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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Cincinnati, Ohio Permit No. 133


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Letter from the Department Head. . ...................................................................................... Page 2 Faculty & Student News.. ............................................................................................ Pages 4 - 25 Time to Play “Name that Fossil!”........................................................................................Page 13 New UC Professor Uses the Past to See the Future............................................................Page 16 Coloquium & Visiting Speakers............................................................Pages 18, 19, 32, 34, 41, 45 Global Extinction: Gradual Doom Is Just As Bad As Abrupt . . ...............................................Page 20 Pursuing Geology from SoCal to Sub-zero and Back to Sun and Sand.. ....................... Pages 21, 22 Digging into the Human Side of Geology............................................................................Page 20 Alumni News............................................................................................................ Pages 26 - 53 The Majic Lantern.. ............................................................................................................Page 39 Geology Donor List.. ........................................................................................................ Pages 45

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Depa rtm en t

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Dear Alumni,

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ope you all had a wonderful year. We certainly did; it was incredibly busy and extremely productive for us all. We continued to have high enrolments in our majors and we brought in one of the largest intakes of graduate students (13 in total) that we’ve had in the past few years. Our students continue to be of the highest caliber; and they just buzz with enthusiasm and zeal for geology. Research in our department is continuing to flourish, with much support coming from the National Science Foundation, NASA, USGS and the National Geographic Society. This year we also did an exceptional amount of hiring of new faculty and staff. On top of all this we are getting ready to change from the quarter to the semester system this coming August. Writing this letter for The Upper Crust has given me a short break to reflect on some of our achievements during the bustle of activities. I will try to summarize some of our highlights, but you can find out much more by turning the pages of The Upper Crust. Our year started with Dr. Brooke Crowley joining us as Assistant Professor of Quaternary Paleoecology. Brooke uses stable isotope biogeochemistry and radiocarbon dating to answer a variety of questions about modern and extinct mammal communities. Brooke’s main research interests include extinction, and environmental and ecological consequences of human impacts, habitat transformation and conserva-

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tion. We threw Brooke in the deep end by having her join us on our Geology of the Himalaya fieldtrip in northern India as soon as she began last September. Brooke loved the high mountains and she plans to go back to the Himalaya this coming summer with her new graduate student, Rajarshi Dasgupta. Over the past year, Brooke has been working hard to develop new teaching and to establish her new Quaternary paleoecology laboratory in our department.

to Cincinnati.

Our fall fieldtrip this year followed the GSA Annual meeting in Minneapolis in October. The GSA meeting was extremely well attended with numerous graduate students and faculty presenting their research. The graduate students lead the fall fieldtrip on a tour back from Minnesota through Wisconsin, Illinois and Indiana

In November, Sarah Tritschler joined our Department as our laboratory manager. Sarah dived straight into her responsibilities for overseeing the new laboratories, laboratory safety, ordering laboratory supplies and helping to processes samples for research. It is wonderful to have Sarah in our department and she is helping our state of the art laboratories to excel. Through February to May, we successfully recruited three new tenure-track faculty and two research pro-


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fessors. These include Dr. Andrew Czaja who will be joining us as an Assistant Professor of Biogeochemistry, Dr. Eva Enkelmann as Assistant Professor of Quaternary Geochronology, Dr. Dylan Ward as Assistant Professor of Numerical Modeling, and Drs. Yurena Yanes and Joshua Miller as Fenneman Assistant Research Professors in Quaternary Science. They will join us this coming academic year so please look forward to hearing more about them in next year’s The Upper Crust. This year again, our graduate students obtained numerous grants from the Geological Society of America, Sigma Xi, the Paleontological Society and other sources. Four doctoral students successfully advanced to candidacy and we graduated three masters and two doctoral students. Our students’ research is diverse, including aspects of Paleozoic stratigraphy and paleontology, Cenozoic and modern paleoecology, tectonic geomorphology, glacial geology, structural geology, biogeochemistry and organic geochemistry. In addition to doing excellent research, our graduates are wonderful teachers and research assistants, and they are actively involved in a whole range of outreach activities. The student Geology Club is thriving and is actively involved in activities such as the Cincinnati GeoFair, SW Ohio Science Fair, the Girls in Science Day, picnics, holiday parties and cleaning the department! Our research is continuing to take us to distant parts of the world, including Tibet, India, St. Croix, Peru, United Kingdom, Spain, Trinidad and Mexico. The number of research papers that has been published in the past year is very impressive, with contributions appearing in journals such as PNAS, Paleogeography, Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology, Geomorphology, Quaternary Science Reviews, Journal of Geophysical Research, Lithosphere, Arctic, Alpine and Antarctic Research, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Global and Planetary Change, and Paleobiology. Throughout the years members of our faculty have been recognized for their outstanding contributions. This year, Carl Brett was honored by the Society for Sedimentary Geology when he received the prestigious Moore Medal in recognition of sustained excellence in paleontology. We are all very proud of Carl’s achievements.

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Our colloquium series was successful again this year organized by Aaron Diefendorf. External speakers included Drs. Patricia Kelley (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Michał Kowalewski (Virginia Tech), Steve Holland (University of Georgia), Susan E. Hough (USGS Pasadena), Patrick Wheatley (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and Brett Tipple (University of Utah). We have to congratulate our Academic Director, Krista Smilek, and her husband, Dan, on the arrival of their first child, Samantha June, who was born on March 23, weighing in at 6 lb and 12 oz, and stretching 19 ¾ inches. We are looking forward to having Samantha join us on our fieldtrips. We hope you will talk with our Alumni Advisory Committee and us about what we can do to help you keep informed of our activities. Do let us know of any way you might like to become more involved in our Department and please do not hesitate to contact me to find out more about what we have been doing for our students. Please do not forget to read about our activities in our weekly informal newsletter, Rolling Rocks. I put Rolling Rocks together every Friday morning in great haste (before the caffeine has taken its full effect - so apologies for the typos) and then e-mail it out to members of our department and friends to help keep them informed of our activities. Please let me know if you would like to be added to the e-mailing list. Rolling Rocks can also be downloaded from our Department website at: http://www.artsci.uc.edu/collegedepts/ geology/pubs/. I should like to thank Warren Huff and Tim Phillips for their hard work in compiling and producing this newsletter. Thank you Warren and Tim. I would also like to thank all you alumni who have keep in touch with us and have generously supported our program throughout this and/or previous years. Your support is always very much appreciated by all. Best wishes, Lewis Owen

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department is delighted to welcome our new colleagues who will join us this coming fall:

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Dr. Andrew Czaja - Assistant Professor of Biogeochemistry Dr. Eva Enkelmann - Assistant Professor of Quaternary Geochronology Dr. Dylan Ward - Assistant Professor of Numerical Modeling Dr. Yurena Yanes - Fenneman Research Assistant Professor Dr. Joshua Miller - Fenneman Research Assistant Professor

A rnie M iller

It’s been quite an eventful year, and, more than anything else, I couldn’t be more pleased with the infusion of new faculty into our program. As recently as two years ago, I was still the third youngest faculty member in the Department (very hard to believe, I know)! At the start of the coming academic year, I’ll be the tenth youngest (and also the seventh oldest, but who’s counting?). Many thanks and congratulations to Lewis Owen on a job well done in spearheading and overseeing this transition. This Spring, three of my students successfully navigated their Ph.D. preliminary examinations and are now officially doctoral candidates. First up was Andrew Zaffos. Andrew’s project is based on his interests in calibrating the relationship between biotic turnover and the structure of faunal gradients at multiple hierarchical scales in space and through time. Part of his dissertation is designed to elucidate changes in the distributions of marine genera with respect to the latitudinal diversity gradient (the observation that the diversity of marine and terrestrial organisms tends to increase towards the tropics). He presented a talk on this topic at the GSA meeting in Minneapolis, and is currently writing up a manuscript for publication. The more extensive part of Andrew’s work will be field-based in the Middle Devonian of New York, focusing on environmental gradients in a sequence-stratigraphic context. For this, he recently got grants from GSA and The Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Fund of the American Museum of Natural History. Andrew also recently published the results of his earlier M.S. work with UC alum Steve Holland, in Paleobiology.

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Next to do prelims was Kelsey Feser. Kelsey’s dissertation involves assessment of anthropogenic environmental impacts on mollusk communities living in seagrass beds around the island of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, based on delineations of variation through time and among different localities in the contents of subfossil (shell) accumulations and in living communities of mollusks. We took a lab trip to St. Croix last June, during which we acquired a large number of samples, and Kelsey has been working them up ever since. She presented preliminary analyses at the GSA meeting in Minneapolis, and has already diagnosed significant variation in biotic and trace-elemental compositions within and among localities...... Kelsey has acquired external funding for her work thus far from GSA, the Paleontological Society and the UC Chapter of Sigma Xi), and will probably take a second sampling trip down to St. Croix in December to collect additional samples and to gather baseline data for the “Winter” season (such as it is at 17° N). Rounding out the Spring trio was Gary Motz. Gary is investigating the role of escalation (an evolutionary outcome of “arms races” between predator and prey species) in mediating major increases in marine biodiversity among venerid bivalves during the Cenozoic era. He’ll focus on the Miocene epoch of the Indo-Pacific biotic province (a biodiversity “hotspot) with initial work on specimens available in museums worldwide, followed by fieldwork (possibly in Japan), if needed. Gary has made significant advances in the past year in automating the capture and analysis of morphological data from digital images of clam shells, and recently presented a poster on one facet of this work at the GSA North-Central sectional meeting in Dayton (co-authored by Sarah Kolbe) . This summer,


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A rnie M iller (continued)

he’ll be traveling to Europe to work with collections in two museums that have extensive Indo-Pacific specimens; Gary acquired a grant from GSA in support of this research.

I anticipate that my “senior” graduate student, Sarah Kolbe, will complete her dissertation this Summer (Sarah will probably gag when she sees herself referred to as “senior”). Her dissertation focuses on several aspects of plant species distributions and the effects of invasive Amur Honeysuckle along an urban-to-wildland gradient in southwestern Ohio, which are outgrowths of a project that we’ve been working on with colleagues in the Biology Department. Sarah’s work is uniquely interdisciplinary, and she has been making steady progress in picking up additional analytical tools (e.g., a GIS certificate) that she is incorporating into her research. In the past year, Sarah has added a soilchemistry angle to her work, in collaboration with Amy Townsend-Small, and this will figure significantly in the chapters/papers that she is currently writing up for her dissertation. Sarah is also involved in various “side” projects that are more paleontological in nature, and these have resulted recently in papers published in Palaios and Paleobiology. She is the current holder the College’s Neff Fellowship, awarded annually to an outstanding woman graduate student in Arts and Sciences. Next year, Sarah will have a teaching postdoc in Environmental Studies at Illinois Wesleyan, and there are strong indications that this will morph into a tenure-track position. As for me, I continue to progress on several projects, including my NASA-funded collaboration with Mike Foote (U. of Chicago) on epicontinental-sea versus open-ocean (e. s. vs. o. o.) evolutionary dynamics; the aforementioned urban-to-wildland gradient (u. to w. g.) study; collaborations with Chinese colleagues on the Paleozoic biodiversity of South China (I’ll be going to Nanjing in July); and the nature of morphological variation throughout the western Atlantic and Caribbean

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Sea in the venerid bivalve genus Chione, in collaboration with Sarah Kolbe. With respect to the e. s. vs. o. o. project, several papers have been published or are currently in the works, including one with former M.S. student, Annie Lagomarcino, entitled: “The relationship between genus richness and geographic area in Late Cretaceous marine biotas: Epicontinental sea versus openocean-facing settings”, to be published soon in PLoS One. As to the u. to w. g. project , I am especially looking forward to the arrival of one of our new Fenneman Research Assistant Professors, Yurena Yanes, who has published extensively on land snails. When she visited Cincinnati, Yurena and I discussed the prospect of investigating gradients in land-snail communities in urban versus rural environments, and she recently sent me some publications describing methods for sampling land-snail communities in urban settings. I look forward to applying these methods during the coming summer!

Mary Jo continues to work as a Social Worker in the Cincinnati Public School system; she recently received the 2012 “Make a Difference” award from the Cincinnati English Language Learning (ELL) foundation, for her work as an advocate for ELL students and their families. After graduating in 2011 from Tufts University, Vanessa has had a very eventful first year as a chef, working her way up to Executive Chef of a restaurant in the South End of Boston called Noche; she was featured one night on the cooking segment of the evening news for the NBC affiliate in Boston, albeit for an item that they don’t serve at the restaurant (the dish isn’t fancy enough)! To view the video, just Google Vanessa Miller Buffalo Nachos, and a link should appear. Nate just completed his third year at Bowdoin College; he’ll be working in a molecular genetics lab this summer at UC’s medical school. He co-authored his first peer-reviewed paper (!) this year, as an outcome of a previous internship at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (Sleep Medicine 12: 797-799). q

Chico (1997[ish]-2011)

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W arren H uff

The past year has been a rewarding one in many respects. In addition to welcoming our new colleague Brooke Crowley in the department I was privileged to have the assistance of several excellent graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants in courses that continued to grow in enrollment. My 8:00 section of geology 101-2-3 alone had 100 students in the fall while the online section grew to 150. Most of the students in the online section are, in fact, fulltime UC students, but many of them have jobs, longdistance commutes, family responsibilities and other schedule conflicts that make class attendance a challenge. However, there were also a few in the military, several on co-op section. I had fourteen students in clay mineralogy this winter, which made finding sufficient laboratory supplies a real challenge. Some other highlights of the year included participation in the Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society, which was held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, and participation in the Annual GSA meeting in Minneapolis. Co-authored publications included a joint paper in the Chinese Science Bulletin with Chinese colleague Wenbo Su on SHRIMP dating of a late Precambrian K-bentonite from North China, two others in a Spanish conference volume, one with a Russian colleague, Andrei Dronov, on Ordovician K-bentonites from Siberia and the other with my former PhD student (‘89) John Haynes on biotites in

B arry M aynard

Our latest project is a study of the potential for monitoring exposure to heavy metals in drinking water by using carbon filters that attach to the faucet. We had hoped to use carafe-style filters, but they do not remove particulate forms of the metals, and these particles are proving to be a dominant mode of exposure. See the photo of our tank and faucet rig to feed known solutions into filters. So far we’ve found these devices to be effective at removing lead, copper, barium and chlorine in particulate and dissolved forms. It’s an analytical challenge to measure metals retained in the filters because of the carbon matrix, but also because several varieties of the filters have multiple

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volcanic tephras, and a joint publication in the Journal of Archaeological Science with Ken Tankersley, a former UC geology student and now Assistant Professor of Anthropology at UC. I have two MS students working with me at the moment with a third scheduled to arrive in the fall. Jim Milawski is working on a co-advised (Ken Tankersley) project in Guatemala concerning the possible relation between the eruption history of major volcanoes and the disappearance of the Mayan culture. Yinal Huvaj is involved in a Turkish Petroleum Corporation-funded project on the burial diagenesis of clay minerals in oil-producing regions of Turkey. Beyond this, I continue as an associate editor for both the American Mineralogist and Clays and Clay Minerals as well as serving as Secretary to the Clay Minerals Society. Recently I have begun archiving some of the department’s historical documents with the hope of eventually merging these into one web page devoted to the history of this department. For starters I have put up the following: Course bulletins dating back to the beginning of the department at http://tinyurl.com/8ynzrcd

Copies of annual newsletters dating back to the early 1950s at http://tinyurl.com/cf84nsc

Moreover, if you go to the “About the Department” section of the department’s UC website at http://www.artsci. uc.edu/collegedepts/geology/about/ you will see links to articles about some of the key players in the history of this department, including Nevin Fenneman, Walter bucher, John Rich, Kenneth Caster and Otto von Schlichten. q

components, including a fabric wrap. The devices might be useful in mineral exploration -- just set up a pump and run 100 gallons of stream water through one. Has to be low turbidity, however. q


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P aul E. P otter

In some ways uneventful, but not in all.

Meetings: I attended the annual joint meetings of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists and the Society for Sedimentary Research in Long Beach, California and congratulated Professor Brett on his receipt of the Moore Award, where he gave a short, most informative and humorous acceptance speech. At the meeting I also attended a day-long workshop on the Monterey Shale. In late summer 2011 I went to a one-day conference on the Utica Shale held at New Philadelphia, Ohio - attended by 246 only one other professor was in attendance. Since this meeting, development of the Utica Shale for gas in Ohio is in the news almost weekly.

Professional Talks: I gave two talks at the Geology Department of Michigan State in the fall, one on the global Miocene and another on U-Pb and Lu-Hf age dating of zircons in the Mount Simon Sandstone of the Eastern Midwest. I repeated the Mt. Simon talk for the Illinois Oil and Gas association in Mt. Vernon, Illinois in April. Surprisingly, this talk was exceptionally well received by the petroleum geologists. I also gave a talk to the Cincinnati Mineral Society on Cincinnati Hills in May (this invitation was the outgrowth of an article in the Sunday Cincinnati Enquirer about hillsides). Research: I continue to help my Australian associate

Amy Townsend-Small

This year has been very busy for me! It was my second year on the tenure track at the University of Cincinnati, and I’m continuing to work hard to develop my courses, expand my research capabilities, and mentor students. I’m very proud to be part of a new NSFfunded project with my colleagues in the Department of Geography investigating impacts of climate change on lakes and other ecosystems in the Alaskan Arctic. I will spend about one month a year in the Arctic, hopefully successfully fending off polar bears and caribou and making measurements of carbon cycling. I also became involved with research this year at the United States Environmental Protection

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on U-Pb and Lu-Hf dating of zircons of the Mount Simon, where my role is that of an auxiliary and writer (he speaks English well, but writing is much harder) and am helping another Brasilian with a follow-up paper on our 2009 global Miocene effort published in Earth Science Reviews. And finally, I am helping Barry and two members of the Kentucky Survey prepare a nontechnical field guide – one that will fit in the glove compartment of a car – on landsliding in the Cincinnati area. I have more dreams, but I want to finish these papers first.

Teaching: I taught Basin Dynamics in the Winter, all ten weeks, and it was much improved over the 2009-2010 version, its first time. This was somewhat trying because I had a terrible attack of Polymyalgia Rheumatica that developed just before Christmas.

Field Trips: I went to Canada twice this year, once with two members of the Ohio Survey, to see a Mount Simon equivalent in eastern Ontario, made many local trips for landslides and am making a collection of photographs – all located by GPS – of the watershed of the Little Miami River. I have learned much local geology from this hobby project. International Trips: I went to Brasil in late summer 2011 and visited two universities and PETROBRAS. q

Agency across the street, and we are now working together on a project studying East Fork Lake near Cincinnati. My very first graduate student, Todd Longbottom, successfully defended his thesis in June, hopefully to be followed soon by his lab-mates Rebecca Smolenski and Andrew Schneider (co-advised with David Nash). I also had four undergraduate students working in the lab with me this past year, and they all successfully presented their research in June at the university’s undergraduate research conference. I’m very proud to be associated with such a wonderful group of colleagues and students here in Cincinnati. q

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C arlton B rett

Few years have been as wonderfully hectic and exciting for me as 2011, with over 100 days of fieldwork (mostly with students) in 14 states, plus England and Germany. Our two children are on their own for the first time: our daughter Leanne was married on St.Patrick’s Day this year. As a result, Betty Lou travelled with me on some trips. I attended the International Subcommission on Silurian Stratigraphy at Ludlow, England in mid July. I went the field trips in the area of Llandovery, Wales and near Ludlow and Dudley, England and she we had a wonderful time exploring lovely Ludlow. In the last two weeks of July we visited our colleagues in Germany, including our dear friends Dolf and Edith Seilacher and we spent a week at their lovely summer home in the Schwarzwald (Black Forest). In addition, I completed some new field studies in the Devonian of the Eifel region with Eberhard Schindler, Rainer Brocke and others. This will lead to some substantial revisions to the geology in that area. We are completing a series of papers on the sequence stratigraphy and paleoecology of the Middle Devonian of the NE Eifel region, the results of my Humboldt Foundation sponsored research. The last two years I have been busy bringing some projects to culmination and starting new ones (of course) and in 2011 about 20 papers were published, we also got out two edited special on totally different topics in the journal Palaeogeography, Palaeclimatology, Palaeoecology (P-3). First, I edited a special volume on Middle Devonian cycles, climate, and bioevents, in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology was officially published early in 2011, including 11 papers by a number of Devonian workers. I also co-edited a second special volume of 10 papers that summarize results of 12 years of The Shelf and Slope Experimental Taphonomy Initiative (SSETI), a large collaborative program headed by former PhD student Karla Parsons Hubbard (Oberlin), Eric Powell (head of Rutgers Shellfish Research Institute) and others which examines potential preservation of shelly fossils in many modern shelf and slope marine environments in the Gulf of Mexico and the Bahamas; SSETI was initiated in 1993. As we approach 2013, we are applying for funding to return to our sites and obtain samples that have remained on the seafloor for 20-years. The longest-running experimental study of taphonomic effects ever attempted. Nonetheless, my primary focus as in all years has been on teaching and I taught or co-taught 7 courses this last year, including two new ones, and spent more than 60 days in the field working with students. As director of undergraduates for our department I have been busy helping to convert our programs from quarters to semesters and we now have nearly 80 majors who need to be nurtured. PhD student Jay Zambito completed his dissertation and received the college’s highest award, the Distinguished Doctoral Dissertation; also two MS students, Nathan Marshall and Tom

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Schramm completed excellent masters theses this past year. Students Nick Sullivan, Jim Thomka, Matt Vrazo are all making good headway on their respective research projects. In April, 2012, I was very honored to receive the Raymond C. Moore Medal from the Society of Sedimentary Geology for excellence in paleontology and stratigraphy, one of the two top honors for a “senior-level” paleontologist, at the AAPG National Meeting.

Raymond C. Moore Medal

For Sustained Excellence in Paleontology Carlton E. Brett

Carlton Brett has is held in high esteem worldwide for his strikingly unique contributions in the fields of paleontology and stratigraphy, ranging from the development of novel methods for determining the regional and global age-equivalencies of strata; to his leadership in the modernization of the science of stratigraphy and its incorporation into evolutionary research; to his seminal work on the use of data on the preservational condition of fossil material to reconstruct ancient environments; to his provocative discoveries about the tempo and mode of evolution among species on a regional scale. The latter topic, dubbed “coordinated stasis”, has attracted the attention of leading evolutionary theorists, who have been debating its merits for more than a decade. More broadly, Carl and his students have been at the vanguard of integrative approaches to the study of Earth history, melding the stratigraphic, sedimentological, paleontological, and geochemi-


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C arlton B rett (continued)

cal records to understand the relationships among regional and global events throughout the mid-Paleozoic. Carl earned his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan in 1978, and moved that same year into a faculty position at the University of Rochester. In 1998, he joined the Department of Geology at the University of Cincinnati. Among the highlights of Carl’s professional career are his receipt the Paleontological Society’s Schuchert Award; his election as a fellow of the Paleontological Society and of the Geological Society of America; his associate editorships of several journals; his receipt in 2008 of the Digby McClaren Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Stratigraphic Paleontology, awarded by the International Commission on Stratigraphy at the International Paleontological Congress in Oslo; and his receipt in 2005 of an Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize. Carl has published some 230 peer-reviewed papers, 62 guidebook articles, and five edited books, and he has supervised 22 Ph.D. and 27 M.S. students throughout his distinguished career. Carl is certainly among the most versatile, imaginative, and hard-working researchers anywhere in the allied fields of paleontology and stratigraphy, and he has an encyclopedic memory of anything that he encounters. Carl is, first and foremost, an aficionado of field work and, as so many of his students and colleagues will tell you, there is no place that he would rather be at any given moment on any given day (or night) in any given weather condition than at a rock outcrop. His intuitive grasp of what he observes out in the field and his ability to incorporate these observations into meaningful scientific advances are legendary. Equally important are Carl’s lack of pretentiousness and his ability to communicate what he does to just about anyone, particularly out in the field during his legendary field trips. Because of these qualities, he is a gifted teacher and mentor who inspires loyalty and enthusiasm among students at all levels, as well as among his colleagues around the world. Carl is one of those people who is able to get the very best out of his students, as evidenced by their successes after they graduate. Arnold I. Miller

Citation: To Carlton E. Brett for his uniquely integrative contributions to the study of Earth history, and for his unmatched dedication to field-based pedagogy. Response by Carl Brett

I am delighted to receive this award, especially as R.C. Moore was something of a hero to me, even though I never met the man. It is remarkable to be honored for doing what is really a life-long passion/addiction. Life is contingent and I feel very fortunate that the twists of fate led me to an extraordinarily exciting career. Almost as far back as I can remember, I wanted to be a naturalist. Growing up on a small family farm in southeastern New Hampshire, I was fascinated by animals of all sorts from clams to cows. I collected, identified, and

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made drawings of shells, insects, and bones and eventually made my own little museum. Both of my parents were teachers and they encouraged me to follow my own interests. My father, Wesley, who just turned 98, was a skilled designer-craftsman and a revered professor of design; he transferred from the University of New Hampshire to SUNY College at Buffalo when I was 10 and we moved from the “Granite State” to the fossil-rich “Niagara Frontier” of western New York. It was sad to leave the farm and yet this was a defining event. I vividly recall the day that I flipped up a slab of crumbling sandstone in the new back yard and saw a fossil-a clam imprint. That was a first. I was thrilled and asked: “How old is that, how did it live, and how did it get preserved in rock?” I’m still pursuing such questions. I first encountered the name R.C. Moore in the library at Buffalo State College, as 12 year old. I tried to identify fossils I had collected in rip-rap along the Niagara River, using the first book I came upon: the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, edited by Moore: a tough source for a beginner, but what did I know: obviously not much! Bit by bit, though, I began to learn. By the time I was a high school student I was determined to become a paleontologist and had the goal of working in one of two great “meccas” for Paleozoic fossils and strata: New York State or the Cincinnati region. Amazingly, I got to do both. As an undergraduate at the University of Buffalo in the turbulent early 1970s, I pursued geology and paleontology with a vengeance and benefitted from the encouragement and advise of mentors Ed Buehler and Parker Calkin; above all, I appreciated the fact that they let me follow my own interests. The year 1973 was pivotal in my life: after I graduated from UB I got engaged to my wife Betty Lou, and quite by accident, I met the incomparable Gordon C. Baird, then a PhD student at the University of Rochester. Both associations have proved to be very wonderful in quite different ways. It turned out that Gordon and I had highly overlapping interests and even were working independently on the same geologic projects: we worked cooperatively from that day onward. Gordon is one of the most remarkable and keen field stratigraphers and paleontologists I have ever met. Eventually, we were extremely fortunate to both get teaching positions in western New York: he at SUNY Fredonia and I at his alma mater, University of Rochester. At the University of Michigan my PhD advisor, Brad Macurda, not only furthered my interests in crinoids, but also, incidentally, introduced me to the notion of sequence stratigraphy as he left UM to take up his new career as a sequence stratigrapher. Professors Jack Dorr, Jim Doyle, Gerry Smith, Bob Kesling and Rob Van der Voo led by example; Bruce Wilkinson kept me on my toes. Fellow graduate students, including Ed Landing, Dave Liddell, and George McIntosh, among others sparked my interests in diverse ways and we cooperated in research projects on echinoderms, paleobiology, taphonomy and paleoecology far beyond our dissertation topics. (continues)

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C arlton B rett (continued)

And there were other influences, as well. Even as a high school student I became intrigued that the Paleozoic fossils of western New York seemed to show remarkably little change for what I perceived to be millions of years, followed by abrupt changes. Therefore, I read Niles Eldredge and Stephen Jay Gould’s seminal paper on punctuated equilibrium with great interest; their phrase “stasis is data” became a mantra to me. I was determined to blend field studies of stratigraphy and paleontology with evolutionary paleoecology. With encouragement from both Gould and Eldredge, Gordon Baird and I proposed the now controversial notion of “coordinated stasis”, based on the same empirical patterns of fossil distribution that had always intrigued me. I was thrilled to get a position at the University of Rochester in 1978, when I was still finishing my dissertation on paleoecology of echinoderms from, of course, the Rochester Shale. Western New York is a classic testing ground for ideas in geology and paleontology. Together with hosts of students, Gordon Baird and I fed off each other’s enthusiasm for stratigraphy and paleoecology, as we scrambled up 100s of stream cuts in Upstate New York; on the long drives home on the NY Thruway we excitedly pulled together new views of stratigraphic relationships, facies models, and paleoecology. Ideas flew back and forth and we raced out at the next available opportunity to test our latest hypotheses. I was delighted to become a part of the great department at University of Cincinnati in 1998, some 30 years after I first marveled over drawers of spectacular Cincinnatian trilobites on a ninth grade field trip to Harvard’s MCZ. It is not simply that the Cincinnatian rocks, so well exposed in the Tristate area, provide an unparalleled natural laboratory to pursue questions of Paleozoic sedimentary geology, paleoecology, and evolution. The UC Geology Department is a uniquely stimulating, collegial and nurturing place for students and faculty, alike. In addition, the Department’s long-standing association with the Cincinnati Dry Dredgers amateur paleontology group, provides an opportunity to interact with a wonderful group of local experts whose

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combined knowledge of the Cincinnatian fossils and strata is stunning. I greatly appreciate the support and friendship of all of my esteemed colleagues in the Geology Department and, especially Dave Meyer and Arnie Miller, who have long nurtured my interests in taphonomy and evolutionary paleoecology. Dave was a role model to me even when he was still a youngster, who was also an avid paleontologist in high school in western New York. Arnie, who graduated from the University Rochester the same month I was hired there, not only urged me to apply for my present position, but has been very supportive in a great many ways. I have been inspired and encouraged by a great many other colleagues and students, too numerous to name. But I must mention Curt Teichert, Dolf Seilacher, and Paul Potter. How could one help but revere these legendary scientists, each still publishing important books and teaching well into their late 80s. With role models like these, don’t expect me to retire any day soon! I also owe a great debt of gratitude to dozens of students past and present-many of them now paleontologists and sedimentary geologists in their own right. I view students as junior colleagues; they inspire me and keep me on my toes. The possibility of direct involvement of students at all levels in new research keeps what might become routine activities vibrant and exciting and some of my most important lines of research evolved from discussions raised by “simple” student questions. There is nothing so gratifying as seeing students develop sparks of interest and then seeing them go on to pursue their own investigations and careers in Earth sciences. I have been fortunate, indeed, to get to work with so many outstanding students. Finally, I must thank my wife, Betty Lou, who has patiently encouraged and helped me for over 38 years-and my children Kenton and Leanne who have taught me many things and put up with an eccentric father who ran around the world in search of rocks and fossils and what they can tell us about the history of this planet. It’s a ‘wonderful life’. Thank you all very much. q

The Department rejoiced as Krista and Dan Smilek welcomed their new baby girl, Samantha June, on March 23rd. She weighed 6 lb and 12 oz.

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D avid N ash

Somehow David Nash’s contribution to last year’s Upper Crust was “lost in the shuffle” (at least in the hard copy edition) so we’re giving you a double dose this year with some material from last year. Nash continues to push plans for constructing a groundwater observatory adjacent to Great Miami River in Miami-Whitewater Forest. He has put together a prospectus for the observatory (available at http://homepages. uc.edu/~nashdb/GMGWO/GMWON.pdf). He and Kevin Savage, successfully “marketed” the concept to Hamilton County Parks who denoted land for the observatory. Mike Ekberg, now the coordinator of the Aquifer Protection Subgroup of the Miami Conservancy District has been indispensable in pledging MCD matching funds for the project. Last Fall Kevin, who has returned to his first love, teaching high school, presented an overview of the proposed observatory at the Project WET conference in Bozeman, Montana. Nash and Matt Nemecek (who earned his MS degree with Nash in Spring, 2011) continue to work on preparing their study of streambed conductance of Paint Creek in Ross County, Ohio for publication. Nash now uses the study site for stream gauging with his geomorphology class (picture below taken Fall 2011) and modeling surface-water/ground-water interaction in his ground-water courses. Nash is delighted with our new colleague Amy Townsend-Small who provides the environmental geochemistry expertise that the ground-water observatory effort so badly needed. Amy’s interest in the nitrogen and carbon cycles compliments the needs of the observatory very nicely. Nash enthuses that Amy is an ideal research partner: she is extremely energetic, productive, writes well, has a great sense of humor and, perhaps most important, shares his love of The Big Lebowski (and provides quotes from it much more accurately than Nash can). Nash is a big fan of Amy’s dog, Gomez (a.k.a. Geodog).

They were impressed with how neat the fracking sites were and the efforts Chesepeake Energy had made to be “good neighbors” with the local community. Nash and Amy chatted with Todd Stephenson, now with Chesepeake Energy, who was pleasant and helpful (as always). Nash, Amy, and Todd all agree on the desirability of establishing environmental baseline readings prior to fracking. Nash continues to work with Paul Edwin Potter on the morphology of the Licking River Basin. Paul and Nash are investigating the relationship between morphology and underlying geology and the influence of Tertiary geomorphic changes on longitudinal profile of the river. Potter and Nash journeyed to the source of the Licking River, a very picturesque spring in Magoffin County, in the heart of Kentucky’s eastern coal basin. Here’s a picture of Paul with Gerald Salyer, the county road commissioner. The spring that is the source of the mighty Licking is to their right. Nash has become fascinated by the Carolina Bays. Yes, even after a century and a half of intensive research, they still have their appeal! He believes that his ground-water and hillslope modeling experience, combined with recently available data may shed new insight into the origin of these intriguing features (spoiler alert: he is extremely skeptical of an extraterrestrial origin). Nash notes that several geomorphologist were studying the Carolina Bays at the time of their death including Douglas Johnson and William Prouty and hopes not to follow suit. Nash’s colleagues have insisted he pursue his studies.

Amy has become interested in the environmental impact of shale gas development in Eastern Ohio and Nash accompanied her on a tour of fracking sites in Spring 2011.

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David Nash (continued) Nash was visited by a Nash was abgreat many recent and solutely denot-so-recent alums… lighted with the again, too numerous to news that Lisa list (and, with his memDameron and ory being what it is, he’s Jeff Dahl had a afraid he might leave beautiful daughsome folks out). He does ter, Madeleine! insist on mentioning a Nash has fond memories of how wonparticular pleasant visit by derful Lisa was with his son Nathan (who Brigid Plummer who’s just graduated from college this Spring). youngest son, Jacob, Tempus fugit! was contemplating atNash enthusiastically invites everyone tending University of Cinto look out his office window via his new, cinnati (he subsequently The Plummers: Dave, Claire, Brigid, Walt, improved webcam (http://homepages. Jake, and Aaron (dog’s name was not provided). chose Thomas More Coluc.edu/~nashdb/cincinnati/lexington_ lege). Nash was amazed at how nicely Jake combined peneplain.htm). In the lower right hand corner you can the personalities and physical characteristics of both see the tulip poplar the department planted in Kees DeBrigid and Dave. You can judge for yourself from the Jong’s memory. q picture.

Craig Dietsch A remarkable year has past. Remarkable hiring! As must be written elsewhere in the newsletter, we hired 3 new faculty and 2 new research professors this year! I was privileged to lead the search in Quaternary Geochronology that ended with the hiring of Dr. Eva Enkelmann from Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, who will join us in January 2013. Dr. Enkelmann has a range of expertise in low-temperature thermochronology, structural geology, tectonics, and geomorphology. Welcome, Eva!

Remarkable India trip! Lewis Owen and I once again led our field course to northern India last September. We had an outstanding group of colleagues, including Alejandro Carrillo (M.S. 1990) from the faculty of Geociencias-UNAM, Campus Juriquilla, Mexico; Antonio Teixell and Julien Babault from the Universidad Autonòma de Barcelona (colleagues of Paco!), a rocking great group of graduate and undergraduate students, and volunteers Jim Benton and Trung Hoang Nguyen. It was a pleasure to have our new faculty colleague Brooke Crowley on the trip, too. This trip was particularly interesting as Julien guided us in collecting sediment samples for 10Be-based erosion

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rates to test his ideas about the development of transverse drainage; Alejandro collected remote water and snow samples to analyze them for industrial pollutants; Antonio had great insights into the structural geology, Jim helped distribute water filters to schools and monasteries, Brooke collected various and sundry plants and animal fur for O isotope analysis, and Trung and I collected high elevation ridge crest bedrock samples for more erosion rate study. And! Brain Davies from DAAP and three of his students were along developing and testing equipment for a new high-altitude habitat. To all: thanks for a great trip! Remarkable graduate students! Emiko Kent completed her M.S. thesis, Towards defining the extent of climatic influence on alluvial fan sedimentation in semiarid Sonoran and Mojave Deserts, southern California, USA and Baja California, northern Mexico last summer; Emiko is now in the Ph.D. program in Plymouth University’s School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences (that would be England). Julia Wise completed her M.S. thesis, Eo-Variscan orogenesis in the Guilleries Massif, Catalan Coastal Ranges, northeastern Spain, recorded by U-Th-Pb ages of monazite inclusions in metamorphic garnet. Emiko’s title beats Julia’s 26 words to 22. Julia is now in our Ph.D. program and is going to work with Amy TownsendSmall (on a project will undoubtedly have a greater human impact than her Masters!). And! Natashia Pierce is well into her M.S. degree using the geochemistry


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T i m e T o P l ay .....

“Name that Fossil” !

But, experts do know that whatever it is, it’s history-making. “This is the largest fossil that has ever been extracted from this age of rock in this area or maybe even in the world,” declared Carl Brett, University of Cincinnati geology professor. “This is the ultimate cold case,” said Ron Fine, who found this slab of mystery matter. “It’s 450 million years old.” And it goes by the nickname, “Godzillus.’’ “I picked that name to make it sound more scientific,” Fine said. “Like Godzilla, it’s a primordial beast that found its way to the modern era.” Fine is a mechanical designer by trade and a fossil hunter by passion. “I’ve been collecting fossils since I was four,” said the 43-year-old Dayton man as he looked at his discovery laid out – like a prehistoric stiff in a CSI TV show – on an examining table in the cramped confines of UC’s Kenneth E. Caster Library of Paleontology. “There are eight bottles of Super Glue holding this thing together,” he said, proudly examining his restoration effort. The fossil dates back those 450 million years, Fine mentioned to the Cincinnatian epoch of the Upper Ordovician period. Fine found it off Route 17 in Kentucky’s Kenton County on Memorial Day2011. Walking along a hillside thatis “a haven for fossil hunters,” he spotted two large rocky lobes – the shape of pads from a cactus pear – at his feet. “The rest was sticking out of the hillside,” Fine said. “I had to dig it out. Took all summer, every Saturday until Labor Day. Most fossils around here are small, the

It stands 6 feet 5, measures 3.5 feet wide and weighs 150 pounds. Nobody knows what it is. Plant. Animal. Mineral. Bacterial. It’s anybody’s guess.

size of your thumbnail or your thumb. This thing’s huge.” To the untrained eye, the shape and color of the fossil resembles a blob of concrete that set up after being washed from a cement truck’s chute – a common sight at work sites. “It’s made out of the same stuff that makes up a sidewalk,” Fine admitted. Smells like it, too. “But, I haven’t tasted it, yet,” he noted. “I knew right away it was a fossil,” he added. “And it looked like nothing I had ever seen.” Turns out, he’s in good company. “This one has us stumped,” admitted David Meyer. The UC geology professor stood between Brett and Fine. The fossil hunter shared his find with the professors in September at a meeting of the Dry Dredgers, an association of amateur geologists meeting at UC for 70 years. The Dredgers belong to the area’s long history of geological exploration. Cincinnati’s rock formations and fossils have been examined since the 1790s. “The members of the Dry Dredgers bring in some amazing finds,” Brett noted. “But we’ve never been stumped.” Until now. That’s why Godzillus is in Dayton today for a regional meeting of the Geological Society of America. “Maybe someone there will know what this is,” Meyer said as he examined one of the lobes. “At first glance, I thought it was one of the things we’ve studying in the silt beds around here for years,” Brett said. “Then we saw the intricate patterning.” So much for the idea that it came from a blob of highly compressed silt. The patterning reminded Meyer of “goose flesh. Some of its surface also looks like scales. But this thing is not boney. It is not a fish.” He should know. He’s the author of a book about the Ordovician period, “A Sea Without Fish.” q

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Craig Dietsch (continued)

of arc-related meta-igneous rocks from northern Vermont, western Massachusetts, and western Connecticut to test regional tectonic models of the pre-Silurian evolution of the New England Appalachians. Natashia is following the geochemistry trail blazed by Marzena Chocyk-Jaminski (Ph.D. 1996). Remarkable IPA! Natashia, undergraduate (but not for long!) Nick Bose and I did fieldwork in New England early this spring, including several days in northern Vermont with Dr. Jon Kim of the Vermont Geologic Survey. Half of the new 9-foot long (!) geological

A aron D iefendorf

This has been an exciting year for my research group. I am proud to report that renovations on the Organic Geochemistry Laboratory were completed in December and we are rushing to get caught up on projects. Much of my time has been spent getting the lab running, giving talks at other universities and at GSA and AGU, teaching, and submitting grants and manuscripts. In October, I was awarded an American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund grant to investigate a class of molecular compounds (biomarkers) that are used to characterize the paleoecology of terrestrial plants, especially during the rise of angiosperms during the Cretaceous. I also had the privilege of attending the Hothouse Ecosystem Workshop last year at Brown University, and will be attending the Early Geoscience Career Workshop in Williamsburg next week. I am pleased to report that Sharmila Giri joined the lab last August. Sharm earned her B.S. in Biology from Penn State where she was working on a research project in organic biogeochemistry of coral reefs. Sharm is working hard on her M.S. thesis project that focuses on transport of biomarkers in river systems. Sharm has been instrumental in helping get the lab up and running following the renovations. She is now busy packing for our fieldwork later this month in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Zach Mergenthal, Tom Lowell’s M.S. student, came over to the dark side last fall for a joint project characterizing the organic geochemistry and temperature history of several lakes in eastern Greenland. Zach is reconstructing Holocene lake temperatures in east Greenland by measuring the degree of unsaturation in alkenone (long-chain ketones)

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map of Vermont is hanging on my bulletin board. One cannot go to Vermont without sampling the local beer. The winners (out of 8): Wolaver’s IPA and Brown Ale, and Rock Art Brewery Ridge’s The Vermonster. And! When on holiday, one cannot go to Portland, Oregon without sampling the local beer. The winners (out of 17): Rogue’s Brutal IPA, Amnesia Brewery’s Desperation IPA, Deschutes’ Vestas IPA, Speakeasy Ales & Lagers’ Big Daddy IPA, and Ninkasi Brewing Company’s Total Domination IPA. Cheers! q

biomarkers that are produced by freshwater haptophyte algae. Alkenones were a new direction for Zach and we have had fun developing this new analytical method. Thanks to Zach, we are getting great results! The lab has also been busy with two undergraduates working on characterizing modern plant biomarkers: Katherine Finan completed a UC Women in Science Experience last summer and Keegan McClanahan joined the lab this winter. In the next couple of weeks, two more undergrads will be joining the lab to work for the summer on various research projects also focused on modern plant biomarkers and biomarkers from Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks: Cheyenne Hassan and Jonathan Marsh (from Miami University). On the home front, my wife Emily and I bought a house in Clifton last August and have been busy fixing it up, and transforming the yard into an urban garden. We now have ~600 square feet of raised bed gardens and hope to produce most of our vegetables for the year. Emily has been busy taking care of our son Eliot. When she gets a chance, she has been working on her knitting and experimenting with bread making. Eliot is growing up faster than I could possibly have imagined. He’s now 1.5 years old, has an excellent vocabulary for his age. He is incredibly inquisitive and very much enjoys bioturbating our house and garden! Relocating potato seeds kept him occupied for quite some time and we have enjoyed seeing potatoes sprout from the weirdest places. I’m very much looking forward to a busy summer in the lab and field. If you are around the department, stop by for a tour of the lab. q

D o you have any recollections of field trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues?

Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

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GSA Annual Meeting, 2012 Charlotte, North Carolina November 4th - 7th

The Geological Society of America 2012 Annual Meeting will be held November 4-7 in Charlotte, NC at the Charlotte Convention Center (http://www.geosociety.org/meetings/2012/). I would like to invite you to attend and to join us for an alumni get-together on Monday, 5 November 2012: 6:30 PM-9:00 PM, next door in the Westin Charlotte Hotel, Queens Room. I hope to see you in Charlotte,

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Letter from the Dean Ronald L. Jackson II

Dean, McMicken College of Arts & Sciences University of Cincinnati I am writing to share with you some great news for the college. Please join me in welcoming our two new associate deans: Arnie Miller and Jana Braziel.

I’d imagine many of you are familiar with Arnie and Jana. Arnie is a professor of paleontology and is coming to this associate dean role from the department of Geology where he was previously department head. He is an internationally recognized researcher who is very well respected in paleontology, one of our top programs in the college. He is also an affiliate faculty member in the philosophy department. To read more about Arnie’s background and research please visit his webpage at http://www.artsci.uc.edu/ collegedepts/geology/fac_staff/profile_details. aspx?ePID=ODA2Mw%3D%3D. We are very fortunate to have the two of them join the college of arts and sciences administration. Again, please reach out to them and join me in welcoming the two of them. Cheers, Ron

Save the Date for a Full-Day Celebration of all things Dave Meyer! Professor Dave Meyer, paleontologist extraordinaire, will be formally retiring—sort of—at the end of the 2011-2012 academic year. Actually, he’ll still be on staff for the next several years in a part-time capacity as a McMicken Professor, but, rather than waiting until he really gets old, we wanted to mark this transition by putting together a celebration in his honor on Friday, October 5. We are still working out logistical details, but, at this time, we can tell you that the day will include an on-campus symposium on Friday morning and afternoon, an evening soiree/dinner somewhere off-campus (likely at the Cincinnati Zoo), and perhaps a Saturday field trip led by Carl Brett (although we haven’t asked him yet….). The symposium will consist of two 3-hour sessions, with speaking commitments thus far from: Bill Ausich (Ohio State), Tom

Baumiller (University of Michigan), Danita Brandt (Michigan State University), Carl Brett (University of Cincinnati), Bob Elias (University of Manitoba), Mike Foote (University of Chicago), Ben Greenstein (Cornell College), Steve Holland (University of Georgia), and Pete Holterhoff (Hess Oil and and Texas Tech University). We are also hoping to include Ghislaine Llewellyn (World Wildlife Foundation, Australia) and Chuck Messing (Nova University). We hope that many of our alumni, in particular Dave’s former students, will want to join us for the celebration. We’ll be back in touch as the summer unfolds with additional details. In the meantime, please save the date, and feel free to contact Arnie Miller (arnold.miller@uc.edu), who is organizing the day’s activities, with any questions. q

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New UC Professor Uses the Past to See the Future By: Ryan Varney, Office of Marketing & Communications, McMicken College of Arts & Sciences.

Brooke Crowley, new assistant professor in geology and anthropology, studies the past to see the future locally and globally.

Quaternary paleo ecologist Brooke Crowley spent time studying the ecological history of Madagascar. Madagascar, an isolated island off the southeast coast of Africa, is home to plant and animal species that are wild, wonderful and even slightly bizarre. New University of Cincinnati Assistant Professor Brooke Crowley has spent time over the past six years studying the ecological history of Madagascar in the hope of determining the island’s ecological future.

To determine the history of past species, Crowley uses two techniques: radiocarbon dating and stable isotope ecology. Radiocarbon dating is used to figure out ages of extinct species and when they tapered off, while stable isotope ecology provides insight on the environmental conditions and dietary categories of animals. These techniques let Crowley create a long-term historical profile of extinct and living species which then allows her to take that information and paint a picture of the future. “I was able to radiocarbon date a bunch of bones from extinct and living animals, and I’ve found there’s a very clear pattern of when these species disappeared— about 1,000 years ago—which is right around the time of an increase in human activity. That’s component number one,” she says. “Component number two is how have the current species been affected by those extinctions: have there been ecological changes; are they eating different things or living in different habitats than they did in the past.”

“The animals and plants there are really unique and isolated—when I go there it feels like I’m entering a Dr. Seuss world. There’s a tremendous diversity of species ranging from chameleons and lizards to butterflies to orBy understanding how things chids and even primates, like may have changed over time, the lemurs—which I really enCrowley can take that inforjoyed studying,” Crowley says. mation and determine what “What I’ve been doing is thinklong-term strategies make ing about what’s lived there in sense when thinking about the last 10,000 years and how the future. “What is the bigthings changed when people gest threat to animals today: came: what have been the is it forest loss; is it human responses to human impact; hunting; is it that they’re being what is going on with animals protected in a different habitat Crowley enjoys some time with a lemur, a speliving there today; what will than what they should be; or cies native to Madagascar. A ringtailed lemur. their future be like; and what is it something else we don’t can we learn from the past to know yet?” understand the current and fuBesides Madagascar, Crowley is also interested in usture situation there.” ing these techniques locally. One of her goals is to work As a quaternary paleo ecologist, Crowley mainly foin local places like Big Bone Lick State Park in Northern cuses on recent history—which is actually considered Kentucky and use local resources such as the Cincinthe past 2.5 million years, though she mostly looks at a nati Museum Center. “Big Bone Lick is an interesting slightly more recent period, the Holocene, which spans continues the past 12,000 years.

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Brooke Crowley (continued)

fossil locality where I could work as part of a team to find answers to some paleo ecological questions. It’s an exciting place with great historical significance.” The mix of global and local research fits nicely with Crowley’s outlook as she considers herself to be interdisciplinary by nature. “I’m an interdisciplinary-type person and I’ve had trouble narrowing myself into a specific discipline. Fortunately, my position here is explicitly interdisciplinary and I’m basically 50-50 in geology and anthropology.” She is currently in the process of developing several courses that will span both the Department of Geology and the Department of Anthropology. One graduate level course is a paleo-ecology seminar that will focus on the taxonomy of mammals in the United States and another will be in zoo archaeology, a foundational course that she is excited to bring to UC. She will also be teaching an introductory undergraduate course on environmental geology this spring. “We will look at human impact and

the historical ways we understand nature, biology and natural systems and then think about our roles today— in terms of consumables, waste and projections for the future of the natural world.” Through her courses and research experience, Crowley hopes to impart her interdisciplinary spirit on future students, too. “Since there’s no way I could really force myself into a specific discipline, the fact that my position is interdisciplinary has allowed me to develop a range of broad interests—something I want my students to have.” Having other McMicken College of Arts and Sciences faculty that share a broad spectrum of interests has also helped Crowley’s transition to UC. “My colleagues are fantastic in both departments and it’s been a really welcoming experience. That was one of the things that sold me on UC. Even after my first meeting I immediately realized how much I enjoyed talking with everyone and I knew it was going to be fun.” q

I nternational G eoscience P rogramme (IGCP) P roject 591

2nd Annaul Meeting and 1st Foerste Symposium

Pre-Conference and Post-Conference Field Trips Katian-Wenlock: Southern Appalachian Basin of Kentucky and Ohio. ORGANIZERS: Carlton E. Brett, Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati Brad Cramer, Department of Geology, University of Iowa

August Frederick Foerste taught for 38 years at Steele High School in Dayton, Ohio (just north of Cincinnati), but as an undergraduate at Dennison University had already begun describing the geology and paleontology of the Dayton area. Upon his retirement, he was offered a professorship at the University of Chicago, but instead chose to spend the remaining years of his life as a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institute. As we will see during this meeting, the Dayton area is critical to connecting the Ordovician and Silurian stratigraphy of the Appalachian Basin with that of the Illinois Basin, and his published works over more than three decades have served as the foundation for the stratigraphy of the tri-state region of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. Whereas his stratigraphy has undergone regular revision, recent re-evaluation of the region has begun to demostrate that Foerste’s detailed work was truly incomparable, much like we saw with O.T. Jones’ work in light of the recent efforts of the British Geological Survey last summer in Ludlow, England (at the IGCP 591 1st Annual Meeting). The aim of this meeting, hosted on the campus of the University of Cincinnati, is to bring the IGCP 591 community to this critical area for Ordovician and Silurian stratigraphy of the paleocontinent of Laurentia. Additionally, the ability to see multiple epicratonic basins in one meeting is ideal for the 2012 annual theme of IGCP 591: Global Sea Level and Sequence Stratigraphy. Two days of preexcursion field trip, two days of presentations, and three days of post-excursion field trip are planned, in addition to a special volume following the meeting in Stratigraphy. Preliminary details are outlined below, and the important deadlines were listed on the first page. We hope to see you in Cincinnati!.

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L ewis O wen

One more fun packed year has flown by! It started for me in June with another fieldtrip the SE Pamirs in China to continue working on our NSF-funded project on the Karakoram fault. Kate Hedrick, who is doing her doctorate with me in the region, and I worked in the field with our colleagues Chen Jie (Institute of Geology, of the Chinese Earthquake Administration in Beijing) and his students, and Professor Marc Caffee from Purdue University. We are getting some great results working on alluvial fans, active faults and giant landslides, to determine geomorphic rates of crustal displacement and landscape development. We have just had our first paper accepted for publication in Quaternary Science Reviews on this work, and we are currently writing several others.

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and collected samples for cosmogenic nuclide analysis to determine erosion rates across the region. Brian Davis, who is a professor in DAAP (College of Design, Architecture, Arts and Planning), added a new dimen-

The motley bunch in Zanskar at ~14,000 feet above sea level on our geology of the Himalaya fieldtrip.

Kate examining what she is going to have for dinner in the Pamir.

In September, Craig Dietsch, Brooke Crowley, Brian Davis and I ran our Geology of the Himalaya fieldtrip to India. Twenty-one students, volunteers and faculty from the US, Spain and Mexico joined us on our three-week traverse of the Himalaya. During the traverse we examined many aspects of tectonic geology, geomorphology, sedimentology and stratigraphy,

sion to our trip. He and his students have been designing a platform system for pitching tents on glaciers to help scientists work and research in high altitude glaciated environments. We tested this platform out during our trip, and this research was featured on Discovery Channel Canada’s “Daily Planet”. If you would like to learn more then please check the following link: http:// watch.discoverychannel.ca/clip552289#clip552289. In October, I attended the GSA meeting in Minneapolis and our fall fieldtrip; and I undertook a quick trip to Owens Lake in Southern California to examine aeolian deposits. We went back to Southern California in December to start off the dissertation work for my new graduate student, Harrison Gray, who is examining transpression along the southernmost reaches of the

C olloqui um & Visit ing Spea k ers 2011-20 12 B randon N uttall

The Kentucky Geologic Survey “Shale Gas Development and Opportunities.”

D r . K ristine H opfensperger

Northern Kentucky University “Plant Community Effects on Nitrogen Cycling and Greenhouse Gas Flux.”

D r . P atrick W heatley

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory “Marine Origins for Crown Clade Crocodylians? Insights from Stable Isotopes”

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D aniel E. H orton

Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Environmental Earth Systems Science Stanford University ‘Linking microbes to the fate of Cold War Era heavy metal contamination.’

D r . B rett T ipple

University of Utah,, Department of Geology “A 35 Myr Terrestrial Higher Plant n-alkane Stable Isotope Record from the Gulf of Mexico: Implications to North American C4 Grasslands and Hydrologic Cycle Dynamics.”


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L ewis O wen (continued)

San Andreas fault. Craig Diestch, Richard Beck (Department of Geography), and students Suyoung Lee, Jenny Arkle and Rebecca Potter joined us bringing a broad range of experiences and interests to the project.

Boys and girls geologists being offset by the San Andreas Fault.

During the Spring break, Brooke Crowley, Ken Tankersley, Jenny Arkle, Harrison Gray and I took a group of undergraduate honors students to Trinidad to examine evidence for Quaternary landscape change. This was a good opportunity for Jenny to get to know

Part of the gang examining and sampling a marine terrace on northeastern corner of Trinidad to help determine uplift rates.

JOHN L. RICH LECTURE

D r . S usan E. H ough

USGS, Pasadena California “A Tale of Two Earthquakes: Insights into the Seismic Potential of the New Madrid Seismic Zone and Lesser Antilles.’

D enise M. A kob , P h .D.

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Friedrich Schiller University Jena “Linking microbes to the fate of Cold War Era heavy metal contamination”.

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the region. Jenny is going to focus her doctoral work on landscape evolution and paleoenvironmental change in Trinidad, and she will be heading back to Trinidad for a long field season early next year. The past year has been relatively productive in terms of publications. Since last June, I have published 6 papers in peer-reviewed journals with colleagues and students, including papers in Lithosphere, Geomorphology, and Arctic, Alpine and Antarctic Research, and published a couple of book chapters. My crowning glory was being a coauthor on a paper with Michael Palin (of Monty Python fame!). I also spent much of my time editing and writing articles for a treatise on tectonic geomorphology. This is due to be published in early 2013. The coming year promises to be another fun packed year. I have a new NSF grant to work on glacial erosion in Alaska, Scotland and New England, which involves quite a bit of fieldwork. Then next summer, we are going to run our Geology of the Himalaya field course again. Please let me know if you are interested in joining us. q

Max makes his daddy very proud Max Owen went as a zombie geologist for Halloween this year. He told his daddy that he modeled himself of some of our graduate students. Check out his hammer, compassclinometer and GPS.

K evin M ueller , P h .D.

Post-doctoral Research Associate University of Minnesota Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve “What do plant lipids tell us about plants, soils, and geologic sediments?

A ndrew D. C zaja , P h .D.

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Geoscience “Micron-scale organic geochemical and morphological analyses of permineralized fossils” (Complete listing continues throughout newsletter)

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G lobal E xtinction : G radual D oom I s J ust A s B ad A s A brupt By; Greg Hand

Photo By: Ashley Kempler

Around 250 million years ago, most life on Earth was wiped out in an extinction known as the “Great Dying.” A team led by University of Cincinnati geologist Thomas J. Algeo finds that the end came slowly from thousands of centuries of volcanic activity.

A painstakingly detailed investigation shows that mass extinctions need not be sudden events. The deadliest mass extinction of all took a long time to kill 90 percent of Earth’s marine life, and it killed in stages, according to a newly published report. Thomas J. Algeo, professor of geology at the University of Cincinnati, worked with 13 co-authors to produce a high-resolution look at the geology of a Permian-Triassic boundary section on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic. Their analysis, published Feb. 3 in the Geological Society of America Bulletin, provides strong evidence that Earth’s biggest mass extinction phased in over hundreds of thousands of years. About 252 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period, Earth almost became a lifeless planet. Around 90 percent of all living species disappeared then, in what scientists have called “The Great Dying.” Algeo and colleagues have spent much of the past decade investigating the chemical evidence buried in rocks formed during this major extinction. The world revealed by their research is horrific and alien: a devastated landscape, barren of vegetation and scarred by erosion from showers of acid rain, huge “dead zones” in the oceans, and runaway greenhouse warming leading to sizzling temperatures. The evidence that Algeo and his colleagues are looking at points to massive volcanism in Siberia. A large portion of western Siberia reveals volcanic deposits up to five kilometers (three miles) thick, covering an area equivalent to the continental United States. And the lava flowed where it could most endanger life, through a large coal deposit. “The eruption released lots of methane when it burned through the coal,” he said. “Methane is 30 times more effective as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. We’re not sure how long the greenhouse effect lasted, but it seems to have been tens or hundreds of thousands of years.” A lot of the evidence ended up being washed into the ocean, and it is among fossilized marine deposits that Algeo and his colleagues look for it. Previous investigations have focused on deposits created by a now vanished ocean known as Tethys, a kind of precursor to the Indian Ocean. Those deposits, in South China particularly, record a sudden extinction at the end of the Permian. “In shallow marine deposits, the latest Permian mass extinction was generally abrupt,” Algeo said. “Based on such

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Professor Thomas Algeo

observations, it has been widely inferred that the extinction was a globally synchronous event.” Recent studies are starting to challenge that view. Algeo and his co-authors focused on rock layers at West Blind Fiord on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic. That location, at the end of the Permian, would have been a lot closer to the Siberian volcanoes than sites in South China. The Canadian sedimentary rock layers are 24 meters (almost 80 feet) thick and cross the Permian-Triassic boundary, including the latest Permian mass extinction horizon. The investigators looked at how the type of rock changed from the bottom to the top of the section. They looked at the chemistry of the rocks. They looked at the fossils contained in the rocks. They discovered a total die-off of siliceous sponges about 100,000 years earlier than the marinemass extinction event recorded at Tethyan sites. Chemical clues, Algeo said, confirm that life on land was in crisis. Dying plants and eroding soil were being flushed into the ocean where the over-abundant nutrients led to a microbial feeding frenzy and the removal of oxygen – and life – from the late Permian ocean. What appears to have happened, according to Algeo and his colleagues, is that the effects of early Siberian volcanic activity, such as toxic gases and ash, were confined to the northern latitudes. Only after the eruptions were in full swing did the effects reach the tropical latitudes of the Tethys Ocean. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation, Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Exobiology Program. q


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P ursuing G eology from S o C al to S ub - zero and B ack to S un and S and .

DOCTORAL STUDENT EMPLOYS CUTTING-EDGE GEOLOGICAL DATING TECHNIQUES IN RESEARCH OF TECTONIC PLATES ON A CARIBBEAN ISLAND. By: Tom Robinette, Public Information Officer McMicken College of Arts & Sciences.

Speeding through perilous rapids on a rubber raft might not seem like the best time to notice the rock strata in the nearby mountains, but that never stopped Jenny Arkle from scanning the horizon with paddle in hand. The longtime professional whitewater rafting guide from Fullerton, Calif., grew up fascinated by the outdoors and had a natural curiosity about her surroundings, including the geological formations of the river canyons and mountain ranges of her hometown landscape. Arkle’s love of nature helped guide her academic path. She has bachelor’s degrees in geography and geology and a master’s degree in geology from California State University, Fullerton and began the University of Cincinnati’s doctoral program in geology this March. She came to UC for a reason; the high quality and quantity of work produced by the Department of Geology faculty, in particular, Department Head Lewis Owen. “I chose UC for the opportunity to work with Dr. Lewis Owen and the other research staff here,” Arkle says. “Lewis is one of the top tectonic geomorphologists in the discipline, and he is known for supporting students who work with him.”

Owen is also considered to be one of the foremost geologists in applying two relatively new geological dating techniques – Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and Cosmogenic Radionucleide (CRN) – and Arkle is eager to learn from him.

Arkle recently joined a group of UC faculty and students on a trip to Trinidad this spring for field work. While there, she was able to gather information on another aspect of her research: the potential impact humans have on landscapes. “Trinidad has a well-documented colonization record,” Arkle says. “What we hope to address are landscape changes over human time scales. So we could potentially see some of the impacts that humans have had on the landscape.” Arkle works with other Geology Department team members on its innovative Quaternary and Anthropocene Research Group (QARG). The premier, public, urban research group serves people worldwide and is dedicated to undergraduate, graduate and professional education; experience-based learning; research in Quaternary Period science; and the study of the Anthropocene Epoch. The Anthropocene is an informally but widely accepted geological time frame that covers the existence of environmental effects caused by increased human population and economic development. Part of QARG’s mission is to assess humans’ impact on Earth and to help predict future changes to the planet through environmental risk assessment and continues on p.22

“He’s a major player in producing and applying these techniques to the types of geologic problems that I’m interested in addressing,” Arkle says. The problems she mentions deal with tectonic geomorphology – the study of how landscapes are shaped throughout time – and her field area is in the tiny Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. The larger of the two islands, Trinidad, is home to a major tectonic plate boundary known to generate earthquakes. It’s also just north of the equator, thereby subjecting it to the mercies of a sweltering tropical climate, periods of intense rainfall and perpetual erosion.

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hazard mitigation. That’s where Arkle’s research on Trinidad fits in. “There are major faults that are mapped through some of the larger cities In Trinidad, such as Port of Spain, but the activity along these faults is not very well constrained,” Arkle says. “The data we get can be passed on to modelers, engineers and other scientists and incorporated into hazard mitigation models.”

UNDER GRADUTE STUDENT AWARDS Pryor-Motl Award

Emily Mazur, Cheyenne Hassan and Rachel Thomas

John L. Rich Outstanding Senior Award Kegan McClanahan: BS Lauren Wasserstrom: BA

Myles Redder Award Evan Krekeler

Cook Scholarships to Rising Underclassmen/women

Rising sophomore: Shawna Friskey Rising junior: Mike Karaus Rising senior: Brain Simpkins

Cook Fund

for

Undergraduate Scholarships Summer Camp

for

Alex Borell: Volocanology Field Camp, University of Hawaii at Hilo

Joshua Brafford: International Volcanological Field School at Kalmai, University of Alaska Sean Fischer: Kent State University Dominique Haneberg-Diggs: Southern Utah University Eric Luken: Field Camp in Turkey (through South Dakota School of Mines Stormy Milewski: Vertebtate Paleontology Filed Camp at Montana State Universityin Bozeman, Montana Catlin Qualls: Kent State University Phillip Rogers: University of Minnesota, Duluth Cameron Schwalback: Kent State University Brian Simpkins: Southern Oregon University Brian Snodgrass: Camp Davis, University of Michigan Nick Stewart: Kent State University Nick Sylvest: Southern Utah University David Wagers: Kent State University

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When she’s finished with her studies, Arkle hopes to teach and continue her research as a faculty member at the university level. In the meantime, this Southern California girl who has previously conducted research in the sub-zero temperatures of Alaska and Antarctica is enjoying the chance to work in Trinidad’s warmer climate. “It’s nice to be somewhere tropical,” Arkle says. “And working in a different climate and different tectonic system gives me more breadth in my research.” q

Student grants & awards Graduating with High Honors Kegan McClanahan, Katherine Finan and Lauren Wasserstrom Graduate Teaching Awards James Thomka & Gary Motz Kenneth Caster Award Sarah Kolbe Alumni Graduate Fund Julia Wise Departmental Good Spirit Award Kelsey Feser, Geology Club President Schuchert-Dunbar Award from Yale University Matthew Vrazo Outstanding Poster Presentations UC Graduate Poster Forum: Kelsey Feser & Matthew Vrazo Outstanding Poster Award, GSA National Meeting, Minnneapolis: James Thomka Theodore Roosevelt Memeorial Fund American Museum of Natural History Andrew Zaffo GSA: Nicholas Sullivan, Gary Motz, Natashia Pierce & Andrew Zaffos GSGA: Jeff Harmon & Julia Wise Sigma Xi: Sharmila Giri URC Summer Research Fellowship: Kelsey Feser A&S Neff Fellowship: Sarah Kolbe Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission: Kelsey Feser


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By: Tom Robinette, Public Information Officer McMicken College of Arts & Sciences.

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Doctoral student emphasizes public health and safety in her research on controversial oil and gas extraction technique known as “fracking.” Julia Wise went from the culture shock of moving from Santa Fe, N.M., to Cincinnati just a few years back, to now analyzing the metaphorical aftershocks threatening public health and safety that have been caused by the recent surge in popularity of hydraulic fracturing. This subterranean oil and gas extraction technique, often called “fracking,” produces contaminated wastewater as a byproduct. The potentially toxic water is then disposed of by pumping it underground into wastewater wells. It’s a controversial method. With our nation’s desire to find new energy sources, fracking is seen by many as a viable way to harvest fuel. But if left unmonitored and done improperly, it can lead to contamination of ground water, damage to air quality and other negative effects on human health.

When she started work on her master’s degree in metamorphic petrology and geochronology, she spent a lot of time traveling to mountain ranges around the world to sample rocks and analyze their mineral composition. It was an incredibly enriching experience for her, but it lacked the human element that she desired. “Mountains aren’t people. I missed the human interaction,” Wise says. “I started thinking about how earth materials impact human health and ways that I can incorporate geology with good living and humans.” As part of her doctoral research, Wise wants to uncover ways to empower communities where fracking is taking place by clearing the misinformation that exists and removing the fear of the science involved. Accessibility is critical to this process. She says people need to know where to get data on water and ground quality and how they can use that information. continues on p.25

Wise knows what’s at stake, and she says there will be no slacking on fracking in her research. She completed her master’s degree in geology at the University of Cincinnati this spring and is beginning work in the Geology Department’s doctoral program, where she’ll focus on the health impact of fracking with help from assistant professor Amy Townsend-Small.

“This type of research is exceptionally important in today’s age where if you were to Google ‘fracking,’ your search results would return everything form ‘God’s own hand reaching down and giving gifts to people’ to ‘the very sight of a hydraulic fracturing truck will make you die,’” Wise says. Wise began to develop her passion for human health issues during her undergrad at Macalester College in Minnesota where she majored in biology and chemistry with an emphasis on international issues. She also worked as a research assistant at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center when she first came to the city and began taking classes at UC.

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Cincinnati Enquirer.

COLLEGE HILL - A few credit hours short of earning a college degree in 1944, Harvey C. Sunderman left the University of Kentucky to enlist in the military and fight for his country in World War II. “He said the college boys, as the drill instructors called them, were steered to certain things, and he was steered to become a pilot,” said one of his two sons, Alan Sunderman of Delhi Township. The 24-year-old had no flying experience, but was trained by the Army Air Corps to pilot the B-24 Liberator, a heavy bomber. Between April and August of 1945, he flew several dozen missions in the South Pacific, his son said. “He said it was incredibly scary, but ... he was never injured and he returned from every one of them.” Mr. Sunderman, who had Parkinson’s disease, died of pneumonia Nov. 1 at Twin Towers senior living community in College Hill, where he had lived for eight years. The retired University of Cincinnati geology professor and longtime resident of Groesbeck was 91. After the war, Mr. Sunderman returned to UK and completed his bachelor’s degree in geology in 1946. Later that year, he married Margaret Dorsey. She died in 1975. Mr. Sunderman’s second wife, Rosemary Powell Hall, died in 2006.

Alan Sunderman isn’t sure why his father chose to major in geology, given that music might have seemed the obvious choice. “He was not much of a student in high school, but he was an unbelievable trombone play-

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November 20, 2011

er,” the son said. “It was his trombone playing that got him into the University of Kentucky on a music scholarship.” Geology, though, became his career choice. He remained at UK and earned a master’s degree in 1947; four years later, he received a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin. He was hired as a geology professor by UC in 1952. “He loved doing field work,” his son said. “He loved doing geological mapping.” But in 1955, at age 35, Mr. Sunderman fell and injured a knee. After several surgeries, he could bend it only 15 degrees. His days doing field work were over, and he walked with a limp the rest of his life. He turned his attention to optical mineralogy, and devised a method of grinding minerals into tiny spheres and using refracted light and polarizing microscopes to study them. His teaching career was sandwiched around stints as assistant dean and associate dean at UC’s McMicken College of Arts and Sciences. He retired from UC in 1985, but he continued to apply his scientific knowledge while enjoying a favorite hobby - fishing. In addition to his son Alan, survivors include a son, Mark Sunderman of Athens, Ohio; one grandson; and three stepgrandchildren. A memorial service is planned for 10 a.m. Dec. 10 in the Wilson Art Gallery of Twin Towers senior living community, 5343 Hamilton Ave., College Hill. Memorials: The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, www.michaeljfox.org.

Dear Warren and Attila, Last Saturday, my son and I were visiting him and he was dreaming and talking aloud in his sleep. We couldn’t make out very much but we definitely heard an utterance about “the line in the water” and then about 20 minutes later something about “getting the samples for the slides ready”. We just laughed. Sincerely, Alan Sunderman

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“It’s no different than if you’re baking a cake ¬– you check the ingredient list,” Wise says. “It’s a matter of making the processes that will be affecting these folks as accessible as an ingredient list. That’s something UC can do. We can fill that role of alleviating concerns.” Wise is grateful for the guidance she’s had in developing a strong background in the fundamentals of geology and the freedom she’s been given in the Geology Department. The connection between rocks and human health might be a difficult one for some to make, but Wise says it shows the department’s openmindedness and its willingness to be on the forefront of interdisciplinary studies. After she earns her PhD, Wise plans to work for a nonprofit organization or think

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tank where she can continue her geology and health research. “Research offers the best of both worlds,” Wise says. “You get to solve puzzles to help people. If you’re doing it right, you’re always faced with new challenges and you’re always going for some greater good. That’s pretty sweet.” If at first Wise doesn’t find what she wants professionally, she’ll rely on what she learned growing up in Santa Fe, a place she says people go to find themselves. “Because of that, you’re never told that you can’t do anything. People just say, ‘Go for it,’” Wise says. “I don’t see myself limited in any capacity. If there’s not a position I like, then I’ll create one.” q

An Illustrative and Prolific Paleontologist and Biostratigrapher from Early Years in our Department . MEMORIAL

ROUSSEAU HAYNOR FLOWER 1913 - 1988

David V. LeMone, Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Texas at El Paso. .....His science background was forged in biology during his high school years; it led him into entomology and Cornell University where he received a bachelor’s and master’s degree in that discipline. He went to paleontology by means of taking a historical geology course in 1934 to obtain a background knowledge on a dispute raging between his professor (Needham) and an Australian (Tillyard). His master’s minor was in plaeontology. He was lost entomology in the summer of 1936 when he became a Filed Assistant to Professor Harris who was collecting gastropods in the Gulf Coast Tertiary. Rouseeeau completed his his doctorate at the University of Cincinnati in 1939, during which time he developed a close working relationship with the New York State Museum and the Paleonotological Research Institution, he took a positionmas Curator at the Unversity of Cincinnati (1940-44), taught briefly at Bryn Mawr (1944), and accepted the position as Assistant

State Paleontologist at the New York State Museum (1944-51). In 1951, with 61 papers published and an assured future in the East, he met his wife Peggy in Alburquerque and moved west to be with her. ...They married that July and move d to Socorro and the New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral resources. I graduated in 1955 and returned to Texas Western College in el Paso (University of Texas at El Paso) to teach as an Assistant Professor in 1964. We met ath fall. and he introduced me to the Franklin Mountains Ordovician section which we worked on together until 1987 during trips to El Paso. He had a good hammer, a true sense of patience, and an interest in thre-dimensional puzzles. His contributions to the Southwest date back to 1953 when he wrote his first three articles on the area (age of the Bliss Sandstone, Franklin Mountains section, and Paleozic

rocks of southwestern New Mexico) and coming to the Bureau, Flower published over 40 articles that are concerned directly with the formations we continue to examine. q

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A HISTORY OF

O LD TEC H

Goetzman & Folmer Architects June 1982

“Old Tech” was built as a result of an agreement between the University of Cincinnati and the Technical School of Cincinnati, a manual training school. The Board of Directors of the Technical School offered to give the University its equipment and charter provided the University would operate the school as the Technical School of the College of Engineering. The trustees of the Technical School further helped facilitate this agreement by raising the money to construct a building on University grounds. James E. Mooney was one of the principal donors. A report by Howard Ayers, President of the Board of Directors of U.C. on June 24, 1901 states “…..a building thoroughly adapted to the needs of Manual Training and Technical Instruction would form an integral part of our

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School of Engineering and furnish the preliminary and indispensable shop-training in wood and metal work, which all of our Engineering students are required to have. In the second place, it would constitute a portion of the experimental course of the Teachers College, and thus serve an important purpose not only in properly training teachers for their profession, but also in giving them adequate practical experience in the fundamental principles of their professional work. The University would maintain the Manual Training course of study of the Technical School until such time as the Board of Education of Cincinnati shall establish a satisfactory Manual Training High School or other Manual Training Schools in this city.” q

This is a large mural that hung in the Graduate Bull Pen (Old Tech, Room 21) in the spring of 1963. From left to right pictured are: Hans the janitor, Leonard Larsen, Ronald G.Schmidt, Kenneth Caster, William F. Jenks, Frank Koucky’s briefcase, Nevin Fenneman, and Harvey Sunderman


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Gerald (Jerry) Schaber (MS ’62, PhD ’65)

Warren—I really enjoyed reading the Spring 2011 Alumni Newsletter when Sandy and I returned to Flagstaff on 31 July 2011 after a wonderful week-long trip to Mission Bay in San Diego with our three girls and their families to celebrate our 50th wedding anniversary (29 July, 1961). We rented a house in Mission Bay just a few hundred feet from the beach. We had pre-arranged to have all four grandchildren participate in the “hands on” encounter with the Dolphins at Sea World. However, to say that walking around Sea World from 8:30 AM until after 11:00 PM wore me out would be an understatement. It is much more fun being young….right? Just an added recent note of interest: Upon our return from our 50th wedding celebration in San Diego I sent an E-mail on 02 August to retired NASA Apollo astronaut David Scott to congratulate him on the recent July 40th anniversary of his Apollo15 landing (with Lunar Module Pilot James Irwin-now deceased) at the Hadley Rille site on the eastern side of Mare Imbrium on 30 July 1971. As you might recall, this was the first Apollo Moon mission with the Lunar Rover vehicle (LRV). As one of four geologists assigned to the geologic field-training of the Apollo 15 crew, I became quite close to Dave and Jim. The other three geologists assigned to geologic field-training of the Apollo 15 crew were Prof. Lee Silver (Cal Tech, Pasadena, CA), Gordon Swann (USGS, Branch of Astrogeology in Flagstaff, AZ) and James “Jim” W.

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Head (Bellcom, Inc, D.C. back then, and presently a Professor in the Planetary Science Department at Brown University, Providence, RI). I participated with Jim Head in the 1:12,500-scale geologic mapping and traverse planning for the Apollo 15 Hadley Rille landing site, and was also charged by Gordon Swann (Principal Investigator of the Apollo 15 Apollo Lunar Surface Geology Experiment) with designing and managing the production (in Flagstaff) of the Apollo 15 crew’s lunar surface geologic and traverse map package that they would carry to the lunar surface. I told Dave Scott in my 02 August 2011 E-mail that it is hard to believe that 40 years had passed since the entire world was thrilled to witness his and Jim Irwin’s impressive adventures aboard the first Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV-I) at Hadley Rille during Apollo 15 (See photograph below). Dave responded with the following E-mail reply: “Thanks so much for your very thoughtful comments, much appreciated. Yes, those were the days...! We had good fun, lots of Sun, and terrific experiences learning your trade. You were a great group of teachers and for that we be forever grateful (otherwise, I would probably still be asleep in the back of the classroom). I too was disappointed not to have a chance at “Schaber Hill” [G. Schaber-a low hill on the mare at the Hadley Rille site that he kindly named in my honor]; it really looked very inviting (much more so than in the photos). But “we” know it is there, and I surmise that some day in Continues

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the distant future, another group of inspired “planetary field geologists” will have a chance again to climb its slopes and let “us” know what it really means...! Take care, don’t drop your hammer, and thanks again for all that you did for Apollo 15.” Cheers--Dave I was thrilled to get his response. Dave (and Jim) did a remarkable job with their “geologic descriptions, sampling and photography while at Hadley Rille--and I told Dave so!

I will be working with Harrison “Jack” Schmitt (Apollo 17 LMP--Lunar Module Pilot) this coming August as he returns to Flagstaff to do some research in our Lunar and Planetary Data Facility at the USGS for his own Apollo book he is writing that will describe his personal journey toward becoming the only geologist to walk/ride on the Moon to date, and the last of the twelve men to set foot onto the lunar surface during Project Apollo back in December 1972. Jack asked me a few months ago if I would assist him in locating any photographs that we might have on file here at the USGS dating back to our geologic field-training of both the Apollo 15 (prime and backup) crews as well as the Apollo 17 prime and backup crews. Gene Cernan and Harrison “Jack” Schmitt were the backup LMP and Commander, respectively, for David Scott and Jim Irwin who of course were the prime-crew Commander and LMP, respectively, for the Apollo 15 mission. Therefore, Jack and Gene participated in all of the geologic field-training exercises that our Branch of Astrogeology planned and carried out for the AP 15 prime crew. As you might recall Warren, Jack Schmitt (along with Donald Elston from our Branch of Astrogeology here in Flagstaff) came to the Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati Airport (near where I was living at the time in Erlanger,

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Kentucky) in April 1965 to re-interview me for my job here with Gene Shoemaker’s fledgling Branch of Astrogeology. My “original” interview for a job with the USGS, Branch of Astrogeology in Flagstaff was with John “Jack” McCauley (then with the Branch of Astrogeology in Flagstaff, Arizona) in Miami Florida during the GSA Annual Meetings in late 1964. Jack McCauley had been earlier advised by our mutual friend and colleague Larry Rowan to look me up at the GSA as a possible “enthusiastic” candidate to hire for Gene Shoemaker’s new Astrogeology group. Larry Rowan, as you are well aware, was hired to work at the USGS, Branch of Astrogeology soon after receiving his PhD in geology from U.C. in spring 1964. I finally received “the letter” from the Department of Interior in June 1965 that I had been approved for the Geologist GS-11 position at the USGS Branch of Astrogeology in Flagstaff. The letter stated that I was to report in Flagstaff to Harrison “Jack” Schmitt who would be my immediate Supervisor. However, upon my arrival in Flagstaff on 07 July 1965, I was informed that Jack Schmitt was no longer there--that he had been selected by NASA to be a Scientist/Astronaut and had already moved to Houston a month before my arrival in Flagstaff. Warren-- life can really be interesting sometimes, right? In my case, I have had a very positive life-path thanks to a lot of luck and “being at the right place at the right time.” The very positive learning environment I experienced at the Department of Geology at University of Cincinnati during the five years I was there (1960-1965) set me on the positive and exciting career path I was fortunate enough to have experienced.


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John (Jack) Masters (BS ’64, MS ’66) Hi Warren,

I just sent you an email with two attachments. (Two photos)

The Rock Dog is another example of Ed O’Donnell’s talent. The summer of 1965 (I think), Ed taught the summer school freshman geology course for Dr. Sunderman (he went fishing). I was his lab assistant and led the field trips. We (Ed , me, my wife Brenda and maybe others) were previewing a gravel pit stop for the next field trip when Ed turned to Brenda and asked her if she liked dogs. She said yes, and Ed, who had the Rock Dog hidden behind his back, presented it to her. What a surprise!! It continues to live with us, mainly as an honored door stop. It might be the original “pet rock,” but

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I don’t think it was the first one Ed made. That size and shape dolomite cobble was not rare in that pit, but I don’t remember the pit’s location. Mill Creek valley, probably Rack Bros. Concerning this year’s Upper Crust, the Serpent Mound model was at Old Tec at the top of the stairs to the second door, next to the water fountain, during my years (6066). It seems like it was restored during that time. The caricature of Dr. Caster could have been done by Ed, but it doesn’t look like his style. If not him, it was probably the work of one of the other grad students (Jerry Schaber ???) that put the 1962 guidebook together. Or possibly Dick Osgood. Now that my computer and printer are finally working together, I’ll be able to send you some pictures from the 60’s. I wish I had more. Jack

WHO’s WHO? Can you name them? Answers on page 31.

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Jorge Portugal (MS ’61, PhD ‘64) Warren,

Thank you very much for your letter of February 7. I do remember very clearly the good days at Old Tech. I have not been in contact with any of the old timers. I hope we can get together sometime and share the good old memories. Regards, Jorge

Frederick (Gene) Simms (PhD ’66) Warren,

Good to hear from you. I am still teaching part-time and working for Service Environmental Engineering but do take extended time off to see the kids in California or go up north. Bonnie and I have been doing some kayaking in Elk Rapids and I hope to try to fish out of kayak this summer. Did publish a brief paper last year in entitled: Glaciotectonic and Associated Features in the Detroit, Michigan Metropolitan Area. Hope all is well. Please pass this info along and give my regards to all. Gene

Robert R. French (BS ’59, MS ’61)

Bob is the current CEO of GTL Energy Ltd, an Australia-based company engaged in the modification of lowrank coal (including lignite) to produce high energy, low

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moisture briquettes. These briquettes produce lower emissions when burned and are easier to transport and handle. The Otago, NZ, Daily Times for 5-1-12 reports, (http://tinyurl.com/c8tl5z9) Solid Energy’s pilot briquetting plant south of Mataura is well on track to be completed by the middle of the year. Solid Energy general manager of lignite conversion Greg Visser said the $29 million project was on schedule. “The structural installation of the main process tower is finished and we aim to have all installation of major coal processing equipment completed this month. “The briquetter and compactor are in place, and the dryer installed on its pedestal, ready to be connected.” The installation of the utility systems and coal conveyors continued, and the boiler stack was ready for connection to the boiler. Electrical installation was also under way, connecting mechanical instruments to the control room. The plant on Craig Rd, using technology developed by GTL Energy, is expected to produce up to 90,000 tons of low-moisture, high-energy briquettes a year from about 150,000 tons of lignite mined from Solid Energy’s New Vale opencast mine at Waimumu. Environmental groups, including Greenpeace New Zealand, Coal Action Network Aotearoa, and Dunedin’s Southern Anti Coal Action, have protested the briquette plant’s construction. The briquette plant is the first of three projects planned by Solid Energy for lignite from the Waimumu, Croydon and Mataura areas.

R e m e m b e r a n c e

Charles A. Greenawalt (BS ’60),

Of Milton, WV, passed away Friday, October 16, 2009 at his residence. He was 75, born July 8, 1934, in Pittsburgh, Pa., the son of the late Clifford and Mary Alyce Gorman Greenawalt. He was retired from U.S. Corp. of Engineers as a Geologist. He is survived by his wife, Lolita Diaz Greenawalt; four daughters and sons-in-law, Anje (Tim) Bogott, and their children Justine and Timmy, Mary (Larry) Drown, and their children Thomas and Cassandra, Cathy (Kevin) Conaway, and their children Jimmy and Jeffrey, Laura (Pierre) Leautiers, and their children, Wyatt and Cooper; one son and daughter-in-law, Tony (Brenda) Chapman, and their daughter Summer; two sisters and their husbands, Sandra (Bob) Hall and Judy (Alan) McDermott, two sisters-in-law, Diana Hatfield and Mimay Diaz; and many nieces and nephews. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corp. during the Korean Conflict and was a distinguished member of the U.S. Marine Corp. Band, a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, a member of St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Barboursville for 35 years, where he served as a lay reader, chalice bearer and senior warden, The American Legion Post 177 Barboursville, and a member of the Big Green and a devoted fan for many years. Memorial services were held 11 a.m. Wednesday, October 2009, at Henson Mortuary Barboursville, with the Rev. Father Andrew Counts officiating. The family wishes are that memorial donations be made to ECCHO, Eastern Cabell County Humanitarian Org., 1038 Smith Street, Milton, WV 25541.

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Colloquium & Visiting Speakers 2011-2012 (Continued) Dr. Attila Kilinc

University of Cincinnati ‘Computational Geochemistry and Thermodynamic Modeling.’

Bruce Whitteberry

Assistant Superintendent Greater Cincinnati Water Works ‘Protecting, Purifying, and Delivering Your Drinking Water - Perspectives from a Hydrogeologist.’

Wayne Goodman

Who’s Who? Answers:

1. Gene Simms 2.Ron Ward 3. Mike Stephens 4. equipment manager? 5. Lester King 6.Ed O’Donnell 7. Larry Rowan 8. Dave Rife 9. Bill Dalnes 10. Rick Ellis 11. Tom Lombardi 12. Dick Osgood? 13. Larry’s wife Margaret(?) The following notice was circulated by the AAPG Executive Director on December 06, 2011.

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Northern Lights Energy ‘Silurian Reefs of the Michigan Basin as Sources of Hydrocarbons and Sinks for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration.’

Dr. David Winship Taylor

Professor and Head of Biology Southern Indiana University ‘Examining Flowering Plant Early Cretaceous Paleoecology through Molecular Fossils.’

R e m e m b e r a n c e

Dear Friends and Colleagues of Gerald M. “Gerry” Friedman, It is with deep regret to inform you that our friend and colleague Gerald M. “Gerry” Friedman passed away peacefully in his sleep last week in New York City. Services were held November 30, in Queens, N.Y. at Parkside Memorial Chapel. Receiving the Sidney Powers Medal in 2000, Gerry was a consummate geologist, researcher, and professor. He authored more than 600 papers and 19 books. He was also active in all three AAPG divisions and also served as AAPG vice president in 1984. In addition to being a Powers medalist, he was also honored by AAPG with Honorary Membership, the Distinguished Educator Award and the Distinguished Service Award. He was also a Trustee Associate of the AAPG Foundation. Gerry had celebrated his 90th Birthday this past July. He is survived by Sue, his loving wife of 63 years, 5 children, 18 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild.

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G S A

The Geological Society of America 2012 Annual Meeting will be held November 4-7 in Charlotte, NC at the Charlotte Convention Center (http://www.geosociety. org/meetings/2012/). I would like to invite you to attend

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that any gifts in remembrance of Gerry be made in support of geological societies. Our thoughts are with the family, his many friends and former students. He will be greatly missed. Dr. Friedman was born in Germany and received his undergraduate training in the UK. He then moved to the U.S. and received his PhD from Columbia University in 1950. The same year he joined the Geology faculty at UC as assistant professor, where he served as the department’s mineralogist and petrologist until 1954, when he left to take a position with a Canadian mining company. He eventually moved on to a very productive and successful academic career at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He gained wide respect among students and faculty during his tenure at UC and was also instrumental in revitalizing the Cincinnati Mineral Society.

R E C E P T I O N

and to join us for an alumni get-together on Monday, 5 November 2012: 6:30 PM-9:00 PM, next door in the Westin Charlotte Hotel, Queens Room. I hope to see you in Charlotte,.

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Larry Lattman (MS ’51, PhD ’53, Dept Head ’70-’74) Dear Warren:

I have just read with total absorption the extraordinary publication of this year’s newsletter. What a superb job and quality production! The piece by Kees DeJong was extremely moving and will be remembered a long time. Marvelous guy and a major loss. I noted with sadness that Bill Gibson has passed away. My first year at UC (1949-50) was his last but we became great friends. Altogether a great group of memories were evoked by the magazine. I would like to include here a brief description of the “great bank robbers chase” in Hillsboro, OH during a four-day field trip many years ago (one of us owned an old black Packard and another owned a green Chevy coupe. The rest is obvious requiring only a toy siren and some cap pistols together with people exiting church one Sunday morning). I arrived at UC in Sept. 1949 and was told by many students about the Great Bank Robbery, which took place in 1948 (or possibly 1947). The occasion was the departmental annual four-day field trip. The last day, a Sunday, was the time of this event.

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As people in Hillsboro were coming out of church they were quite startled by the following caravan racing past them. A large black car, apparently a Packard, of the type commonly used by John Dillinger, Pretty-Boy Floyd, or Baby-Faced Nelson roared through town with several masked men leaning out the back windows firing (cap) pistols. Their “target” was a pursuing green Chevrolet with a (toy) siren wailing and from the front windows of which two men with caps on were returning “fire”. This terrifying tableau was seen and gone so quickly that the local newspaper published several diverse and disjointed eye witness accounts but all assumed a robbery had occurred. The cars went right through town and disappeared. Neither were seen in that area again and MOST IMPORTANTLY the field trip left town and Dr. Rich never found out about it. Dick Durrell kept the details secret but apparently the execution of the whole thing was masterful. Needless to say no claims were ever made by the perpetrators and to the best of my knowledge the “crime” was never solved. The Department is clearly blooming- so delighted to learn of the success. Larry

Kate Cosgrove’s unfortunate broken wrist.

C ol lo q uium & Visit ing Spea k ers 2011-2012 J ohn C. S teinmetz , P h .D. Director and State Geologist Indiana Geological Survey

‘Even after 175 Years, There’s Always Something New at The Indiana Geological Survey.’

D r . E va E nkelmann

Uni Tübingen Institut für Geologie Germany ‘Bridging Time Scales: From Modern Day Observations to Geological Timescales.’ ‘Using thermochronometry to study rock exhumation processes in the St. Elias Range, Alaska.’

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(Continued)

D r . J ason R ech

Associate Professor Department of Geology & Environmental Earth Science Miami University, Oxford, Ohio ‘Desiccation of the Atacama Desert and Formation of the Central Andean Rainshadow.’ ‘14C dating and reconstructing climatic, environmental, and cultural change.’


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L A U R E N C E H . L AT T M A N

McMicken Magazine 2003, University of Cincinnati As a nationally renowned geologist, educator, and administrator, Laurence H. Lattman continues to improve the future for students through his writings, research, and generosity. His particular blend of skills has allowed him to recognize weakness, then restructure and improve college departments and programs, bringing national recognition to a number of universities. “Larry Lattman has served as an academician at four different universities in the United States and has established himself as an outstanding educator, researcher, and civic servant,” said Attila Kilinc, head of the Geology Department. “He is a product of an A&S department that we should all be proud of.” After receiving his Bachelor of Chemical Engineering degree from City College of New York in 1948, Dr. Lattman moved to Ohio to earn his masters and doctorate in geology from McMicken College in 1951 and 1953 respectfully. Dr. Lattman spread his knowledge and expertise in the field of geology to a number of universities and companies throughout the United States. He began his professional career as an instructor in geology first at the University of Cincinnati in 1952, then spent the next year at the University of Michigan. From 1953 to 1957, Dr. Lattman took the position of photo geologist for the Gulf Oil Corporation. While working for the company, he continued to instruct students at Pennsylvania State University as an assistant, associate and eventually full pro-

fessor of Geology. In 1970, Dr. Lattman added the responsibilities of an administrator and moved back to the University of Cincinnati to head the Geology department. He coupled his expertise with foresight to restructure the department and make it competitive in the region. In 1975, Dr. Lattman received national recognition when he became Dean of two separate colleges at the University of Utah. Serving as the Dean of the College of Mines and Minerals and Dean of the College of Engineering, he brought high levels of visibility in education and research to the university. In 1983, Dr. Lattman was asked to turn around a troubled New Mexico Tech. As the President there, Dr. Lattman not only reversed waning student enrollment, he also established the greatest growth for research and research facilities in the university’s 100-year history. Dr. Lattman has served on numerous boards during his career including those in the fields of science and technology, education, business, and civil service. Recently, Dr. Lattman and his wife Hanna, also a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, have established an endowed fund for McMicken’s Geology department. The endowment is designed to provide funding for geology faculty and their research projects.

George Rieveschl Jr. Geo Lecture Series: Interdisciplinary lectures for the physical and life sciences on earth processes and their consequences for humanity. Each lecture is sponsored by two or more disciplines from the physical and life sciences, open an free to all the University community and general public. There will be ample opportunity to meet the speaker. This series is named for Dr. George Rieveschl, Jr., a Cincinnatian, UC PhD in chemistry and inventor of Benadryl.

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o you have any recollections of field trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues? Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN. HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

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Tod Roush (BS ‘74)

Wayne Goodman (MS ‘76)

Love the banjo! Were you auditioning for the Brothers Four? A long neck no less; hope you still have it. In Pete Seeger’s “How to play the 5-string Banjo” he has diagram showing how to make your banjo a long neck by adding frets to the old neck. I’ve always wondered how that works with lengthening the scale without moving frets. Having built dulcimers now for a while I know fret placement varies depending upon the scale length. Sounds like you had a complete neck made which would seem, to me, much better. I build mountain dulcimers, about 40 or so to date. Have sold some of them at music festivals and given others away. Probably have an inventory of 10 – 12 on hand. I use various woods; hardwoods - walnut, mahogany, cherry, for the body; softwoods - spruce, cedar, butternut, for the tops. Shapes are mostly ‘teardrop’ and ‘hourglass’, and a few that are an elongated diamond.

As always, I sure enjoyed getting my copy of Upper Crust a couple days ago. I don’t know when it was actually mailed out, we just returned from a 2-week excursion to Alaska, my first time to The Last Frontier! Extraordinary trip, would have been so for anyone, but for two geologists, that much more spectacular! Outstanding firsthand look at alpine glaciations and its effects for our first time ever…couple that with all the interesting structure at a plate collision zone, and you get the basics for a great trip all by itself! We were on land, Anchorage-Fairbanksback to Seward for a week, then a cruise ship down the coast from Seward to Vancouver. Included side trips such as a helicopter flyover of Mt. Denali and vicinity, a narrow gauge train trip from Skagway to Fraser, B.C., and a catamaran trip/float plane trip in the Misty Fjords N.P. area. All outstanding!

Hi, Warren,

Warren,

I see the ‘kids’ are going to be up in my neck-o-the-woods in the fall for the annual 4-day trip. If they need some good things to see; a volcano complex in Wausau, a 3-mile long by 600’+ high quartzite xenolith (laying on it’s side!), Cambrian sandstone with jellyfish, glacier moraines, erosional remnants of the Cambrian sand in the so-called ‘driftless area’, etc. let me know. There’s an article in Geology about the jellyfish. Geology, Feb, 2002 v. 30, no. 2, p. 147-150. Data Repository Item 2002010. Over this past Memorial Day weekend there was a 10-mile stretch of the Florida coast that was inundated by stranded jellyfish. I once heard that the ‘present is the key to the past’!

My wife, Marty, and I were briefly through Cincinnati in early July on a side trip before attending a wedding near Terre Haute on July 4 weekend. We took in a ball game at Great American and also visited the Newport Aquarium. (Really liked how they put that together a lot, especially the “Rivers of the World” and “Mississippi-Ohio River Systems” portions.) While in Newport, we connected for a quick lunch on the Levee with Mary Lou Motl and Marv Good at Buckhead’s on a nice, typical, sultry Ohio Valley summer day…but the view of the river was terrific. Cheers, Wayne

Cheers, Tod Roush

Col lo q ui um & Visiti ng Spea k ers 2011-2012 D r . S upriyo D as

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D r . Y urena Y anes

(Continued)

D r . J oshua M iller

Linnaeus University, Sweden

Universidad de Granada, Spain

Florida Museum of Natural History

‘Biomarkers & Stable Isotopes in Past Environment & Climate Reconstruction.’

‘Land Snail Assemblages as Paleoenvironmental and Paleoecological Proxies.’.

‘Tracking Ecological Change Through The Anthropocene and Beyond: From Paleoecology to Conservation Biology.’


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Jim Teller (B.S. ‘62; Ph.D. ‘70) Hi Warren:

After reading the outstanding 2011 issue of the Alumni Newsletter (Upper Crust) -- many thanks for your continuing efforts -- I decided to send some news you might want to include in the next issue. It’s been an exciting and enjoyable year for me. I retired from teaching in the Department of Geological Sciences (University of Manitoba), after 40 years, but continue to do lots of research, fieldwork, advise students, write papers, and be involved in many professional geological organizations. The University officially awarded me Professor Emeritus status this year. My Lake Agassiz research seems to be of interest to many, and I’ve been fortunate to have been invited to give talks around the world. Kathy and I have 4 grandchildren (living in Winnipeg and Calgary with parents Steve and Melissa and their spouses), and we spend lots of time each year travelling (professionally and otherwise), including to Cincinnati where we have many family members. For your interest, below are a couple of things that happened in 2011: 2011 W.A. Johnston Medal from the Canadian Quaternary Association, the society’s highest award, for excellence in Quaternary science. Keynote Address at Joint meeting of CANQUA and the International Association of Hydrogeologists on “Large and abrupt changes in runoff from North America during the last deglaciation” (Quebec City, August 2011).

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2011 Geological Society of America, Special Session on “Glacial Lake Agassiz-its history and influence on North America and on global systems: In honor of James T. Teller” (Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Oct. 2011).

I hope to see you and fellow alumni and faculty at GSA. My best regards, Jim Teller

Osborne (Ossie) Nye (PhD ‘72) and Bruce Bell (PhD ‘72) (A note from Carrie Bell) Dear Warren,

I thought you might enjoy this picture of Ossie Nye and Bruce Bell at Bruce’s 70th Birthday Party in Oklahoma City October 14. Ossie and his wife Monica drove up from Houston to help Bruce celebrate. Bruce is enjoying semi retirement by traveling around Colorado to gem and mineral shows. I like the gems and he likes the minerals and fossils!

Amber Williams KLEKAMP

Published in The Cincinnati Enquirer on April 15, 2012

Amber Williams passed away April 7, 2012. She was born in New Orleans to the late John Junius Williams Sr. and Myrtle Baker Williams and is survived by her beloved husband of 23 years, THOMAS KLEKAMP; her daughter, Helen Chick Becker; two grandchildren, John Ransom Becker and Thomas Mitchell Becker; son in-law, Ransom Fuess Becker; brother and sister-in-law, John Junius Williams, Jr., and Kathy Duhon Williams; sister and brother-inlaw, Mary Catherine Williams Blunschi and Alton Blunschi; nieces, Megan Blunschi Walvoord, Sarah Blunschi Lopez, Susan Williams Wright and Amber Williams; nephews, Benjamin Williams Blunschi and Abel Allen Duhon. Her Cincinnati family include the late brother-in law, Stephen Klekamp and sister-in-law, Mary Reynolds Klekamp; brother- and sister-in-law, Joel Klekamp and Ruth Lone Klekamp; niece, Christy Klekamp Cron; nephew, Doug Klekamp; grandnieces, Molly and Matty Cron and grandnephew, Joey Cron. In addition she had a host of friends in the Cincinnati area. Amber earned her BA in English from Tulane’s Newcomb College and MA

in English from Tulane University. For thirty-three years she taught in Louisiana public schools, both on-level and honors British Literature as well as being chairman of the English Department at Mandeville High School. She enjoyed playing golf at Leland Country Club in the summer. An avid gardener, she had recently completed theLouisiana Master Gardener Program, lovingly applying her skills to the gardens of the New Orleans Opera Association’s GuildHome in the Garden District. She was a member of the Board of Governors of the New Orleans Opera Association Women’s Guild. She enjoyed being a docent and meeting worldwide guests to the Guild Home. A private memorial service in Cincinnati is planned. Memorials may be made to the “Amber Williams Klekamp Scholarship Fund” at Berea College, Berea, Kentucky 40404. Arrangements by Bagnell & Son Funeral Home of Covington, LA. To view and sign the family guest book, please visit www.bagnellfuneralhome.com.2012

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Ralph Ewers (MS ‘72)

Ho-Shing Yu (PhD ‘79)

I’m still busy with contaminant problems in karst aquifers, and I hope to exit with my boots on puzzling over the hydraulic characteristics of soluble rocks somewhere. I was just in the deserts of Qatar last week looking at some karst that formed apparently in a much wetter mid-Pleistocene time.

May you and your family have a merry Christmas and a happy new year of 2012.

Warren,

Ralph

Dear Dr. Huff:

I and three gradate students attended the AGU 2011 meeting in SFO from 12/4 to 12/9. We then visited to and spent two days in the Grand Canyon National Park in the following week. We left the Grand Canyon and then paid a visit to Prof. Peter DeCelles, a well-known geologist for foreland basin system, at the department of Geosciences, University of Arizona at Tucson. It was a great trip to see the spectacular canyon lands in Arizona and discussed the topics of foreland basin systems with geologists at the University of Arizona. I gave a talk (Over-spilling sediments and longitudinal sediment transport of the western Taiwan foreland basin) at the department of Geosciences. Coincidently, Prof. DeCelles knows Paul Potter well. It is really a small world. Give Paul and Barry my best regards, please.

Janet Modene Elliott (’79)

I’ve been working for myself for the last 18 years, doing a combination of geological, GIS and cartographic consulting work. Based in Priest River, Idaho, my company name is Jasper Geographics, and my geological focus has been mining, mineral exploration and environmental permitting. For 12 years my husband and I also offered geotechnical and environmental hollow-stem auger drilling, but he is retired from that now. I have seen a steady increase in geological business coming my way since about 2005 and am currently working on projects in Montana, Idaho, Washington, New Mexico and Texas. Current project commodities are copper/cobalt, gold, zinc-lead, and REE. We have lived remotely in the mountains of north Idaho for 25 years, using solar power, gravity flow water and wood heat. Our son graduated from college last year and hopes to pursue graduate work in archaeology, but is currently working in Seattle and saving to live in Taiwan for a while. I always enjoy getting my issue of the UC geology newsletter and have fond memories of my years in the department. Best wishes to everyone there. Janet Modene Elliott

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Sincerely yours, Ho-Shing

William B. Harrison III (PhD ’74) Linda K. Harrison (BS’70, MS ‘72))

and

Editor’s note: Our heartiest congratulations to Bill and Linda who are recipients of the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Arts & Sciences. For a description of their achievements go to http://tinyurl.com/7zg9v4h.

We do not have current mailing addresses for the following alumni. Can you help? Dr. Mary Bremer Mr. David J. Green Mr. Glenn King Mr. Shuguang Mao

Ms. Susan Parrett Mr. Paul R. Schuh Mr. Kenneth Sparks Mr. James I. Streeter


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at the department’s Christmas party of 1973 (about 6 weeks of gestation).

Upon their return to Cincinnati, Wayne and LeRon told Bill about meeting Stella Reuthers at the convention, their discussion about her own MS research project and its possible overlap with Bill’s, and that they would inform Bill about everything on their return home, which they did. Everything else, starting with Bill’s initial letter, followed from that background. One Somewhere along the way (950 additional note is that, almiles there, 950 miles home, and (Editor’s note: You can see more of the Stella docuthough everyone in the 4 days of total time), they decidmentation at http://tinyurl.com/7ztzjwb) photo participated in this ed to “get Bill good”. Wayne only scheme in one way or anremembers a “stellar” starry night somewhere and an inother, it was Wanda Osborne, the department’s secstant of revelation and a 5-10 minute discussion of the retary, who was instrumental in intercepting Bill’s letter following con job to pull on Bill. The convention before it actually got mailed. was in early November and its finalization came It was the Fall of 1973, and Bill Harmon, Wayne Goodman, and LeRon Bielak were scheduled to go to the GSA Annual Convention in Dallas, Texas, with Bill Harmon driving everyone in his own car. Bill bailed out at the last minute, so Wayne and LeRon decided to continue on their own, now going in LeRon’s car which was on “its last legs”. As it turned out, they made it there and back, but barely.

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R e m e m b e r a n c e

Rhua Ethel (Slavens) Kepferle (1927 - 2011)

Rhua Kepferle, beloved wife of Roy Clark Kepferle and loving mother of eight, passed away peacefully at home in Cincinnati, Ohio on December 29th, 2011. Mr. and Mrs. Kepferle had celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on October 27. Rhua, 84, was born to Ralph Carrington Bowles Slavens and Mary Ethel Stefenon in Portland, Oregon. She grew up in Molt, Montana. Rhua was an accomplished home economist, volunteer, librarian, political activist, teacher, and genealogy enthusiast who raised her family to love learning, travel widely, and seek truth in all their endeavors. She was a devout Catholic and for nearly 30 years a parishioner at St. Xavier Church in downtown Cincinnati. A life-long learner, she took coursework toward a master’s degree in theology at Xavier University and the Athenaeum of Cincinnati in the 1970s. During that period she was also an active member of the St. Agnes parish in Bond Hill, where she served as Director of Religious Education and was a key participant in the Christ Renews His Parish program, ecumenical outreach, home prayer circles, and other parish activities. Growing up in a small town in Montana, Rhua was very close to her cousins Susanne Slavens Carman of Waukesha, WI, Harold Slavens of Billings, MT, and Shelly Slavens Ehni, of Seattle, WA, as well as William (Bill) Slavens (deceased). Following her marriage in Miles City, Montana, in 1951, she and her family lived in the Dakotas, Colorado, Tokyo, and Elizabethtown, Kentucky, finally settling in Cincinnati in 1968. Throughout all her travels, she maintained her close connections with family and friends around the world, and especially in Montana, where her grandparents had homesteaded. She was partial owner of her father’s general store and kept some Montana wheat farmland for most of her life as a link to her family roots. She and her family visited Montana whenever the opportunity arose. An avid 4-H’er, she was selected as one of 31 United States representatives to participate in the International Farm Youth Exchange program. She spent the Summer following her 1949 graduation from Montana

State University living and working on a family farm in Luxembourg, and remained in warm contact with her IFYE “sister”, Marie-Paul Gloden-Meyer, visiting her in Luxembourg in 1989. Educated in home economics, she worked for the Montana Agricultural Extension Service as a home demonstration agent in Custer County before starting her family. She continued to share her expertise in budgeting, cooking, nutrition, and sewing with her children as well as with others in the various communities in which she lived over the years. She is survived by her husband, Roy Clark Kepferle, her children, Mary Rose Sperlich (Helmut) of Ingolstadt Germany, Michael Roy Kepferle (Deborah Waltman) of Lexington Park, MD, Gregory Ralph Kepferle (Jean Blomquist) of Morgan Hill, CA, Mary Elizabeth Kepferle (Thomas Gorguissian) of Alexandria, VA, Christopher Damian Kepferle (Elizabeth Abele) of Bethesda, MD, Theresa Marie Kepferle (Kevin Wagerson) of Davie, FL and son-in-law Sherman Thorpe of Morning View, KY. Surviving grandchildren are Maxi, Francis, and Sevi Sperlich, Kaci, Megan, and Chase Kepferle, Margaret Gorguissian, and Christian and Karl Wagerson. She was preceded in death by her sister, Margaret Ann Slavens, her son, Matthew Clark Kepferle, her daughter, Anne Marie Thorpe, and grandsons Jason Grant Thorpe and Joseph Patrick Kepferle. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Xavier Church, 607 Sycamore St. in downtown Cincinnati at 10:30 on February 20th, 2012. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Rhua’s memory may be to a charity of choice , or to any of her favorite causes, including: TAP’s Community Brotherhood (http://www.thetcb.org/): St. Aloysius Gonzaga School for Aids Orphans in Nairobi, Kenya (http://www.sagnairobi.org/); Catholic Charities (http://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org); Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (http://jdrf.org), National Meningitis Association (http://nmaus.org), and Montana State University (http://www.montana.edu). The family is grateful for the loving care and support provided over the past months by individuals from Hospice of Cincinnati and HomeWell Senior Care.

2011 GSA RECEPTION

The Geological Society of America 2012 Annual Meeting will be held November 4-7 in Charlotte, NC at the Charlotte Convention Center (http:// www.geosociety.org/meetings/2012/). I would like to invite you to attend and to join us for an

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alumni get-together on Monday, 5 November 2012: 6:30 PM-9:00 PM, next door in the Westin Charlotte Hotel, Queens Room. I hope to see you in Charlotte!


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Magic Lantern

Although there’s evidence of earlier versions of the magic lantern, most historians credit the Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens with its invention in 1659. The use of the Magic Lantern to its full commercail and narrative potential is credited to Thomas Walgenstein, a Danish scientist and entertainet who toop it on tour across Europe in 1664. Important as camera obscuras are to the history of screen projection, the invention known as the magic lantern was associated far more closely with projection screens – because it is, in effect, a slide projec-

1932. Giant ripples in “Unda” limestone. West of Cincinnati, Muddy Creek.

tor by another name, as well as ‘the forerunner of all film screens’ Not surprising, if you put yourself in the position of someone in the seventeenth century, that magic lantern shows were so popular: As Paul Clee writes, ‘In a world with so few images, it’s no wonder that lantern shows, with their enlarged, luminous colored pictures, were such a marvel’. Over the centuries they were lit by a variety of sources from candles, kerosene lamps to limelight and electricity.

1949. Under bedding in Shawangunk grit. South of Ellenville, NY.

1950, Typical bedding of siltstone beds carry casts of flow markings on their undersides. Near Moorehead, KY. Willaim J. Wilson Letiole.

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Anne Rauf (BS ’81) Good morning!

It’s so good to hear from you after all these years.

My 26 year old son Keegan completed his electrical engineering degree at Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ in Prescott, Arizona in May, 2007 and moved back to Anchorage where he works for a mechanical/electrical engeering firm. He often travels to sites around the state and just returned from a trip to Barrow for a project with the company founder. He seems to enjoy the work and travel.

Daughter Rebecca completed the Urban Planning degree at UC last December and has done airport design and 3D CAD for Landrum and Brown in Blue Ash for the past year and a half. However, she just accepted a job in Anchorage working for the state doing airport design work and will be moving by the end of September. I moved back to the Midwest in spring 2007 to help my elderly parents. I work for Northwest Local School District and have taught 7th grade and high school biology and geology. This year is geology and geophysics. Classes begin Tuesday, Aug 30 so I’m busy setting up the classroom. Hope you have a great year! Anne

Tatsuo Oji (Fulbright Junior Researcher, 1987-88) Dear Dave,

How nice to hear from you! Thank you for your greetings, and for asking how I am! What a happy news that all the Meyer’s family are in Cincinnati area and are fine! As for my family, we are a little scattered (geographically) now. Have I told you that my daughter, Nao has been in Kyoto, working for Nintendo company for almost three years? She is working for the department of international affairs, and she frequently uses English with communicating with the staff in Seattle, and other places. She also travelled to Seattle for her job. My wife Kasumi is very fine, and she is busy with her job in a hospital (as a receptionist). Gradually her job is becoming busier, and as for April next year, she will be a formal employee, not a part-time worker. My son, Kohei is a junior in Keio University in Tokyo, and learning economics. He is a big fan of ramen (a kind of Chinese noodle). Kohei, as well as Kasumi are in Fujisawa in Kanagawa, and taking care of our dog, “Zico” (9 years old).

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As for myself, I had a big move last year from U of Tokyo to Nagoya University. Currently I am working for the University Museum. Nagoya is my birth place, and I returned to Nagoya after more than 30 years absence. I like to work in this museum, surrounded by a lot of fossil specimens. I am also teaching in undergraduate and graduate students, and also have students who work with me. One of the students is working on Miocene deep-water echinoderms from central Japan near Nagoya. This fauna includes very rare echinoderm taxa, with only extant records of congeners available (no fossil records reported so far). As you know, we had a tremendous tragedy in northeastern Japan in last March. As I have started my career of paleontologist by surveying this coastal area (for Cretaceous crinoids), I could not believe what actually happened in this area. In spring and in October, I visited to two local towns in this coastal area, one for the rescue of museum collections in Rikuzentakata City where all the six curators’ lives of the museum were lost, and the other for the teaching of local guide for tsunami and geology in Tanohata Village. While the former city is still struggling for the restoration of the town, the latter village is already thinking about the future by educating local villagers as guides for tsunami, in spite that the village was also severely damaged! Actually there are a lot of tsunamidrifted bounders on the hills, some by the recent tsunami (because they still have Mytilus shells and calcareous algae around the boulders), and other “clean” boulders by the older tsunamis, for example that occurred in 1896. By comparing the lithology of one of the tsunami-drifted boulders (about 20 ton located on the hill of 28 m above sea level) with that along the coast, I concluded that this boulder should have originated from the coast and travelled laterally for more than 400 m! I am going to write a small paper with the photo of this boulder in a Japanese journal. Also the local guides will tell this story to visitors. Very best wishes, Tatsuo Oji

D o you have any recollections of field

trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues? Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.


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Almério Barros França (PhD ‘87) Dear Prof. Maynard,

I had a nice visit to Cincinnati late Fall. It was just beautiful. I was missing all the colors of nature at this time of the year. Sorry we could not meet. I am away from Curitiba for more than a week. Please, let Prof. Potter knows that as soon as I return home, I will send him a letter with some pictures and a note on his last request over the telephone some days ago. I am presently in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State.

Carolina my oldest daughter lives here and she just had a baby this morning. A girl named Cecilia. She is my second grandchild; the first one is Nubia’s Clara, born 8 months ago in Goias State. Thank you. Almerio

Col lo q ui um & Visiti ng Spea k ers 2011-2012 Judith A. Hubbard

Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Harvard University ‘Uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, and the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake.’

Dylan Ward, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of New Mexico Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences ‘Scaling the Teflon Peaks: Rock Type and the Generation of Extreme Relief in the Glaciated Western Alaska Range.’

(Continued)

Dr. Stuart Thomson

University of Arizona ‘Glaciation as a Destructive and Constructive Control on Mountain Building: An example from the Patagonian Andes.’

Dr. Antonios E. Marsellos

Research Associate The Department of Geological Sciences University of Florida ‘Long-term and short-term deformation and surface landscape evolution at Hellenic forearc ridge, Aegean.’

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Michael Taylor (BS ‘86) (Letter to David Nash) Dr. Nash, I hope this contact finds you well, and that things are going good for you. I was an undergraduate student in your Geomorphology class in the early 80s. I also took some groundwater modeling classes from you while I was in graduate school in the Engineering College in the early 90s. I’d appreciate the opportunity to catch up with what you have been involved in when you have time. How are things at UC? I am glad to be employed, especially still dealing with groundwater. I was in consulting since getting my MS in ’93 until early ’09. Then I did a stint as a general manager for a large drilling company in Lakeland/Polk City Florida, and finally landed here at the District. While my major duty is review of water use permit applications, there is plenty of cool things the District is still involved in, even with the quite drastic budget cuts. The class I took from you in groundwater modeling has served me quite well. I am in debt to you. Mike Taylor

Janette Hansen (Class of ‘89) Warren,

I am back with the EPA, this time in Chicago working in the Underground Injection Control Program. Life in the big city is definitely different than small-town New Hampshire, but I am enjoying the city. To make up for being so far from the ocean, I’ll be taking sailing lessons on Lake Michigan. Sailing on fresh water will be a first for me. My son, Bobby, is finishing his freshman year at New York University – Abu Dhabi. While I have travelled recently to Houston and Washington, DC, he has been to Sri Lanka, Shanghai, and Vienna. I must be doing something wrong.... When he comes home, I’m sure he’ll tell me all about sabhkas. (Doubtful, he’s a neuroscience major.) Take Care, Janette

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Patrick “Pat” Okita (PhD ’87) Editor’s note:

We had a very pleasant but too brief visit in May from Pat as he was passing through on his way home to the metropolitan Washington, DC area. Pat founded and is the current CEO of Upstream Resources LLC (http://upstreamresources.com/home.html) a company involved in mineral and energy resource projects worldwide. Here is a photo of him along with Barry Maynard.

Bill Haneberg (MS ’85, PhD ’89) After 12 years as an independent consultant, last year I moved to Houston and joined Fugro GeoConsulting as a senior technical expert in its Special Projects Group.

Many of you in the oil and gas business may be familiar with Fugro as a geophysical data provider; however, it also includes a global offshore geoengineering consultancy built around sister companies in Houston, Brussels, and the UK. Our work ranges from top-hole drilling hazard studies for single wells to multi-year integrated geohazard assessments for large deepwater development and production projects around the world. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that finding oil is just the first step. Developing the seafloor infrastructure necessary to safely produce and deliver it presents another set of formidable challenges, especially now that we have the capability to work in as much as 10,000 feet of water. The transition from onshore to offshore has been a great experience. My work so far has included development of GIS-based methods to probabilistically evaluate the potential for earthquake triggered submarine landslides, adaptation of image processing methods for quantitative characterization of seafloor geomorphology, and numerical modeling of seafloor deformation as a consequence of shallow reservoir depressurization. The next project on my docket is going to include GIS-based cost surface optimization of a deep-water submarine pipeline route constrained by geohazards ranging from salt cored and faulted anticlines to giant mudflows. Others in the consultancy work on things like seafloor foundation design, gas hydrates, hydrocarbon seep detection, debris flow and turbidity current modeling, seismic inversion and AVO, and optimization of high resolution 2-D and 3-D seismic data for the shallow section. Anyone who’s interested can reach me at either whaneberg@fugro.com or bill@haneberg.com.

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Becky (Hinnefeld) Carter Hi Warren, I hope all is well with you. It sounds as though you are keeping busy. I loved the latest edition of The Upper Crust. Here I am with my granddaughter Maya. Please say hello to all my friends who are still there – David, Arnie, Dave, Tom, Barry, Attila, Craig, Tom, and any others from the olden days.

Becky Carter Associate Director, Advance College Project Office of the Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education NACEP Accreditation Committee Chair Maxwell Hall 122, 750 E. Kirkwood Avenue Bloomington, IN 47405-7101

Darren Locke (MS ‘99) (Letter to Attila Kilinc) Hi Attila, My career has taken a few interesting turns in recent years. I have been working with synchrotron X-ray and neutron scattering of materials at high pressure and temperature. Academically this has been interesting and I have also managed to get myself involved with industrial projects. For the last five years I have been involved with Chevron to develop in-situ methods to convert and extract hydrocarbons from kerogen in oil shale rock. We have a patent that will be submitted soon. Maybe we will be able to make a little money with this process if the US ever decides that hydrocarbons from oil shale rock is a good idea. Who can tell! I spend most of my time these days thinking about carbon dioxide. I have a reasonably good program started on carbon dioxide adsorption by rocks, minerals, and other materials. I have a paper that I am writing with some folks at Penn State on CO2 adsorption in amorphous silica that contains an ordered array of nano-pores. Turns out that we can load polymers into the pore spaces and adsorb CO2 onto the polymer. I used a small angle X-ray scattering technique to follow the uptake of carbon dioxide by the polymer and the resulting structural modifications to the matrix material. These types of solid porous materials are useful for scrubbing carbon dioxide from flue gas streams at coal fired power plants.

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Right now I am negotiating a position with Michigan State University. Laura is a beam physicist and she recently took a position at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). It is a future DOE facility that will be located at MSU. Anyway, we are trying to get me a lab and research faculty position there so I can bring over some research money to continue my work. I will continue to be associated with Argonne but have a lab and research position at MSU. This will allow me to live in Michigan full time and travel to Argonne to use the synchrotron.

(MS ’96)

Kind regards, Becky

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Anyway, it would be great to visit with you and the department in Cincinnati. I have an uncle that lives in Germantown so I occasionally get out to the Cincinnati area.

Take Care, Darren

Kenan Cetin (PhD ‘92) Hi Warren,

Very good to hear from you. I meant to write a few lines before, when my family and I moved to Charleston, WV. But I guess I forgot in the crowd of things during the move. My wife got accepted into a 4-year residency program in the Department of Behavioral Science & Psychiatry here in Charleston Area Medical Center (CAMC of the West V. U.) after many years of studying and finally very successfully passing three of the four US Medical License Exams (the fourth one, Step 3 exam is usually taken once you are in a residency program). She had a M.D. from Turkey, but it was practically useless here if she had not gone through a residency program here, and Psychiatry was the only thing that she really wanted to pursue. Because our daughter is still only 6 years old, and a resident MD’s work schedule does not really allow for raising a kid without help, I quit my work in Pittsburgh and moved about a month ago. So, as of now I am a stay-home-dad, or a house husband, taking care of Kezban who’s is a firstgrader. In a couple of minutes, I’ll read and put her to bed. Like always, I’ll try keeping in touch. Best wishes for a great school year and a pleasant fall. Kenan

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n September 1848, photographers Charles Fontayne and William S. Porter set up their camera on a rooftop along the Ohio River in Newport, Kentucky to take a panoramic view of Cincinnati. They panned their camera across Cincinnati’s waterfront, each time capturing a different segment of the growing city’s skyline. The resulting images from that September day, eight whole-plate daguerreotypes, were simply titled “Da-

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guerreotype View of Cincinnati. Taken from Newport, Ky.” Recognized then and now as one of the finest sets of daguerreotypes of its kind, this dramatic view of Cincinnati is known today as “The Cincinnati Panorama” and is included in the collection of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

2011 Departmental Four- Day Field Trip

Here is a photo of the group at Van Hise Rock, Sauk County, Wisconsin, courtesy of PhD candidate Gary Motz. This outcrop of Baraboo Quartzite, located in the Baraboo Hills, has been the focus of national and international scientific interest for over one hundred years. The rock

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is named in honor of University of Wisconsin Professor Charles R. Van Hise (1857-1918), renowned geologist, conservationist and President of the University of Wisconsin. And this one was taken by Dave Lienhart (MS ’65)


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2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 Ge olo g y D on or L i s t Mr. Eugene J. Amaral R ex L. Baum, Ph.D. Mr. L eland W. B urton M s . Becky Carter John L. Carter, Ph.D. and R uth C. Carter, Ph.D. Ms . Annette M. Crompton M r. John A. Crompton Devon E nergy Corporation Dry Dredgers, Inc. Estate of L ucile and Richard D urrell Edison International Company Robert J. Elias, Ph.D. Mrs. Janet M. Elliott ExxonM obil Education Foundation M r. Michael N. Fein Mr. Mark P. F isher and Mrs. Connie M. Fisher Mr. W ayne R. Goodman Ms . Andrea J. Haas Alexandre G. Haralampiev, Ph.D. Ms . Jean Johns Ms . Lynne A. Johns Mr. Lawrence P. Karasevich and Mrs. Ellen R. Karasevich Laurence H. Lattman, Ph.D. and M rs. Hanna R. L attman Mr. Walter A. Laufer

Mr . David A. Lienhart and Mrs. Donna P. L ienhart M r. Anthony Limke M arathon Petroleum Company M r. J ohn M. Masters Mr. J ohn P. M cAnaw Ms . M arihelen Millar Arnold I. Miller, Ph.D. and Ms. Mary Jo Montenegro-Miller

Dr.

and M rs . J ohn P ojeta , J r . Paul E. Potter, P h.D. Mrs. J oan E. Ramahi Mrs. Cornelia K. Riley Mr . Tod W. R oush Mrs. M aria R. Rufe Richard B. Schultz, Ph.D. M r. Stanley P. Schweinfurth Frederick E. Simms, Ph.D. Mr. Alan H. Turner William A. Van Wie, Ph.D. D r. Roy B. VanArsdale M s . Raelyn E. Welch Mr. William L. M. Wilsey M r. Ronald J. Wolf and Mrs. J oyce A. Wolf Thank You!

Col lo q ui um & Visiti ng Spea k ers 2011-2012 Dr. John Jones

(Cont inued)

Dr. Steven M. Holland

Washington State University “New Insights into the Peopling of the Caribbean: Evidence from the Microscope”.

University of Georgia ‘Sea-level, The Area of Shallow Marine Habitats, and Diversity.’

Director and State Geologist Indiana Geological Survey ‘Even after 175 Years, There’s Always Something New at The Indiana Geological Survey.’

Department of Geosciences, Virginia Tech and Florida State Museum of Natural History, University of Florida ‘Stratigraphic Paleobiology of Quaternary Sequences on The Po Plain.’

John C. Steinmetz, Ph.D.

Dr. Michał Kowalewski

Dr. Patricia H. Kelley

University of North Carolina Wilmington ‘The Arms Race From a Snail’s Perspective: Evolution of the Naticid Gastropod Predator-Prey System.’ Perspectives from a Hydrogeologist.’

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Adrian Badescu (MS ’98) Hello Dr Huff, 



In a timeline fashion, the short story of my career would go something like this: 
 1998, finished MS in Cincinnati, moved to Austin for a PhD in sequence stratigraphy at UT Austin. 2000, got married. 2002, got the first baby in June, finished my PhD in August, started working for BP in November. 2005, got the second baby in Nov. 2006, quit BP and started working for Hess. 2011, still working at Hess as a senior geologist in the GoM exploration 

 From the students at UC I have kept in touch with, Jacek and Marzena (Jaminski), and Chris Morton. Adrian

Bryant Ramirez (MS ‘95) Hi Warren,

I’ve been meaning for some time to update you and the department on my career path. I’ve enjoyed reading the letters you’ve gotten over the years from my contemporaries from the mid 90s.

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It’s been a strange trip. As planned, I went to the University of Kentucky right after completing my MS to work on a PhD with David Moecher. My plan was to get a degree and go teach at some university. But during that first year I began to realize that metamorphic petrology simply didn’t call me to a career. Liking education, I decided to return to Cincinnati and get a teaching certificate. The following year, I began to teach biology at my alma mater in Finneytown, St. Xavier (go Bombers). I had 5 great years at X and certainly could have been happy staying there. But frankly I felt something was missing. I’d always wanted to be a physician, felt it was a good fit for my personality. With the support of my (relatively) new wife, Dawn, I decided to retake Organic Chemistry and Physics (I’d done horribly in these courses in college). By the way, as you may recall, I met Dawn during my time with the geology department. I took the MCAT and, somewhat to my surprise, was admitted to medical school at Wright State University in Dayton. After completing my medical degree in 2006 (with the nickname “grandpa” since I was about 10 years older than many of my classmates) I returned to Cincinnati where I spent 4 years at University Hospital in a neurology residency. I completed my residency in

continues

R e m e m b e r a n c e

We bid loving farewell to our colleague and friend, Dr. Barbu Lang, “Bobby”, who died on August 20th, 2011. Bobby was born In Bucharest, Romania in 1937 where he survived the agony of World War II and the Holocaust. He developed a passion for Geology at an early age and enrolled the University of Bucharest from where he eventually graduated with a PhD in Magmatic Petrography. He made his first professional steps at the Geological Institute of Romania studying ore deposits in northwestern Romania. In 1976 he followed his parents and siblings who had emigrated a decade earlier to Israel. In his new country he soon obtained tenure at The Geological Survey of Israel where he would work until his retirement, specializing in magmatic geochemistry. Bobby’s work became associated with the study of Mesozoic magmatic rocks in the Ramon region and Timna Valley (southern Israel) and his expertise extended to isotope geochronology (K-Ar, Ar-Ar) and fluid inclusions.

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His involvement with academia included teaching igneous petrology and the geology of metalliferous deposits at The Hebrew University, Jerusalem. He was a visiting scholar at The University of Minnesota, Vrije Universitei, Amsterdam, and other universities. He visited the University of Cincinnati several times, most recently in 2000. Throughout his career he authored and co-authored 200 publications. In 1994 Bobby was awarded the Distinct Employee of the Year Prize by the Israeli Ministry of Energy and in the same year he was elected President of the Israeli Geological Society. In 2002 he retired to spend more time with his family but kept a limited involvement in Radon measurement and raising the public awareness on Radon hazards. This is an extract from A Memorial Tribute to Dr. Barbu Lang, by Dov Levitte, pending publication in the Annual Review of the Israeli Geological Society, 2011 (Hebrew only).


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Bryant Ramirez (continued)

2010. By this time, Dawn and I were raising two daughters, Sophia and Liliana. Having some family in Virginia, we decided to move where it’s warmer, and so moved to Newport News where we currently reside. Sophia is age 12 and Liliana is now age 11. I could not be happier with my decision to go into medicine, though it was a very long road. Anyway, I often think of the good years I had at UC. It seems like just yesterday when I was taking your Intro to Geology course in that huge auditorium. The geology department at UC was remarkably close knit and I imagine, based on the relative absence of change of the faculty, that it remains so. I would love to hear from some of the folks who I studied with while at UC. My email address is bryantramirez92@ gmail.com. Take care and keep the Upper Crust coming. Bryant

Mike Lutz (BS ‘99) Hey Dr. Huff,

How are you doing? How is everything going with you and the Department? In case you don’t recall, I graduated in ’99 with BJ Lechler, Nicole Yarger, Adam Flege, among others. I also helped Mark Krekeler on some research. I am glad and proud that the Department is doing well. I am actually in environmental consulting working as a geologist and hydro. I have worked on many small (<10k) and large (multimillion dollar) environmental investigations and clean-ups for both private and public sector clients. The previous couple years I successfully started a Brownfield and Environmental Remediation/Restoration business unit for GT Environmental. GT is a very small consulting company. Actually, Dr. Nash taught one of the owners of the company in his Geology for Engineers course. My current employer is a large 20k employee international company providing consultancy, design, engineering and management services in the fields of infrastructure, water, environment and construction. The move allows me access to a diverse number of experts, opportunities and resources. I am very excited about the opportunity. On a personal note, I have a very lovely wife of 11 plus years, Christie whom I met while at UC, and two wonderful daughters, Kaitlin who is 7 and Evelyn who is 4. My wife is a RN in labor and delivery at the OSU Medical Cen-

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ter. Kaitlin already has quite the rock and mineral collection and a keen intellect for the sciences. I hope to continue to nurture her interest. Well, at least I can enjoy it while it lasts, right? I hope to get down for a visit this summer, Warm Regards, Mike

Stewart Ebersole (MS ‘97) Hey Arnie,

In November, Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey (http://www. alpineocean.com/) offered me a job, and as of this minute I am writing to you from my new cubical in Norwood, NJ. From start to finish, upon getting the job, I had to uproot my entire life in Philadelphia and start a new life a few hundred miles to the north. The job is an interesting one in that I will spend my first six months or so learning the equipment on site (one group just left for a job in Ethiopia), and my first assignment might possibly be an offshore survey job in Israel early next month. There is a lot of travel, which is right down my alley. Alpine is an oceanic survey company, and we do geophysical and geotechnical methods for clients interested in understanding or building at a sediment/water interface. After Alpine is satisfied that I know the equipment, I will move into a project management position, and then hopefully into an assessment/Geologist position, and then….I don’t know. Very exciting. Alpine is a growing business, and with a new president, Rob (son of the founder and former president) we are ambitiously pursuing work all over the world, and in some strange environments (possible job in the Persian Gulf in disputed waters between Saudia Arabia and Iran). Rob wants to move the company in a more “green” direction, opting to work more with organizations doing alternative energy research, and less for oil companies, so I think that I got in at a perfect time with a perfect situation. At any rate, as I establish myself here, I hope to make some opportunities available for graduating Geologist from UC. So, once again, thank you for the nod. I really like it here. I think that I am a good fit for Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey, and vice versa. Sincerely, Stewart Dean Ebersole II Marine Scientist/Geologist

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Matthew (Matt) Frato (BS ’98)

Xuan (Susan) Meng (MS ’96)

I received the recent issue of “The Upper Crust” newsletter last year and thought it was a nice see what everyone is doing these days. Just a refresher on my background... I graduated in March of 1998 with a BS in Geology. Jeff O’Connell was in my class and I know he went on for his PhD.

During her earlier career, Ms. Meng traveled intensely in China, and later in North America, as a geoscientist. She has worked in the environmental industry as a GIS specialist and a geochemist, helping government agencies and private sectors to analyze and search for pollution sources. Later, Ms. Meng’s interest led her into the fields of high tech, telecommunication and web design where, with her husband John Lu, she started D7 Technology in 2001 to help large to small businesses build web sites and develop mobile applications for smart phones such as iPhone and Android. With connections wide spread among the successful business entities in both China and North America, Ms. Meng specializes in liaising among international traders and bridging culture and background differences in a multi-culture environment. She has successfully helped connecting Chinese companies with their North American counterparts in forming strategic partnership and joint ventures. With rave reviews from classroom teaching (English and Chinese as second languages) and interpretation for ministerial level delegations and dignitaries, Ms. Meng was the instrumental organizer of several culture and business exchange events among business organizations from Eastern and Interior China to US and Canada.

Dr. Huff,

I enjoyed my years there in the program and have many memorable experiences from the field trips. Just as I finished college, I decided to go into financial services and eventually opened up my own branch office in Akron and I did that for about 7 years. I eventually moved to Palm Coast, FL (small boom town North of Daytona) at the end of 2004 and switched careers in to real estate. I worked for a regional builder in sales, then the bottom dropped out of the real estate boom at the end of 2005. I also met my wife that year who is a high school chorus director. We got married the following year and now have 2 boys ages 2 and 4. We decided to stay here through the bust cycle, since my wife liked her job and it was relatively stable and I wound up managing and building up leasing and property management division of a local real estate office. I left that about a year ago to get back into financial services. Thank you, Matt Frato

Michael O’Connell (BS ’96) Hello Dr. Huff,

It’s been a long time since we spoke. The family and I have finally made it back to the Cincinnati area after stints in MT, SC, and IN. I’m working for a small environmental company in Blue Ash called PSARA Technologies, and we are in need of an entry-level geologist in the near future. I thought I’d reach out to you to see if you have any soon to be or recent graduates that might be looking for experience. BS or MS would be great. I’m particularly interested in anyone that has done a fair amount of technical writing for a thesis or senior project, etc. Anyway, I’ve been looking for a chance to bring my boys down there to see the old department and show them the department museum (if it’s still there). I’ll try to get down there one day this spring and see if you’re around. I hope all is well, and thanks in advance for any candidates you might be able to send my way. Take care, Mike

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Owner, D7 Consulting

Dear Dr. Huff, 

 Thanks for your message and I am looking forward to all the updates on everyone else in the newsletter! 

As for me, I am changing my career path again. I have been doing IT consulting for more than 10 years, but have been shifting towards business consulting for US and Chinese companies in the past year. It is a new adventure for me and I am really excited, although it requires quite a bit of traveling. My family is also doing well and my daughter will be in high school after this summer. Time does fly... 

 Hope to see you, Dr. Maynard and all other professors some time in the near future. Susan

Annette Summers Engle (MS ’97)

Editor’s note: The July 2012 issue of GSA Today carries the announcement that Annette has been elected as a Fellow of the Geological Society of America. Congratulations Annette!


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Mike Oestreich (Class of ’09) Warren, How are you? Per your request, I took a few photos of Lake Bonneville terraces a couple days ago. I still need to get out and shoot some around Tremonton where I live because there are some good views, but I figured you’d appreciate seeing the terraces around the salt flats too. I was at the World of Speed this week. In two weeks I’ll probably go back because a friend of mine (Jacob Dillingham, he was a geo student for a while) is on a team running a ‘53 Buick with a straight 8. They are hoping to set a 4th record with the car this year. Attached are some photos, including one with me riding my Enfield. New camera, big files, you’re welcome to use them for classes. Also, I’ve got a bunch of photos of the race event posted on facebook.

Jason Dortch (MS ’07, PhD ’10)

Going out to the salt flats was a great experience. Great to be there, great to drive around on the salt, and great to see what the other folks brought to race. Always some very interesting stuff to see and people to meet. That was the best time I’ve ever had at a race event. Mike O

Alexander Stewart (PhD ’07) Dear Warren,

I hope all is going well with you and yours down there in Cincinnati. All is moving along well here at St. Lawrence. Have had a busy and productive summer … Alaska, International Military Geoscience Conference, Peru and now a dendroecological field school here in a few days. My student recently completed her fieldwork with a Keck-supported program in the high Andes of Peru. I was speaking with the PI on the project and we decided she could use our new XRD to help resolve provenance on some lake cores we captured while there. Basically, the project is late-Pleistocene/Holocene glacial reconstruction work. Thanks and see you at GSA, Alexander K. Stewart, PhD

Dan Sigward (BS ‘11) Hi Dr. Nash,

I thought I’d drop you a message to let you know how I was doing. I feel like I’ve settled into OU fairly well, and I’m enjoying myself so far. I feel like Oklahoma is going to be a good fit for me, especially as I’m interested in going into the petroleum industry. I’m taking a couple classes in geophysics at the moment, which is an ongoing adventure since I have no previous experience with that realm of the geosciences. I’m really liking it here so far in Norman, the department is well run and everyone has been very friendly. I’ve managed to become both a Research Assistant and a Teaching Assistant this quarter, so my plate is really full. I hope everything is going well up at UC. I’m planning on visiting the first week of May after exams are finished down here. I hope to see you then. Have a good day! Dan Sigward

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Theses/dissertations defended 2011-2012

PhD

Phd Qualifying Exam

Jay Zambito IV

Esteban Sagredo Zhenzu Wan

Masters Nathan Marshall Thomas Schramm Julia Wise Gianna Evans

Gary Motz Kelsey Feser Andrew Zaffos James Thomka Todd Longbottom Zack Mergenthal Todd Longbottom Jeffrey S. Hannon

Graduate Student Poster Forum

2012 Science Fair

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Geology Awards Banquet

Congratulations to all the award winners, and thanks to Carl, Craig and Mary Lou for presenting the awards. It was great to see so many alumni and friends. Wayne Goodman, Ed Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell and Steve Wells from our alumni ad-

GSA Minneapolis

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2012 Uppercrust