenda Mackie Mr. Shawn Abbott Ms. Maureen Cormier Jackson


Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

as of March 31, 2013

Canadian Academy of Health Sciences A. Dr. Subrata Ghosh

Departments of medicine and microbiology, immunology & infectious diseases Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Fellow B. Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn Departments of medicine and community health sciences Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Fellow C. Dr. Todd Anderson Department of Cardiac Sciences Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Fellow

B

2012/13 Anuual Report — 23

Statement of Endowment Valuation (unaudited)

Awards

A

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

22 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Order of Canada Dr. Merrill Knudtson Departments of cardiac sciences and medicine Order of Canada

C

The Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) inducted three members of the Faculty of Medicine as Fellows this in fall 2012. Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn, Dr. Todd Anderson and Dr. Subrata Ghosh were inducted into the academy for their demonstration of leadership, creativity, distinctive competencies and a commitment to advance academic health science. The CAHS recognizes individuals of great accomplishment and achievement in the academic health sciences in Canada. The academy provides timely, informed and unbiased assessments of urgent issues affecting the health of Canadians.

Funding Sources

Royal societ y of Canada Hans Vogel, PhD. Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine; Departments of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science Royal Society of Canada Fellow

 Hans Vogel, PhD, is one of Canada’s leading biochemists. He has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Vogel has made numerous contributions to our understanding of metalloproteins. Recently his group has also been working on developing new diagnostic and prognostic methods in the areas of cancer and infectious diseases.

Royal societ y of Canada David Proud, PhD. Department of Physiology & Pharmacology Royal Society of Canada Fellow

2011 /2012

2012/2013

2012/2013

(1)

Donor Contributions

 Dr. Merril Knudtson has been

named a Member of the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honour. Knudtson is being recognized for his significant contributions to cardiology and health care. He joins previous Faculty of Medicine inductees including: Dr. Clarence Guenter, Dr. Tom Noseworthy and Dr. Garnette Sutherland.

Changes Closing Balance

Closing Balance

$

78,558,051

$

2,785,370

$

81,343,421

Province of Alberta Matching Grants

20,767,980

20,767,980

Capitalized Income

25,459,078

1,445,370

26,904,448

Market Value Adjustment

5,629,504

9,310,842

14,940,346

Total Endowment Value

$ 130,414,613

Total Faculty of Medicine Expenditure Allocations

(2)

$

$ 13,541,582

4,052,864

$ 143,956,195 $

4,255,700

Investment Information

 In recognition of his widespread research accomplishments and extensive contributions to Canadian intellectual life, David Proud, PhD, has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. The fellowship is considered the highest honour that can be attained by scholars, artists and scientists in Canada. Proud has made numerous and important contributions to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that trigger the symptoms of inflammatory airway diseases like asthma.

Faculty of Medicine endowments are invested in the university's long-term investment pool. Each endowment has units in the pool.

Number of units held by the Faculty of Medicine Market Value of units at March 31 $ Market Value of Faculty of Medicine at March 31

1,296,893

103.90 $

$ 130,414,613

Add: Market Value for endowment not part of pool (3) Total Market Value of Faculty of Medicine at March 31

1,255,138

$ 143,956,195

3,887,555

$ 134,302,168

111.00

3,847,790

$ 147,803,985

Notes: 1. Total of 132 endowments for 2012/13 and 128 endowments for 2011/12. 2. Based on 4.0% of the four year rolling market average 3. The Buchanan Portfolio is not part of the University’s unitized investment pool

Facult y of Medicine Alumni (as of 2012)

Universit y of Calgary 2012 Residency Education Programs MSc (1072) PhD (686)

BCR (235)

Family Medicine (60)

Internal Medicine - Core (22) Paediatrics (10)

BHSc (340) MD (3234) Alumni featured in this report are: Douglas Hamilton (MD ’91, PhD ’91), Merril Knudtson (MD ’75), Jocelyn Lockyer (PhD ’92), Connor Wells (BHSc ’13) Jen Wild (MD ’13), Samuel Weiss (PhD '93)

Other (164) For a complete list of all of the Faculty of Medicine’s residency programs, please visit: medicine.ucalgary.ca/postgrad/programs


Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

as of March 31, 2013

Canadian Academy of Health Sciences A. Dr. Subrata Ghosh

Departments of medicine and microbiology, immunology & infectious diseases Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Fellow B. Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn Departments of medicine and community health sciences Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Fellow C. Dr. Todd Anderson Department of Cardiac Sciences Canadian Academy of Health Sciences Fellow

B

2012/13 Anuual Report — 23

Statement of Endowment Valuation (unaudited)

Awards

A

Connec t ing w i t h t he communi t y

22 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Order of Canada Dr. Merrill Knudtson Departments of cardiac sciences and medicine Order of Canada

C

The Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) inducted three members of the Faculty of Medicine as Fellows this in fall 2012. Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn, Dr. Todd Anderson and Dr. Subrata Ghosh were inducted into the academy for their demonstration of leadership, creativity, distinctive competencies and a commitment to advance academic health science. The CAHS recognizes individuals of great accomplishment and achievement in the academic health sciences in Canada. The academy provides timely, informed and unbiased assessments of urgent issues affecting the health of Canadians.

Funding Sources

Royal societ y of Canada Hans Vogel, PhD. Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine; Departments of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science Royal Society of Canada Fellow

 Hans Vogel, PhD, is one of Canada’s leading biochemists. He has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Vogel has made numerous contributions to our understanding of metalloproteins. Recently his group has also been working on developing new diagnostic and prognostic methods in the areas of cancer and infectious diseases.

Royal societ y of Canada David Proud, PhD. Department of Physiology & Pharmacology Royal Society of Canada Fellow

2011 /2012

2012/2013

2012/2013

(1)

Donor Contributions

 Dr. Merril Knudtson has been

named a Member of the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honour. Knudtson is being recognized for his significant contributions to cardiology and health care. He joins previous Faculty of Medicine inductees including: Dr. Clarence Guenter, Dr. Tom Noseworthy and Dr. Garnette Sutherland.

Changes Closing Balance

Closing Balance

$

78,558,051

$

2,785,370

$

81,343,421

Province of Alberta Matching Grants

20,767,980

20,767,980

Capitalized Income

25,459,078

1,445,370

26,904,448

Market Value Adjustment

5,629,504

9,310,842

14,940,346

Total Endowment Value

$ 130,414,613

Total Faculty of Medicine Expenditure Allocations

(2)

$

$ 13,541,582

4,052,864

$ 143,956,195 $

4,255,700

Investment Information

 In recognition of his widespread research accomplishments and extensive contributions to Canadian intellectual life, David Proud, PhD, has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. The fellowship is considered the highest honour that can be attained by scholars, artists and scientists in Canada. Proud has made numerous and important contributions to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that trigger the symptoms of inflammatory airway diseases like asthma.

Faculty of Medicine endowments are invested in the university's long-term investment pool. Each endowment has units in the pool.

Number of units held by the Faculty of Medicine Market Value of units at March 31 $ Market Value of Faculty of Medicine at March 31

1,296,893

103.90 $

$ 130,414,613

Add: Market Value for endowment not part of pool (3) Total Market Value of Faculty of Medicine at March 31

1,255,138

$ 143,956,195

3,887,555

$ 134,302,168

111.00

3,847,790

$ 147,803,985

Notes: 1. Total of 132 endowments for 2012/13 and 128 endowments for 2011/12. 2. Based on 4.0% of the four year rolling market average 3. The Buchanan Portfolio is not part of the University’s unitized investment pool

Facult y of Medicine Alumni (as of 2012)

Universit y of Calgary 2012 Residency Education Programs MSc (1072) PhD (686)

BCR (235)

Family Medicine (60)

Internal Medicine - Core (22) Paediatrics (10)

BHSc (340) MD (3234) Alumni featured in this report are: Douglas Hamilton (MD ’91, PhD ’91), Merril Knudtson (MD ’75), Jocelyn Lockyer (PhD ’92), Connor Wells (BHSc ’13) Jen Wild (MD ’13), Samuel Weiss (PhD '93)

Other (164) For a complete list of all of the Faculty of Medicine’s residency programs, please visit: medicine.ucalgary.ca/postgrad/programs


Ins t i t u t e Ov erv ie ws

24 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Ins t i t u t e Ov erv ie ws

2012/13 Anuual Report — 25

Institute overviews Institute for Public Health iph.ucalgary.ca.

Alberta Children’s Hospital Rese arch Institute for Child and Maternal Health research4kids.ucalgary.ca

The Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health (ACHRI) is a multidisciplinary institute of the University of Calgary, Alberta Health Services and the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation. Membership encompasses the faculties of arts, education, kinesiology, medicine, nursing, science, social work and veterinary medicine. ACHRI co-ordinates child and maternal health research from bench to bedside with a vision of giving mothers and children the best health care possible.

Working together with an incredible breadth of expertise, the institute members are determined to find the causes of disease, advance medical treatments and prevent illness and injury in children.

Calvin, Phoebe and Joan Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases snyder.ucalgary.ca

The Calvin, Phoebe and Joan Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases was named in 2008 in honour of Joan Snyder and her parents, who she credits with teaching her the value of philanthropy. It is a group of more than 104 clinicians, clinician-scientists and basic scientists who are impacting and changing the lives of people suffering from chronic diseases,

such as diabetes, asthma, sepsis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cystic fibrosis.

Hotchkiss Brain Institute

With more than 320 members, the Institute for Public Health (IPH) is a virtual hub/network that integrates research groups, academics, health professionals, community leaders, and policy makers across the health continuum to catalyze excellence in population health and health services research. IPH research priorities focus on three main areas: enhanced health systems performance, improved population health, and innovative tools and methods for public health. Together, our members strive to produce new knowledge and evidence to inform the public health agencies and health systems tasked with keeping us (and making us) healthy - achieving the institute’s vision of better health and health care.

hbi.ucalgary.ca

The Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), consists of more than 100 clinicians and scientists who are dedicated to advancing neurological and mental health research and education. The institute’s research strengths in foundational neuroscience (axon biology and regeneration, cerebral circulation, neural systems and behaviour) are leading to new treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders, aimed at improving quality of life and patient care.

Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta libininstitute.org

The Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta coordinates cardiovascular science research, education and patient care as an entity of both Alberta Health Services (Calgary) and the University of Calgary. It provides education and training of health-care professionals and offers world-class treatment using new technologies and access to cardiac services.

There are more than 150 basic research, clinicians and clinical research members who serve two million people in southern Alberta, Saskatchewan and eastern British Columbia. The institute is committed to developing outstanding cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention programs by translating innovative research into novel health-care solutions.

McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health mccaiginstitute.com

The McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health brings together a group of experts with specialized knowledge to address the myriad of bone and joint health issues affecting more than six million Canadians including: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, spinal disorders, joint health and osteoporosis. The consortium includes: basic scientists, orthopedic surgeons, rheumatologists, kinesiologists and biomedical engineers, who all bring diverse technologies and perspectives to bear on these complex conditions. The McCaig Institute strives for early and accurate diagnosis with the ultimate goal of providing personalized treatments and preventing the development of these conditions in future generations, while also providing a model of patient care pathways in the system for others to emulate.

Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute sacri.ucalgary.ca

The Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI) brings together more than 100 researchers and clinicians, using the latest advances in research to: determine the most effective cancer treatments, understand cancer causation, explain trends in cancer incidence and mortality and to improve the scientific knowledge of all aspects of the cancer care continuum, with an overall goal of improving the lives of those living in Alberta and beyond. SACRI is committed to creating a community for innovative cancer research and training, which is dedicated to achieving a cancer-free future through the application of precision medicine guided by cutting edge research.


Ins t i t u t e Ov erv ie ws

24 — University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine

Ins t i t u t e Ov erv ie ws

2012/13 Anuual Report — 25

Institute overviews Institute for Public Health iph.ucalgary.ca.

Alberta Children’s Hospital Rese arch Institute for Child and Maternal Health research4kids.ucalgary.ca

The Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute for Child and Maternal Health (ACHRI) is a multidisciplinary institute of the University of Calgary, Alberta Health Services and the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation. Membership encompasses the faculties of arts, education, kinesiology, medicine, nursing, science, social work and veterinary medicine. ACHRI co-ordinates child and maternal health research from bench to bedside with a vision of giving mothers and children the best health care possible.

Working together with an incredible breadth of expertise, the institute members are determined to find the causes of disease, advance medical treatments and prevent illness and injury in children.

Calvin, Phoebe and Joan Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases snyder.ucalgary.ca

The Calvin, Phoebe and Joan Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases was named in 2008 in honour of Joan Snyder and her parents, who she credits with teaching her the value of philanthropy. It is a group of more than 104 clinicians, clinician-scientists and basic scientists who are impacting and changing the lives of people suffering from chronic diseases,

such as diabetes, asthma, sepsis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cystic fibrosis.

Hotchkiss Brain Institute

With more than 320 members, the Institute for Public Health (IPH) is a virtual hub/network that integrates research groups, academics, health professionals, community leaders, and policy makers across the health continuum to catalyze excellence in population health and health services research. IPH research priorities focus on three main areas: enhanced health systems performance, improved population health, and innovative tools and methods for public health. Together, our members strive to produce new knowledge and evidence to inform the public health agencies and health systems tasked with keeping us (and making us) healthy - achieving the institute’s vision of better health and health care.

hbi.ucalgary.ca

The Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), consists of more than 100 clinicians and scientists who are dedicated to advancing neurological and mental health research and education. The institute’s research strengths in foundational neuroscience (axon biology and regeneration, cerebral circulation, neural systems and behaviour) are leading to new treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders, aimed at improving quality of life and patient care.

Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta libininstitute.org

The Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta coordinates cardiovascular science research, education and patient care as an entity of both Alberta Health Services (Calgary) and the University of Calgary. It provides education and training of health-care professionals and offers world-class treatment using new technologies and access to cardiac services.

There are more than 150 basic research, clinicians and clinical research members who serve two million people in southern Alberta, Saskatchewan and eastern British Columbia. The institute is committed to developing outstanding cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention programs by translating innovative research into novel health-care solutions.

McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health mccaiginstitute.com

The McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health brings together a group of experts with specialized knowledge to address the myriad of bone and joint health issues affecting more than six million Canadians including: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, spinal disorders, joint health and osteoporosis. The consortium includes: basic scientists, orthopedic surgeons, rheumatologists, kinesiologists and biomedical engineers, who all bring diverse technologies and perspectives to bear on these complex conditions. The McCaig Institute strives for early and accurate diagnosis with the ultimate goal of providing personalized treatments and preventing the development of these conditions in future generations, while also providing a model of patient care pathways in the system for others to emulate.

Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute sacri.ucalgary.ca

The Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute (SACRI) brings together more than 100 researchers and clinicians, using the latest advances in research to: determine the most effective cancer treatments, understand cancer causation, explain trends in cancer incidence and mortality and to improve the scientific knowledge of all aspects of the cancer care continuum, with an overall goal of improving the lives of those living in Alberta and beyond. SACRI is committed to creating a community for innovative cancer research and training, which is dedicated to achieving a cancer-free future through the application of precision medicine guided by cutting edge research.


41095528 PM AGREEMENT NO. 41095528 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:

University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine Communications and Media Relations 7th Floor, TRW Building 3280 Hospital Drive NW Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6

Fofmannualreport201213web  

Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary Annual Report 2012/13

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