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2014/15 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT


Table of Contents Message from the Executive Associate Dean, Research....................................................................................................................... 2 Research Excellence by the Numbers ....................................................................................................................................................... 5 Key National and International Rankings............................................................................................................................................ 5 CIHR Foundation Grants......................................................................................................................................................................... 6 CIHR Transitional Operating Grant...................................................................................................................................................... 7 Faculty of Medicine within UBC Scope of Research........................................................................................................................ 7 Research Funding by Sponsor Type...................................................................................................................................................... 8 Distribution of Research within the Faculty of Medicine................................................................................................................ 8 Building Our Research Community........................................................................................................................................................... 11 Canada Research Chairs........................................................................................................................................................................ 11 Donor-Funded Chairs, Professorships, and Distinguished Scholar Awards............................................................................ 18 CIHR New Investigator Awards.......................................................................................................................................................... 18 Fostering Research Innovation...................................................................................................................................................................21 Canada Foundation for Innovation......................................................................................................................................................21 Grant Funding Highlights......................................................................................................................................................................22 Faculty of Medicine Internal Awards.................................................................................................................................................22 Profiles on Transformational Research....................................................................................................................................................25 Recognizing Research Excellence..............................................................................................................................................................31 Awards and Honours Highlights..........................................................................................................................................................31 National Prizes Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine....................................................................................................................34 Advancing New Frontiers: Personalized Medicine................................................................................................................................ 37 Educating our Trainees in Research.........................................................................................................................................................43 Master’s and PhD Programs............................................................................................................................................................... 44 MD/PhD Program...................................................................................................................................................................................45 Clinician Investigator Program........................................................................................................................................................... 46 Postdoctoral Research Fellows............................................................................................................................................................47 Prestigious External Awards for Graduate and Postdoctoral Trainees......................................................................................47 Internal Awards for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows............................................................................................47 Summer Student Research Program................................................................................................................................................. 49 Health Profession Programs................................................................................................................................................................ 50 Vancouver Summer Program in Medicine........................................................................................................................................52 Conclusion.....................................................................................................................................................................................................54 Acknowledgments.......................................................................................................................................................................................54 Appendices....................................................................................................................................................................................................55

Cover photo (bottom): Courtesy of GenomeBC.


Message from the Executive Associate Dean, Research In our Faculty of Medicine Strategic Plan 2011-2016, the Faculty of Medicine committed to developing new frontiers of research in health where UBC can provide global leadership. One new frontier our research community has readily embraced is personalized—or precision—medicine. By identifying a patient’s unique molecular features through genomics, proteomics, and other omics, it is becoming possible to move beyond the “onesize-fits-all” model of medicine to a more personalized, tailored approach. We can foresee transformations in health through this approach to prevention of disease, safer use of medications, improved efficiency of clinical trials, and more efficient use of health resources. Of course, realizing this lofty promise will require disruptive change, mobilizing omics platforms to point of care, advancing medical informatics and big data mobilization. This disruptive change will call for different skill sets, training backgrounds, and educational focus. We can see this movement at UBC through our Faculty. A centrepiece of this effort is the Life Sciences Institute (LSI), which, under the leadership of Dr. Pieter Cullis, is advancing a provincial Personalized Medicine Initiative. Earlier this year the LSI hosted an international Personalized Medicine Summit with the goal of making recommendations on best practices in advancing personalized medicine in British Columbia and Canada. Reaching the stage where programs arrive in usual care settings represents an enormously important milestone in our efforts to bring the promise of personalized medicine closer to reality for patients, families, and communities. We can appreciate some of the striking examples in the cancer field. Researchers at the BC Cancer Agency, including Drs. Marco Marra, Janessa Laskin and Steven Jones, have demonstrated success through the Personalized Onco-Genomics Program, where they are using personalized genomic arrays of cancer tissue to identify the key pathways that are activated in an individual’s tumor. Those results are then analyzed and used to inform treatment strategies, in one case resulting in the successful use of a readily available and affordable antihypertensive drug for a colon cancer patient. In the Department of Family Practice, Dr. Martin Dawes is taking steps to move personalized medicine into the community through TreatGx, one of the

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


first attempts at providing pharmacogenomic information to primary care physicians, by using a panel of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to tailor drug selection and dose. In addressing the challenging problem of early life epilepsy, a collaborative team led by Drs. Mary Connolly and Matthew Farrer is undertaking next-generation sequencing to unravel the causes. The results have both identified treatable causes as well as allowed focus on treatment based on etiology. Supporting this program in personalized medicine, is a need for excellence in research. The strength of faculty in personalized medicine is reflected in our latest round of Canada Research Chairs, including Drs. Christopher Carlsten (environment-gene interactions), Jennifer Gardy (genomic epidemiology), Dan Goldowitz (genomics of neurodevelopmental disorders), Michael Hayden (pharmacogenomics), Sara Mostafavi (informatics and big data), Robert Molday (gene therapy for retinal diseases), and Samuel Aparicio (genomics and systems biology, cancer). Another vital part of the collaborative effort to advance new frontiers like personalized medicine is the role of our partnerships in the broader community. LifeSciences BC, Genome BC, and philanthropic funders are providing the financial support needed to make visionary projects a reality. Clinical sites like the BC Cancer Agency, BC Children’s Hospital, and general practitioners’ offices around the province are the conduits connecting research to patients. And partnerships to support commercialization—the pathway to get a test into clinic—are essential to the future success of these promising applications. Together, we are pushing the boundary of what is possible in research and care. While there are significant challenges and changes within our research environment, we must remember to appreciate the transformational impact that our research can engender. Stepping back to appreciate how far we have come is especially relevant as we advance into a new frontier. We hope that this report stimulates a sense of accomplishment and pride in our progress in 201415 and encourages members of our community to maintain and advance their excellent work.

Howard Feldman

Together, we are pushing the boundary of what is possible in research and care.

Howard Feldman, MD, FRCP(C) Executive Associate Dean, Research Professor, Division of Neurology UBC Faculty of Medicine

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Research Excellence by the Numbers

Graduate student Matthew Sacheli with a participant in the study of exercise’s effects on Parkinson’s patients.


RESEARCH EXCELLENCE BY THE NUMBERS

Research Excellence by the Numbers Overview According to the UBC Office of Research Services Researcher Information Services database (RISe), the total amount of direct research funding received by the Faculty of Medicine (FoM) in FY 2014-15 was $305M.1 Over the past five years, this amount has hovered around the $300M mark, ranging from $280M in FY 2008-09 to a high of $307M in FY 2013-14.

$305M Research Funding

Key National and International Rankings •

University Global Health Impact Report Card: UBC ranked #1

Canada’s Top 50 Research Universities 2015 (RE$EARCH Infosource Inc.): UBC ranked #3

Canada’s Research University of the Year2 (RE$EARCH Infosource Inc.): UBC ranked #3 in the Medical⁄Doctoral category

Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2015–2016:

UBC ranked #20 worldwide in the Life Sciences

UBC ranked #31 in the world in the area of Clinical, Pre-Clinical, and Health

QS World University Rankings 2015-16: •

UBC ranked #26 worldwide for Medicine (up from #39 in 2014-15)

Numbers presented in this section reflect total research funding from all sources based on departments/schools/centres within the Faculty of Medicine as of April 1, 2015. 2 Three universities gain RE$EARCH Infosource’s designation of Research University of the Year in their category for their performance on a balanced set of input, output and impact measures for FY2014. These full-service universities are recognized for demonstrating superior achievement both in earning research income and in publishing research in leading scientific journals. 1

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CIHR Foundation Grants The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Foundation Grants support research leaders from all career stages in building and conducting programs of health research across CIHR’s mandate. Researchers in the UBC Faculty of Medicine have received 22 CIHR Foundation Grants totaling $50.9 million, resulting in an exceptional faculty success rate of 23%. In contrast, the national success rate was only 11%, with a total of 150 Foundation grants funded out of 1,366 applications from across the country. This is the first time that CIHR Foundation Grants have been awarded and are part of a $408.9 million investment in health research by the Government of Canada. Grant recipients were chosen through a rigorous peer-review process, and the program will help health researchers improve disease prevention and treatment and strengthen healthcare for Canadians. For the full list of FoM Foundation Grant recipients and the details of their awards, please see Appendix A.

Figure 1. CIHR 2014 Foundation Scheme Live Pilot – Institutional Comparison of Dollar Amount Awarded3

University of  Toronto  

$133.7 (32.7%) $60.6 (14.8%)

University of  BriPsh  Columbia  

FoM: $50.9 (12.5%) Non FoM:  $0.5  (<1%)  

U15 Members  

McGill University   McMaster  University  

$29.9 (7.3%)

Université Laval  

$29.1 (7.1%)

University of  Calgary  

$25.9 (6.3%)

University of  OIawa  

$22.7 (5.6%)

Université de  Montréal  

$18.9 (4.6%)

University of  Western  Ontario  

$9.9 (2.4%)

University of  Alberta  

$9.4 (2.3%)

Non-­‐Members Queen's  University  

$7.2 (1.8%) $4.0 (1.0%)

University of  Manitoba  

$3.7 (<1%)

Dalhousie University  

$2.5 (<1%)

$0

$50 $100   Awarded  Amount,  in  Millions  

$150

Total amount  funded:  $408.9M   Note:  Each  U15  member  includes  its  affiliates  (if  any)  

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Source: CIHR funded research database.

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


RESEARCH EXCELLENCE BY THE NUMBERS

CIHR Transitional Operating Grant Since 2013, CIHR began designing a new Open Suite of Programs and peer review system as part of the commitments made in CIHR’s second strategic plan, and its Open Operating Grant Program (OOGP) was reformed to be eventually replaced by two new funding schemes: the Foundation Scheme and the Project Scheme. In order to facilitate the transition within CIHR’s open funding schemes, two Transitional Open Operating Grant Program (T-OOGP) competitions were held: in March 2014 and March 2015. In addition to the success which FoM saw through the 2014 CIHR Foundation Scheme – Live Pilot competition, FoM investigators also received 25 regular Operating Grants in the March 2015 Transitional Open Operating Grant competition, with an additional 6 applications receiving funding through Priority Announcements (PA), for a total of $16.1M in CIHR funding from the competition.

Faculty of Medicine within UBC Scope of Research In FY 2014-15, the Faculty of Medicine was responsible for 57% of UBC’s total research activity (Figure 2). The Faculty of Medicine has accounted for at least 50% of UBC’s total research activity for the past six years. Figure 2. UBC research funding from all sources by Faculty, FY 2014-15.4 UBCO IKE  Barber  School   VP  Research  and   of  Arts  &  Sc,  1%   Interna3onal,  1%   Arts,  4%  

UBCO Applied  Science,   1%  

Sauder School   of  Business,  1%  

Den3stry, 1%   Educa3on,  1%  

Applied Science,   9%  

Forestry, 2%   Land  and  Food  Systems,   1%  

Science, 17%  

President's Office,  2%   Pharmaceu3cal   Sciences,  1%   Medicine,  Faculty  of,   57%   $305,087,673  

Facul&es represen&ng  less  than  1%  are  not  shown  

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Source (Figures 2-6): UBC Office of Research Services RISe data.

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Research Funding by Sponsor Type Nearly one-third of the Faculty of Medicine’s research funding is supported by funding from Canada’s Tri-Council Agencies, including CIHR, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and Genome Canada grants often require applicants to secure matching funds from a wide variety of sources. Grant, Peer-reviewed sponsors include national and provincial non-profit agencies that have experts in their respective field review grant applications. Grant, non peer-reviewed sponsors include various local hospital foundations and other granting agencies that do not use the peer-review process. Contracts & Agreements and Clinical Trials are mostly private-industry funded. Figure 3. UBC research funding by sponsor type, FY 2014-154 Contracts &   Agreements   8%  

Clinical Trial   6%  

Tri-­‐Council 30%   Grant,  non  peer-­‐ reviewed   24%   Grant,  Peer-­‐ reviewed   22%  

CFI/Matching/ Genome   10%  

Total research  funding:  $305,087,673  

Distribution of Research within the Faculty of Medicine Research within the Faculty of Medicine is distributed across six major research sites (Figure 3). In 2014-15, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) was responsible for 28% of Faculty of Medicine research grant/contract funding. It includes two major research centres: The Centre for Brain Health and The Vancouver Prostate Centre. Figure 4. 2014-15 Faculty of Medicine research funding from all sources, by research site. 4,5,6 $84.6M (28%)  

Vancouver Coastal  Health  Research  InsFtute  

$73.8M (24%)  

BC Cancer  Agency  

$54.4M (18%)  

Child &  Family  Research  InsFtute  

$46.5M (15%)  

UBC Point  Grey  Campus  

$42.7M (14%)  

Providence Health  Care  Research  InsFtute   $3.1M  (1%)  

BC Centre  for  Disease  Control   0.0  

20.0

40.0

60.0

80.0

100.0

$, in  millions  

Total funding:  $305,087,673  

Research funding data for BC CDC site are based on investigators’ primary physical location. For data based on UBC CDC affiliation, see Figure 5. The research funding at the UBC Point Grey site is composed primarily of faculty members based at the LSC and SPPH buildings. This site also includes researchers from the Biomedical Research Centre, Anesthesiology (in Medical Sciences Block C), a handful located in Michael Smith Labs, and a few others who are in non-VCHRI space within the UBC Hospital (Physical Therapy, Occupational Sciences). 5

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RESEARCH EXCELLENCE BY THE NUMBERS

Figures 5 and 6 present the distribution of Faculty of Medicine total research funding by research centre and department/ school, respectively. 7 Figure 5. 2014-15 Faculty of Medicine research funding from all sources, by research centre. 4,8 Centre for  Brain  Health  

$26.9M (24%)  

Vancouver Prostate  Centre  

$13.8M (16%)  

James Hogg  Research  Centre  

$11.0M (10%)  

Centre for  Blood  Research  

$10.3M (9%)  

Centre for  Health  EvaluaFon  &  Outcome  Sciences  

$10.0M (9%)  

InternaFonal CollaboraFon  On  Repair  Discoveries  

$9.1M (8%)  

Centre for  Molecular  Medicine  &  TherapeuFcs  

$9.1M (8%)  

Biomedical Research  Centre  

$4.6M (4%)  

Centre for  Disease  Control  

$3.8M (3%)  

Human Early  Learning  Partnership  

$3.5M (3%)  

Centre for  Hip  Health  &  Mobility  

$3.0M (3%)  

Centre for  Health  Services  &  Policy  Research  

$1.7M (2%)  

Centre for  Excellence  in  Indigenous  Health  

$0.4M (<1%)  

Centre for  Health  EducaFon  Scholarship  

$0.1M (<1%)  

Centre for  Applied  Ethics  

$0.1M (<1%)   0.0  

10.0 $,  in  millions  

20.0

30.0

Total Research  Centre  Funding:  $111,463,180  

Figure 6. 2014-15 Faculty of Medicine total research funding from all sources, by department/school.4,9,10 Medicine Medical  GeneCcs   Pathology  &  Lab  Med   PopulaCon  &  Public  Health   Paediatrics   Urologic  Sciences   Psychiatry   Biochem  &  Molecular  Bio   Cellular  &  Physiological  Sci   Surgery   Obstetrics  &  Gynaecology   Orthopaedics   Ophthalmology   Anaesthesiology,  Pharm  &  Therap   Physical  Therapy   Radiology   Family  PracCce   Dermatology   Emergency  Medicine   OccupaConal  Sci  &  Occ  Therapy   Audiology  &  Speech  Sci  

$62.1M (22%)   $52.6M  (19%)   $27.6M  (10%)   $22.0M  (8%)   $19.5M  (7%)   $16.2M  (6%)   $14.9M  (5%)   $11.5M  (4%)   $11.1M  (4%)   $8.1M  (3%)   $6.2M  (2%)   $5.1M  (2%)   $4.7M  (2%)   $4.2M  (1%)   $3.9M  (1%)   $3.3M  (1%)   $3.0M  (1%)   $2.9M  (1%)   $2.1M  (1%)   $1.4M  (<1%)   $0.2M  (<1%)   0.0  

20.0

40.0

60.0

80.0

$, in  millions  

Total Faculty  of  Medicine  Department/School  Funding:  $282,832,334*   The grant and contract funding for faculty members with appointments in departments and memberships in research centres are reported in both their home department and research centre. Therefore, to avoid double counting, the two amounts cannot be added to derive the total funding of the Faculty of Medicine. 8 Includes research funding credited to centre members’ home departments. Not all faculty members have centre affiliations; therefore, the centre funding total will be less than the Faculty of Medicine total research funding. 9 Funding credited to research centres has been folded into the PI’s respective Department/School. A small amount (< 1%) is excluded for PIs who belong to a Faculty of Medicine Research Centre but whose primary appointment is in a non-Faculty of Medicine department. 10 Excludes Medicine Dean’s Office ICR and O/H 7

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Building Our Research Community

Haakon Nygaard, Fipke Professor in Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research and Assistant Professor in the Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine


BUILDING OUR RESEARCH COMMUNITY

Building Our Research Community Chairs, professorships, and scholar awards are important vehicles that enable the university to attract and retain leaders in our research community. The Faculty of Medicine is fortunate to have access to a number of these prestigious honours, including external sources such as the federal governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Canada Research Chairs Program as well as those established through the generosity of UBC donors.

Canada Research Chairs As of March 31, 2015, the Faculty of Medicine has achieved a total of 55 Canada Research Chairs (CRCs), divided between the senior Tier 1 (n = 31) and midterm level Tier 2 (n = 24) categories. Eight Tier 1 and five Tier 2 Chairs were awarded in FY 2014-15 (Table 1). Additionally, in the Fall of 2014 the Faculty of Medicine held an internal CRC competition with the result that two Tier 1 and two Tier 2 Chairs were recommended for submission to Ottawa in April 2015. Table 1. Faculty of Medicine 2014-15 CRC recipients. Tier

Investigator

Department

Tier 1 (advancement)

Dr. Samuel Aparicio

Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

Tier 2 (new)

Dr. Christopher Carlsten

Medicine

Tier 2 (new)

Dr. Jennifer Gardy

SPPH

Tier 2 (new)

Dr. Michael Law

SPPH

Tier 2 (new)

Dr. Sara Mostafavi

Medical Genetics

Tier 2 (new)

Dr. Alexander Rauscher

Pediatrics

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Daniel Goldowitz

Medical Genetics

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Michael Hayden

Medical Genetics

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Robert Molday

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Gina Ogilvie

SPPH

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Martin Schechter

SPPH

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Jon Stoessl

Medicine

Tier 1 (renewal)

Dr. Annalee Yassi

SPPH

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Introducing the Faculty of Medicine’s 2014-15 CRC Recipients Dr. Samuel Aparicio

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Molecular Oncology As the Canada Research Chair in Molecular Oncology, Dr. Aparicio is focused on breast, ovarian, and hard-to-treat cancers. In British Columbia alone, there will be about 4,000 new cases of breast and ovarian cancers per year. In his research, Dr. Aparicio is taking two convergent approaches. In the first, he is combining genetics, genomics, and mathematical/statistical approaches to clonal population dynamics to learn about the genetic factors responsible for resistance. In the second approach, he is generating small-molecule compounds—precursors of drugs—to explore ways of beating the ability of cancers to evolve. In this approach, he is using information about genetic factors of resistance to engineer combination therapies that bypass tumour evolution. Ultimately, he hopes to identify drug-like molecules with the potential to be developed as anti-cancer agents.

Dr. Christopher Carlsten

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease

Dr. Carlsten is pushing to broaden the concept of “personalized medicine” to be increasingly focused on prevention (rather than simply treatment) and thus to be seen more as “personalized health.” To do so, his team is working to deepen our understanding of gene-environment interactions in the context of common exposures, such as air pollution, commercial chemicals, and common allergens, to gain better resolution on the combinations of risk factors that lead to toxicity relevant to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Dr. Carlsten is excited by the prospect that such understanding will enhance individual- and population-level measures to avoid airborne threats before they cause harm.

Dr. Jennifer Gardy

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Public Health Genomics Dr. Gardy helped pioneer the new field of genomic epidemiology, in which the whole genome sequences of bacterial and viral pathogens are used to understand how outbreaks and epidemics of infectious disease start and spread—information critical to developing new ways of managing and preventing disease transmission. Dr. Gardy’s work allows public health agencies to accurately plot—for the first time—the precise route a pathogen like tuberculosis or measles takes through a social network, revealing individual transmission events at a resolution never before possible. She is excited to scale up her work in genomics, including embarking on a decade-long, province-wide study of TB transmission in B.C. that will change the way we manage this re-emerging disease.

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BUILDING OUR RESEARCH COMMUNITY

Dr. Daniel Goldowitz

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics Dr. Goldowitz’s research focuses on two areas: 1) studying the cells and molecules that make for a functioning cerebellum, a region important for the functional integrity of the brain, and 2) developing a knowledge base for better understanding brain development and function in the child and for improving function when there are neurodisabilities. The former work comes from his own laboratory and trainees in collaboration with international researchers. Most recently, this has resulted in papers in Nature and Science and several other highimpact journals related to the accumulation of transcriptome data during the early development of the cerebellum. The latter work emerges from NeuroDevNet, a transCanadian effort funded by the National Centres of Excellence. Dr. Goldowitz is excited about identifying novel genes in the cerebellum based on his recent transcriptome data and leading NeuroDevNet for another five years.

Dr. Michael Hayden

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine

Dr. Hayden’s research examines how changes in genes result in specific diseases. His research interests include Huntington disease (HD), genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and diabetes, and genetic changes that underlie adverse drug reactions (pharmacogenomics). His research findings are leading to novel approaches to prevention and treatment of these diseases. Dr. Hayden has developed antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) drugs that turn off production of mutant Huntington proteins by targeting specific DNA variations. These drugs are being evaluated in an HD mouse that has human Huntington genes with the targeted DNA variations. Contingent on these findings, a primary ASO drug could be rapidly translated for human trials. Additionally, Dr. Hayden’s research on HD has implications for other neurodegenerative diseases.

Dr. Michael Law

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Access to Medicines In health systems around the world, patients spend billions out of their own pockets for prescription drugs, one of the most commonly used and important forms of modern health care. Canadians are not immune to these costs: for 1 in 10 Canadians, these costs mean they don’t take their prescriptions as directed. Dr. Law and his research team explore access-to-medicine issues through high-impact studies of prescription drug insurance claims databases and large patient surveys using cutting-edge observational study techniques. In particular, he is very excited about national survey work that will produce new knowledge on what drugs patients are avoiding due to cost and what trade-offs they are making in their lives in order to afford their medicines. The results of Dr. Law’s work will help inform the design of better drug coverage systems.

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Dr. Sara Mostafavi

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Computational Biology Dr. Mostafavi’s research focuses on advancing state of the art computational and statistical approaches to integrating varied types of genomics data, with the ultimate goal of identifying robust and meaningful molecular associations for common and complex pathologies. Previously, she developed the algorithms that underlie the GeneMANIA system, a popular webserver that takes a graph-based integrative approach to context-dependent gene prioritization. Now, her research focuses on integrative approaches in the context of neuropsychiatric diseases. She is very excited about the opportunity to develop models that combine multiple genomics data types in order to disentangle the impact of genetic and environmental factors in the context of both early development and the aging brain.

Dr. Robert Molday

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Vision and Macular Degeneration

Retinal degenerative diseases, including macular degeneration, are a leading cause of vision loss in the world’s population. Dr. Molday is at the forefront of elucidating the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying retinal degenerative diseases and applying this knowledge toward the development of novel treatments to prevent or reduce vision loss. His research group has successfully used gene therapy to restore vision in several mouse models of macular degeneration. Gene therapy is now in clinical trials for a number of retinal diseases. Dr. Molday’s current research is directed toward developing gene therapy and drugs that can prevent vision loss in animal models for Stargardt macular degeneration, with the expectation that these approaches will lead to future clinical trials.

Dr. Gina Ogilvie

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Global Control of HPV Related Disease and Cancer Dr. Ogilvie’s research is focused on both the public health and clinical aspects of reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, HPV screening, and the HPV vaccine. Her findings have been highly influential in setting and directing health policy both in Canada and globally. With her Canada Research Chair, Dr. Ogilvie is leading an integrated suite of population-based intervention studies focusing on the prevention of HPV-related cancers in high- and low-/middle-income countries, to create evidence to achieve the goal of eradication of HPV-related cancers.

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BUILDING OUR RESEARCH COMMUNITY

Dr. Alexander Rauscher

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neuroimaging Scientific progress requires new tools of observation. Dr. Rauscher and his team work on new quantitative magnetic resonance imaging techniques for the mapping of brain tissue damage. With these techniques they hope to measure the effects of disease and injury as well as the effects of treatment. Dr. Rauscher is particularly excited about translating his work to the neonate and pediatric world, where objective imaging markers are urgently needed to predict outcomes later in life and to quantify the effects of new treatment approaches.

Dr. Martin Schechter

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in HIV/AIDS and Urban Population Health

Through the legacy of residential schools and loss of culture, the epidemics of HIV and HCV infections, overdoses, and violence continue to exact a dramatic toll on Aboriginal communities throughout British Columbia. Similarly, HIV is having a devastating effect on people in sub-Saharan Africa as well as child soldiers in Northern Uganda. Dr. Schechter is conducting studies in both settings aimed at informing prevention programs. Although these investigations take place on opposite sides of the globe, they are both aimed at breaking the connection between historical trauma and current risk of disease in extremely vulnerable populations. Closer to home, Dr. Schechter is investigating the effectiveness of innovative treatments, including medically prescribed heroin and hydromorphone, for people struggling with addiction.

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Dr. Jon Stoessl

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Parkinson’s Disease Dr. Stoessl is conducting research on the progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and related disorders. The major pathological feature of PD is the loss of dopamine (DA)-producing cells in the midbrain. However, by the time people become symptomatic with PD they have already lost most of their DA neurons. By studying people who do not yet have PD, but who have a high risk of developing the disease, Dr. Stoessl and his colleagues hope to understand the evolution of DA cell loss during the earliest (presymptomatic) stages, when it might be most amenable to treatment. They are also looking at the trajectory of cell loss affecting other neurotransmitters, as well as the spatial and temporal pattern of neuroinflammation and abnormal protein deposition in Parkinsonian disorders. It has been recognized for many years that exercise may help the symptoms of PD, and there is more recent appreciation that it may delay disease progression. Dr. Stoessl and his team are using imaging to study the mechanisms of symptomatic as well as disease-modifying effects of exercise.

Dr. Annalee Yassi

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Global Health and Capacity Building

Dr. Yassi works to promote and protect the health of health workers, building their capacity globally to address new and ongoing challenges. Her team has published extensively, especially on issues surrounding infection control and occupational health in healthcare workplaces, in what is quintessential implementation science. Her team has adopted an iterative approach to research and knowledge translation in which “knowledge producers” and “knowledge users” interact throughout every stage of the research. Her work in low- and middleincome countries, focusing particularly on the multi-scalar challenges of HIV and tuberculosis in health workers, is having international impact, as is the technology transfer of information systems and other technology-enabled knowledge translation products. Dr. Yassi is excited about new collaborations which integrate arts-based intervention and research methods that engage the body and mind into a scientifically rigorous international, interdisciplinary research program to improve the health of health workers and communities globally.

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BUILDING OUR RESEARCH COMMUNITY

New Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health launched at UBC Launched in early 2014, UBC’s Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health (CEIH) will foster research into Aboriginal communities’ health priorities, and optimize the indigenous component of health science curricula. A goal integrally related to this is to boost representation and retention of Aboriginal students in health professions, especially physicians, nurses, dentists and pharmacists, so indigenous communities can take a larger role in their own well-being. Strides are being actioned already towards this goal with the involvement of a recruitment coordinator who will focus on the full array of health professions, building on the success achieved in the MD program. Based in the School of Population and Public Health, the centre is led by Dr. Martin Schechter, a Professor and former Director of the school, and Dr. Nadine Caron, an Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery and the first Aboriginal woman to earn a medical degree from UBC. “We want to increase the research capacity in Indigenous health and to empower community members to do their own research, setting their own priorities,” says Dr. Caron. The centre gained crucial momentum in June of 2015 from two $1 million gifts: one from UBC Chancellor Lindsay Gordon and his wife Elizabeth, and the other from Vancouver investment manager Rudy North, his wife Patricia, their daughter Caroline and son, Rory.

Martin Schechter, Nadine Caron

We want to increase the research capacity in Indigenous health and to empower community members to do their own research, setting their own priorities.

Both gifts target the centre’s initiatives at recruiting and retaining Aboriginal students, but also address distinct needs. Nearly half of the Gordon’s gift will provide financial aid for Aboriginal students. The Norths are supporting the Summer Science program, which is aimed at Aboriginal high school students throughout British Columbia, and the creation of a new certificate program for Aboriginal public health. “The health disparities that exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians are persistent,” explains Dr. Schechter. “The Centre will work to find ways to advance the health of Indigenous people, leading to better outcomes for their communities.”

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76 Chairs & Professorships

Donor-Funded Chairs, Professorships, and Distinguished Scholar Awards As of August 11, 2015, 52 donor-funded chairs (Appendix B) and 24 donorfunded professorships (Appendix C) were held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine. In addition, a new category of donor-funded honorific called the Distinguished Scholar Award was created (Appendix D), of which two have now been established.

CIHR New Investigator Awards The CIHR New Investigator Salary Awards program is intended to provide outstanding new investigators with the opportunity to develop and demonstrate their independence in initiating and conducting health research through provision of a contribution to their salary. Of the 40 CIHR New Investigator Salary Awards awarded across Canada, seven were given to UBC investigatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;of which five are FoM investigators. Each investigator will receive $300,000 over five years. Table 2. Faculty of Medicine investigators awarded CIHR New Investigator Awards in 2015. Investigator

Department

Project Title

Dr. Shira Goldenberg

Medicine (AIDS)

A research program on migration as a social determinant of HIV, STIs, & HCV among marginalized women

Dr. Kanna Hayashi

Medicine (AIDS)

Addiction Research Program to Reduce Costs and Improve Health

Dr. Jeremy Hirota

Medicine (Respiratory Medicine)

Respiratory mucosal immune responses to environmental exposures relevant in airway health and disease

Dr. William Lockwood

Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

Integrating clinical, functional and chemical genomics to understand lung cancer biology

Dr. Peter Stirling

Medical Genetics

Understanding and exploiting genome instability in cancer

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


BUILDING OUR RESEARCH COMMUNITY

David Cabral: Ross Petty-Arthritis Society Research Chair Dr. David Cabral is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Head of its Division of Rheumatology. In March 2015, he was named the first holder of the Ross Petty-Arthritis Society Research Chair in Pediatric Rheumatology. Dr. Cabral co-founded the Young Adult Rheumatic Disease (YARD) clinic, the first chronic disease transition clinic at BC Children’s Hospital, which has been a model for other pediatric rheumatology programs across the country. His research interests include the study of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and pediatric vasculitis. He has participated in, or helped establish, national and international physician networks and patient registries for the study of children with rheumatic disease. “Because most of the diseases we are involved with are rare, registries are an essential for many aspects of research” says Dr. Cabral. “Currently, I am excited to be expanding our registry horizons to help with research on ‘what matters most to patients’. I am involved in information technology initiatives that will allow using accumulating clinical data, integrated across different registries, ideally towards providing personalized medicine to patients and their families.”

I am excited to be expanding our registry horizons to help with research on ‘what matters most to patients’.

Richard Mulcaster, Executive Director of the Arthritis Society, BC & Yukon, which provided funds for the chair, believes Dr. Cabral is the absolute right fit for this position. “[Dr. Cabral] is highly esteemed and is known for his insight and clinical judgment, and incredible research that will improve treatments and move us closer to a cure for this complex disease in children,” he says. “The Chair will act as a bridge between research done in the lab and actual treatment, which means discoveries made in the lab will be used more quickly to improve the care of children living with juvenile arthritis.” In his role as Chair, Dr. Cabral will ensure children with chronic arthritis (juvenile idiopathic arthritis - JIA) and other rheumatic disease such as Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus – SLE), Vasculitis and fever syndromes benefit from research findings sooner, and he will play a critical role in treating children with these rheumatic diseases and training the next generation of pediatric rheumatologists. Dr. Cabral is personally honoured by the appointment, but he also sees it as a tribute to the renown of UBC’s Pediatric Rheumatology program and all of the individuals (past and present) who are a part of it. “The program has had a longstanding mandate to integrate research with clinical care and teaching,” he explains. “This appointment specifically provides our group some dedicated research time towards that end.”

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Fostering Research Innovation

Lara Boyd, Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy


FOSTERING RESEARCH INNOVATION

Fostering Research Innovation Canada Foundation for Innovation The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) supports innovative infrastructure projects that sustain and enhance areas of activity in which the CFI has already invested and provides support to explore promising new research directions.

$20.6M CFI grants

The Faculty of Medicine received $20,005,104 from the CFI Innovation Fund 2015 competition (Table 3) and $639,439 from the CFI John R. Evans Leaders Fund 2014 competitions (Table 4).

Table 3. Faculty of Medicine CFI Innovation Fund 2015 grants. Investigator

Department/School

Total CFI Contribution

Dr. Colin Collins

Urologic Sciences

$2,844,939

Dr. Steven Jones

Medical Genetics

$8,364,268

Dr. Alex MacKay

Radiology

$2,457,048

Dr. Denise Pugash

Obstetrics & Gynaecology/Radiology

$827,685

Dr. Natalie Strynadka

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

$2,275,601

Dr. Bruce Verchere

Surgery/Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

$3,235,563

Table 4. Faculty of Medicine CFI John R. Evans Leaders Fund 2014 grants. Investigator

Department/School

Total CFI Contribution

Dr. Kevin Harris

Pediatrics

$121,547

Dr. Peter Stirling

Medical Genetics

$125,000

Dr. Michael Law

SPPH

$73,107

Dr. Gina Ogilvie

SPPH

$72,145

Dr. Jeremy Hirota

Medicine

$122,640

Dr. Sara Mostafavi

Medical Genetics

$125,000

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Grant Funding Highlights •

Drs. Neil Cashman ($1.5M), James Johnson ($1.05M), and Christian Naus ($1.5M) awarded grants from the British Columbia Alzheimer’s Research Award Program.

Dr. Philip Hieter and national collaborators awarded $2.3M from CIHR to establish Canadian Rare Diseases Models and Mechanisms Network

NeuroDevNet, an NCE led by Dr. Dan Goldowitz, received renewal notice for 2014/15 in the amount of $19.6 million, bringing total funding received for 2009-2019 to $39.2 million.

Drs. Timothy Murphy ($1,416,375) and Elizabeth Simpson ($1,496,062) received funding provided by CQDM, Brain Canada, and the Ontario Brain Institute as part of their Focus on Brain strategic initiative.

Dr. Jan Dutz received $1.1M from Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Canadian Clinical Trial Network to assess the safety and dosing of ustekinumab in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Thomas Kerr received $800k from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the first year of his five year study on Vancouver drug users

Dr. Ann Marie Craig, Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, received a CIHR Foundation grant for $2.65 million over 7 years in support of her project Molecular analysis of synapse development.

Dr. Janice Eng, Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy received a CIHR Foundation grant for $2.48 million over seven years to further her stroke research.

Faculty of Medicine Internal Awards The Office of the EADR holds a number of internal competitions to promote research and inspire excellence; most are run annually. In academic year 2014-15, the Office of the EADR ran the following competitions:

Faculty of Medicine Spring Start-Ups This award provides start-up funding for faculty members who are in the first two years of a full-time appointment. In 2015, Dr. Kanna Hayashi (Department of Medicine, Division of AIDS) and Dr. Jeremy Hirota (Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine) were awarded $5,000 each in start-up funding.

Faculty of Medicine Discussion Groups $15,437 of supporting funds was distributed across Faculty of Medicine departments and research centres to support interdisciplinary discussion groups and formal seminar series. These seminars are open to all interested UBC faculty members, staff, and students, and offer opportunities for students to actively connect with visiting speakers from around the world.

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FOSTERING RESEARCH INNOVATION

Distinguished Medical Research Lecturer Award Each year the Faculty of Medicine recognizes the outstanding lecturers in our medical research fields. Candidates from Basic Sciences or Clinical Sciences are nominated by fellow faculty members on the basis of a distinguished research career, recognition in the medical community, and mentoring contributions over the past year. Nominees are selected by the Faculty of Medicine Research Council. Acceptance of this award is accompanied by a seminar open to all faculty members and students as a part of the Leaders in Medical Discovery Series. The winners for 2015 were: Basic Science: Dr. Shoukat Dedhar, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Clinical Science: Dr. Janice Eng, Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy

Dr. Jill Zwicker, CIHR Foundation Grant recipient Dr. Jill Zwicker, an assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, was a recipient of the highly competitive Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) 2014 Foundation Grant competition. She received funding for her research focusing on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects an estimated 400,000 Canadian children. Dr. Zwicker, who was awarded $684K for her research program, is one of the few occupational therapists world-wide to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Over the next five years, she plans to conduct research that integrates brain imaging and rehabilitation with the goal of improving outcomes for children with DCD. Through her research-integrated DCD clinic at Vancouver’s Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children, she also hopes to begin to understand psychosocial functioning and quality of life of children with the disorder. “I am particularly excited about being able to facilitate a diagnosis of DCD and provide families with educational materials and recommendations to support their children,” explains Dr. Zwicker. “My aim is to increase awareness of DCD and better understand the holistic needs of this underserved population.” Research funding from CIHR is highly competitive. Only four percent of new investigators from across Canada were funded in this year’s competition. Dr. Zwicker is humbled by the honour. “I am incredibly grateful to my mentors, grants facilitators, and fellow faculty for their feedback and support in preparing this successful application,” she says. “Aside from the funding which allows me to carry out my research program, I was honoured that the peer review committees at the three stages of competition believed my research program for children with DCD is worthy of being conducted.”

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Profiles on Transformational Research

Timothy Kieffer, Professor in the Department of Cellular & Physicological Sciences


PROFILES ON TRANSFORMATIONAL RESEARCH

Profiles on Transformational Research From basic science to clinical trials and then to knowledge implementation and commercialization, the UBC Faculty of Medicine provides and fosters ground-breaking research and is recognized nationally and internationally for its innovation. Our researchers are at the forefront of paradigm shifts in the way we approach, treat and prevent disease to promote health. The researchers profiled here are pioneers in their own right; Dr. Montaner in his mission to eradicate HIV/AIDS, Dr. Kieffer in his quest to transform diabetes care, Drs. Finlay and Turvey in their work towards the prevention of childhood asthma and Dr. Schonert-Reichl in her dedication to revolutionizing thoughts on childhood mental health. It is this kind of transformative thinking that results in health care breakthroughs and improved outcomes for patients.

Timothy Kieffer Transforming the care of diabetes Dr. Timothy Kieffer (pictured on left), a professor in the Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences and the Department of Surgery, is making progress in his quest to create a stem cell treatment for diabetes. His research was included in two year-end lists for scientific achievement: it was listed as one of eight “Notable Advances” of 2014 by Nature Medicine, and as one of the top 10 “Breakthroughs of the Year” by Science. With industry collaborators, Dr. Kieffer also published a study in Nature Biotechnology in September 2014 describing a protocol to convert stem cells into insulin-producing cells. “We are a step closer to having an unlimited supply of insulinproducing cells to treat patients with Type 1 diabetes,” says Dr. Kieffer.

The protocol transforms stem cells into insulin-secreting pancreatic cells via a cellculture method. The cells have the capacity to rapidly reverse diabetes following transplant. “We have not yet made fully functional cells in a dish, but we are very close,” explains Dr. Kieffer. “The cells we make in the lab produce insulin, but are still immature and need the transplant host to complete the transformation into fully functioning cells.” Nevertheless, Dr. Kieffer’s contributions have pushed scientists ever closer to generating an unlimited supply of insulin-producing cells, which could potentially treat a disease that affects almost 400 million people worldwide.

We are a step closer to having an unlimited supply of insulin-producing cells to treat patients with Type 1 diabetes.

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B. Brett Finlay and Stuart Turvey Transforming our understanding of childhood asthma Dr. Brett Finlay, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, and Dr. Stuart Turvey, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, have found a strategy to prevent asthma: Acquiring four types of gut bacteria within the first three months of life.

Brett Finlay

Stuart Turvey

Their work, published in Science Translational Medicine, revealed that lower levels of four specific gut bacteria in three-month-old infants was associated with an increased risk for asthma. Most babies naturally acquire these four bacteria, nicknamed FLVR (Faecalibacterium, Lachnospira, Veillonella, Rothia), from their environments, but some do not, either because of the circumstances of their birth or other factors. “This research supports the hygiene hypothesis that we’re making our environment too clean. It shows that gut bacteria play a role in asthma, but it is early in life when the baby’s immune system is being established,” explains Dr. Finlay, a member of the Michael Smith Laboratories.

This discovery gives us new potential ways to prevent this disease that is lifethreatening for many children .

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“This discovery gives us new potential ways to prevent this disease that is lifethreatening for many children,” Dr. Turvey says. “It shows there’s a short, maybe 100-day window for giving babies therapeutic interventions to protect against asthma.”  The findings received worldwide media attention, including coverage by the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Daily Mail (U.K.), the BBC, National Public Radio, Agence France-Presse, Wired, Time, and the Australian Broadcasting Corp.

2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


PROFILES ON TRANSFORMATIONAL RESEARCH

Mads Daugaard Transforming cancer treatment Dr. Mads Daugaard, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Urologic Science and a Senior Research Scientist at the Vancouver Prostate Centre, has been able to “turn” an insidious malarial protein to a therapeutic cause – stopping cancer. In a collaboration with colleagues from the University of Copenhagen, the researchers discovered that a sugar molecule, found in both the placenta of pregnant women as well as in most cancers, could be a target for anti-cancer drugs, and that the malarial protein, called VAR2CSA, could provide the tool for carrying such drugs to tumours.

Mads Daugaard

“When my colleagues discovered how malaria uses VAR2CSA to embed itself in the placenta, we immediately saw its potential to deliver cancer drugs in a precise, controlled way to tumours,” Dr. Daugaard says.

When my colleagues discovered how malaria uses VAR2CSA to embed itself in the placenta, we immediately saw its potential to deliver cancer drugs in a precise, controlled way to tumours.

In the October 2015 issue of Cancer Cell, Dr. Daugaard and colleagues described how they targeted and killed more than 95 per cent of cancer cell lines with a novel toxin attached to VAR2CSA. The compound was then tested on mice that were implanted with three types of human tumours. With non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the treated mice’s tumours were about a quarter the size of the tumours in the control group. With prostate cancer, the tumours completely disappeared in two of the six treated mice a month after receiving the first dose. With metastatic breast cancer, five out of six treated mice were cured from metastatic disease. The mice showed no adverse side-effects, and their organs were unharmed by the therapy. Two companies – Vancouver-based Kairos Therapeutics and Copenhagen-based VAR2 Pharmaceuticals – are developing the compound for clinical trials in humans, which will take at least another three to four years.

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Julio Montaner Transforming global HIV/AIDS treatment In the early 80s, Dr. Julio Montaner, was a young respiratory doctor at St. Paul’s Hospital when cases of a previously very rare form of pneumonia started to emerge among otherwise healthy men. The illness would eventually be linked to an illness unknown until that point: HIV/ AIDS. It is important to talk about Dr. Montaner, a Professor of Medicine and Head of the faculty’s Division of AIDS, when talking about advances in HIV/AIDS treatment and research. In fact, it might be impossible not to mention his name. In 2015, Dr. Montaner was named Officer in the Order of Canada and was inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame for his outstanding achievements in medicine and research in this field. The Director of the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE), who has been waging war on HIV/AIDS for more than 30 years, saw his strategy for eradicating HIV formally adopted by the United Nations in September 2014, as part of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target. Treatment as Prevention® (TasP®) forms the backbone of UNAIDS’ global approach to reach an AIDS-free generation by 2030. TasP® consists of widespread HIV testing and the immediate offer of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to those who test positive and those who are medically eligible. The 90-90-90 strategy is as simple as it is ambitious: make sure 90 per cent of people living with HIV are tested, get 90 per cent of that group on regular treatment, and have 90 per cent on consistent treatment to reduce their viral loads to undetectable levels. It’s an approach that’s led BC to a 65-per-cent decline in new diagnoses and a drop of 88 per cent in new AIDS cases from 1994 to 2013.

There’s a difference between endorsement and crystallizing Treatment as Prevention® as the therapy for the world.

“To actually make it the cornerstone of the global fight against HIV/AIDS is huge,” says Dr. Montaner. “There’s a difference between endorsement and crystallizing Treatment as Prevention® as the therapy for the world.” In March 2015, Dr. Montaner presented research on the effectiveness of TasP® to senior officials at the Vatican and even to Pope Francis himself. A number of jurisdictions have adopted TasP® in their fight against the spread of HIV, including China, France, Spain, Panama, Brazil, Argentina, the state of Queensland in Australia and several major cities in the United States. It is exciting to see what will come out of this collaboration. And all of this marks just the tip of the iceberg for TasP®. The strategy has the potential to be applied to other communicable illnesses, such as hepatitis C, as part of a larger disease elimination approach.

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


PROFILES ON TRANSFORMATIONAL RESEARCH

Kimberly Schonert-Reichl Transforming education and emotional health in children Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, Director of UBC’s Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) and professor in the UBC Faculty of Education, is transforming our understanding of children’s health and well-being. Her research has focused on identifying the processes and mechanisms that foster children’s positive human qualities, including empathy, altruism, and resiliency. She has designed psychometrically rigorous assessments of social and emotional learning (SEL), including the Middle Years Development Instrument (MDI) – a population-level tool for assessing children’s social and emotional health and well-being. Dr. Schonert-Reichl has dedicated years conducting empirical research to identify ways in which SEL competencies are incorporated into educational policy and teacher certification requirements and coursework. One recent example, appearing in the January 2015 edition of Developmental Psychology, examined MindUP™, a social and emotional learning program which teaches a number of mindfulness practices, including breathing, tasting, and movement exercises. The study was one of the first to investigate the value of a social and emotional learning program that incorporates mindfulness techniques for children’s well-being using a variety of scientific measures, including both biological and neurological tests. Dr. Schonert-Reichl and her collaborators found that fourthand fifth-graders who participated in the program were better at regulating stress and were more optimistic and helpful. Dr. Schonert-Reichl, whose work builds upon the legacy of HELP’s founding Director, the late Clyde Hertzman (1953-2013), was recently awarded the 2015 Joseph E. Zins Distinguished Scholar Award for Outstanding Contributions to Research in Social and Emotional Learning, given by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL). She believes cooperation across disciplines has been essential to her work. “Over the past decade, my research has been advanced via my collaborations with researchers at the Human Early Learning Partnership,” she says. Dr. Howard Feldman agrees. “With her diverse academic background in both education and psychology, Dr. Schonert-Reichl’s appointment as Director of HELP superbly honours our faculty and the university’s commitment to interdisciplinary research and health care.”

Dr. Schonert-Reichl is passionate about continuing to lead such research and, along with her colleagues, plans to continue to explore the developmental trajectories of children in British Columbia, ensuring the emerging evidence on children’s health and well-being is translated into policy and practice across sectors.

Improving the conditions in which all children and their families can flourish and thrive has been some of the most exciting work in which I have been involved over the length of my career.

“Working collaboratively with researchers from multiple disciplines towards the common goal of improving the conditions in which all children and their families can flourish and thrive has been some of the most exciting work in which I have been involved over the length of my career.”

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Recognizing Research Excellence Dianne Miller, Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology


RECOGNIZING RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

Recognizing Research Excellence Awards and Honours Highlights Faculty members were honoured with prestigious research awards and prizes in 2014-15.11 •

Dr. Adeera Levin, for her leadership in the treatment of kidney disease, and Dr. Anthony Phillips, for his achievements in neuroscience, addiction, and mental health, were appointed to the Order of Canada

Drs. Julio Montaner and Joanne Sullivan Douglas recognized as Officers of the Order of Canada

Dr. Brett Finlay received the 2014 Prix Galien Canada for pharmaceutical research and innovation

Dr. Samuel Aparicio received the 5th annual Aubrey J. Tingle Prize for his internationally recognized work in cancer research

Dr. Julio Montaner, for his many contributions to the field of HIV/AIDS research, and Dr. Judith Hall, for her contributions to medical understanding of birth defects, dwarfism, and other physical abnormalities, inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

Dr. Julio Montaner received the Royal Society of Canada’s McLaughlin Medal awarded for important research of sustained excellence

Dr. David Granville inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists for his groundbreaking research of novel therapeutics to treat chronic inflammatory diseases

Drs. Steven Jones, Adeera Levin, Victor Ling, Kirk Schultz, and Garth Warnock inducted into the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in recognition of their distinguished accomplishments and academic service

Dr. Jane Buxton received Canadian Public Health Association’s Ron Draper Health Promotion Award for significant contributions to health promotion by working in the community

Drs. Laura Magee and Peter von Dadelszen received the Chesley Award from the International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy for their sustained and substantial contribution to research in preeclampsia

Dr. Lindsay Machan received the 2015 Society of Interventional Radiology Leader in Innovation Award, recognizing and promoting innovation with interventional radiology

Dr. Adele Diamond received the Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contributions to Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society from the American Psychological Association

Drs. Paul Schaffer, François Bénard, Anna Celler, and Thomas Ruth received NSERC’s prestigious Brockhouse Canada prize for Interdisciplinary Research in Science and Engineering

The Faculty of Medicine’s 2014 Annual Awards & Significant Honours Report may be referenced for a complete list of the Faculty’s accomplishments in research, teaching, leadership, and general contributions to society. 11

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Dr. Peter von Dadelszen received the 2014 APOG Excellence in Research Award from the Association of Academic Professionals in Obstetrics and Gynaecology of Canada, recognizing outstanding scientific leadership, research mentoring, creative effort, and major research accomplishments

Dr. Wendy Norman received the Federation of Medical Women of Canada’s 2015 Enid Johnson MacLeod Award for her significant contribution to women’s health research

Dr. Kimberley Schonert-Reichl received the 2015 Joseph E. Zins Distinguished Scholar Award for Outstanding Contributions to Action Research in Social and Emotional Learning from CASEL

Dr. Dianne Miller received the 2015 Virginia Greene Leadership Award from Ovarian Cancer Canada for her leadership in the field of ovarian cancer

Drs. Pieter Cullis, Mel Krajden, Adeera Levin, and Simon Sutcliffe received 2015 LifeSciences British Columbia Awards for their significant contribution to research and excellence in B.C.’s life sciences industry

Drs. Ian Mackenzie, Fabio Rossi, and Poul Sorensen received UBC Killam Research Prizes (Senior Category) for their outstanding research and scholarly contributions

Dr. David Scheifele was awarded the 2015 Geoffrey L. Hammond Lectureship, honouring his career, which has had a significant impact on the health and well-being of children and families

Dr. Reka Gustafson received the James M. Robinson Award for significant contributions to public health

Dr. Eric Young received the George Elliot Award for lifetime contributions to public health

UBC Faculty of Medicine hosts 2014 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research scholar In March of 2015, UBC and the Faculty of Medicine had the honour of hosting the 2014 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research scholar, Dr. Lap-Chee Tsui, professor and former Vice-Chancellor and President at the University of Hong Kong. Awarded annually, the $35,000 prize was established in recognition of Dr. Henry Friesen’s distinguished leadership, vision and innovative contributions to health and health research. Dr. Tsui has a notable academic career, which includes the identification of the Cystic Fibrosis gene and, subsequently, the characterization of chromosome 7. He contributed significantly to fighting the SARS coronavirusin 2003 and led the Hong Kong consortium in the international effort in completing the first comprehensive catalogue of the human genetic evaluations. Lap-Chee Tsui

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


RECOGNIZING RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

UBC Professors elected Fellows of The Royal Society and the Royal Society of Canada Dr. Natalie Strynadka, Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, was elected a Fellow of The Royal Society. The Royal Society is a selfgoverning Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine. Dr. Strynadka is a pioneer in the study of proteins and protein assemblies essential to bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. Her agenda-setting dissection of the membrane assemblies involved in infection, virulence and bacterial cell wall synthesis is having major impact in the development of therapeutic agents; both antibiotics and vaccines. “I could not be more honoured by my election to the Royal Society, truly a direct reflection of the creative collective of trainees, research assistants and collaborators with whom I have had the pleasure to explore and visualize the detailed molecular underpinnings of protein complexes essential to infectious disease and human health.”

Natalie Strynadka

Professor Emeritus, Dr. Robert Brunham, the former Head of the Division of Infectious Disease and former Executive and Scientific Director of the B.C. Centre for Disease Control has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. The fellowship of the RSC comprises distinguished Canadian men and women from all branches of learning who have made remarkable contributions in the arts, the humanities and the sciences. Dr. Brunham’s research centres on the immunology and epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases and on the origins of emerging infectious diseases. Much of his research has dealt with chlamydia. He has made seminal contributions to defining the clinical features of infection in women, evaluating the impact of screening and treatment control programs, determining the underlying mechanisms of immunity, and discovering protective antigens suitable for vaccine development. He has analyzed the impact of public health efforts to control chlamydia, deduced that the strategy is arresting the development of immunity, and developed the rationale that a vaccine will be essential to chlamydia control.

Robert Brunham

“It is an unexpected honour to be elected as a 2015 fellow to the Royal Society of Canada, which was founded in part by Sir William Osler, Canada’s greatest physician,” Dr. Brunham says. “Among this year’s new fellows are some of Canada’s most influential humanists, artists and scientists. I am humbled that my contributions to research on the control and prevention of infectious diseases is among such awe-inspiring company.”

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National Prizes Awarded by the Faculty of Medicine The Margolese National Brain and Heart Disorders Prizes Established in 2011, the prestigious Margolese National Brain Disorders Prize and Margolese National Heart Disorders Prize are awarded annually to two Canadian researchers ($50,000 in each category) who are leaders in the fields of brain and heart research, respectively. The 2015 winners are Dr. James Rutka (University of Toronto, Brain Prize) and Dr. Stuart Connolly (McMaster University, Heart Prize).

Dr. Chew Wei MBBS [HK] FRCOG [ENG] Memorial Prize in Cancer Research The Dr. Chew Wei MBBS [HK] FRCOG [ENG] Memorial Prize in Cancer Research is a $50,000 prize awarded annually to a Canadian physician or scientist who has made transformational, internationally recognized contributions to the treatment, amelioration or cure for cancer. The 2015 prize winner is UBC’s Dr. Marco Marra. Recipients of the Margolese and Chew Wei prizes were announced in September 2015 and honoured at a formal celebration in November 2015.

About the 2015 Dr. Chew Wei Memorial Prize in Cancer Research Winner Dr. Marco Marra, Head of the UBC Department of Medical Genetics, a Canada Research Chair in Genome Science, and Director of the Genome Sciences Centre at the BC Cancer Agency, has become a world leader in using genomics to find new mutations, biomarkers and therapeutic targets of major significance to health and disease conditions, particularly cancers. In 2014, he was named one of the “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” by Thomson Reuters and is recognized as one of the world’s most highly cited researchers. Dr. Marra has co-authored more than 330 peer-reviewed manuscripts, including a landmark paper, which described the first DNA sequence analysis of the SARS coronavirus genome. With colleagues at the BC Cancer Agency, UBC and BC Children’s Hospital, Dr. Marra is developing comprehensive genome analysis approaches for personalizing cancer therapies. He co-leads the Personalized Oncogenomics (POG) program, which has enrolled hundreds of patients at the BC Cancer Agency and BC Children’s Hospital and shown that it is possible to bring leading-edge whole genome analysis approaches to cancer clinics. Dr. Marra is particularly energized by his involvement in mentoring the next generation of thought leaders. Award-winning trainees from his laboratory have gone on to further their careers in science and medicine, taking on roles in Canada and abroad in academic and industrial contexts. With Dr. Tak Mak as last year’s inaugural Chew Wei prize recipient, the Faculty is honoured and proud to have one of our outstanding leaders recognized with this award.

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RECOGNIZING RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

About the 2015 Margolese National Heart Disorders Prize Winner Dr. Stuart Connolly, a Professor at McMaster University, the inaugural holder of the Salim Yusuf Chair in Cardiology, and former Director of the Division of Cardiology at McMaster University, is an internationally recognized authority on treatment of heart rhythm disorders. A cardiac electrophysiologist at Hamilton Health Sciences and a researcher at McMaster’s Population Health Research Institute, he has transformed the treatment of patients with cardiac rhythm abnormalities by designing and carrying out randomized clinical trials that have affected everyday clinical decision-making for people with these conditions. Dr. Connolly led several important clinical trials related to treatment of patients using pacemakers and implantable defibrillators, demonstrating the effectiveness of these devices, as well as their limitations. In a study published earlier this year, he and colleagues demonstrated conclusively that the standard practice of the past 30 years of inducing cardiac arrest at the time of implanting a defibrillator yields no benefit and is possibly harmful – a finding now changing practice around the world. Dr. Connolly has played a pivotal role in establishing the Population Health Research Institute, one of the leading clinical cardiovascular research groups in the world.

About the 2015 Margolese National Brain Disorders Prize Winner Dr. James Rutka, the RS McLaughlin Chair of the Department of Surgery at University of Toronto and former Dan Family Chair of the Division of Neurosurgery, has been on the surgical staff at the Hospital for Sick Children, in the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, for 25 years. In 2015, Dr Rutka was appointed as an Officer in the Order of Canada. He has focused his research and clinical efforts on human brain tumours and, in the lab, created and characterized several human brain tumour cell lines that have been used as models by scientists around the world. He has identified the main molecular mechanisms by which brain tumours invade into regions of normal brain, making surgical removal and radiation treatment challenging. Dr. Rutka’s lab is one of the few exploring the potential of using conjugated nanoparticles to ferry therapeutic antibodies across the blood-brain barrier – the biggest obstacle to drug treatment for brain cancers. Dr. Rutka has given more than 400 clinical and scientific presentations around the world, and was the first Canadian to be appointed as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Advancing New Frontiers: Personalized Medicine

Martin Dawes, Head of the Department of Family Practice


ADVANCING NEW FRONTIERS: PERSONALIZED MEDICINE

Advancing New Frontiers: Personalized Medicine Technological progress – not just in sequencing people’s genomes, but in the explosion of information about the function of individual genes, and the harnessing of computer hardware and software to produce useful information – is a major reason why some health researchers, including Dr. Pieter Cullis, Director of UBC’s Life Sciences Institute, are predicting the dawn of “personalized medicine.” Personalized medicine is the practice of using individualized molecular-level information as well as environmental factors to decide which treatment will work best for each patient. The field of personalized medicine has become a priority for the Faculty of Medicine, with many of our researchers focusing their efforts on this innovative new frontier of research. Pieter Cullis In June of 2015, UBC hosted the Personalized Medicine Summit, which was focused on how to implement personalized medicine into the population and the immediate steps that British Columbia should take to implement personalized healthcare in the province. Well attended with over 300 participants, the summit’s major deliverable was a Green Paper (see personalizedmedicineinitiative.ca), in which a number of recommendations were made.

Within the next five years, increasingly comprehensive molecular tests will be available that will tell you, with ever-improving accuracy, what is wrong with you.

“An avalanche of molecular-level analyses of the bits and pieces that make up you is coming online,” Dr. Cullis, writes in his new book, The Personalized Medicine Revolution. “Within the next five years, increasingly comprehensive molecular tests will be available that will tell you, with ever-improving accuracy, what is wrong with you.”

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Getting personal with cancer: Using genome analysis to determine the best treatment for the individual In 2008, Dr. Janessa Laskin, a clinical associate professor and medical oncologist at the BC Cancer Agency, delivered difficult, but all too common news to one of her patients. His rare form of tongue cancer had metastasized to his lungs and there was not much more that could be done to treat him. Around the same time, scientists were beginning to make rapid advances in cancer treatment options; using DNA sequencing technologies to examine Steven Jones the composition of individual cancer genomes and to help deduce the most viable treatment options for patients. Dr. Laskin’s patient went on to become “Patient Zero” in the Personalized OncoGenomics (POG) Program, a province-wide initiative which she co-leads with Dr. Marco Marra, Department Head and professor of medical genetics at UBC and Director of the Genome Science Centre. By 2010, their research team had successfully sequenced Patient Zero’s rare and aggressive tumour to help select the most appropriate drugs for his treatment. Dr. Steven Jones, a professor in medical genetics at UBC and Head of Bioinformatics and Associate Director of the Genome Sciences Centre at the B.C. Cancer Agency, recalls that milestone. “This was actually the first case in the world where the complete sequencing of a tumor was used to inform clinical decision making. It allowed us to identify a couple of drugs that were given to the patient that did allow the tumor to regress and, therefore, showed therapeutic value.” Funded by the BC Cancer Foundation, the POG Program has grown from examining one case a month to almost one case a day. Each Thursday, the team meets to review their current cases and to explore what the genome analysis has revealed about individual patients, their disease, and treatments that might work for them. A large number of people are involved, emphasizes Dr. Marra. “It’s a big group, including oncologists, pathologists, many, many scientists as well as an increasing number of patients.”

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“ Janessa Laskin

Marco Marra

This is the future of cancer medicine; this is the way in which we can provide more effective and less toxic therapeutic options to our patients.

The UBC BC Cancer Agency Research Ethics Board recently approved the study of 5,000 cases and new Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) funding will allow the program to sequence over 10,000 genomes a year. As B.C.’s population grows and ages, the incidence of cancer is expected to increase rapidly, making the POG Program an increasingly important player in the advancement of cancer treatment in both our province and beyond. In the coming years, Dr. Marra expects that the program’s research will allow clinicians to assist patients earlier in their diagnosis and ultimately believes there is an opportunity to design a program within the province that would allow more patients to participate. Dr. Jones agrees: “The goal should be that we are able to do this analysis for every single patient who could benefit from it. Knowledge is power. If we understand exactly how a tumour is working, how it may become resistant to a particular drug – the idea is that each time we can hit the tumor with the best possible drug for that patient at that time.” Dr. Laskin, who witnessed the life of Patient Zero extended thanks to personalized oncogenomics, is excited by the potential the POG Program holds for cancer patients worldwide. “This is the future of cancer medicine; this is the way in which we can provide more effective and less toxic therapeutic options to our patients.”

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Personalized prescriptions: bringing genomics to primary care Dr. Bruce Carleton, a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and a clinical pharmacologist at BC Children’s Hospital, is the leader of a Canada-wide surveillance and solution-finding effort for adverse drug reactions in children – the Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety (CPNDS). CPNDS is helping to solve drug safety problems by developing genetic tests that predict which patients are at risk of serious adverse drug reactions. In a recent study, published in the September 2015 issue of Nature Genetics, CPNDS found a genetic variation that brings a five-fold higher risk of cardiotoxicity for patients treated with anthracyclines. “We can now better predict the drug’s benefit/risk profile in a specific patient,” Dr. Carleton says. As Dr. Carleton searches for the genomic basis of adverse drug reactions, Dr. Martin Dawes, Head of UBC’s Department of Family Practice, is harnessing established pharmacogenic data for primary care. Using a sampling of genetic data – culled from patients’ saliva samples – Dr. Dawes’ “TreatGx” project tries to reduce harmful drug reactions in people with 10 common medical conditions, including depression, hypertension, high cholesterol, gout and asthma. Specially-designed software considers details about a patient such as age, weight, blood pressure, allergies, other medical conditions, and other drugs they may be taking. It also includes the latest reliable evidence about the safety and effectiveness of the more than 250 drugs involved in the treatment of those 10 conditions. Layered on top of those inputs is genetic data about the patient in question – specifically, whether he or she has any of the 33 variations, spread across five genes, that might render a drug ineffective or even harmful. “All of the information that underpins medication choices is out there, but it’s impossible for physicians to hold it all in their heads,” Dr. Dawes says. “We’re trying to simplify the process – and enhancing it with powerful genetic data that physicians, until recently, haven’t had at their disposal.”

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Bruce Carleton

We can now better predict the drug’s benefit/risk profile in a specific patient.


ADVANCING NEW FRONTIERS: PERSONALIZED MEDICINE

Removing the unknowns from “unknown cause epilepsy” An interdisciplinary group at the Child and Family Research Institute has embarked on an extremely innovative program to identify genetic mutations that cause epilepsy. With sophisticated sequencing technology in the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and expertise in genetics and genome informatics, UBC researchers are analyzing portions of the genomes of children under age five with epilepsy of unknown cause. Identified genetic mutations can reveal biochemical abnormalities – and possible treatments. “In genetic medicine…our goals are to promote rapid innovation and provide accurate, clinically meaningful results,” says Dr. Matthew Farrer, the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Neurogenetics and Translational Neuroscience at UBC and the Dr. Donald Rix BC Leadership Chair in Genetic Medicine. “We perform the genome sequencing within a week, so for some patients and families our approach is much faster and lower in heartache than the current standard of care.”

Matthew Farrer

Successes emerged in the first months of testing. Of the 50 children whose genomes were sequenced by June, the cause of epilepsy was identified in 13, and the results pointed to changes in treatment for eight of them. In one child, a mutation put her at high risk of liver damage, and by changing the drug being used to treat her seizures, her doctor was able to spare that organ from harm.

The UBC study will incorporate an economic analysis, which could convince health policy-makers of the need for more routine genetic sequencing of children with epilepsy, reducing the risk of potential long-term brain damage from seizures.

It is a remarkable tool that will help us quickly diagnose hundreds of children every year, stop the seizures, and let these kids be kids.

“Seizures are bad for the developing brain,” says Dr. Mary Connolly, Head of the Division of Pediatric Neurology and Director of the Epilepsy Program at BC Children’s Hospital. “Some children outgrow them and bounce back, but others can develop autism and intellectual impairment. Genetic sequencing won’t help every child, but it is a remarkable tool that will help us quickly diagnose hundreds of children every year, stop the seizures, and let these kids be kids.”

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Educating our Trainees in Research Eiman Zargaran, General Surgery Resident and former Clinician Investigator Fellow


EDUCATING OUR TRAINEES IN RESEARCH

Educating our Trainees in Research Exposing trainees to the fundamental principles and opportunities of research is an important priority for the Faculty of Medicine. We offer 22 Master’s and PhD programs, which include eight professional Master’s programs, one MD/PhD program and, 13 research-based MSc/PhD programs. Diverse postdoctoral and clinical research training opportunities are also available to our trainees. A breadth of clinical, population, and discovery-based research takes place at multiple, state-of the art facilities across the province. In our three undergraduate programs, students are exposed to research through a variety of courses and elective opportunities. An important initiative is the Summer Student Research Program (SSRP), an extracurricular program that supports both MD and non-MD undergraduate students. The Faculty of Medicine also offers research-related training to international undergraduate students through the Vancouver Summer Program in Medicine.

Graduate, Postgraduate, and Postdoctoral Research Programs In March of 2015, the Faculty was pleased to welcome Dr. Wendy Robinson to the role of Assistant Dean, Graduate and Postdoctoral Education. Dr. Robinson is a Professor in the Department of Medical Genetics at UBC and a Senior Scientist at the BC Child & Family Research Institute (CFRI). She completed her PhD in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley and worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Medical Genetics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Her main research interests involve the genetic and epigenetic aspects of early human development affecting healthy trajectories at birth. Since joining UBC in 1994, Dr. Robinson has been actively involved in undergraduate and graduate teaching, which has been recognized with Departmental and Killam teaching awards. She has also been involved in many training opportunities including codirecting the Interdisciplinary Women’s Reproductive Health Training Program and acting as Director of the Reproduction & Healthy Pregnancy Research Cluster. Dr. Robinson is committed to ensuring our trainees are being well-supported within each program and have access to diverse resources to develop the broad skill sets needed for research and teaching in today’s world. “My goal is to support and serve individual graduate students, graduate programs, and postdoctoral education to attract top trainees, energize their research and training, and set them on an optimal trajectory for a successful career,” says Dr. Robinson. “I envision a community of trainees at all levels whose members are intellectually and socially engaged, well connected to each other, responsible, collaborative, and globally aware.”

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1,596 Graduate Students

Master’s and PhD Programs As of November 2015, the Faculty of Medicine graduate programs reported 1,596 graduate students enrolled in master’s and doctoral programs; this includes over 700 MSc and PhD students engaged in biomedical research. Much of this research occurs at hospital affiliated research institutes and bridges the gap between discovery science and health applications. Our graduate training programs encourage broad skill development that will not only encourage high standards of research excellence, but also help our trainees to work collaboratively with others to advance health research forward and to act as educators that can effectively share their knowledge with the broader community. Our students are attracted to UBC from around the world with 40% of doctoral students originating from outside of Canada. A breakdown of the number of graduate students by program can be found in Appendix E.

Student Profile: Dustin King, 65th Annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting attendee Every year, dozens of Nobel Laureates convene at Lindau where they meet with the next generation of leading scientists from all over the world. The Annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings foster energetic exchanges among scientists of different generations, cultures, and disciplines. This year’s meeting was dedicated to interdisciplinary scientific exchange. A record number of 65 Nobel Laureates met with 650 young scientists. Through an internal competition, graduate student, Dustin King, was selected and supported by the Faculty and UBC to attend the meeting. King is a highly regarded fourth year PhD candidate in Biochemistry and Dustin King Molecular Biology, and works in Dr. Natalie Strynadka’s lab in the Life Sciences Institute. His doctoral research project takes a multi-disciplinary approach towards understanding the molecular basis of beta-lactamase antibiotic resistance. His work, and collaborations stemming from it, has already led to numerous publications in prestigious journals such as Nature. King says he was extremely impressed with the topics discussed at this year’s meeting. “I was inspired by how the Laureates shared a general interest in scientific areas that were outside their immediate field of study,” he explains. “A major topic of discussion at the meeting was climate change and the Laureates were active in advocating many different perspectives.” Reflecting on this opportunity, King is quick to express his gratitude. “This was a once in a lifetime experience,” he says. “I am very grateful to have been given the opportunity to take part in such an inspiring meeting.”

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MD/PhD Program The UBC MD/PhD Program is an integrated program jointly administered by the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Its purpose is to provide selected and highly qualified students the opportunity to combine their medical school experience with intensive scientific research training in a PhD graduate program, in order to pursue careers as clinician-scientists. The program is designed such that students can receive the combined MD/PhD degree after successful completion of seven years of enrollment. The program of study is built upon the standard MD curriculum, but it is further customized to meet the unique PhD training program requirements of individual students based on their background, previous research experience, and chosen medical field of expertise.

MD/PhD Award Success Highlights Graduate students in the MD/PhD program have excellent results in external funding competitions. In 2015, four students were awarded the most prestigious graduate student award in Canada, the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. The award is valued at $50,000 per year for three years during doctoral studies and weighted equally on the three evaluation criteria: academic excellence, research potential, and leadership. The 2015 Awardees were: •

Parker Jobin (supervisor: Dr. Christopher Overall) Project title: tRNA synthetases as extracellular targets of matrix metalloproteinases

Frank Lee (supervisor: Dr. Edward Pryzdial) Project title: Dissecting the mechanism of a novel clot dissolving agent: Amino acid-tethered clotting factor Xa

Adam Ramzy (supervisor: Dr. Timothy Kieffer) Project title: An adeno-associated virus based gene therapy treatment for diabetes: Using transcription factors to guide the expansion of insulin producing beta-cell mass in the pancreas

Eric Zhao (supervisor: Dr. Steven Jones) Project title: Networks, signatures, and personalized medicine: a whole genome approach to cancer therapy

Eric Zhao, MD/PhD Year 3 student

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Clinician Investigator Program Program Director: Dr. Siân Spacey, MD

The UBC Clinician Investigator Program (CIP) is designed to provide a combined research and clinical training stream for residents in clinical specialty programs at UBC. The aim is to encourage young physicians to pursue careers as clinician-scientists and to renew the clinical academic faculty at UBC and other Canadian medical schools. As of July 2015, 14 fellows were enrolled in the Clinician Investigator Program. The program has been highly successful in renewing the clinical academic faculty positions at UBC and other Canadian medical institutions. CIP fellows have consistently obtained salary awards, operating grants, and prestigious fellowships (e.g. Grand Challenges, Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships). Of highly important note, a recent graduate obtained a £2.6M operating grant in Cambridge, which has lead him to run numerous projects in the UK.

UBC’s Clinician Investigator Program helps build the next generation of physician-scientists For Sheona Mitchell the decision to pursue a career as a physician-scientist was not just about making an impact — it was about building long-term, sustainable healthcare solutions for some of the world’s most underserved populations. “As a doctor, I didn’t want to be a medical tourist, I want to be a part of something more sustainable — and that’s what drew me to research,” says Dr. Mitchell, a former UBC resident, now working as an obstetrician gynecologist and researcher in Prince George. Dr. Mitchell’s first introduction to life as a physician-researcher came during her time as a resident at UBC, while working with Gina Ogilvie, a professor, and principle investigator of the Advances in Screening and Prevention in Reproductive Cancers (ASPIRE) project in Uganda. The experience left her with a desire for more research opportunities — and ultimately led her to pursue a two-year fellowship with UBC’s Clinician Investigator Program (CIP), which is designed to provide a combined research and clinical training stream for UBC residents in clinical specialty programs. Over the course of her time as a CIP fellow, Dr. Mitchell continued her research and work with ASPIRE, travelling to impoverished areas of Kampala, Uganda, where, under the supervision of Dr. Ogilvie, she piloted a HPV self-collection and cervical cancer screening program. “In low-income countries, like Uganda, there’s not the medical infrastructure or number of skilled professionals to provide the kind of screening programs that we have here in Canada. That’s why using a simple technology that allows women living in low-resource areas to collect their own swabs for HPV is so important,” explains Dr. Mitchell. For Dr. Mitchell, it was time spent abroad, engaging face-to-face with the women of Kampala during her CIP fellowship, that helped solidify her passion for research and interest in becoming a physician-scientist long term. “Research-clinicians have a big role to play in helping to narrow the health inequality gap,” says Dr. Mitchell. “It’s all about looking at the root causes of a problem and investing the time and energy to develop a tailored, evidence-based solution that is relevant to local realities.”

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Postdoctoral Research Fellows Postdoctoral research fellows are individuals who have completed a doctoral degree (PhD) and who are seeking the opportunity to train further in a particular area of research. As of November 2015, there were 313 postdoctoral research fellows across all of our campuses and sites, contributing to a broad variety of interdisciplinary areas in health from all parts of the world.

Prestigious External Awards for Graduate and Postdoctoral Trainees â&#x20AC;˘

1 Faculty of Medicine postdoctoral researcher awarded Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship

â&#x20AC;˘

1 Faculty of Medicine postdoctoral researcher awarded CIHR Fellowship Award

313

Postdoctoral Research Fellows

In the last year, CIP fellows have also achieved awards within UBC, from external universities including Columbia and UCLA as well as training and presentation awards.

Internal Awards for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows Faculty of Medicine Graduate Student Awards Awarded annually, these comprise a number of awards with distinct criteria. In 2014-15, these awards provided $93,000 worth of scholarship funds to 12 Faculty of Medicine graduate students.

Friedman Scholars Program Established in 2013 with a generous donation from the Constance LivingstoneFriedman and Sydney Friedman Foundation, the Friedman Scholars Program aims to extend the global reach of UBC graduate students and medical resident trainees, and enrich our scholarly community by providing opportunities for our future scholars in the health sciences to learn from global experts in their respective fields. Friedman Scholars are expected to travel outside of Western Canada to other areas of the world in order to seek new perspectives and learn from experts in their fields. Four Friedman Scholars were selected during the 2014-15 academic year and were awarded a total of $100,000 to pursue learning opportunities with experts abroad.

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Bluma Tischler Postdoctoral Fellowship The Bluma Tischler Fellowship was established in 1978 with two initial gifts from the Universities Council of British Columbia. It was named after Dr. Bluma Tischler, in recognition for her work in biochemical disorders leading to developmental delays and her efforts to institute newborn screening for preventable disorders in British Columbia. This fellowship provides over $20,000 in funding to a postdoctoral fellow carrying out research on the biochemical or genetic aspects of mental retardation or other neurological disorders. Many past awardees of the Bluma Tischler Postdoctoral Fellowship have moved on to successful academic careers. For example, past awardees Austen Milnerwood, Clara van Karnebeek & Graham Sinclair are now professors in the Faculty of Medicine. Sadly, Dr. Tischler passed away in May of 2015. However, this legacy award ensures that her memory will inspire future generations of reserachers.

Dr. Dale Martin, Bluma Tischler Postdoctoral Fellowship recipient The Bluma Tischler Fellowship recipient for both 2014 and 2015 was Dr. Dale Martin (Medical Genetics; supervisor Dr. Michael R. Hayden). His research focuses on identifying and characterizing new targeting strategies in Huntington Disease (HD) therapy. Dr. Martin sees similarities in his research and that of Dr. Tischler, explaining how the rarity of Huntington Disease, which affects one in 7,300 people, is similar to that of phenylketonuria (the disease Dr. Tischler’s work focused on), which affects one in 10,000 people. “Rare diseases are largely underfunded,” Dr. Martin emphasizes. “I believe that stimulating discussion into any rare disease is important to promote both funding and research.” Dr. Martin also highlights the parallel between Dr. Tischler’s work to promote the use of the Guthrie test and the genetic predictive test for HD developed by Dr. Hayden. Still used today, the Guthrie test has expanded from its original screening for phenylketonuria (PKU) to test for 22 treatable disorders. “Dr. Tischler was at the forefront of translational medicine,” Dr. Martin says. “I believe highlighting the research we are doing in HD to identify new treatments could help reduce the anxiety for being tested and may help increase the uptake rate for HD predictive testing.” Dr. Martin’s interaction with patients in the lab is what keeps him inspired in his work. “It’s hard to put in words, but seeing their struggle and how they face it each day inspires us to work harder,” he explains. “I think that in Dr. Hayden’s lab, there is a real opportunity to make a valuable contribution to help patients of HD.”

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Summer Student Research Program The Faculty of Medicine Summer Student Research Program (FoM SSRP) is an extracurricular program administered by the Office of the EADR with the goal to inspire and support students to pursue research training. The FoM SSRP provides students an opportunity to engage in biomedical health research over the summer, with some projects continuing beyond the FoM SSRP into the academic year. The competition is currently open to non-MD undergraduate students (e.g., science, pharmacy, midwifery, laboratory science undergraduate students, etc.) and first- and second-year MD students registered at UBC. It provides funding for a summer research project supervised by a member of the Faculty of Medicine. The 2015 SSRP competition received 186 eligible applications (97 from MD students and 89 from non-MD students). The available funding for the 2015 SSRP competition ($318,000) provided support for 77 MD student projects and 35 non-MD student projects, for a 60% funding success rate. The Faculty of Medicine SSRP is by far the largest of the health-related summer studentship programs at UBC and its affiliated research institutes. The Faculty of Medicine SSRP funds over 100 projects per year, compared with an average of 7-30 projects funded per year by other programs.

Medical student learns valuable research skills through the Summer Student Research Program According to Statistics Canada, some 30,000 concussions or related head injuries are recorded annually for patients 12 to 19 years old. Although low risk concussions and head injuries do not benefit from Computed Tomography (CT) scanning, many patients admitted to the ER with these injuries undergo CT scans and are, therefore, exposed to unnecessary radiation. As part of this summer’s Faculty of Medicine Summer Student Research Program (SSRP), second-year Southern Medical Program student, Hannah Duyvewaardt, worked on a project with Dr. Mike Ertel, Clinical Instructor with UBC’s Department of Emergency Medicine and Chief of Staff for Kelowna General Hospital (KGH). Their goal was to identify optimal candidates for CT scanning thereby reducing patient exposure to avoidable radiation. Before this experience, Duyvewaart says she had never participated in a research study. “I knew nothing about research,” she explains. “[Through the SSRP] I learned how to create a research proposal, how to write an ethics application. I learned how to do a literature review and how to present to doctors.” Dr. Ertel agrees the project was a superb learning opportunity for Duyvewaardt and emphasizes how it will increase her overall awareness of the proper use of hospital resources and help her in her future practice. Duyvewaardt will continue her involvement in the project by helping to distribute educational resources to ER physicians and monitoring their impact. With increased education, she and Dr. Ertel expect to see significant improvements in physician adherence levels to CT scanning protocols, better utilization of resources, and reduced radiation exposure for non-qualified patients. Duyvewaardt, who is very interested in pursuing a career in Emergency Medicine, believes this project and the SSRP experience has significantly improved her understanding of the specialty and has enabled her to develop the skills necessary to be a successful student, researcher and physician.

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Health Profession Programs Associate Dean: Dr. William Miller

As recognized leaders in numerous academic and institutional settings, faculty members in the health professions have built strong partnerships with world-class facilities and research institutions. Many have also garnered strong support from provincial, national, and international research granting agencies, including the CIHR, CFI, NIH, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canada Stroke Network, Michael Smith, and more. In 2015 alone, health researchers — including the Department of Physical Therapy’s Drs. Janice Eng and Teresa Liu-Ambrose and the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy’s Drs. Jill Zwicker and Ben Mortenson — received significant investment, totaling in the multi-millions, from the Canadian Institute of Health Research. A recent study examining the productivity of physical and occupational therapy faculty at universities across Canada found that UBC’s Department of Physical Therapy and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy rank highest in Canada when it comes to CIHR funding dollars per principal investigator, and number two on the h-index, which measures publication productivity and citation impact. Under the leadership and supervision of faculty, UBC’s health professions students at both the undergraduate and graduate level are helping to tackle some of the major health issues faced by Canadians, and have secured funding to advance research, aimed to improve the health of our communities.

William Miller

UBC’s Health Profession Programs •

Physical Therapy

Occupational Therapy

Audiology and Speech Sciences

Midwifery

Genetic Counselling

Medical Laboratory Science

UBC Master of Occupational Therapy students showcase research at annual Capstone Conference The Capstone Conference is one of the crowning events for UBC’s second-year Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) students. This year’s 10th anniversary event was no exception. The graduating class of 2015 designed and executed well over 20 research projects, each contributing new developments to the field of occupational therapy. Dr. Catherine Backman, head of UBC’s Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, applauded the students’ efforts. “I’m always impressed by the caliber of research conducted by our students,” she said. The conference drew support from local MLAs Suzanne Anton (VancouverFraserview) and David Eby (Vancouver-Point Grey) who heard from students and gained a richer understanding of some of the unique research projects underway within the Department. RIGHT: Greg McKinstry, Vice President of the Stroke Recovery Association of BC; Suzanne Anton, MLA for Vancouver-Fraserview; Marie Maratos, UBC MOT student; David Eby, MLA for Vancouver-Point Grey; and Linh Huyng, UBC MOT student.

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PhD candidate takes a novel approach to rehabilitation for older adult amputees By designing an in-home, tele-health Wii Fit intervention, aimed at improving walking capacity in older adults with lower-limb amputation, UBC Rehabilitation Sciences PhD candidate Bita Imam is examining how gaming technology can be used as a rehabilitation tool. “The number of older adults living with lower limb amputation who require rehabilitation is growing, but existing practices frequently fail to meet this demand,” says Imam. “Commercial video games present a potentially cost-effective and practical rehabilitation intervention at a time when health care costs are on the rise.” Imam’s work has generated interest from funding agencies across Canada. In 2014, she garnered prestigious doctoral research awards, including the UBC Killam Doctoral Scholarship. She also recently presented at the 2015 International Society of Prosthetics and Orthotics in Lyon, France.

Commercial video games present a potentially cost-effective and practical rehabilitation intervention at a time when health care costs are on the rise.

Imam’s supervisor, Dr. Bill Miller — a professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy and Associate Dean, Health Professions — believes her work holds much promise. “Bita’s work using off- the-shelf technology in a novel way is just one example of creative health service provision,” he says. “The Wii.n.Walk program is a platform that could be applied to many different areas of rehabilitation.” Imam says the inspiration for pursuing her research comes from her passion to improve the lives of those with lower-limb amputation. “These adults are my source of inspiration,” says Imam. “I feel very privileged to be a part of their journey and see them improve and do activities that they once thought would never be possible again.”

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2015 VSP in Medicine cohort

Vancouver Summer Program in Medicine Through engaging classes in basic and clinical sciences, as well as social activities and intercultural workshops, the Vancouver Summer Program (VSP) in Medicine provides an opportunity for visiting undergraduate students from international universities to experience the very best of Canadian medical education, and to learn about Canadian culture firsthand. The demand for quality summer programs in Medicine was evidenced by the 238 participating students (a dramatic increase from 85 in 2014), who travelled to UBC from 41 international universities for the four-week academic program. The VSP has helped strengthen the Facultyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existing international partnerships in Asia, with student participation from top institutions (including Fudan University, Peking University and Hong Kong University) almost doubling from 2014 to 2015. The total number of participating institutions has tripled in the same amount of time with a total of six countries sending students to the program. This year saw a new partnership with Wenzhou Medical University, who entered into a VSP-specific agreement with UBC and sent 21 medical students to the program. The VSP in Medicine will continue to grow and attract students from other leading institutions. An additional cohort is planned for June 2016 and is proving to be an attractive option for students in India, Mexico and Singapore, where recruitment is already underway.

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Opportunity presented through UBC’s VSP in Medicine allows international student to pursue his dreams Shuo Chen, an undergraduate psychology student from Southwest University in China, recently completed the Vancouver Summer Program in Medicine at UBC. Chen has always been interested in science and research, so when he discovered the opportunity to study at UBC, he jumped at the chance. “I wanted to know what it would be like to study and conduct research in another country,” Chen explains. “The Vancouver Summer Program in Medicine has allowed me the opportunity to do this.”

Shuo Chen

Along with his fellow participants, Chen spent four weeks at UBC’s Vancouver campus attending classes, learning about medicine and Canadian culture. He found the experience to be rich and rewarding. “The best thing was to have classmates from different majors, who contribute knowledge through their own lens,” Chen says. “The way we communicated cooperatively in the program will be an expectation in our upcoming careers as health professionals.” Because of his experience at the VSP in Medicine, and his love for medicine and research, Chen has been fortunate enough to secure a term research position with Dr. Elton Ngan and Dr. Christian Schultz (Associate Professors, Psychiatry). He will be working to evaluate a data set in an fMRI project which looks at decision making in addicts and gamblers. “I feel grateful to be working with Dr. Ngan and Dr. Schultz,” says Chen. “This kind of opportunity will allow me to pursue my dreams.”

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Conclusion This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prolific research activities illustrate the Faculty of Medicineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to transformation, innovation and, particularly, the promise of new frontiers in medical research and their potential to transform care. We hope this report is inspiring to our research community, in the breadth of our collective contribution and ability to transform care and health in British Columbia and beyond.

Acknowledgments We are grateful to the following individuals for contributing their knowledge and expertise to help in the preparation of this report: Dr. Sam Aparicio, James Beresford, Kerry Blackadar, Warren Brock, Dr. David Cabral, Dr. Bruce Carleton, Dr. Chris Carlsten, Dr. Nadine Caron, Melissa Carr, Shuo Chen, Hansen Chou, Dr. Peter Cullis, Dr. Martin Dawes, Tessa Feuchuk, Dr. Jennifer Gardy, Dr. Dan Goldowitz, Patricia Gray, Kelsey Harmse, Dr. Michael Hayden, Linda Herbert, Dr. Steven Jones, Lina Jung, Juzer Kakal, Dustin King, Brian Kladko, Dr. Janessa Laskin, Dr. Michael Law, Alison Liversage, Patricia Lou, Lindsay Lynch, Dr. Marco Marra, Dr. Dale Martin, Dr. Bill Miller, Dr. Robert Molday, Dr. Sara Mostafavi, Dr. Gina Ogilvie, Dr. Alex Rauscher, Dr. Samantha Reid, Lisa Ritland, Dr. Wendy Robinson, Dr. Martin Schechter, Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, Dr. Sian Spacey, Dr. Jon Stoessl, Amy Tsang, UBC Public Affairs, Cindi Valensky, Daniella Weber, Bryan Wong, Jacqueline Wong, Dr. Michelle Wong, Dr. Annalee Yassi, Dr. Jill Zwicker.

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


APPENDICES

Appendices Appendix A – UBC Faculty of Medicine 2014 CIHR Foundation Grant Recipients............................................................................56 Appendix B – Donor-funded professorships held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine................................................57 Appendix C – Donor-funded chairs held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine................................................................58 Appendix D – Donor-funded distinguished scholar awards held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine. ..................59 Appendix E – UBC Faculty of Medicine Graduate Program Students................................................................................................... 60 Appendix F – UBC Faculty of Medicine Research Committees...............................................................................................................62 Appendix G - UBC Faculty of Medicine, Research - Organizational Chart..........................................................................................66 Appendix H - UBC Faculty of Medicine Publications in High-Impact Journals (2014-2015 fiscal year).................................... 68 Appendix I – UBC Faculty of Medicine International Agreements.........................................................................................................72 Appendix J – Geographical distribution of UBC Faculty of Medicine international agreements....................................................73

55


Appendix A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; UBC Faculty of Medicine 2014 CIHR Foundation Grant Recipients Name

Project Title

CIHR Contribution Term

Craig, Ann Marie

Molecular analysis of synapse development

$2,647,918

7 yrs

Dedhar, Shoukat The Role of Tumor Microenvironment in Cancer Progression: Identification and Therapeutic Intervention of Novel Targets

$4,164,493

7 yrs

Eng, Janice

Optimizing and maintaining abilities after stroke

$2,481,346

7 yrs

Gill, John

Strategies to achieve self-sufficiency in kidney transplantation in Canada

$916,387

7 yrs

Granville, David

Granzymes in Tissue Injury, Inflammation and Repair

$1,805,469

7 yrs

Kieffer, Timothy

Hormonal Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis

$2,296,305

7 yrs

Lam, Wan

An integrative approach to understand lung cancer development in smokers and non-smokers

$2,631,735

7 yrs

Lester, Richard

Evidence to action for Canadian and global mobile health (mHealth) communication to promote patient engagement in care: a rigorous implementation science approach

$732,666

5 yrs

Leung, Peter

Hormonal determinants of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive health and disease $3,758,884

7 yrs

Marra, Marco

Exploring the relationship between the genome and the epigenome in cancers

$4,088,854

7 yrs

Murphy, Timothy

Enabling novel circuit-based treatments for stroke: insights from cortical circuit monitoring and manipulation in mouse models

$2,901,475

7 yrs

Nicholls, Tonia

Violence, Victimization, and Crime among Marginalized Populations: $2,028,413 Research to Advance Care and Management

7 yrs

Ogilvie, Gina

Integrated global control and prevention of HPV related diseases and cancer

$2,714,493

7 yrs

Raymond, Lynn

Aberrant NMDA receptor and synaptic signaling in vulnerability to neurodegeneration: Focus on Huntington disease

$2,261,754

7 yrs

Shah, Sohrab

The clonal dynamics of ovarian cancers: phylogenetic models of chemosensitivity and resistance

$910,631

5 yrs

Shannon, Kate

Structural Determinants, Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS: Reducing Health & Social Inequities

$2,448,322

5 yrs

Sin, Donald

Using Multi-Omics To Discover Novel Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

$2,249,084

7 yrs

Sorensen, Poul

Targeting the tumour cell stress response in high-risk childhood cancers

$2,301,116

7 yrs

Strynadka, Natalie

Structure-based Antibiotic Discovery on the Bacterial Membrane

$4,043,512

7 yrs

Wood, Evan

Positioning Canada as an international leader in addiction research and education to improve care and reduce costs to the health care system

$2,141,561

7 yrs

Yip, Calvin

Molecular mechanisms of autophagy regulation

$739,963

5 yrs

Zwicker, Jill

Using Brain Imaging to Determine Predictors of Developmental Coordination Disorder and Response to Intervention

$684,199

5 yrs

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APPENDICES

Appendix B – Donor-funded professorships held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine Research Area

Professorship

Holder

Audiology & Speech Sciences

Eric W Hamber Professor in Clinical Audiology

Dr. Susan Small

Cancer

Dr. Chew Wei MBBS [HK] FRCOG [ENG] Memorial Professorship

Dr. David Huntsman

Heart & Lung

British Columbia Lung Association Professorship

Dr. Michael Brauer

GlaxoSmithKline Professorship in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder

Dr. Stephan van Eeden

McLeod Family Professorship in Valvular Heart Disease Intervention

Dr. John Webb

Paul Brunes UBC Professorship in Heart Rhythm Disorders

Dr. Andrew Krahn

UBC Heart & Stroke Foundation Professorship in Women’s Cardiovascular Dr. Karin Humphries Health Neurosciences & Mental Health

Medicine Pediatrics

BC Neurotrauma Professorship

Dr. Matt Ramer

Fipke Professorship in Alzheimer’s Research

Dr. Haakon Nygaard

Jack Brown & Family Professorship in Alzheimer’s Research

Dr. Weihong Song

Pacific Parkinson’s Research Institute Professorship in Parkinson’s Research

Dr. Silke Cresswell

Ralph Fisher and Alzheimer Society of BC Professorship in Alzheimer Research

Dr. Howard Feldman

R. Howard Webster Professorship in Brain Imaging and Child Development

Dr. Tim Oberlander

Sauder Family and Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon Professorship in Clinical Stroke Research

Dr. Phillip Teal

Glen Hillson Professorship in Clinical Virology

Dr. Richard Harrigan

Michael O’Shaughnessey Professorship in HIV/AIDS & Population Health

Open

Aubrey J Tingle Professorship in Paediatric Immunology

Dr. Stuart Turvey

UBC and BC Children’s Hospital Professorship in Acute and Critical Care - Dr. Niranjan “Tex” Global Child Health Kissoon Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Dr. Victor Gomel Professorship in Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Dr. Geoffrey Cundiff

Population & Public Health

Mary and Maurice Young Professorship in Applied Ethics

Dr. Peter Danielson

Professorship in Health Promotion

Dr. James Frankish

Professorship in Health Services and Policy

Open

Dr. Patrick J. Doyle & Dr. Quentin D. Jacks Professorship in Otolaryngological Research

Dr. Cathie Garnis

Surgery

57


Appendix C – Donor-funded chairs held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine. Research Area

Chair

Holder

Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics

Dr. Jean Templeton Hugill Chair in Anaesthesia

Dr. Stephen Schwarz

University of British Columbia Chair in Patient Safety

Dr. Malcolm Maclure

Asa and Kashmir Johal and Family Chair in Paediatric Oncology

Dr. Poul Sorensen

BC Leadership Chair in Functional Cancer Imaging

Dr. Francois Benard

Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Primary Prevention of Cancer Research

Dr. Carolyn Gotay

Liber Ero BC Leadership Chair in Prostate Cancer Research

Dr. Martin Gleave

University of British Columbia, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, BCYukon Chapter, Nan Robertson Chair in Breast Cancer Research

Dr. Samuel Aparicio

VGH and UBC Hospital Foundation Dr. Patricia Clugston Chair in Breast Reconstruction

Open – search

Family Medicine

Royal Canadian Legion Chair in Family Medicine

Dr. Martin Dawes

Heart & Lung

AstraZeneca Chair in Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease

Dr. Christopher Carlsten

Sauder Family and Heart and Stroke Foundation Chair in Cardiology

Dr. Andrew Krahn

Allan M McGavin Chair in Geriatric Medicine

Open

CSL-Behring Research Chair in Endothelial Cell Biology

Dr. Ed Conway

E.W. Hamber Chair in Medicine

Dr. Graydon Meneilly

Harold Robinson Arthritis Society Chair in Arthritic Diseases

Dr. Linda Li

Mary C. Fisher Chair of Medicine

Open

Mary Pack Arthritis Society Chair in Rheumatology

Dr. Diane Lacaille

Reichwald Family UBC Southern Medical Program Chair in Preventive Medicine

Open

UBC and St Paul’s Hospital Foundation Chair in AIDS Research

Dr. Julio Montaner

Alcan Chair in Neurosciences

Dr. Gary Redekop

BC Leadership Chair in Depression Research (LEEF)

Open - search

Chair in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Research

Dr. Andrei Krassioukov

Cordula and Gunter Paetzold Chair in Spinal Cord Clinical Research

Dr. Marcel Dvorak

Dr. Donald Rix BC Leadership Chair in Genetic Medicine (LEEF)

Dr. Matthew Farrer

Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon Chair in Stroke Research

Dr. Yu Tian Wang

IMH Chair in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Dr. Anthony Bailey

IMH Chair in Psychotherapy

Open

Jack Bell Chair in Schizophrenia

Dr. William Honer

John and Penny Ryan BC Leadership Chair in Spinal Cord Research

Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff

Louise Brown Chair in Neuroscience

Dr. Steven Vincent

Marianne Koerner Chair in Brain Diseases

Dr. Jason Barton

Cancer

Medicine

Neurosciences & Mental Health

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APPENDICES

Research Area

Ophthalmology

Pediatrics

Population & Public Health

Surgery

Chair

Holder

Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada Research Chair, Supported by the MS MRI Group

Dr. Anthony Traboulsee

Pacific Parkinson’s Research Institute UBC Chair in Parkinson’s Research

Dr. Martin McKeown

Providence Health Care BC Leadership Chair in Addiction Research

Dr. Michael Krausz

Rick Hansen Institute Spinal Cord Research Chair

Open

Julia Levy BC Leadership Chair in Macular Research

Dr. Kevin GregoryEvans

Stephen M. Drance Chair in Ophthalmology

Dr. David Maberley

CH.I.L.D. Foundation Chair in Paediatric Gastroenterology Research

Dr. Bruce Vallance

CKNW Orphan’s Fund Chair of Immunology

Dr. Stuart Turvey

James & Annabel McCreary Chair in Pediatrics, Supported by the BC Children’s Hospital Foundation

Dr. Allison Eddy

Sauder Family Chair in Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Dr. David Speert

Sunnyhill Health Centre BC Leadership Chair in Early Child Development (LEEF)

Open – search

Ross Petty - The Arthritis Society Research Chair in Pediatric Rheumatology

Dr. David Cabral

Chair in Biomedical Ethics

Dr. Michael Burgess

Chair in Business and Professional Ethics

Dr. David Silver

J. Armand Bombardier Foundation Chair in Regional Transportation Planning

Dr. Lawrence Frank

Maurice Young Chair in Applied Ethics

Dr. Peter Danielson

WCB Chair in Occupational Hygiene (Applied Science)

Dr. Murray Hodgson

WCB Chairs12 in Occupational Hygiene (Graduate Studies & Medicine)

Dr. Michael Brauer

C.N. Woodward Chair in Surgery

Dr. Garth Warnock

Irving K Barber Chair in Diabetes Research

Dr. Bruce Verchere

Appendix D – Donor-funded distinguished scholar awards held by faculty within the UBC Faculty of Medicine. Research Area

Distinguished Scholar Award

Holder

Medicine

Charles Kerr Distinguished Scholarship in Cardiovascular Genetics

Dr. Zachary Laksman

Medicine

Charles Kerr Distinguished Scholarship in Heart Rhythm Management

Open

12

These are considered two chairs for counting purposes. 59


Appendix E – UBC Faculty of Medicine Graduate Program Students Graduate Programs

Master’s

PhD

Enrollment

Degrees conferred

Enrollment

Degrees conferred

MD/PhD Program

-

-

27

1

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (MSc, PhD)

24

3

40

6

Cell and Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

27

11

30

6

Experimental Medicine (MSc, PhD)

75

6

126

8

Health Administration (MHA)

84

42

-

-

Health Sciences (MHSc)

54

14

-

-

Interdisciplinary Oncology (MSc, PhD)

14

0

35

3

Medical Genetics (MSc, PhD)

20

5

40

5

Neuroscience (MSc, PhD)

42

10

76

9

Occupational and Environmental Hygiene (MSc)

28

12

-

-

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (MSc, PhD)

32

45

4

8

Pharmacology and Therapeutics (MSc, PhD)

5

4

18

4

Population & Public Health (MSc & PhD)

48

6

84

11

Public Health (MPH)

74

27

-

-

Master of Rehabilitation Science (MRSc)

76

8

-

-

Rehabilitation Science (MSc, PhD)

27

2

42

2

Reproductive and Developmental Sciences (MSc, PhD)

19

2

17

4

Surgery (MSc)

6

5

-

-

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APPENDICES

Graduate Health Professional Programs Master’s

PhD

Total student enrollment

Degrees conferred

Enrollment

Degrees conferred

Audiology and Speech Sciences (MSc, PhD)

78

37

5

0

Genetic Counselling (MSc)

12

4

-

-

Physical Therapy (MPT)

161

77

-

-

Occupational Therapy (MOT)

105

46

-

-

Comments on Graduate Student Enrollment and Graduation Data •

The graduate student enrollment data is a snapshot of student enrollment in programs administered by the Faculty of Medicine as of November 1, 2015.

Students enrolled in graduate programs outside of the Faculty of Medicine (e.g., Interdisciplinary Studies) are not included even though they may have Faculty of Medicine faculty supervisors.

Degrees conferred are reported for the 2015 calendar year and include both May and November convocations.

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Appendix F â&#x20AC;&#x201C; UBC Faculty of Medicine Research Committees Associate/Assistant Deans, Research (Academic Year 2014-15) Title

Name

Executive Associate Dean, Research (Chair)

Dr. Howard Feldman

Associate Dean, Research: BC Cancer Agency

Dr. Samuel Abraham (Interim)

Associate Dean, Research: Child & Family Research Institute

Dr. Wyeth Wasserman

Associate Dean, Research: Providence Health Care Research Institute

Dr. Robert Sindelar

Associate Dean, Research: Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute

Dr. Robert McMaster

Associate Dean, Graduate & Postdoctoral Education

Dr. Wendy Robinson

Regional Associate Dean, Vancouver Island

Dr. Bruce Wright

Assistant Dean, Northern Medical Program

Dr. Geoffrey Payne

Assistant Dean, Research, Fraser Health

Dr. Sonia Singh

Assistant Dean, Research, Southern Medical Program

Dr. Chris Fibiger (Interim)

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APPENDICES

Centre Directors (Academic Year 2014-15) Representation

Name, Title

Office of the Executive Associate Dean, Research

Dr. Howard Feldman, Executive Associate Dean, Research (Chair) Dr. Michelle Wong, Director

Research Centres Biomedical Research Centre

Drs. Kelly McNagny and Fabio Rossi, Interim CoDirectors

Centre for Blood Research

Dr. Ed Conway, Director

Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health

Drs. Nadine Caron and Martin Schechter, Co-Directors

Centre for Health Education Scholarship

Dr. Kevin Eva, Acting Director

Centre for Health Evaluation Outcome Sciences (CHĂ&#x2030;OS)

Dr. Aslam Anis, Director

Centre for Health Service and Policy Research

Dr. Sabrina Wong

Centre for Hip Health and Mobility

Dr. Heather McKay, Director

Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics (CMMT)

Drs. Dan Goldowitz and Wyeth Wasserman, CoDirectors

Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health

Drs. Jon Stoessl and Brian MacVicar, Co-Directors

Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)

Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, Interim Director

International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD)

Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff, Director

UBC Centre for Disease Control

Dr. Mark Tyndall, Director

UBC James Hogg Research Centre/IHLH

Dr. Keith Walley, Director

Vancouver Prostate Centre

Dr. Martin Gleave, Director

W. Maurice Young Centre for Applied Ethics

Dr. David Silver, Director

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Research Institute

Dr. Deborah Money, Executive Director

Research Institutes BC Cancer Agency

Dr. Samuel Abraham, Associate Dean, Research: BCCA (Interim)

Child and Family Research Institute

Dr. Wyeth Wasserman, Associate Dean, Research: CFRI

Life Sciences Institute

Dr. Pieter Cullis, Director

Providence Health Research Institute

Dr. Robert Sindelar, Associate Dean, Research: PHRI

Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute

Dr. Robert McMaster, Associate Dean, Research: VCHRI

63


Research Council (Academic Year 2014-15) Composition/Role

Name of Member

Appointed/ Elected/ ExOfficio

Executive Associate Dean, Research, UBC (Chair)

Dr. Howard Feldman

Ex-Officio

Executive Associate Dean, Education

Dr. David Snadden

Ex-Officio

Associate Dean, Continuing Professional Development

Dr. Brenna Lynn

Ex-Officio

Associate Dean, Health Professions

Dr. William Miller

Ex-Officio

Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education

Dr. Roger Wong

Ex-Officio

Assistant Dean, Graduate & Postdoctoral Education

Dr. Wendy Robinson

Ex-Officio

Faculty member representing clinicians elected by Faculty

Dr. K. S. Joseph

Elected

Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Faculty member representing clinicians elected by Faculty

Dr. Jonathon Leipsic

Elected

Radiology

Faculty member representing scientists elected by Faculty

Dr. Bruce Vallance

Elected

Pediatrics

Faculty member representing scientists elected by Faculty

Dr. LeAnn Howe

Elected

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Faculty Executive representative elected by Faculty Executive

Dr. Catherine Backman

Elected

Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy

Faculty Executive representative elected by Faculty Executive

Dr. Valter Ciocca

Elected

Audiology & Speech Sciences

Faculty member at Large elected by Faculty

Dr. Wendy Norman

Elected

Family Practice

Mid-Career Faculty Member elected by Faculty (Associate Professors, or Instructors with 5-7 years of experience)

Dr. Francis Lynn

Elected

Surgery / Cellular and Physiological Sciences

Mid-Career Faculty Member elected by Faculty (Associate Professors, or Instructors with 5-7 years of experience)

Dr. Kurt Haas

Elected

Cellular and Physiological Sciences

Junior Faculty Member elected by Faculty (Assistant Professors, or Instructors with less than 5 years of experience)

Dr. Sheona Mitchell-Foster

Elected

Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Junior Faculty Member elected by Faculty (Assistant Professors, or Instructors with less than 5 years of experience)

Dr. Joan Sims Gould

Elected

Family Practice

64

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Dept/Centres


APPENDICES

Composition/Role

Name of Member

Appointed/ Elected/ ExOfficio

Dept/Centres

Research Associate elected by Research Associates

Dr. Paul Orban

Elected

Surgery

Department Head/School Director representative appointed by the Dean

Dr. Martin Dawes

Appointed

Family Practice

Department Head/School Director representative appointed by the Dean

Dr. Jayne Garland

Appointed

Physical Therapy

Department Head/School Director representative appointed by the Dean

Dr. David Patrick

Appointed

Population and Public Health

Regional Associate Dean

Dr. Bruce Wright

Appointed

Island Medical Program

Associate or Assistant Dean, Research

Dr. Robert Sindelar

Appointed

Providence Health Care Research Institute

Associate or Assistant Dean, Research

Dr. Geoffrey Payne

Appointed

Northern Medical Program

Associate or Assistant Dean, Research

Dr. Chris Fibiger

Appointed

Southern Medical Program

Senate/Faculty approved Centre/Institute Director

Dr. Aslam Anis

Appointed

Centre for Health Evaluation & Outcome Sciences

Senate/Faculty approved Centre/Institute Director

Dr. Pieter R. Cullis

Appointed

Life Sciences Institute

Senate/Faculty approved Centre/Institute Director

Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff

Appointed

ICORD

Graduate Student Basic Science

Ms. Samantha Jones

Appointed

Graduate Student

Graduate Student Clinical Science

Ms. Rand Mahmoud

Appointed

Graduate Student

Graduate Student MD/PhD

Mr. Victor Li

Appointed

MD/PhD Student

Medical Undergraduate Society student representative

Ms. Milan Aspe

Appointed

VFMP 2017 Medical Student

Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Katie Sheehan

Appointed

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Galen Wright

Appointed

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

65


Appendix G - UBC Faculty of Medicine, Research - Organizational Chart

Dean

Executive Associate Dean, Research

Associate Dean, Graduate & Postdoctoral Education

Director, Research

Anatomy and Cell Biology Biochem. & Molecular Biology Database Analyst & Grant Applications Officer

Manager, Research Grant Development

Graduate and Postdoctoral Research Coordinator

Experimental Medicine Health Administration Health Sciences Master of Rehab. Science MD/PhD Program

Research Evaluation Assistant

Grant Development Officer

Manager, Research & Development Proposals

(50% with Development)

Medical Genetics Occ. & Environmental Hygiene Path. & Lab. Medicine Pharmacology & Therapeutics Population & Public Health

Assistant to Executive Associate Dean, Research

Grant Development Officer (8 week contract)

Strategic Programs Officer

Public Health Rehabilitation Science Reproductive & Developmental Sciences Surgery

CORE OPERATIONS  

Student Research Coordinator (50% with Education)

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT & EVALUATION

Audiology & Speech Sciences Genetic Counselling Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Neuroscience Oncology GRADUATE PROGRAMS

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APPENDICES

Associate Dean, Research, BC Cancer Agency Associate Dean, Research, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute Associate Dean, Research, Providence Health Care Research Institute Associate Dean, Research, Child and Family Research Institute

Regional Associate Dean, Vancouver Island

Biomedical Research Centre

Centre for  Blood  Research  

Centre for  Brain  Health  

Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences

Centre for Health Services and Policy Research

Centre for Hip Health and Mobility

Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics

Human Early Learning Partnership

ICORD

W. Maurice  Young  Centre   of  Applied  Ethics  

Assistant Dean, Research, Northern Medical Program

Life Sciences  InsAtute  

UBC Centre for Disease Control

Assistant Dean, Research, Southern Medical Program

UBC James Hogg Research Centre

Vancouver Prostate Centre

Assistant Dean, Research, Fraser Health

Centre for Health Education Scholarship

Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health

ASSOCIATE/ASSISTANT DEANS, RESEARCH

Institute of Mental Health

CENTRES &  INSTITUTES  

67


Appendix H - UBC Faculty of Medicine Publications in High-Impact Journals (2014-2015 fiscal year) Nature Aspergillomarasmine A overcomes metallo-beta-lactamase antibiotic resistance. King, AM; Reid-Yu, SA; Wang, WL; King, DT; De Pascale, G; Strynadka, Natalie C; Walsh, TR; Coombes, BK; Wright, GD. Jun 26, 2014 Comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma. The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (371 authors including Holt, Robert A., Jones, Steven JM, Marra, Marco A). Jul 30, 2014 Targeting transcription regulation in cancer with a covalent CDK7 inhibitor. Kwiatkowski, N; Zhang, TH; Rahl, PB; Abraham, BJ; Reddy, J; Ficarro, SB; Dastur, A; Amzallag, A; Ramaswamy, S; Tesar, B; Jenkins, CE; Hannett, NM; McMillin, D; Sanda, T; Sim, T; Kim, ND; Look, T; Mitsiades, CS; Weng, Andrew P; Brown, JR; Benes, CH; Marto, JA; Young, RA; Gray, NS. Jul 30, 2014 Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma. The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (309 authors including Birol, Inanc, Holt, Robert A., Jones, Steven JM, Marra, Marco A). Sept 11, 2014 Loss of signalling via G alpha 13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma. Muppidi, JR; Schmitz, R; Green, JA; Xiao, WM; Larsens, AB; Braun, SE; An, JP; Xu, Y; Rosenwald, A; Ott, G; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rimsza, LM; Campo, E; Jaffe, ES; Delabie, J; Smeland, EB; Braziel, RM; Tubbs, RR; Cook, JR; Weisenburger, DD; Chan, WC; Vaidehi, N; Staudt, LM; Cyster, JG. Dec 11, 2014 Primate-specific endogenous retrovirus-driven transcription defines naive-like stem cells. Wang, JC; Xie, GC; Singh, M; Ghanbarian, AT; Rasko, T; Szvetnik, A; Cai, HQ; Besser, D; Prigione, A; Fuchs, NV; Schumann, GG; Chen, W; Lorincz, Matthew C; Ivics, Z; Hurst, LD; Izsvak, Z. Dec 18, 2014 Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (349 authors including Birol, Inanc, Holt, Robert A., Jones, Steven JM, Marra, Marco A). Jan 29, 2015 Dynamics of genomic clones in breast cancer patient xenografts at single-cell resolution. Eirew, P; Steif, A; Khattra, J; Ha, G; Yap, D; Farahani, H; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Mar, C; Wan, A; Laks, E; Biele, J; Shumansky, K; Rosner, J; McPherson, A; Nielsen, C; Roth, AJL; Lefebvre, C; Bashashati, A; de Souza, C; Siu, C; Aniba, R; Brimhall, J; Oloumi, A; Osako, T; Bruna, A; Sandoval, JL; Algara, T; Greenwood, W; Leung, K; Cheng, HW; Xue, H; Wang, Yuzhuo; Lin, D; Mungall, AJ; Moore, R; Zhao, YJ; Lorette, J; Nguyen, L; Huntsman, David; Eaves, Connie J; Hansen, C; Marra, Marco A; Caldas, C; Shah, Sohrab P; Aparicio, Samuel. Feb 19, 2015 Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes. The Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium (95 authors including Jones, Steven JM, Marra, Marco A). Feb 19, 2015

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APPENDICES

Science Extensive transduction of nonrepetitive DNA mediated by L1 retrotransposition in cancer genomes (review article). Tubio, JMC; Li, YL; Ju, YS; Martincorena, I; Cooke, SL; Tojo, M; Gundem, G; Pipinikas, CP; Zamora, J; Raine, K; Menzies, A; Roman-Garcia, P; Fullam, A; Gerstung, M; Shlien, A; Tarpey, PS; Papaemmanuil, E; Knappskog, S; Van Loo, P; Ramakrishna, M; Davies, HR; Marshall, J; Wedge, DC; Teague, J; Butler, AP; Nik-Zainal, S; Alexandrov, L; Behjati, S; Yates, LR; Bolli, N; Mudie, L; Hardy, C; Martin, S; McLaren, S; O’Meara, S; Anderson, E; Maddison, M; Gamble, ICGC Breast Canc Grp; ICGC Bone Canc Grp; ICGC Prostate Canc Grp; S; Foster, C; Warren, AY; Whitaker, H; Brewer, D; Eeles, R; Cooper, C; Neal, D; Lynch, AG; Visakorpi, T; Isaacs, WB; van’t Veer, L; Caldas, C; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Aparicio, Samuel; Foekens, JA; Eyfjord, JE; Lakhani, SR; Thomas, G; Myklebost, O; Span, PN; Borresen-Dale, AL; Richardson, AL; Van de Vijver, M; Vincent-Salomon, A; Van den Eynden, GG; Flanagan, AM; Futreal, PA; Janes, SM; Bova, GS; Stratton, MR; McDermott, U; Campbell, PJ. Aug 1, 2014 Pyrimidoindole derivatives are agonists of human hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. Fares, I; Chagraoui, J; Gareau, Y; Gingras, S; Ruel, R; Mayotte, N; Csaszar, E; Knapp, DJHF; Miller, P; Ngom, M; Imren, S; Roy, DC; Watts, KL; Kiem, HP; Herrington, R; Iscove, NN; Humphries, R Keith; Eaves, Connie J; Cohen, S; Marinier, A; Zandstra, PW; Sauvageau, G. Sept 19, 2014

New England Journal of Medicine ABT-450/r-Ombitasvir and Dasabuvir with Ribavirin for Hepatitis C with Cirrhosis. Poordad, F; Hezode, C; Trinh, R; Kowdley, KV; Zeuzem, S; Agarwal, K; Shiffman, ML; Wedemeyer, H; Berg, T; Yoshida, Eric M; Forns, X; Lovell, SS; Da SilvaTillmann, B; Collins, CA; Campbell, AL; Podsadecki, T; Bernstein, B. May 22, 2014 Effects of an Anti-TSLP Antibody on Allergen-Induced Asthmatic Responses. Gauvreau, GM; O’Byrne, PM; Boulet, LP; Wang, Y; Cockcroft, D; Bigler, J; FitzGerald, J Mark; Boedigheimer, M; Davis, BE; Dias, C; Gorski, KS; Smith, L; Bautista, E; Comeau, MR; Leigh, R; Parnes, JR. May 29, 2014 Simvastatin for the Prevention of Exacerbations in Moderate-to-Severe COPD. Criner, GJ; Connett, JE; Aaron, SD; Albert, RK; Bailey, WC; Casaburi, R; Cooper, JAD; Curtis, JL; Dransfield, MT; Han, MK; Make, B; Marchetti, N; Martinez, FJ; Niewoehner, DE; Scanlon, PD; Sciurba, FC; Scharf, SM; Sin, Don D; Voelker, H; Washko, GR; Woodruff, PG; Lazarus, SC for the COPD Clinical Research Network and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Jun 5, 2014 Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Cryptogenic Stroke. Gladstone, DJ; Spring, M; Dorian, P; Panzov, V; Thorpe, KE; Hall, J; Vaid, H; O’Donnell, M; Laupacis, A; Cote, R; Sharma, M; Blakely, JA; Shuaib, A; Hachinski, V; Coutts, SB; Sahlas, DJ; Teal, Phil; Yip, Samuel; Spence, JD; Buck, B; Verreault, S; Casaubon, LK; Penn, A; Selchen, D; Jin, A; Howse, D; Mehdiratta, M; Boyle, K; Aviv, R; Kapral, MK; Mamdani, M for the EMBRACE Investigators and Coordinators. Jun 26, 2014 Transplantation Outcomes for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, 2000-2009. Pai, SY; Logan, BR; Griffith, LM; Buckley, RH; Parrott, RE; Dvorak, CC; Kapoor, N; Hanson, IC; Filipovich, AH; Jyonouchi, S; Sullivan, KE; Small, TN; Burroughs, L; Skoda-Smith, S; Haight, AE; Grizzle, A; Pulsipher, MA; Chan, KW; Fuleihan, RL; Haddad, E; Loechelt, B; Aquino, VM; Gillio, A; Davis, Jeffrey; Knutsen, A; Smith, AR; Moore, TB; Schroeder, ML; Goldman, FD; Connelly, JA; Porteus, MH; Xiang, Q; Shearer, WT; Fleisher, TA; Kohn, DB; Puck, JM; Notarangelo, LD; Cowan, MJ; O’Reilly, RJ. Jul 31, 2014

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One-Unit versus Two-Unit Cord-Blood Transplantation for Hematologic Cancers. Wagner, JE; Eapen, M; Carter, S; Wang, YL; Schultz, Kirk R; Wall, DA; Bunin, N; Delaney, C; Haut, P; Margolis, D; Peres, E; Verneris, MR; Walters, M; Horowitz, MM; Kurtzberg, J for the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network. Oct 30, 2014 Gigantism and Acromegaly Due to Xq26 Microduplications and GPR101 Mutation. Trivellin, G; Daly, AF; Faucz, FR; Yuan, B; Rostomyan, L; Larco, DO; Schernthaner-Reiter, MH; Szarek, E; Leal, LF; Caberg, JH; Castermans, E; Villa, C; Dimopoulos, A; Chittiboina, P; Xekouki, P; Shah, N; Metzger, Daniel; Lysy, PA; Ferrante, E; Strebkova, N; Mazerkina, N; Zatelli, MC; Lodish, M; Horvath, A; de Alexandre, RB; Manning, AD; Levy, I; Keil, MF; Sierra, MD; Palmeira, L; Coppieters, W; Georges, M; Naves, LA; Jamar, M; Bours, V; Wu, TJ; Choong, CS; Bertherat, J; Chanson, P; Kamenicky, P; Farrell, WE; Barlier, A; Quezado, M; Bjelobaba, I; Stojilkovic, SS; Wess, J; Costanzi, S; Liu, P; Lupski, JR; Beckers, A; Stratakis, CA. Dec 18, 2014 Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia in Living Kidney Donors. Garg, AX; Nevis, IF; McArthur, E; Sontrop, JM; Koval, JJ; Lam, NN; Hildebrand, AM; Reese, PP; Storsley, L; Gill, John S; Segev, DL; Habbous, S; Bugeja, A; Knoll, GA; Dipchand, C; Monroy-Cuadros, M; Lentine, KL for the DONOR Network. Jan 8, 2015 Nivolumab in Previously Untreated Melanoma without BRAF Mutation. Robert, C; Long, GV; Brady, B; Dutriaux, C; Maio, M; Mortier, L; Hassel, JC; Rutkowski, P; McNeil, C; Kalinka-Warzocha, E; Savage, Kerry J; Hernberg, MM; Lebbe, C; Charles, J; Mihalcioiu, C; Chiarion-Sileni, V; Mauch, C; Cognetti, F; Arance, A; Schmidt, H; Schadendorf, D; Gogas, H; Lundgren-Eriksson, L; Horak, C; Sharkey, B; Waxman, IM; Atkinson, V; Ascierto, PA. Jan 22, 2015 Less-Tight versus Tight Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Magee, Laura A; von Dadelszen, Peter; Rey, E; Ross, S; Asztalos, E; Murphy, KE; Menzies, J; Sanchez, J; Singer, Joel; Gafni, A; Gruslin, A; Helewa, M; Hutton, E; Lee, SK; Lee, T; Logan, AG; Ganzevoort, W; Welch, R; Thornton, JG; Moutquin, JM. Jan 29, 2015 A 9-Valent HPV Vaccine against Infection and Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Women. Joura, EA; Giuliano, AR; Iversen, OE; Bouchard, C; Mao, C; Mehlsen, J; Moreira, ED; Ngan, Y; Petersen, LK; Lazcano-Ponce, E; Pitisuttithum, P; Restrepo, JA; Stuart, Gavin; Woelber, L; Yang, YC; Cuzick, J; Garland, SM; Huh, W; Kjaer, SK; Bautista, OM; Chan, ISF; Chen, J; Gesser, R; Moeller, E; Ritter, M; Vuocolo, S; Luxembourg, A for the Broad Spectrum HPV Vaccine Study. Feb 19, 2015 Randomized Trial of Primary PCI with or without Routine Manual Thrombectomy. Jolly, SS; Cairns, John A; Yusuf, S; Meeks, B; Pogue, J; Rokoss, MJ; Kedev, S; Thabane, L; Stankovic, G; Moreno, R; Gershlick, A; Chowdhary, S; Lavi, S; Niemela, K; Steg, PG; Bernat, I; Xu, Y; Cantor, WJ; Overgaard, CB; Naber, CK; Cheema, AN; Welsh, RC; Bertrand, OF; Avezum, A; Bhindi, R; Pancholy, S; Rao, SV; Natarajan, MK; ten Berg, JM; Shestakovska, O; Gao, P; Widimsky, P; Dzavik, V for the TOTAL Investigators. Apr 9, 2015

Lancet Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease, and dystonia. Stoessl, A Jon; Lehericy, S; Strafella, AP. Aug 9, 2014 Antepartum dalteparin versus no antepartum dalteparin for the prevention of pregnancy complications in pregnant women with thrombophilia (TIPPS): a multinational open-label randomised trial. Rodger, MA; Hague, WM; Kingdom, J; Kahn, SR; Karovitch, A; Sermer, M; Clement, AM; Coat, S; Chan, Wee Shian; Said, J; Rey, E; Robinson, S; Khurana, R; Demers, C; Kovacs, MJ; Solymoss, S; Hinshaw, K; Dwyer, J; Smith, G; McDonald, S; Newstead-Angel, J; McLeod,

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


APPENDICES

A; Khandelwal, M; Silver, RM; Le Gal, G; Greer, IA; Keely, E; Rosene-Montella, K; Walker, M; Wells, PS for the TIPPS Investigators. Nov 8, 2014 Efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus 16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in women older than 25 years: 4-year interim follow-up of the phase 3, double-blind, randomised controlled VIVIANE study. Skinner, SR; Szarewski, A; Romanowski, B; Garland, SM; Lazcano-Ponce, E; Salmeron, J; Del Rosario-Raymundo, MR; Verheijen, RHM; Quek, SC; da Silva, DP; Kitchener, H; Fong, KL; Bouchard, C; Money, Deborah M; Ilancheran, A; Cruickshank, ME; Levin, MJ; Chatterjee, A; Stapleton, JT; Martens, M; Quint, W; David, MP; Meric, D; Hardt, K; Descamps, D; Geeraerts, B; Struyf, F; Dubin, G for the VIVIANE Study Group. Dec 20, 2014 Global epidemiology of HIV among female sex workers: influence of structural determinants. Shannon, Kate; Strathdee, SA; Goldenberg, Shira M; Duff, P; Mwangi, P; Rusakova, M; Reza-Paul, S; Lau, J; Deering, Kathleen; Pickles, MR; Boily, MC. Jan 3, 2015 Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 19902013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The GBD 2013 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators (713 authors including Brauer, Michael, Gotay, Caroline). Jan 10, 2015 An action agenda for HIV and sex workers. Beyrer, C; Crago, AL; Bekker, LG; Butler, J; Shannon, Kate; Kerrigan, D; Decker, MR; Baral, SD; Poteat, T; Wirtz, AL; Weir, BW; Barre-Sinoussi, F; Kazatchkine, M; Sidibe, M; Dehne, KL; Boily, MC; Strathdee, SA. Jan 17, 2015 Efficacy and safety of 12 weeks versus 18 weeks of treatment with grazoprevir (MK-5172) and elbasvir (MK-8742) with or without ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection in previously untreated patients with cirrhosis and patients with previous null response with or without cirrhosis (C-WORTHY): a randomised, open-label phase 2 trial. Lawitz, E; Gane, E; Pearlman, B; Tam, E; Ghesquiere, Wayne; Guyader, D; Alric, L; Bronowicki, JP; Lester, L; Sievert, W; Ghalib, R; Balart, L; Sund, F; Lagging, M; Dutko, F; Shaughnessy, M; Hwang, P; Howe, AYM; Wahl, J; Robertson, M; Barr, E; Haber, B. Mar 21, 2015

Cell Polarization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum by ER-Septin Tethering. Chao, JT; Wong, AKO; Tavassoli, S; Young, BP; Chruscicki, A; Fang, NN; Howe, LeAnn J; Mayor, Thibault; Foster, Leonard J; Loewen, Christopher JR. Jul 31, 2014 Dual Proteolytic Pathways Govern Glycolysis and Immune Competence. Lu, W; Zhang, Y; McDonald, DO; Jing, HE; Carroll, B; Robertson, N; Zhang, Q; Griffin, H; Sanderson, S; Lakey, JH; Morgan, NV; Reynard, LN; Zheng, L; Murdock, HM; Turvey, Stuart E; Hackett, SJ; Prestidge, T; Hall, JM; Cant, AJ; Matthews, HF; Koref, MFS; Simon, AK; Korolchuk, VI; Lenardo, MJ; Hambleton, S; Su, HC. Dec 18, 2014 The Cellular Mechanisms of Neuronal Swelling Underlying Cytotoxic Edema. Rungta, RL; Choi, HB; Tyson, JR; Malik, A; Dissing-Olesen, L; Lin, PJC; Cain, SM; Cullis, Pieter R; Snutch, Terrance P; MacVicar, Brian A.

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Appendix I – UBC Faculty of Medicine International Agreements Country

Partner Institution

UBC Unit Level of Agreement

Bangladesh

Centre for Injury Prevention & Research

UBC Faculty of Medicine, SPPH

China

BGI, Shenzhen (formerly Beijing Genome Institute)

UBC Vancouver Prostate Centre

China

Beijing Municipal Administration of Hospitals

UBC Faculty of Medicine

China

Beijing Youan Hospital

UBC Faculty of Medicine Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

China

Capital Medical University (Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders) with Department of Neuroscience Karolinska Institutet, McGovern Inst for Brain Research MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, Florey Inst of Neuroscience & Mental Health U of Melbourne

UBC FoM Centre for Brain Health

China

Chongqing Medical University

UBC

China

Chongqing Medical University (Children’s Hospital) UBC

China

Fudan University, Shanghai Medical College

UBC Faculty of Medicine

China

Guangzhou Women and Children’s Health Center, Guangdong

UBC Faculty of Medicine

China

Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University (Guangzhou)

UBC ICORD

China

Peking University, Health Science Centre

UBC Faculty of Medicine

China

Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital

UBC Faculty of Medicine Obstetrics & Gynaecology

China

Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine

UBC Provost’s Office

China

Shanghai Pudong New Area Health Bureau

UBC Faculty of Medicine

China

Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine

UBC

China

Sichuan BoXin LaiTe Biotechnology Inc (Chengdu) & Heracles International Investment (BC)

UBC Faculty of Medicine Centre for Blood Research

China

Sun Yat-Sen University

UBC

China

Wenzhou Medical University

UBC Provost’s Office

China

WHO Shanghai Collaborating Centre for Health Education & Health Promotion

UBC Faculty of Medicine

China

Xi’an Jiao Tong University School of Medicine

UBC Faculty of Medicine, Brain Research Centre

China

Zhejiang University School of Medicine

UBC

China

Zhejiang University Medical School Women’s Hospital

UBC Faculty of Medicine Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Ecuador

Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar

UBC

Ethiopia

Gondar University Hospital (GUH), College of Medicine and Health Sciences

UBC Faculty of Medicine Branch for International Surgery

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2014-2015 RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT | UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE


APPENDICES

Country

Partner Institution

UBC Unit Level of Agreement

Germany

Eberhard Karls Universitat Tubingen, Faculty of Medicine

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Hong Kong

The University of Hong Kong, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine

UBC Faculty of Medicine

India

Baba Farid University of Health Sciences

UBC Faculty of Medicine SPPH

India

King George’s Medical University

UBC Faculty of Medicine

India

National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences, Bangalore

UBC

Saudi Arabia

King Fahad Medical City

UBC Faculty of Medicine ICORD

Saudi Arabia

King Saud University’s College of Medicine, Dept of UBC, Centre of Excellence for Medical Education Simulation Education and Innovation

Saudi Arabia

Ministry of Higher Education (rep by Saudi Arabian Cultural Bureau, Canada)

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Sweden

Lund University Faculty of Medicine

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Sweden

Karolinska Institutet

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Uganda

Makerere University College of Health Sciences

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Uganda

Soroti Regional Referral Hospital

UBC Faculty of Medicine, OPSEI

United States

Johns Hopkins University Centre for American Indian Health

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Vietnam

University of Medicine & Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City

UBC Faculty of Medicine

Appendix J – Geographical distribution of UBC Faculty of Medicine international agreements13

13

Pink shading = countries with current agreements 73


Office of the Executive Associate Dean, Research | Faculty of Medicine The University of British Columbia 317 - 2194 Health Sciences Mall Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z3 med.ubc.ca/research

UBC Faculty of Medicine | 2014-2015 Research Annual Report  

The 2014-2015 Annual Report of the UBC Faculty of Medicine's Office of the Executive Associate Dean, Research.

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