Page 1

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BA ACADEMIC + CAREER HANDBOOK ACADEMIC YEAR 2020-2021

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising


Table of Contents Why study Environmental Design BA at UB? https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba.html ....................................................... 5

Learning Outcomes ...................................................................................................................................................... 6 The Learning Environment.............................................................................................................................................. 6 Environmental Design BA Academic Opportunities https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_experience.html .................. 6 Experiential Learning + Undergraduate Research ...................................................................................................... 7 Study Abroad .................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Extracurricular Activities .................................................................................................................................................. 8 Honors and Awards ......................................................................................................................................................... 8 Departmental Honors................................................................................................................................................... 8 Academic Advising ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 Academic Advising Contact Information ....................................................................................................................... 9 Scholarships and Financial Support .............................................................................................................................. 9 Career Advising ................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Career Advising Contact Information .......................................................................................................................... 10 Career Outlook ........................................................................................................................................................... 10 Salary Information ...................................................................................................................................................... 11 Sample Occupational Information for Environmental Designers ............................................................................ 12 Graduate Study Opportunities ...................................................................................................................................... 12 Completing the Environmental Design BA Program https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_requirements.html ............ 15 Academic Requirements ........................................................................................................................................... 15 Academic Advice ........................................................................................................................................................ 15 Transfer Credit Policy ................................................................................................................................................ 16 Prerequisite Courses ................................................................................................................................................. 17 Required Courses ...................................................................................................................................................... 17 Departmental Honors Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 18 Total Credit Hours Required ..................................................................................................................................... 19 Environmental Design BA Curricular Plan/Roadmap https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_curricular_plan.html ........ 19 Becoming an Environmental Design BA Student https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_applying.html ..................... 22 Becoming a University at Buffalo Student .............................................................................................................. 22 ap-advising@buffalo.edu |2


Freshman Admission to the Program...................................................................................................................... 22 Transfer Admission to the Program ......................................................................................................................... 23 Current UB Students Applying to the Program ...................................................................................................... 23 Suggested Introductory Courses ............................................................................................................................. 24 University at Buffalo Minors .............................................................................................................................................. 25 UB School of Architecture + Planning Research ................................................................................................................ 28

Our Approach to Research: Pushing at the periphery of knowledge and creative practice ......................... 28 University at Buffalo Academic Support ............................................................................................................................ 30 Tutoring and Academic Support Services .................................................................................................................... 30 University at Buffalo Campus Support Services ................................................................................................................ 32 TUTORING + ACADEMIC SUPPORT .............................................................................................................................. 32 STUDENT HEALTH + WELLNESS .................................................................................................................................. 32 Medical Care ..................................................................................................................................................................... 32 Emotional Health + Wellness .......................................................................................................................................... 32 Healthy Decisions ............................................................................................................................................................ 32 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ......................................................................................................................................... 32 STUDENT + CAMPUS LIFE ............................................................................................................................................. 32 CAREER PLANNING ........................................................................................................................................................ 32 STAYING SAFE ................................................................................................................................................................ 32 HELP AND SUPPORT ...................................................................................................................................................... 32 Emergency + Crisis ............................................................................................................................................................ 32 Students in Distress ........................................................................................................................................................... 32 Victim Assistance ............................................................................................................................................................... 32 Emergency Funds .............................................................................................................................................................. 32 Food Support ..................................................................................................................................................................... 32 National Environmental Design Organizations ................................................................................................................. 33 The Connection between Environmental Design + Architecture ....................................................................................... 34 TED Talks on Environmental Design + Architecture ........................................................................................................ 39 University Libraries > Environmental Design Overview ................................................................................................... 40 University at Buffalo Financial Responsibility Statement ................................................................................................. 42 University at Buffalo Student Responsibility Statement .................................................................................................... 45

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

Edited date: 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM ap-advising@buffalo.edu |3


Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog https://catalog.buffalo.edu/

Environmental Design BA Department of Urban & Regional Planning 126 Hayes Hall South Campus Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 716-829-2133 716-829-3256 ap.buffalo.edu/academics/urban-regional-planning.html Daniel B. Hess Professor and Chair Norma Everett Graduate Programs Administrator R. J. Multari Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Education and Adjunct Instructor Christy Krawczyk Academic Advisor

Why study Environmental Design BA at UB? https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba.html

University at Buffalo Environmental Design addresses the arrangement, appearance, and functionality of neighborhoods, towns, and communities. In addition, environmental design is concerned with the way these places are experienced and used, as well as other aesthetic elements that contribute to the quality of community environments. Environmental design promotes the best use of a community's land and physical resources for residential, commercial, institutional, and recreational purposes. Environmental Design provides students with the skills to understand, analyze, and solve development problems with a view toward community planning and the design of sustainable environments. The purpose of environmental design is to gain a better understanding of community environments, and then apply that knowledge to improve physical surroundings. University at Buffalo Environmental Design addresses issues in the dynamic bi-national Buffalo-Niagara region as a laboratory for planning, design, and development.

ap-advising@buffalo.edu |5


Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of all requirements, the student will have knowledge of:    

Fundamental Skills: Ability to effectively use basic planning and development principles in environmental design; Investigative Skills: Ability to gather, assess, record, apply, and comparatively evaluate information related to environmental design challenges; Communication Skills: Ability to effectively read, write, speak and listen, and visually communicate ideas; Critical Practice Skills: Ability to apply evidence-based design, development, and planning methods and precedents to environmental design processes and proposals; and, Graduate School & Entry Level Job Preparation Skills: Students will be well prepared to enter graduate school or an entry-level position in an environmental design related field of study.

The Learning Environment Environmental designers plan and develop physical environments with which people interact every day. Direct, tangible engagement with the environment – whether it be neighborhoods, communities, streetscapes, or citizen activists – is fundamental to the aspiring environmental designer. University at Buffalo Environmental Design is distinctive by engaging our students in the dynamic binational Buffalo-Niagara region. In Environmental Design, students become involved with municipal governments and neighborhood groups, urban and rural environments, citizens and leaders, and the challenges they face: both complex problems and creative opportunities. This is done through in-class exercises, site visits, field work, internships and independent study, capstone courses, and through Environmental Design studio workshops. Through Environmental Design, we prepare students for careers in which they can make positive change in communities.

Faculty List Directory Please visit the University at Buffalo and Urban and Regional Planning website for additional information about our faculty.

Environmental Design BA Academic Opportunities https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_experience.html

University at Buffalo Environmental Design students have access to agencies, municipalities, and local leaders for information, resources, and practicums. Workshops focus on real-world exercises in planning, development and design throughout the Buffalo-Niagara region. In the senior-year workshop, environmental design students work with a public, private, or nonprofit client to analyze and engage in the development, economic, political and physical design issues associated with complex planning problems. Recent clients include: ap-advising@buffalo.edu |6


           

Erie Canal Harbor Development Corporation Buffalo Audubon Society Tonawanda Township, New York Amherst Township, New York Pendleton Township, New York UB Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access City of Lockport, New York Development Corporation Buffalo's Fillmore Corridor Neighborhood Coalition Roycroft Revitalization Corporation Akron Township, New York Eden Township, New York North Collins Township, New York

Experiential Learning + Undergraduate Research A learn-by-doing approach to professional education is the crux of our programs in architecture, environmental design, real estate development, and urban planning at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning. Situated within the Buffalo Niagara binational region, we engage in constant creative dialogue with local industries, firms, designers, planners, governments, and an active grassroots movement. Visit University at Buffalo Environmental Design’s Learn by Doing webpage for more information. Environmental design internships (END 496) may be available with: Environmental design internships (END 496) may be available with:       

The Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access The Community of Excellence for Global Health Equity The Center for Urban Studies Citizen Planning School + One Region Forward The Food Systems Planning and Healthy Community Lab The University at Buffalo Regional Institute/Urban Design Project Research and Education in Energy, Environment and Water

Interested students should contact each research center for more information about available opportunities.

Study Abroad Traveling can enhance students' awareness of the world, bringing them closer to understanding global diversity, and appreciating what is universal and unique to a culture. With the largest study abroad program at the University at Buffalo, the School of Architecture and Planning offers diverse exchange programs and global summer studios. Study abroad programs will be offered on an ad-hoc basis by University at Buffalo Environmental Design and the UB Office of Study Abroad based upon faculty and student interest. For additional information, visit University at Buffalo Environmental Design’s Study Abroad webpage. ap-advising@buffalo.edu |7


Extracurricular Activities Extracurricular information is available on the School of Architecture and Planning website. These include the Graduate Planning Student Association, Alpha Rho Chi, and the Environmental Design Student Association. See the UB Student Association.

Honors and Awards University at Buffalo Environmental Design gives a series of annual awards and prizes to honor undergraduate environmental design student excellence. These include:    

The Dean's Award for Academic Performance to the continuing environmental design student with the highest grade point average. Award of Academic Excellence to the graduating environmental design senior with the highest GPA. Chair's Award for Excellence to the graduating senior who excelled in and contributed most to the bachelor of arts in environmental design program. R. Buckminster Fuller Award (biannually) to the graduating senior who is continuing on for graduate studies within the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning and exemplifies attributes of creativity, inventiveness, and intellectual excellence. Departmental Honors are awarded to graduating environmental design students who achieve a high level of academic excellence and ingenuity within the University of Buffalo Urban and Regional Planning.

Departmental Honors Departmental distinctions are awarded to graduating environmental design students who achieve a high level of academic excellence, creativity and ingenuity within University of Buffalo Urban and Regional Planning.

Academic Advising All students in the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning have access to faculty mentors upon enrollment. In addition, advisors with School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education are available for assistance. Students are encouraged to consult regularly with advisors and faculty mentors for academic options, course selection, graduate studies, and career opportunities. Students meet with advisors and faculty mentors as often as they choose to explore educational opportunities available within the department to plan a course of study that is consistent with their abilities, achievements, interests, and expectations. The ultimate goal of advisement is to empower students to be active, responsible learners who take full advantage of the many opportunities UB provides in the areas of academics, research, and community and global engagement. Visit the Undergraduate Academic Advisement website for additional information on academic advisement.

ap-advising@buffalo.edu |8


Academic Advising Contact Information School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall, South Campus ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education Website

Scholarships and Financial Support The University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in partnership with the university, our alumni, our faculty and staff, and our philanthropic supporters, provides support to our undergraduate students. In addition to tuition scholarships, stipends for travel and supplies, and support for study abroad, our students, like our faculty, are actively engaged in teaching, research and service — and are rewarded for their hard work. Visit the School of Architecture and Planning website for more information.

Career Advising Pave your path into the built environment professions Your preparation as an architect, environmental designers, urban planner, historic preservationist, or real estate developer starts from day one at the School of Architecture and Planning. Visit with our career development and advising team for tips on building your portfolio, internship searches or mock interviews. Meet leaders from top firms and employers across the built environment professions through meet-and-greets and offsite treks. Pair up with one of our alumni mentors to build deep professional connections and gain valuable career-building advice. At University at Buffalo Career Services, you’ll find career planning experts who are excited to help you. Whether you’re a freshman trying to decide on a major, or a graduate student searching for a job — or anywhere in between — we’ll help you plan for a fulfilling career and a meaningful life. University at Buffalo Career Services offers advising, coaching, skill-building, and trend-watching services. BullsEye is a virtual tool to connect employers with UB students for jobs, internships and networking opportunities. This resource provided by University at Buffalo Career Services allows you to search job and internship opportunities specific architecture, urban planning, real estate development, and environmental design. 1. When you click on one of the job postings below, you will be taken to UB Career Services where you will be required to login using your UBit username and password. ap-advising@buffalo.edu |9


2. You will be required to create or update your profile with UB Career Services in order to see one of the listings below. 3. Before you click on one of the job postings below, please take note of the posting number of the position listed. You MAY have to search through the listings in order to find the correct listing. LinkedIn Connect with employers and search for additional employment and internship listings on the School's LinkedIn page https://www.linkedin.com/in/ubuffaloarchplan/.

Career Advising Contact Information Ed Brodka, Career Counselor University at Buffalo Career Services 259 Capen Hall/1 Diefendorf Hall (Wednesdays) (716) 645-4618 brodka@buffalo.edu School of Architecture and Planning Career Advisement Website University at Buffalo Career Services Website

Career Outlook Career outlook information for Environmental Designers is available online: https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-4061.01 Environmental design graduates often pursue careers in urban planning and real estate development. Many graduates with bachelor's degrees qualify for entry-level positions with local governments, working as assistant planners, community developers or associate environmental planners, for example. With experience or further education, graduates may work as urban planners, architects, real estate developers, and historic preservation. Career opportunities also exist in landscape design, environmental planning, public administration, and educational administration. Some environmental designers work in the area of environmental conservation to protect ecologically sensitive lands that abut developed areas. Additional career activities include:     

Participate in and support collaborative planning, design, and development efforts. Prepare reports, using statistics, charts, visual design, and graphs, to illustrate planning and development studies in areas such as population, land use, or zoning. Research, compile, analyze and organize information from maps, reports, investigations, images, and books for use in reports and special projects. Provide and process zoning and project permits and applications. Inspect site plans and designs for development proposals. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 10


Alumni from Environmental Design have found employment in the following careers:                      

Architect (+ an Architecture Minor + graduate degree in Architecture) City, county, township, or village planning Community Development Construction Management (+ an Architecture Minor) Economic Development Educational Administration (+ an Education Minor + graduate degree in Education) Environmental Graphic Designer (+ a Studio Art Minor) Environmental Management (+ an Earth Systems Science Minor or Geography Minor) Environmental Restoration Planners (+ an Earth Systems Science Minor) Geographic Information Systems (+ a GIS Minor) Historic Preservation (+ an Architecture Minor) Industrial Development Land Redevelopment Specialists and Site Managers Landscape Architect (+ a Geography Minor *or* an Architecture Minor + graduate degree in Landscape Architecture) Neighborhood Design and Development Property Management Real Estate Development Site Planning and Development Sustainable Design and Development Transportation analysis (+ a Geography Minor) Urban Design and Development Zoning and land use development

Salary Information Students interested in environmental design careers may find good job prospects. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected average job growth - 10% for urban and regional planners and 14% for landscape architects - between 2012 and 2022 (www.bls.gov). In addition, the BLS expected planning jobs in the private sector to grow the fastest, particularly within architecture and urban planning firms that must ensure new development meets environmental regulations. Salaries range greatly from one occupation, position, and work setting to another. According to the U.S. Department of Labor's 2014-2015 Occupational Outlook Handbook, the median wages for Environmental Designers was $ 20.42 hourly / $ 42,480 annually. Visit O*Net Online (https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-4061.01) for more information.

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 11


Sample Occupational Information for Environmental Designers Architects, Except Landscape and Naval

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/17-1011.00

Designers, All Other - https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/27-1029.00 Construction Managers

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9021.00

Construction and Building Inspectors

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/47-4011.00

City and Regional Planning Assistants - https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-4061.01 Urban and Regional Planners Environmental Planners

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-3051.00

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-2041.02

Transportation Planners

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/19-3099.01

Environmental Compliance Inspectors

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1041.01

Environmental Redevelopment Specialists Landscape Architects

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/17-1012.00

Transportation Managers Logistics Managers Logistics Analysts

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9199.11

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-3071.01

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-3071.03 - https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1081.02

Geographic Information Systems Technicians

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1199.05

Government Property Inspectors and Investigators - https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1041.04 Property Managers and Real Estate Developers Sustainability Specialists Appraisers, Real Estate Legend:

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/11-9141.00

- https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-1199.05 - https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/13-2021.02

= Green Career;

=

Bright Outlook

Graduate Study Opportunities Graduates of the pre-professional Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design are prepared for graduate study in a variety of professions or the social sciences, including:       

Urban Planning Architecture Real Estate Development Historic Preservation Environmental Planning Landscape Architecture Educational Administration/Higher Education/Student Affairs Administration a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 12


   

Geography/Geographic Information Systems Public Administration Environmental Studies/Environmental Policy/Environmental Management Construction Management

Advising for Applying to Graduate School University at Buffalo Career Services can help you make sure you’re on track for graduate school, find the right grad school program, put together your personal statement and application. Learn more about University at Buffalo's Graduate Academic Programs How to Choose the Right School  

Research graduate programs carefully to choose the one that will best suit your needs and talents. Consider a variety of factors such as accreditation, admission standards, career assistance, cost/financial aid, culture, degrees offered, faculty, location, diversity, facilities, reputation, research/academic focus, resources, size, residency requirements, and surrounding community. Talk with your professors, career counselors, advisers and alumni to help identify the graduate program and university/college that best suits you.

When to Start Planning Junior Year      

Start investigating available programs (visit school websites, talk with faculty, alumni, and students currently in the program). Start exploring financial aid resources. Sign up for required standardized test and take a practice test through the UB testing center. Set up appointment with Career Services to discuss a plan. Identify potential letter of recommendation writers. Develop your personal timeline for applying.

Senior Year (Fall Semester)   

 

Write the first draft of your personal statement/statement of purpose. Request your letters of recommendations from faculty. Order transcripts from all post-secondary institutions. If fall grades are expected, check with the Registrar's Office to see if a transcript including fall grades can be sent in time to meet your deadlines. Write final draft of personal statement/statement of purpose. Investigate funding sources. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 13


 

Apply for aid available through program assistantships, fellowships, scholarships. Complete your applications.

Senior Year (Spring Semester)    

Complete and submit financial aid applications. Visit prospective campuses if possible. Follow-up with schools to make sure your applicant file is complete. After receiving acceptance from the school of your choice, send in the required deposit, and contact other schools to decline acceptances. Start planning for admission interviews. Write thank you notes to the people who helped you.

 

How to Apply for Graduate School Creating a winning graduate school application? Possible. A complete graduate school program application will consist of…     

Personal statement The application form and application fee Official transcripts Letters of recommendation Many graduate school programs will not review your application until all components are complete and submitted. It is important to start working on all parts of the application as soon as possible.

Writing Your Personal Statement A personal statement presents details about you that a GPA or testing scores can’t convey. It tells who you are, what you value and how well you will be able to handle graduate school.   

Tell your story. Was there an event in your life where you felt confident, independent or learned humility? Capture your story in two pages, double space, free of grammatical errors. Schedule an appointment with a Career Counselor to review your personal statement.

Print date: 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 14


Completing the Environmental Design BA Program https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_requirements.html

Academic Requirements Students are reviewed on their progress and eligibility to continue on a semesterly basis. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.500 in environmental design program courses and a minimum cumulative UB GPA of 2.000 is required for successful completion of the major. In addition to all minimum GPA levels, all undergraduate students are expected to make satisfactory progress in workshops. All students must earn no less than a C- in an environmental design workshop or capstone course; any student who receives a grade lower than C- must repeat the environmental design workshop or capstone course before registering for the next workshop or capstone course. Grades of lower than C- in any environmental design workshop or capstone course will not count toward the preprofessional bachelor of arts in environmental design degree requirements, and a grade of F in any environmental design workshop may result in dismissal from University at Buffalo Environmental Design. Workshop courses (END 350, END 360, END 450, END 460, END 494, END 498) are majorsonly courses and require full admission to the preprofessional bachelor of arts in environmental design. Concurrent enrollment in the following combination of program courses is not permitted: END 120/END 350, END 212/END 360, END 350/END 450, END 360/460, END 360/END 494, END 350/END 498, and END 360/END 498.

Academic Advice Environmental Design students are placed into mathematics, physics and English courses based upon the following criteria: SAT/ACT/TOFEL/ALEKS/CLEP/IB scores; Advanced Placement scores; or, completed college courses. Upper-division courses END 350, END 360, END 450, END 460, END 494, END 498 are for majors-only and require full admission to the major. Enrollment on a space available basis. For enrollment eligibility into the upper division END 350 and END 360 sequence, students need: 

  

A min. cumulative GPA of 2.500 in the following three courses:  ENG 105 Writing and Rhetoric  END 120 Introduction to Urban Environments  END 212 Urban and Environmental Planning A min. overall UB GPA of 2.330 Junior standing (min. 60 credit hours earned) Preferred applicants should have an overall minimum UB GPA of 2.500.

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 15


For enrollment eligibility into the upper division END 450/END 498 and END 460/END 494 sequence, students need:   

A min. cumulative environmental design (END-prefixed) GPA of 2.500 Successful completion of END 350 plus END 360 Senior standing (min. 90 credit hours earned)

No more than 3 credits of END 496 and 3 credits of END 499 may be applied toward major requirements. A minimum cumulative urban planning and environmental design (END-prefixed) GPA of 2.5, completion of END 350 Environmental Design Workshop 1 plus END 360 Environmental Design Workshop 2, and senior standing is required for enrollment in END 450 Environmental Design Workshop 3, END 460 Environmental Design Workshop 4, END 494 Visions of the City and END 498 Research Projects in Environmental Design. No more than 3 credits of END 496 Environmental Design Internship and 3 credits of END 499 Independent Study may be applied toward major requirements.

Transfer Credit Policy Courses completed at other colleges and universities are not automatically accepted by University at Buffalo Urban and Regional Planning as fulfilling undergraduate requirements. Determination is made by an evaluation of the student's transcripts, course content, contact hours, and grades earned. A minimum passing grade on a 4.0 scale is required in each course for possible articulation to courses offered by the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in accordance with SUNY policy. Student transcript evaluations are conducted by School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education. Actual placement in the undergraduate preprofessional environmental design program is made after this evaluation is completed. No more than 15 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward environmental design major requirements, and no more than 6 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward environmental design minor requirements.

Residency Requirement A minimum of 36 END-prefixed credit hours must be completed at the University at Buffalo to satisfy the Department of Urban and Regional Planning's bachelor of arts in environmental design academic residency requirement, a minimum cumulative urban planning and environmental design (END-prefixed) GPA of 2.5, and a minimum cumulative UB GPA of 2.0 is required for successful completion of the major. Grades of lower than C- in any environmental design workshop or capstone course will not count toward the pre-professional Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design degree requirements. The pre-professional Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design is completed in six semesters. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 16


Prerequisite Courses ENG 101 Writing 1* or ENG 105 Writing and Rhetoric* PD/END 120 Introduction to Urban Environments PD/END 212 Urban and Environmental Planning

Required Courses END 350 Environmental Design Workshop 1: Methods of Inquiry END 360 Environmental Design Workshop 2: Graphic Communications END 450 Environmental Design Workshop 3: Comprehensive Projects END 460 Environmental Design Workshop 4: Planning, Design, and Development or END 480 Environmental Design Workshop Abroad** END 494 Visions of the City END 498 Research Projects in Environmental Design Minimum 18 credit hours and minimum 6 courses of department (PD/END-prefixed) electives at the 270-level or higher. All students must earn no less than a C- in an environmental design workshop or capstone course; any student who receives a grade lower than C- must repeat the environmental design workshop or capstone course before registering for the next workshop or capstone course, and a grade of F in any environmental design workshop may result in dismissal from University at Buffalo Environmental Design. Environmental Design students are placed into mathematics, science, and English courses based upon the following criteria: SAT/ACT/TOFEL/ALEKS/CLEP/IB scores; Advanced Placement scores; or, completed college courses. No more than 15 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward environmental design major requirements. Workshop courses (END 350, END 360, END 450, END 460, END 494, END 498) are majorsonly courses and require full admission to the preprofessional bachelor of arts in environmental design. Concurrent enrollment in the following combination of program courses is not permitted: END 120/END 350, END 212/END 360, END 350/END 450, END 360/460, END 360/END 494, END 350/END 498, and END 360/END 498. Electives END 275 Environment and Landscape: Discovering Landscapes END 279 Exploring the Design of Buffalo Niagara END 285 Transportation and Urban Life END 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development END 302 Sustainable Urban Environments END 303 Methods of Communication a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 17


END 305 Environmental Education and Urbanism END 312 Design of Cities END 313 Local Government Policy and Politics END 319 The City Through Film: The Built Environment in Mass Media END 356 Computing for Environmental Analysis END 363 Cities and Globalization END 402 Real Estate Development END 403 Strategies of Property Management END 405 Urban Planning and Environmental Change END 406 Housing and Community Development END 407 School Planning and Development END 417 Special Topics END 422 Economic Development Planning END 426 Site Planning and Development END 428 Foundations of Historic Preservation END 467 Legal Issues in Planning and Development END 464 Infrastructure Planning and Design END 473 Projects in Physical Planning and Design END 480 Environmental Design Workshop Abroad ** END 496 Environmental Design Internship END 499 Independent Study in Environmental Design * ENG 101 Writing 1 or ENG 105 Writing and Rhetoric are also UB Curriculum requirements. ** Students who are eligible to complete END 480 Environmental Design Workshop Abroad will have fulfilled their END 460 Environmental Design Workshop 4: Planning, Design, and Development requirement. Individuals with a baccalaureate degree must contact School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education prior to applying to the pre-professional Environmental Design BA for alternative academic advisement and information on the accredited professional Master of Urban Planning (MUP) degree program.

Departmental Honors Requirements University at Buffalo Environmental Design offers the designations “with distinction,” “with high distinction,” and “with highest distinction” to students who achieve a certain level of academic excellence in the major or minor upon graduation. The award of Program Distinction is based on the UB GPA for the program. A minimum of 50% of credits for the major or minor program must be completed at UB. University at Buffalo Environmental Design requires a minimum of 3.25 for “with distinction”; 3.50 for “with high distinction”; and 3.75 for “with highest distinction.” a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 18


Total Credit Hours Required Credits Required for Major Additional Credits Required for UB Curriculum Additional Credits Required for Electives Total Credits Required for Degree

54 37 29 120

Students should consult with an academic advisor to determine how any transfer or exam credit might be utilized in meeting general education, prerequisite, or major requirements. * ENG 101 Writing 1 or ENG 105 Writing and Rhetoric are also UB Curriculum requirements. See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements. Total Credit Hours Required represents the minimum credits needed to complete this program, and may vary based on a number of circumstances. This chart should not be used for financial aid purposes.

Environmental Design BA Curricular Plan/Roadmap https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_curricular_plan.html

A Curricular Roadmap provides clear directions for completing this academic program and the UB Curriculum on time. Your actual plan may vary depending on point of entry to the university, course placement and/or waivers based on standardized test scores, earned alternative credit and/or college transfer credit. All students are encouraged to use this roadmap in conjunction with other academic planning resources such as your academic advisor, the hUB Academic Advisement Report, and Path Finder tool. In addition to following this course roadmap, all other admission and academic requirements of this major as listed in the Undergraduate Catalog must be met in order to successfully complete this degree. Freshman Year Fall Semester Course UB Seminar END 120LEC Intro to Urban Environments Pathway or ENG 105LEC Writing and Rhetoric ARC 122LAB Architectural Sketching & Environments or ARC 121LEC Introduction to Architecture Pathway Total Credits: 15 or 16

Category UBS M

Credit 3 3

P or CL1

3 or 4

M/P

3

P

3

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 19


Spring Semester Course END 212LEC Urban & Environmental Planning ARC 211LLB American Diversity & Design (Approved Diversity in the United States course) Pathway or ENG 105LEC Writing and Rhetoric END 275LEC Environment & Landscapes: Discovering Landscape Design or END 279LEC Explore the Design of Buffalo Niagara Math and Quantitative Reasoning Total Credits: 16 or 17

Sophomore Year Fall Semester Course END 285LEC Transportation in Environ Design & Urban Life ARC 122LAB Architectural Sketching & Environments or ARC 121LEC Introduction to Architecture Communication Literacy 2 Scientific Literacy 1 Pathway Total Credits: 15 Spring Semester Course END 275LEC Environment & Landscapes: Discovering Landscape Design or END 279LEC Explore the Design of Buffalo Niagara Pathway Pathway Scientific Literacy 2 + Lab Elective (possible minor course) Total Credits: 16

Junior Year Fall Semester Course END 350SEM Environ Design Workshop 1 END Elective Elective (possible minor course) END Elective Total Credits: 15 Spring Semester Course END 360SLB Environ Design Workshop 2

Category M

Credit 3

DIV/P

3

P or CL1

3 or 4

M/P

3

MQR

4

Category M

Credit 3

M/P

3

CL2 SLI1 P

3 3 3

Category

Credit

M/P or M/P

3

P P SLI2 E

3 3 4 3

Category M M E M

Credit 6 3 3 3

Category M

Credit 6

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 20


Spring Semester Course END Elective Elective (possible minor course) Elective (possible minor course) UBC 399 UB Capstone Total Credits: 16

Senior Year Fall Semester Course END 450SEM Environ Design Workshop 3 END 498SEM Research Projects Enviro Design END Elective Elective (possible minor course) Total Credits: 15 Spring Semester Course END 460 or END 480 Environmental Design Study Abroad END 494SEM Visions of the City END Elective (possible minor course) Total Credits: 13

Category M E E CAP

Credit 3 3 3 1

Category M M M E

Credit 6 3 3 3

Category M or M M M

Credit 6 or 6 3 3

Minimum Total Credits Required for the ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BA Degree: 120 Curricular Category Key Category Description M Course required for major (including pre-requisites needed for admission to major) E Elective (course not required for major or UB Curriculum) UB Curriculum CAP UB Capstone CL1/CL2 Communication Literacy (2 required) DIV Diversity in the United States MQR Math and Quantitative Reasoning P Pathway Course (6 required: 3 Global, 3 Thematic) SLI1/SLI2 Scientific Literacy and Inquiry (2 required) UBS UB Seminar Note: Some classes may count toward both a major (M) and UB Curriculum (UBC) requirement. Courses that count toward more than one requirement are indicated by a "/" (slash) in the category column, indicating which categories the course will satisfy. Students may begin working on a University at Buffalo Minor in the Sophomore Fall semester. Total credit hours required for the Environmental Design BA degree Credits Required for Major Additional Credits Required for UB Curriculum

54 37

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 21


Additional Credits Required for Electives 29 Total Credits Required for Degree 120 Students should consult with an academic advisor to determine how any transfer or exam credit might be utilized in meeting general education, prerequisite, or major requirements.

Becoming an Environmental Design BA Student https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba_applying.html The University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning has an admission policy that actively encourages applicants from protected groups and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status. Admission is competitive, and applicants are reviewed according to the admission criteria. Acceptance of students in the preprofessional, professional, and advanced graduate programs is determined on the basis of the applicants' qualifications and experience. However, since the school's size is limited, the programs may exercise discretionary powers of selection. Courses and programs offered by the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning may include an instructional support services fee. Contact School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education for more information.

Becoming a University at Buffalo Student Admission to UB is based on a holistic review. We consider high school average, class rank (where applicable), SAT or ACT scores and strength of the high school academic record. A personal essay, recommendations, documented creative talent, demonstrated leadership, community service and special circumstances are also considered. For the 2018 admitted freshman class, UB reported an average ACT score of 25-30 and an average SAT score of 1190-1350. The average GPA ranged from 91-96. The following is not required for admission, but is suggested as adequate preparation for university-level coursework:     

Four years of English (with a substantial writing component). Four years of social studies. Three years of college-preparatory science. Three years of a second language. Three years of college-preparatory mathematics.

Visit Undergraduate Admissions to learn more.

Freshman Admission to the Program For students with no previous postsecondary education experience, University at Buffalo Environmental Design uses similar requirements for departmental admission at the freshman level as the university uses: high school grade point average, completed high school courses, rank in high school class, and standardized exam scores (SAT/ACT). Prospective high school a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 22


students interested in University at Buffalo Environmental Design must submit an application early in the fall of your senior year of high school. Freshmen are notified of Environmental Design program acceptance by University at Buffalo Undergraduate Admissions. Admitted Environmental Design students are placed into math, science, and English courses based upon the following criteria: SAT/ACT/TOFEL/ALEKS/CLEP/IB/AP scores; or, completed college courses. Admitted Environmental Design majors must fulfill the required lower-division course requirements for advancement eligibility into the core upper-division design workshops. Contact School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education for academic advisement.

Transfer Admission to the Program Transfer students may be eligible for direct admission to University at Buffalo Environmental Design on a space-available basis, but need the required introductory courses prior to entering the core upper-division Environment Design workshops. No more than 15 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward major requirements. A minimum overall transfer GPA of 2.330 along with a minimum GPA of 2.500 in the pre-requisite courses (ENG 105, END 120, and END 212), and a minimum of 60 credits earned is required for advancement eligibility into the core upper-division Environmental Design workshops. Applications to the pre-professional Environmental Design BA are accepted rolling basis, and students will be reviewed on a space-available basis. Preferred applicants should have an overall minimum GPA of 2.5. Transfer students should consult with School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education for admissions and academic advisement. The major is typically completed in 6 semesters.

Current UB Students Applying to the Program     

Minimum GPA of 2.33 overall. Minimum GPA of 2.5 in ENG 101 or ENG 105, END 120 and END 212. Minimum completion of 24 credit hours. Admission on a space available basis. Preferred applicants should have an overall minimum UB GPA of 2.500.

Students are reviewed for admission consideration to the preprofessional bachelor of arts in environmental design upon completing a minimum of 24 credit hours, attaining an overall minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.33, completing ENG 101 or ENG 105, END 120 and END 212 with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Preferred applicants should have an overall minimum UB GPA of 2.5. Applications to the pre-professional Environmental Design BA are accepted rolling basis, and students will be reviewed on a space-available basis as guided by the School of Architecture and Planning's admission statement. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 23


Suggested Introductory Courses END 120 Introduction to Urban Environments END 212 Urban and Environmental Planning END 275 Environmental and Landscape: Discovering Landscapes END 279 Exploring the Design of Buffalo Niagara END 285 Transportation in Environmental Design and Urban Life https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba.html University at Buffalo Undergraduate Catalog Published Online: 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 24


Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog https://catalog.buffalo.edu/

University at Buffalo Minors A minor is a secondary field of study and offers students a means to complement their major, explore a subspecialty, and/or broaden career opportunities. Minors may not be taken in the same discipline as the student’s major(s). For instance, a student may not complete both an English BA and an English minor. See the Academic Programs section for a list of approved minors and corresponding requirements. A minor alone is not sufficient for graduation: a student cannot receive a bachelor’s degree if they are pursuing a minor but not a major. Some departments require formal application to the minor; students should contact the department for application information and deadlines. African-American Studies Minor American Studies Minor Anthropology Minor Architecture Minor Art History Minor Asian Studies Minor Biological Sciences Minor Biotechnology Minor Chemistry Minor Chinese Minor Classics Minor - Ancient Greek Language and Literature Concentration Classics Minor - Ancient History Concentration Classics Minor - Ancient Latin Language and Literature Concentration Classics Minor - Classical Civilization Concentration Classics Minor - Mediterranean Archaeology Concentration Communication Minor Computer Science Minor Counseling Minor Criminology Minor Economics Minor Education Leadership and Policy for Equity Minor a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 25


Education Minor Electrical Engineering Minor English Minor Environmental Design Minor Environmental Studies Minor French Minor Geography Minor Geological Sciences Minor German Minor Global Film Studies Minor Global Gender Studies Minor History Minor Human Factors and Ergonomics Engineering Minor Information Studies Minor Italian Minor Japanese Minor Jewish Studies Minor Korean Minor Latina/Latino Studies Minor Law Minor Linguistics Minor Management Minor Manufacturing Minor Mathematics Minor Media Study Minor Medicinal Chemistry Minor Music Minor Neuroscience Minor Nutrition Minor a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 26


Operations Research Minor Pharmaceutical Sciences Minor Pharmacology and Toxicology Minor Philosophy Minor Physics Minor Polish Studies Minor Political Science Minor Psychology Minor Public Health Minor Quality Engineering Minor Robotics Minor Social Justice Minor Society, Medicine and Health Minor Sociology Minor Spanish Minor Speech and Hearing Minor Statistics Minor Studio Art Minor Theatre Minor

University at Buffalo Undergraduate Catalog Published Online: Jun 20, 2019 15:02:18

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

Reprint Date: 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 27


UB School of Architecture + Planning Research Our Approach to Research: Pushing at the periphery of knowledge and creative practice Drawing from deep traditions in research and creative practice, the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning is infused with a culture of experimentation. Our faculty, researchers, and students engage in purposeful research that tackles complex societal challenges, locally and globally. Ideas come to life in the community as we test, apply and scale research in practice settings. Our practice-driven research takes place in diverse community settings hand in hand with citizens, government and entrepreneurially-minded partners in industry.

Evidence-based research The school is home to award-winning faculty whose research is routinely translated into evidence-based action in new plans, policies, designs, and programs in Buffalo and beyond. The breadth of our impact spans the fields of inclusive design, food systems planning, material and build systems development, and climate resilient design.

Practice-driven research Research at the School of Architecture and Planning is situated in real-world challenges and practice environments. By working with professionals and civic stakeholders, faculty and students generate innovative, forward-looking solutions to problems facing industry and communities today.

Inclusive research Our faculty purposefully choose to work on questions of equity, inclusion, and diversity toward the planning, design and development of just communities.

Engaged in creative production research From prototypes and built works to installations and exhibitions, our creative work is funded by nonprofits, industry and government, and recognized nationally and globally. Realized in the communities around us, from Buffalo to Costa Rica, our creative practice both contributes to an improved quality of life and the innovation of our professions.

Collegial and collaborative research Faculty take great pride in engaging students in research and creative activities. Many of our students have co-published articles and books with faculty, and actively participate in creative projects of our faculty. We encourage students to reach out to centers and labs to seek research internships.

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 28


Research supported by robust infrastructure The School of Architecture and Planning is home to five internationally-regarded research centers and labs. Our faculty also play lead roles on several university-wide research centers with transdisciplinary missions. The following centers and labs are central to the research and creative practice of our school.        

Center for Architecture and Situated Technologies Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access Center for Urban Studies Community for Global Health Equity Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab Research and Education in Energy, Environment and Water Sustainable Manufacturing and Advanced Robotic Technologies UB Regional Institute

The School is home to several national archives and databases led by scholars in urban planning and architecture:   

Rudy Bruner Award Digital Archive Growing Food Connections Food Policy Database Global Policy Database for Food Policies

Get involved with our research The School of Architecture and Planning welcomes student researchers. If you would like to partner with our faculty and research programs, please contact Samina Raja, Associate Dean for Research and Inclusive Excellence: ap-ResearchInclusiveExcellence@buffalo.edu

http://ap.buffalo.edu/research/research_approach.html

7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 29


University at Buffalo Academic Support Tutoring and Academic Support Services: A destination for studying, collaboration, support and growth. Tutoring and Academic Support Services (TASS) helps undergraduate students raise the bar on their classroom performance by providing resources that open doors to academic success. TASS sets a new standard for academic support at UB, where you’ll find that asking for help is one of the smartest things you can do. When you work with one of our tutors, you’ll find new ways to approach your studies and gain strategies to overcome the rigors of college-level work. We offer services to meet these needs and more. These services are free to all undergraduate students. Walk-in tutoring: Tutors are on-site during specific days/times for high-demand courses. No appointment needed. Tutoring by appointment: If you prefer one-on-one attention, you can request a tutor, who will schedule weekly sessions with you.    

Study group sessions: Our tutors organize structured group study sessions for students taking the same course. Academic coaches: Available by appointment, our academic coaches will help you with time management, organization and study strategies based on your preferred learning style. Even more: Computers, study areas, events and workshops to build your skills. Additional On-Campus Tutoring Help

Everyone — even students at the top of their class — benefits from a little bit of extra help. Tutoring can help you better understand the material, strengthen your skills and boost your confidence in the classroom. Here is how to get started: Online Tutoring Get help without leaving your room! All UB students have access to free, unlimited online tutoring from 7 p.m. to midnight, Sunday - Thursday, in accounting, biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, math, nursing, physics, psychology and writing. Request a tutor and learn more about these services. Academic Success Centers As a UB student, you get free unlimited tutoring in our Academic Success Centers, which are located in three residence hall areas. Tutoring is available in accounting, biology, chemistry, economics, English, math and physics. Individuals, groups, on-campus residents and commuters are encouraged to drop by the centers between 7 and 10 p.m., Sunday through Thursday. No appointment necessary.   

Blake Academic Success Center 167 Fillmore (Ellicott) Jones Academic Success Center Clinton Hall Basement (Governors) Goodyear Academic Success Center 141 Goodyear Hall (South Campus)

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 30


Center for Excellence in Writing 209 Baldy Hall | 645-5139 Strengthen your writing skills at the Center for Excellence in Writing. The dedicated staff helps UB writers through individual appointments, online consultations, writing groups and workshops. The CEW’s Writing Lab, inside the tutoring center, is available for in person and online writing consultations, multi-modal composing support and more. Walk-ins are always welcome! Thomas J. Edwards Undergraduate Learning Center Math Place 211 Baldy Hall | 716-645-2394 Visit the Thomas J. Edwards Undergraduate Learning Center to get free math tutoring. Walk-in tutoring is available for the following subjects:     

ULC 148 MTH 121 MTH 122 MTH 131 MTH 141

Additional Online Resources Many students love the Khan Academy, a destination for online exercises, instructional videos and personalized learning dashboards. Here are other ways to get help.  Ask your instructor for help.  Ask your teaching assistant (TA) for help.  Ask your instructor about being paired with successful students in the course.  Ask the department for contacts in the major who may be able to help.  Post flyers around campus letting others know that you’re seeking tutoring assistance.  Form a study group.

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 31


University at Buffalo Campus Support Services At the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, you - our students - are our most valued asset. Here you will find information, academic services, and tools to help you succeed . TUTORING + ACADEMIC SUPPORT

STUDENT + CAMPUS LIFE

Academic Advisement Academic Calendar SUNY Online Tutoring (FREE) Academic Success Centers Center for Excellence in Writing Undergraduate Catalog Undergraduate Math Place Undergraduate Academies University Honors College Undergraduate Research Financial Aid Registrar: course registration, grades, transcripts and academic policies

Who can help you UB Student Engagement UB Cares UB Future Alumni Network (UBFAN) UB Events Calendar UB Events Calendar UBLinked: organizations + events UB Student Association UB Card Maps and directions Getting around UB UB Student parking UB Bus and shuttle schedules Public transportation

STUDENT HEALTH + WELLNESS CAREER PLANNING Medical Care Available Care After-Hours Care Make an Appointment Flu Shots + Prevention Health Insurance

University at Buffalo Career Services Part-time student jobs + internships BullsEye: job and internship database Assess your strengths and interests Explore majors and careers

Emotional Health + Wellness Stress Management Counseling + Therapy Depression Body Image + Eating Disorders Grief + Death

STAYING SAFE

Healthy Decisions Alcohol + Other Drugs Sleep Eating Healthy Personal Health Kit Stay healthy + well

HELP AND SUPPORT

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS International Student Services Information for international students

Emergency information Sign Up for UB Alert Sign Up for UB Guardian Safety + Crime Prevention

Emergency + Crisis Suicide Intervention Students in Distress Alcohol + Drug Overdose Unwanted Sexual Experience Victim Assistance Emergency Funds Food Support

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 32


National Environmental Design Organizations This is a sample, bit not all-inclusive, list of organizations that play a role in Environmental Design. Accessibility Professionals Association American Institute of Architects American Institute of Certified Planners American Planning Association American Society of Landscape Architects Architects, Designers, Planners for Social Responsibility Association of Bicycle and Pedestrian Professionals Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Association of Commercial Real Estate Professionals Center for Urban Planning Research Community Development Society Commercial Real Estate Development Association (NAIOP) Construction Management Association of America (CMAA) Environmental Design Research Association International Association of Real Estate Professionals Lincoln Institute of Land Policy National Academy of Environmental Design National Association of Development Organizations National Association of Home Builders National Association of Real Estate Advisors (NAREA) National Charrette Institute National Community Development Association National Trust for Historic Preservation New Urban Network Planetizen: The Planning & Development Network Planners Network Project for Public Spaces Rails to Trails Conservancy Smart Growth America Smart Growth Online The Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) The Trust for Public Land Urban Land Institute US Green Building Council 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 33


The Connection between Environmental Design + Architecture Amit Price Patel, AICP, AIA — Environmental Designer, Urban Planner, Architect

Amit is a licensed architect, certified planner, and environmental designer with SITELAB urban studio, a multi-disciplinary urban design and strategy firm in San Francisco. In his experience, studying urban planning or architecture is not an either or proposition. An architect that is a planner helps to mediate and translate between disciplines to focus on the right questions before proposing solutions. He offers his perspective on the dynamics of city building and managing work in a multidisciplinary environment. AMIT PRICE PATEL, AICP, AIA I knew I wanted to be an architect when I was six years old. Growing up in a small town in the Ozarks in Missouri, I’m not even sure how I heard of the profession. Maybe it was The Brady Bunch. I started off in architecture school at Washington University in St. Louis. The first few years were a bit difficult for me. I did not really care about making cool modernist designs for single-family houses on remote hillsides. I almost switched to a geology major, but two things kept me going: some professors who emphasized the community building role of design and the discovery of something called city planning [and environmental design]. The confluence of design with social equity, economics, the natural environment, and history was so much more interesting to me that designing individual buildings. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 34


After Wash U and several internships at St. Louis architecture firms, including an [environmental] design center, I decided to go to Johannesburg, South Africa, to work for a professor’s firm. This was just a few years after apartheid ended and Mandela came into power. It was fascinating to learn about the culture and history of South Africa and in real time see the transformation of the cities from racially segregated enclaves into a messy more integrated mix of urbanism. The use of highways, railways, and zoning to separate races during the apartheid era [in South Africa] was clearly evident, sadly had many parallels to the U.S., and showed the power of urban planning when used to propagate evil. While there, I was fortunate to work on a design competition for the nation’s first apartheid museum in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Based on the idea of “memory boxes” and inspired by an industrial aesthetic to commemorate the anti-apartheid labor union movement, the project has been a catalyst for a cultural/arts district. Back in St. Louis, I began in earnest to work on affordable housing and decided to pursue this as a focus in graduate school. Without having ever been to Berkeley, I moved to California in 1999 and worked at a geodesic dome company making pre-fab components. Berkeley is very much a "choose your own adventure" school, and I decided to focus my time on environmental design with an even split between urban planning and architecture. While at Cal, I received the Branner Traveling Fellowship, which allowed me to travel around the world to study the regeneration of modernist high-rise social housing. I visited projects in Brazil, New York and Boston, Europe and Asia and learned that high-rise buildings can work for any type of household, but — unlike the modernist vision of towers in the park — a mix of uses, a mix of building scale and a robust transportation system have to be in place to make them work. In many parts of the world, high-rise housing is just the norm, whereas it's been vilified in the U.S. either as warehouses for the poor or condos for the rich. I think it is an important tool in densifying and creating sustainable cities, when thoughtfully designed and integrated into a neighborhood. After graduate school, I worked in Boston for a few years doing urban design on HOPE VI public housing redevelopment projects and mixed-use master plans. I was interested in getting my architecture license, so shifted full time to designing buildings, including campus buildings and housing. In my spare time, I worked on design competitions and won an affordable housing design competition for a site along San Francisco’s Octavia Boulevard, formerly an elevated freeway. That win helped me to move back to the Bay Area and work for David Baker Architects, a firm known for its innovative infill housing design. During my time there, I worked on several affordable and market-rate projects, including housing for formerly homeless individuals and families, and low-income seniors. I was the Urban Design Lead at the firm at DBA and used my knowledge of the building process to inform master planning for mixed-use and mixed-income neighborhoods. I moved to SITELAB urban studio a few years ago to focus on urban design and have been immersed in really interesting and compelling projects ranging from a new resilient mixed-income neighborhood in the wildfire-affected area of Santa Rosa to a placemaking study for an arts organization, to an incubator innovation district for a local university. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 35


Photo courtesy Amit Price Patel, AICP, AIA SKILL AND TRAITS Urban Planning is about crafting a long-term vision for a place and I think there are a few essential characteristics for excellent planners and designers:  Constant curiosity and asking “what if”  Being able to see multiple sides of any project but having a strong enough vision and compelling narrative that can bring others along  Understanding and navigating power and being able to speak in simple direct terms that anyone can understand NEIGHBORING FIELDS How important is it for environmental designers and urban planners to understand the work of “neighboring “fields” (e.g., architecture, landscape architecture, historic preservation)? These distinctions between fields are somewhat arbitrary and irrelevant. Yes, because of the complexity (and liability) of project implementation, specialist knowledge and responsibility is required, but urban planners need to understand the neighboring professions as much as possible to grasp critical decision drivers and to effectively collaborate or push back when needed. It’s important to partner with these specialists with actual building experience to test and provide constructive criticism on planning policy ideas. Equally important, [environmental designers and] planners need to clearly convey their goals and motivations to architects, landscape architects, and urban designers so they understand the big picture, long-term city building principles that extend beyond individual projects. TYPICAL DAY As a principal at SITELAB, every day is completely different and requires a lot of strategic thinking. My primary role in our small firm is to help guide the design vision for the firm and projects, but also to run the business with my fellow principals and make sure there is a steady supply of new projects coming in that aligns with our mission. We try to give opportunities for staff to develop and grow, and mentorship is a big part our work. We consider ourselves “radical pragmatists” and have to continually balance innovative imagination with hardheaded practicalities to get things done. BIGGEST SURPRISE The best surprise so far has been that design is important, but it’s just one small part of how I can make change. When I was in Urban Planning and Architecture school, I thought my days would be filled with a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 36


doing challenging design work. As I’ve progressed in my career, I’ve found that design is the by far the easiest part of my job and one of many things I do on a daily basis. The ability to communicate and deeply listen is the most important and useful skill any professional can have, and this holds especially true for planners, who have simultaneous responsibilities to both lead and represent the will of the people. I’ve also learned that simplicity has power. Ideas don’t really have a lot of value if you can’t create a compelling, comprehensible story that everyone can understand and hopefully support. I’ve had nothing but good fortune in my career so there’s not really much I would change, except spending more time exploring off-the-wall ideas with my professional colleagues. Also, traveling is the best education and I always wish I could make more time to see and learn from other places. DESIGN PROJECTS You’ve taken on projects from every corner of the design spectrum: campus planning, public projects, private development, senior housing and more. Do you have a favorite area to work in? I’m interested in all of it. Each type of project and place has its fascinating complexities and charms. The hardest projects, when sometimes everything seems to go wrong, often end up being my favorites. But, my most rewarding projects over the years have been ones that have helped provide homes for people, whether through urban design or architecture. Housing is a human right, the elemental basic building block of any city and it’s extremely gratifying to set the stage for thousands of new units being built or seeing low-income seniors or formerly homeless families move into safe, new affordable homes that build stability and hope in their lives. ADVICE Be a nimble generalist. Find some great mentors. Learn to draw fast. Work at a variety of places in different cities on a large project spectrum before you settle on an area of focus. Always be learning and at the very least (and sometimes a lot), work outside of your comfort zone to really grow. SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION: Washington University in St. Louis, B.Arch University of California, Berkeley, M.Arch, M.C.P. (Urban Design concentration) FIRST PLANNING JOB: Urban Designer at Goody Clancy in Boston INFLUENCES I read a lot about history and find that it really helps put things in perspective. Any issue or challenge I may be experiencing often pales in comparison with what others have had to go through. That gives me both a great sense of responsibility in helping contribute to the continuum of civilization and also a deep sense of humility. a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 37


I am currently reading Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals biography of Lincoln. While city planning was not his area of expertise, Lincoln’s ability to build consensus and bring along a broad coalition without losing sight of the larger humanistic goals is truly inspirational. TOOLS My favorite tools have always been paper and pencil, the most direct and efficient way to convey a concept and iterate quickly. Computers are great for information but too slow for thinking, in my estimation. WHAT DO YOU DO OUTSIDE OF WORK THAT HELPS YOU BE SUCCESSFUL? I’m fortunate to live and work in the bustling Bay Area and get a chance to walk around on city streets every day. This allows me to be immersed in urbanity and carefully observe how a city functions. I am always trying to learn from how people might use a public space, or how power is expressed through architecture, or the best size for a block, or the eclectic mix of uses in a neighborhood. We as planners often forget that at the end of the day the only thing that matters is not the policy or how much something costs, but the experience of a place and whether people love it or not. Those are the only things that endure and create memories. ANY INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE? My parents. I think of them often when I am doing my work. They came to Toronto as poor rural immigrants from India and were able to find an affordable apartment in a high-rise building and bluecollar jobs that allowed them to improve their quality of life, as well as provide for me, my sister, and extended family. Similarly, I moved from a small town to cities to both find educational and economic opportunities and to create a diverse community of friends and colleagues. Cities have been really good to me, so I feel a commitment to help make them as welcoming and open as possible to others too.

https://www.planning.org/plannerprofile/amitpricepatel/ 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 38


TED Talks on Environmental Design + Architecture 7 principles for building better cities | Peter Calthorpe James Kunstler: How bad architecture wrecked cities Kent Larson: Brilliant designs to fit more people in every city 4 ways to make a city more walkable | Jeff Speck Buildings that blend nature and city | Jeanne Gang How a video game might help us build better cities | Karoliina Korppoo How we can design timeless cities for our collective future | Vishaan Chakrabarti Amanda Burden: How public spaces make cities work Why the buildings of the future will be shaped by ... you | Marc Kushner How urban landscapes can preserve history and build community | Walter Hood

Other Videos on Buffalo + UB Environmental Design What is Urban Design (#UBuffalo Environmental Design) Buffalo: America's Best Designed City John Norquist commentary on Buffalo: America's Best Designed City AndrĂŠs Duany commentary on Buffalo: America's Best Designed City The Best Planned City: Olmsted, Vaux, and the Buffalo Park System Buffalo For Real TV - On The Waterfront Buffalo: Right Here. Right Now. Buffalo, New York: This Place Matters Buffalo: A Sense of Place

7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 39


University Libraries > Environmental Design Overview University Libraries > Research Guides > Environmental Design > Overview Key Library Links  

   

Libraries' Catalog – to locate any item that is available in our libraries, including books, journals, newspapers, and audio/visual materials. Everything – the tab is a great place to start searching through the library’s resources in one simple multidisciplinary search interface. The results will display books, articles, government documents, etc. Journals- is a database of electronic journals that are indexed in databases or found online. (Cannot search for articles, citation is needed) Reserve – or Course Reserve: a collection of books or articles (pdfs) set aside at the Circulation Desk by your professor. Top Planning Databases - Planning research databases Research Tips – an online guide designed to help you perform research at the University at Buffalo’s University Libraries, includes citation help. Center for Excellence in Writing - 209 Baldy Hall My Account & Delivery+ – use for book renewal and interlibrary loan. Journal articles and book chapters are delivered electronically to your email and physical items are made available for pick-up at the UB library of your choice. (free of charge)

Borrowing/Loan Periods: Your UB Card serves as your library card. Current UB students, faculty and staff may use their cards to check out books and other materials at any campus library. UB Libraries & UB Quota for Printing: semester "allowance" free printing for UB students. Background Searching/Starting Points Background info: 

Gale Virtual Reference Library - includes subject encyclopedias, almanacs, and specialized reference works in broad subject areas, including issues related to planning.

Oxford Handbooks Online - a collection of Oxford Handbooks in four subject modules Business and Management; Philosophy; Political Science; and Religion. Each handbook takes an aspect of its discipline and unpacks it, explaining the key issues, the classic and contemporary debates on those issues, and setting the agenda for how those debates might evolve.

Best Basic Resources Guide (created by UB Libraries)

Google Books Well over 15,000,000 books and magazine issues may be searched in Google Books. The numbers grow daily as Google moves forward with its mission of scanning literally all the a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 40


world's books and magazines. Even materials that are not readable full text are nonetheless searchable. Some texts (pre-1923) may be read in their entirety; while others may be read across a limited number of pages (20% of the book) in 'preview' mode and some are only viewable in snippet view. The latter is the least useful to researchers. For further details visit: http://books.google.com/googlebooks/library/screenshots.html 

Google Scholar o Click on "Settings" in the upper right-hand corner. o Click on "Library Links" on the left-hand side o On the next screen, type University at Buffalo into the "Library Links" box. o Scroll down and click on "Save" o Start searching. o When you link to a full-text article from off campus you will be presented with a log-in screen. o Log in with your UBIT name and password.

https://research.lib.buffalo.edu/environmental-design 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 41


University at Buffalo Financial Responsibility Statement A student accepts financial obligation when he or she enrolls for classes at the University at Buffalo. Ensuring that students understand the financial commitment they are making when they register for courses is an important component of a student’s financial literacy. Method of Billing The University at Buffalo uses electronic billing (eBill) as its official billing method, and therefore the student is responsible for viewing and paying the student account eBill by the scheduled due date. Failure to review the eBill does not constitute a valid reason for not paying the bill on time. Learn More About Billing Billing Errors Administrative, clerical or technical billing errors do not absolve the student of the financial responsibility to pay the correct amount of tuition, fees and other associated financial obligations assessed as a result of registration at the University at Buffalo. Payment of Fees Registration for any class at the University at Buffalo incurs full responsibility to pay all tuition, fees and other associated costs assessed as a result of registration. Students must drop any courses before the semester starts or during the first week of classes to remove all tuition liability. Non-attendance in classes will not remove financial liability. Dropping or Withdrawing From Courses Students may be responsible for partial or full tuition and fee liability when dropping courses. If a student wishes to drop a course, or formally withdraw from the University, he or she must login to the MyUB student portal and drop their course(s) and follow all withdrawal procedures. Non-attendance of course(s) for which the student is registered does not constitute a withdrawal from the course(s). Enrollment changes may impact the student’s financial aid. Online information is available regarding the tuition liability schedule and withdrawal procedures and financial aid information.

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 42


Financial Hold If the student fails to pay their student account bill or any monies due to the University at Buffalo by the scheduled due date, the University at Buffalo will place a financial hold (BIL) on the student account, preventing registration for future classes, requesting transcripts, or receiving a diploma. Late Payment Charge If the student fails to pay the student account bill or any monies due to the University at Buffalo by the scheduled due date, the University at Buffalo will assess an administrative and/or late payment fee per billing cycle on the past due portion of the student account until the past due account is paid in full. Returned Payments If a payment made to the student account is returned by the bank for any reason, the student must repay the original amount of the payment. The student account will be assessed a returned check/credit card fee of $20.00 in addition to a late payment fee. Loss of Anticipated Aid If the student becomes ineligible for an award and he/she no longer has actual or estimated anticipated aid on their student account, the outstanding charges become immediately due. Do not wait for a revised eBill as failure to pay may result in late payment fees and registration holds. The student must view their current account activity in his/her HUB Student Center via MyUB. In the Student Center under the Finances section, click on the ‘Payment Options’ link, then click on the ‘View Accounts’ menu option. Returned Financial Aid Students are responsible for repaying the university any funds that were returned on their behalf to the financial aid program(s) for which they may have lost eligibility. There are various reasons that this might occur, particularly with federal regulations surrounding attendance, academic progress, overpayment, or withdrawal. Collection Policy and Fees Students with an unpaid balance on the student account at the end of the semester could be subject to additional collection activity. The University may refer the delinquent account to a a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 43


collection agency and/or the New York State Attorney General’s Office. Students are responsible for paying the collection agency fee of up to 22% and the assessment of additional interest and fees that may be added to the outstanding account balances referred to collection. IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Students are to provide a Social Security number (SSN) or taxpayer identification number (ITIN) to the University at Buffalo upon request as required by Internal Revenue Service (IRS) regulations for Form 1098-T reporting purposes. Failure to provide the SSN or ITIN could result in the student being responsible for payment of any and all IRS fines assessed as a result of the missing SSN-ITIN.

University at Buffalo Student Financial Agreement I understand that when I register, or a university-designee who registers on my behalf, for any class at the University at Buffalo or receive any service from the University at Buffalo, I accept full responsibility to pay all tuition, fees and other associated costs assessed as a result of my registration and/or receipt of services. I further understand and agree that my registration and acceptance of these terms constitutes a promise to pay for all assessed tuition, fees and other associated costs by the published or assigned due date. I understand that administrative, clerical or technical billing errors do not absolve me of my financial responsibility to pay the correct amount of tuition, fees and other associated financial obligations assessed as a result of my registration at the University at Buffalo. http://www.buffalo.edu/studentaccounts/financial-responsibility-statement.html Reprint Date: 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 44


University at Buffalo Student Responsibility Statement The university is committed to the ideal of flexibility and diversity in the educational experience. Certain regulatory procedures are necessary, however, to ensure that the complex needs of a large student body in search of diverse educational goals are met efficiently and smoothly. Students are advised to familiarize themselves with the following details in order to avoid any difficulties along their chosen path to the baccalaureate degree. By accepting responsibility for their education, students enhance the development of their academic, social and career goals. As a condition of enrollment, students are responsible for reviewing, understanding, and abiding by the university’s regulations, procedures, requirements and deadlines as described in official publications, including the university’s undergraduate catalog, UB websites, and official university email communications. In addition, all students are required to positively affirm their knowledge of UB’s Student Conduct Rules, University Standards and Administrative Regulations prior to their inaugural semester at UB. Asserting a lack of knowledge of university regulations will not be accepted as a basis for an exception to these regulations. https://catalog.buffalo.edu/policies/student-responsibility-statement.html Reprinted on: 7/1/2020 1:23:20 PM

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Education 126 Hayes Hall Buffalo, NY 14214-8030 ap-advising@buffalo.edu To schedule an academic advisement appointment - https://bit.ly/ub-arc-env-dsn-advising

a p - a d v i s i n g @ b u f f a l o . e d u | 45

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BA ACADEMIC + CAREER HANDBOOK  

Why study Environmental Design at the University at Buffalo? https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba.html Univ...

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BA ACADEMIC + CAREER HANDBOOK  

Why study Environmental Design at the University at Buffalo? https://catalog.buffalo.edu/academicprograms/environmental_design_ba.html Univ...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded