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Where to Get the Best Barbecue at the Rally Page 5 Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

“About You, For You”

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Biker Rally Causes Transit Route Changes Staff Report Bikes, Blues and BBQ will affect Razorback transit routes starting today, according to a news release. Routes that will be affected include the Brown Route, Green Reduced Route and the Purple Route, according the release. Brown Route will be affected from 7 a.m - 6 p.m. Brown stops on Lafayette Street may be closed because of detours, according to the release. The Purple Route and Purple Reduced Routes will not detour, but delays can be expected. When Dickson Street is closed, stops at Highland and Dickson, the first stop on Church Street just south of Dickson and all stops between West Avenue and Bell Engineering including the Walton Arts Center inaccessible, according to the release. People with questions can contact Razorback Transit.

Taking Out the Trash

Old blackboard queries slow the system for students and faculty. Full Story, Page 3

Rugby Team Successful After Rebuilding

The oldest club sport on campus was brought back in 2007 and has attracted attention since.

Photo Illustration Marcus Ferreira

Full Story, Page 7

Men’s Golf Competes at a High Level in Atlanta Arkansas men’s golf tied for 11th place in the Ping/Golfweek Preview in Atlanta, Ga. Full Story, Page 7

Check Out More Traveler Stories At UAtrav.com Today’s Forecast

82/63° Tomorrow Scattered T-storms 84/64°

For Bikes, Blues and BBQ Stories, see Page 5

UA Expansion Forces Residents Out of Homes

Jack Suntrup Asst. News Editor

UA officials are planning to clear two blocks of houses off Razorback Road to make way for a new parking lot, officials said. The university bought the entirety of Brenda Drive and Court Street in April 2011. Since then, residents have been signing monthto-month leases from a new management company, a resident said. The neighborhood has been in decline for a few years, said Nancy Deyo, a seven year resident. Current-

ly there are six residents on Court Street and only one on Brenda Drive. “This was a very nice neighborhood, but gradually after it was no longer owned by Ozark Theatre Group Limited, people started leaving because they didn’t know what was going to happen,” Deyo said. The university’s intentions were always to expand onto the property, said John Diamond, associate vice chancellor for University Relations. “The university has felt that those properties are not in the future interest of the university and have since the property was purchased attempted to clear the property,” Diamond

said. Though residents expect to be out of their homes before next year, no definitive demolition date has been set. “The issue is, as far as we’re concerned, is that we would like a firm timetable,” Deyo said. Renting on a month-bymonth basis does not give residents enough notice to move out, Deyo said. Issues like disabled residents and the cost of moving could hinder efforts by occupants to move if they do not know when to leave. “I’m semi-retired. My son and that gentleman you spoke to over there are on disability,” she said. “Nobody has a great

deal of money.” When tenants sign a shortterm lease, and with the university making known its plans to demolish the homes, residents should be prepared to move on short-notice, Diamond said. “My understanding is that property managers have been in communication with the tenants and that the tenants are aware that their leases are for a very short period of time, that sometime in the future those properties would be cleared,” he said. Moving information and online help is also available to residents on the university website, Diamond said.

Local Episcopal Church Offers Blessings for Same-Sex Couples

Shelby Gill Asst. Companion Editor

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church’s congregation, in Fayetteville, has been blessing same-sex couples for six years, but Episcopal Churches worldwide agreed on a standard liturgy for the blessing of same-sex couples in July at the General Convention of the Episcopal Church, said rector of St. Paul’s, Lowell Grisham, who was also the chairman for the committee that processed the same-sex blessing legislation. “I was just delighted with

see BLESSINGS page 2

Shelby Gill Asst. Companion Editor Lowell Grisham, rector at St. Paul, walks down a hallway adorned in photographs, depicting the history of St. Paul’s, towards the sanctuary.

Kappa Delta House Floods Jaime Dunaway Staff Writer

Members of the Kappa Delta sorority were forced to pack their bags and leave their house Monday night after sprinklers started going off at the residence. “All the sprinklers just started going off,” said Caty Mills, a junior journalism major. “There was water on clothes and in closets. Everyone just started grabbing their laptops.” A sprinkler located near a closet was hit from the side by a door, said Wayne Brashear, university fire marshal. The sprinkler ran for 10-15 minutes before the fire department was able to shut off the water. All 80 women living in the house were forced to move in to other members’ houses and apartments that are off-campus, Mills said. The members will not be able to move back in for at least five days and up to two weeks, Mills said. Chartwells is providing the women three free meals per day while they wait to move back into the house, Brashear said. A whole wall, as well as the ceiling, will have to be replaced because of the damage. Repairing the damage is expected to be expensive. Large fans and carpet cleaners were brought to the house by an emergency restorative company hired by the university, Brashear said. Monday night’s cleanup process focused on getting personal belongings out of the house so the water could be removed. Insurance will cover the damages to the house, but Brashear said he was afraid that damage done to personal items would not be compensated. “Everybody has responded well. I’m really proud of the Greek people for doing something they’re not used to doing,” Brashear said. “They were on it last night and were on it today. The response was good as it could be.”


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Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

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The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Briefly Speaking Department of Economics Research Seminar Series Walton College of Business room 405 12 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Career Fair Bud Walton Arena 12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Goodwill Gains a New Taking Out the Trash: Location in Fayetteville

Reading Program Focuses on Economic Problems

Karen Stigar Staff Writer

“The Working Poor: Invisible in America,” by David Shipler, is this year’s featured book for the fourth annual One Book, One Community. Shipler, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former foreign correspondent for The New York Times, will visit Fayetteville Oct. 24 to 26 to speak about his work. The purpose of One Book, One Community is to “create a

History of Art: Stone Age to Ancient Rome

Continuing Education Center 2 East Center St. 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. SHIPLER

conversation about critical topics of our time that need to be part of a public conversation,” said Kevin Fitzpatrick, UA sociology professor. The event involves students in various classes and community members of local book clubs who read the same book, participate in the same discussions and other activities, like meeting the author. “The Working Poor: Invisible in America,” was a national best-seller in 2004 and 2005. It was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Critics Circle Award and the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Award. It won an Outstanding Book Award from The Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights at Simmons College and led to awards from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, the New York Labor Communications Council and the D.C. Employment Justice Center, according to onebook. uark.edu. During his visit to Fayette-

ville, Shipler will talk with UA students and faculty, deliver a public lecture and meet with local book-club members at the Fayetteville Public Library. “The One Book, One Community council picked this book because it is told in a real human way. It shows the different complexities of the current economic situation and makes the poverty issue more comprehensive,” Fitzpatrick said. Shipler’s book is part of the freshman English composition curriculum, Fitzpatrick said. The UA has had a theme for each book for the last two years. Last year was sustainability, but this year the program is focusing on work and the economy, Fitzpatrick said. “Students, staff and faculty are on the One Book, One Community committee, that way we can get as much input as possible from all over the campus,” Fitzpatrick said “UA is relatively new to One Book, One Community; other schools have been doing this for years,” Fitzpatrick said.

OLD BLACKBOARD QUERIES SLOW THE SYSTEM FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY

Karen Stigar Staff Writer

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BLESSINGS continued from page 1 the debate, conversation, and the final product that was approved just overwhelmingly,” Grisham said. The House of Bishop’s vote for the same-sex blessing, titled “the Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant,” was 171-to-50, according to Resolution A049 of the General Convention report. “The Episcopal Church has been seeking, in various ways and over the last 30 years, to celebrate the goodness of God, the grace of Christ, and the gifts of the Holy Spirit in the lives of our brothers and sisters who are gay and lesbian. A series of General Convention resolutions during that time has now led the Church to ask the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to “collect and develop theological and liturgical resources” for the blessing of same gender relationships,” according to the 77th General Convention report, otherwise known as the “Blue Book.” The topic of same-sex blessings had been brought up at the General Convention in 1976, 1985, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2000 and 2003 but had been not resolved until July of 2012, according to the Blue Book. “To a lot of people outside the Episcopal Church, It might seem like a hasty thing, but from what I understand, they started talking about this years ago. Even in the 1970s they began talking about homosexuals in the church and decided that they are children of God,” said Ashley Flippin [CQ], an English major from Fort Smith, Ark, who attends St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Now in all Episcopal dioceses, under the direction and approval of the regional bishop, the priest can offer a rite of blessing to same-sex couples, Grisham said. “I am completely in favor of

it. I think that it’s just a good step towards equality in the church,” Flippin said. “It really helps give homosexuals, transgender, lesbians a place to go. It gives them a home in the church because I know a lot of in the gay community have felt kind of ostracized.” The Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, St. Paul’s, began the process of blessing what Mr. Grisham referred to as “committed” gay couples in 2003, according to St. Paul’s calendar of the blessing process. “We began to explore the question on whether we wanted to offer blessings for the couples in our congregations who were committed samegender couples,” Grisham said. “When we first posed the question most people at St. Paul’s were open to the possibility of talking about it and deciding what we wanted to do, but we had a sizable minority over 1/5 of the respondents of the survey who said ‘no we don’t even want to talk about it.’” From there, St. Paul’s congregation went through a yearlong process of helping people think about how they feel, learn scripture, talk about theology, understand science, and to learn more about people’s experience to help meet gay couples, Grisham said. “One of the many things that was important to us is that we entered a conversation together that was very structured and very safe,” Grisham said. “This allowed people a safe container to say what they thought, to listen to other opinions and for everyone to be heard respectfully.” After the vestry, the administrative committee of a parish, went through the process, it was recommended to the entire congregation, Grisham said.

“When people were able to put a human face and a real life story onto what was formerly only an issue, it began to change their feelings and opinions about it,” Grisham said. Not all members of the Episcopal Church were happy with this decision, Flippin said. “I think a lot of people have said, ‘I don’t really agree with this but I’m still going to be an Episcopalian. I can disagree with this one aspect but still believe in God and worship in this church,’” Flippin said. Mr. Grisham’s experience in seminary is what essentially drove him to begin the process of practicing same-sex blessings at St. Paul’s. Mr. Grisham grew up in Mississippi not knowing anyone who was gay, he said. The first time he met a homosexual was in seminary, when a gay Episcopal priest spoke to a group of first-year students, he said. “I didn’t have a category for what he was talking about. I’ll never forget, I pointed my finger at him and I said, “But don’t you know? Your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit,’ and he looked at me without defense and with absolute candor and truth coming out of his face and his eyes and he said ‘Yes, yes my body is the temple of the Holy Spirit.” Mr. Grisham began studying scriptures and eventually became convinced that “some of us are created with a samesex orientation,” he said. “I have met gay couples who have as loving, authentic, life-giving relationships as I have with my wife,” Grisham said. “We have been married for over 35 years and I’ve met gay couples who have been married longer than Kathy and me.” The new liturgy, created at the General Convention, re-

quires one of the couple to be a baptized Christian. It also requires two or more presenters, who may be friends, parents, family members, or drawn from the local assembly to present the couple to the assembly, according to “the Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant.” The pronouncement of the couple varies from a wedding ceremony. “I now pronounce that they are bound to one another in a holy covenant as long as they both shall live,” compared to the marriage liturgy, which says, “I pronounce that they are husband and wife, in the Name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” according to the recently instated Blessing liturgy and the Episcopal marriage rite. “One of the people on my committee a married man from New Jersey, who was married five years ago said, ‘I wish we had this when I got married. I like this liturgy and ritual. I think it says so much – I think my wife and I would have used it if it was an option for us when we got married,’” Grisham said. Mr. Grisham pulls his belief in same-sex blessings from thousands of verses in the scripture, “not just the seven clobber verses that get quoted,” about love, faithfulness, fidelity, and truthfulness, he said. “One of the most important to me is a verse by Saint Paul from Galatians 5:16-26, the Fruit of the Spirit, Paul says, is love, joy, peace, long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and moderation,” Grisham said. “Paul then goes onto say ‘Against this there is no law.’ What I have seen in the lives of gay people are those Fruits of the Spirit and against that, there is no law.”

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Corrections Shelby Gill Asst. Companion Editor Lowell Grisham, rector at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, suggested the same-sex blessing process to his congregation back in 2003. Since then, he’s served as the chairman who processed the same-sex legislation at the 2012 General Convention of the Episcopal Church.

The Arkansas Traveler strives for accuracy in its reporting and will correct all matters of fact. If you believe the paper has printed an error, please notify the editor at 479 575 8455 or at traveler@uark.edu.

The UA is a factor in the opening of Goodwill’s second location in Fayetteville Sept. 13. The new store is located in the former Aldi’s Grocery Store building on College Avenue. The 14,600-square-foot store, donation and career services center will be the second location in Fayetteville. The area was chosen because of the convenience for its customers to shop and donate and its close proximity to the UA, according to information provided by Rebecca Brockman, Goodwill public relations and community engagement manager. “There is a demand for thrift stores because people want to give items a second life and people in Fayetteville seem to like to do that,” Brockman said. The resale industry has grown 7 percent a year in the past two years. This percentage reflects the estimated number of new stores opening each year, minus the businesses that close. There are currently more than 25,000 resale, consignment and not-for-profit resale shops in the United States, according to the National Association of Resale Professionals website. This will be the sixth Goodwill location in the northwest Arkansas area and the 31st location in the state, according to a Sept. 13 press release. In the last fiscal year, which ended in June, 2,480

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people sought services from Goodwill’s career centers in Springdale and Fayetteville, and Goodwill placed 480 people into employment in Northwest Arkansas, according to information provided by Brockman. Compared to last year, there has been a 285 percent increase in the people who were served in the northwest region, according to the press release. “The first week of this location being open has received a very good response. We have had many customers and many donations,” said Cathy Magner CQ College Avenue Goodwill manager. Revenue from the sale of donated goods provides over 96 percent of Goodwill Industries of Arkansas budget for programs and services geared towards assisting people with disabilities and other disadvantages train for and get jobs, according to information provided by Brockman. “When I first started my business there were only really two other resale shops in Fayetteville,” said Harriet Wells, owner of the resale shop Cheap Thrills. A resale shop is a store that buys merchandise from individuals. A thrift shop is a not-for-profit organization to raise money to support their charitable cause, according to NARTS.org. “There is competition with the new thrift stores and resale shops and it eats into my business,” Wells said. Goodwill Industries generated $2.69 billion in retail sales from more than 2,500 notfor-profit resale stores across

America in 2010, according to NARTS.org. Resale shopping attracts consumers from all economic levels. About 16 to 18 percent of Americans will shop at a thrift store during a given year. For consignment or resale shops, it’s about 12 to 15 percent. During the same time frame; 11.4 percent of Americans shop in factory outlet malls, 19.6 percent in apparel stores and 21.3 percent in major department stores, according to NARTS. org. “We have shoppers of all ages and all income brackets. We tend to lean more towards women shoppers, although it is almost half and half,” Brockman said. “It’s amazing the diversity you will see. A lot of “middle aged” couples will go in, a lot of families with children, old people, people of all races, and most interesting of all the resellers. It is funny because we have regulars that come in and hunt for the treasures we put out every day that they can in turn put in their own stores,” said Mia Schick, Goodwill employee. Goodwill Industries, which has operated since 1915, participates in online shopping. They have an auction site,shopgoodwill.com, Brockman said. “Shopgoodwill.com is like eBay. Goodwill Industries in Arkansas do not participate in it but we do see the benefits of selling items online,” Brockman said. “I sell a few things online. Only if I think I can get more money for it than I would if I sold it in the store,” Wells said.

Town Hall Meeting to Discuss Traffic

Kayli Farris Senior Staff Writer

Fayetteville officials will present a town hall meeting at 5 p.m. Oct. 11 in the UA Law School courtroom. A focus of the town hall will be traffic concerns around campus. Mayor Lioneld Jordan and city department directors will be giving presentations, answering questions and addressing the public’s concerns and recommendations during the meeting. After a short update from Mayor Lioneld Jordan, city department directors will discuss topics that could affect students, staff and faculty. Traffic problems are a major issue students said they want city officials to address. “Making a left turn onto Leverett from Maple is nearly impossible with traffic,” said Grant Bodiford, sophomore political science student. “I have seen cars make dangerous left turns as soon as the light turns green instead of yielding to oncoming traffic because they’re tired of waiting at the light for five minutes.” City Engineer Chris

Brown will discuss the proposal to close Dickson Street. That involves a request from Facilities Management for the UA to control a portion of Dickson Street during school hours, said Lindsley Smith, city of Fayetteville communication director. “The UA proposes to restrict access by use of a staffed security gate, initially to be located west of Harmon Avenue, and then to be moved to Duncan Avenue in 2015,” Brown said. Brown also will include information about the Garland Avenue project and the Cato Springs Road project. Mike Mihalevich, city trails coordinator, will provide an overview of trails near the UA and review of the Razorback Greenway, a 36-mile trail extending from the Bella Vista Trail in Bentonville to the Frisco Trail in south Fayetteville, Smith said. Utilities Director David Jurgens will discuss the public parking deck project in the Dickson Street entertainment district, Smith said. Other topics on the agenda are: things to do offcampus, City of Fayetteville volunteer opportunities, the Town and Gown committee and the Wedington Corridor neighborhood plan.

Nick Brothers Companion Editor Chris Bray, UA Blackboard Administrator, works daily and often hourly with Blackboard support staff to solve the issues Blackboard Learn 9.1 is facing. Bray has been working at UA since 1995, and he uploaded the first campus Web course software in 1997

Nick Brothers Companion Editor After discovering that years of documents in the Blackboard recycle bin database were slowing response time for users, UA technicians turned off the recycle function, causing a significant increase in speed, the UA Blackboard administrator said. Blackboard Learn is software that provides digital methods for faculty to manage basic classroom interactions, such as turning in assignments, making announcements, hosting videotaped lectures and online discussion boards among other features, according to blackboard.com. After conducting “a lot” of tests, Blackboard technicians found that there were 15 billion queries occurring over five hours. Queries are file requests to the database that find the necessary data to display the proper webpage. About 870,000 queries a second were happening, causing the central processing unit working with the database to max out, the Blackboard administrator said. “To deal with this, we turned off the recycling bin function,” Chris Bray said. “Normally, if an instructor uploads a file they can go in at any point and edit or delete the file. If they delete the file, it goes to the recycling bin and it’s still there in the database.” This led to be one of the bigger issues with Blackboard. “Most people don’t know it’s there and won’t take the time to clean their files out. What happens when you go into a course is the application looks to see who you are and it does queries to see what you have access to,” he said. “It has to look at each item your professor put in the database. The billions of queries were looking at these archived recycled files on top of everything else, and it was slowing the response time.” As soon as Bray was able to shut down the recycling bin function and its files, he saw a big decrease in Blackboard’s response time. “The process took 12 hours to run and then pret-

ty much immediately after that we saw a major drop in response time,” Bray said. “It was a lot faster to get into courses, and basically at about 12:35 p.m. it was a major drop.” Now, if users go and click their courses, the frame loads in, and about five seconds later the course loads up. From there, it might only take a few seconds to load each page as you keep going into your classes, Bray said. “There’s definitely room for improvement, but the fact that it doesn’t take you 20 seconds or more for you to get your stuff, that’s a major improvement — but not good enough,” he said. “It needs to be faster. That’s just where we are right now, identifying each problem at a time.” To troubleshoot these issues, Bray has been working with Blackboard engineers and support staff daily and often hourly, using diagnostic programs that can report response times and time out issues to the staff. “Right now we’re working with Blackboard all the time,” Bray said. “My mailbox has 400 emails just with this case alone with the communication and data shooting back and forth with their support staff.” While this might help with response time, there is still the issue of handling traffic, as there are about three thousand users an hour and 600-900 users on all the time, Bray said. “We are seeing more usage in general,” he said. “Last year we had 59,000 enrollments in 2,400 courses and now 81,000 enrollments in almost 2,900 courses, so more students and faculty are using Blackboard.” The ITS administration kept in constant communication with faculty on their progress. “The one thing that’s helped with this whole situation is the daily meetings and updates we have. We have a lot of faculty involved who have been working on the issue,” said Susan Adkins, UA associate director of ITS. “We have been communicating with faculty and staff and having them understand that we’re working on it daily

and hourly with Blackboard support technicians.” “We aren’t just accepting the issues, we’re working on them,” she said. “We’ve been posting announcements and providing new updates to keep everyone up to date on everything.” “It’s been pretty grueling,” she said. “It has been by far our No. 1 priority.” Blackboard officials have worked with other schools that have had issues of slowness, but they have reported that the UA is some case of “abnormality”, and they haven’t seen this before, Bray said. “The issues just happen to be something that is caused in our environment. Our systems aren’t the problem. Just something in the application system isn’t working like it should. The problem is nothing we’ve done which makes us feel good,” Bray said. Freshman Spencer Mitchell had three classes that actively used Blackboard, and he only occasionally had difficulties with the application. “Blackboard is all right, I don’t mind it. I think using it is better than hand writing papers,” he said. “In the beginning of the semester I had some problems with trying to log in. I would log in and then click on my class’s content tab and it would log me out of Blackboard. Also, earlier I was using another computer and it might be this computer, but it’s just crawling right now.” Hillary Scott, who works as a teacher’s assistant, said that generally she found Blackboard to work slower on campus than off campus. “Using it was worse at the beginning of the semester. Now, there aren’t too many problems and overall it’s pretty manageable,” she said. “I use it to upgrade students’ grades and host class materials, and it works fine.” Technical issues always will be a problem, Bray said. “I think there’s always going to be issues as long as humans write code,” he said. “I hope humans keep doing it, but as long as there’s someone doing it, there’s always going to be issues somewhere. There’s no way to not have a problem.”


“Making Your Journey Worthwhile” Companion Editor: Nick Brothers Assistant Companion Editor: Shelby Gill Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Page 5

The Smoky Side: Where to Get the Best Barbecue at the Rally

Georgia Carter Staff Writer Today the rumbling of motorcycles will be heard throughout Fayetteville as thousands of bikers ride into the Ozarks for Bikes, Blues and BBQ. The event, which runs until Sept. 29, is one of the nation’s biggest bike rallies, bringing not only bikers, but also bike enthusiasts, tourists and locals, to Fayetteville. Not only does this event have a car show, motorcycle races, a poker run and concerts each day, Bikes, Blues and BBQ will host a variety of barbecue vendors and a barbecue contest. Even if you are not parTraveler Archive Ph otos ticularly interested in bikes or blues, the rally is worth a visit for any barbecue lover. The first Bikes, Blues and BBQ rally occurred in Fayetteville in 2000. In the past 12 years, this event has grown steadily, putting Fayetteville on the map for motorcyclists and motorcycle rally aficionados. With this increase in the rally’s popularity, the barbecue aspect of the event has grown. Barbecue vendors will be located on and around Dickson Street, selling delicious barbecue and side items to rally attendees. The Bikes, Blues and BBQ headquarters booth, located at the Bank of Fayetteville on Dickson Street, will provide all rally-goers with a map displaying where each vendor is located. To get an idea of how exactly how much barbecue will be available, booths will be sited along Dickson Street at the Walton Arts Center parking lot, in the lot between Hammontree’s and Hog Haus Brewery, and in the parking lot of the Rowdy Beaver and Chipotle. The parking lot of Baum Stadium will also host barbecue vendors. Many of these vendors will be restaurants from Fayetteville and the surrounding Northwest Arkansas area, so locals will have a chance to visit their old favorites in a different environment, and visitors will be able to get a taste of Northwest Arkansas barbecue. The barbecue contest will host 35-50 competitors at the Washington County Fairgrounds Friday night at 6:15 p.m. This event will cost $6 for the public. Attendees at this event will be able to sample barbecue from all participants and cast their vote for the People’s Choice award. This event is perfect for cheap — or even broke — college students, with a ticket price lower than an average restaurant meal that offers much more food. It’s also great for students who consider themselves foodies and want to sample a great variety of barbecue. Students may also wish to enter a raffle at the contest to win a trailer-hitch smoker. Motorcycles, barbecue and music may not seem closely related, but this event pulls them together to create a unique experience. “Barbecuing meat is a very hands-on, personal experience, much like riding or working on your motorcycle,” said Coleson Burns, associate director of Bikes, Blues and BBQ. “Once the barbecue has finished, it is then time to enjoy and share with your friends. “This is very much like a bike rally. You get to go experience great rides, events and vendors, all the while enjoying and sharing the experience with friends.” With just a walk down Dickson Street, one can see people showing off their motorcycles, which have often been customized to a T, and get the chance to eat some of the best barbecue in the area, all while listening to music and soaking up the atmosphere this event is known for.

Traveler Archive Photo Bikes, Blues and BBQ has been around for more than a decade, growing from small crowds to one of the biggest motorcycle festivals in the U.S.

Sarah Villegas Staff Writer Bikes, Blues and BBQ is known for bringing countless motorcycles, jive music, distant and local vendors, great food, and lots of culture to Dickson Street and the rest of the city. But this ever-popular bike rally wasn’t always the largest event to come to Fayetteville. Bikes, Blues and BBQ had its first run in 2000 with just over 300 riders, according to the rally’s history website. Today, the event attracts people on a global level, with 400,000 people from all 50 states and a few other countries coming together last year. It is no doubt the rally has seen significant changes in the past 12 years by those who call Fayetteville home. “I think the greatest change is that this whole thing started as a poker run to help raise money for Meals on Wheels,” said Coleson Burns, assistant event director.

bikers and businesses in the area, the idea for a rally was presented to the Chamber of Commerce and approved, according to the Bikes, Blues and BBQ event history website. The founders decided from the beginning that the rally would not only be a great place for bikers to come hang out, listen to music and enjoy the company of other bikers, but it would be a charitable way to give back to the community. An annual poker run was established to benefit the Meals on Wheels program, which quickly became one of the most popular events at Bikes, Blues and BBQ. The poker run is now run through the Fire Fighter’s Association with over 1,200 participants, according to the Bikes, Blues and BBQ event history website. The rally quickly became popular, with numbers growing every year. It became so popular that there became a need for more entertainment, events and vendors, Burns said.

“I think the greatest change is that this whole thing started as a poker run to help raise money for Meals on Wheels.” Coleson Burns

Assistant event director The original founders of Bikes, Blues and BBQ were Richard Watson, Fayetteville’s then-police chief; Steve Ward, president of the Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce; and Neal Crawford, owner of Jose’s Mexican Restaurant. The three of them discussed hosting a motorcycle rally in Fayetteville for six years and created “Bike Night” at Jose’s before Bikes, Blues and BBQ was even a poker run. Bike Night served as a way to get local bikers a chance to voice their interest, and predict the interest of others, in a bike rally in Fayetteville. After positive feedback from

Although Dickson Street draws most of the rally’s attention, Bikes, Blues and BBQ has expanded to other venues, including Baum Stadium and Jose’s, because of its growing size. “We’re at the full capacity of a bike rally with beer gardens, bikes shows and demo rides from manufacturers,” Burns said. Even with continued growth, the Bikes, Blues and BBQ staff has never lost sight of the rally’s original purpose: to give back. In 2010, Bikes, Blues and BBQ donated to 36 charities directly, and 20 charities were able to generate funds through the event, Burns said.

“We are so much more than just one charity,” Burns said. Bikes, Blues and BBQ is not exclusive to bikers, either. Every year, UA students, faculty and staff come out to celebrate with the entire Northwest Arkansas community. “I have been to Bikes, Blues and BBQ since my freshman year,” said Andy Peterson, first-year graduate student. “Last year I even saw some of my teachers out on Dickson. It was awesome.” Rumbling from the rally can be heard anywhere on campus, drawing curious freshman out of the dorms to see what all the hype is about. “I keep hearing people talk about Bikes, Blues and BBQ, but I don’t really know what it is,” said freshman Rachel Soria. “I’ll probably go. I guess it’s a big (deal); that’s what it seems like, anyway.” Bikes, Blues and BBQ is a big deal to the charities, the people, the local businesses and the community. And despite the rally’s rapid growth, Burns said the staff doesn’t want to stop here. “We’re in our 13th year, and we’re already on a level comparable to those other guys like Daytona with national attention,” Burns said. Event staff are working on a five-year plan that includes reaching out to and working with more entities in the area in hopes of allowing for more expansion, Burns said. Larger rallies like Daytona, which has been around for over half a century, get the entire county and surrounding areas involved, and that’s the goal for Bikes, Blues and BBQ, Burns said. “We want to expand to have events in Eureka Springs because it is such a beautiful place to ride,” Burns said. “There are people who never even make it (to Fayetteville) because they just stay there for a week. We want them to have the full experience of our rally, too.” Bikes, Blues and BBQ is one of Fayetteville’s most popular events, never failing to have a rich variety of people, food, music and experiences for anyone to enjoy.

Can’t Stand the Noise?

How to Have Fun Avoiding the Rally

Caitlin Murad Staff Writer

Courtesy Photo Bikes, Blues and BBQ brings dozens of vendors to Fayetteville every year, from barbecue to soul food.

The city of Fayetteville opens its doors every year to Bikes, Blues and BBQ, the largest charitable motorcycle rally in the U.S. It is the one time of the year where nothing can be heard over the gunning of engines and music coming from Dickson Street. If roaring engines and bikers in leather studded jackets aren’t your ideal way of spending a weekend, Fayetteville has plenty of other options for you and your friends. If you plan on staying around Fayetteville for the weekend, the Square has boutiques like Riffraff, The Mustache and SavoirFaire. Their prices are made for

a college budget, and their fun displays are perfect for window shopping. You can also shop on College Avenue at the unique vintage boutique Grey Dog. Grey Dog is a vintage clothing store operated out of an Airstream trailer. It was the first of the Airstream trailers to set up in the parking lot on College Avenue between Maple Street and North Street. Grey Dog sells clothing, shoes and accessories. Vintage Violet, another vintage shop, opened up just last year on College Avenue. In addition to clothing and accessories, Vintage Violet sells furniture and home goods. The town of Prairie Grove is located 15 miles outside of Fayetteville and is home to tons of antique shops. It is a perfect

place to look for antique furniture and get some fun ideas for gifts or decorating your home. Trying to avoid the Fayetteville traffic? Head toward Devils Den and go hiking while the weather is still warm. It is free and located only 20 minutes away from campus. The view of the Ozark Mountains is a perfect alternative to the craziness of Fayetteville this weekend. Another alternative is to go to Beaver Lake in Rogers. With fall quickly approaching, this will probably be one of the last times you can enjoy the lake without bracing yourself for the icy water. You and your friends can bring a picnic and hang out by the shoreline. If you are over 21, you can rent a boat starting at $50 an hour and enjoy the lake with your friends.

About 30 miles north of Fayetteville, you can enlighten your mind and refine your tastes at Crystal Bridges Museum. The museum is free to all visitors and includes famous artwork from American history like the iconic “Rosie the Riveter” and portraits of George Washington. In addition to the artwork in the museum, you can also enjoy the trails around the property, which feature several pieces of artwork and beautiful landscaping. Whether you plan on staying in Fayetteville for the weekend or plan on venturing to the neighboring cities, there are plenty of things to do to keep you away from bustling Fayetteville during Bikes, Blues and BBQ.


Page 6

The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Comics Pearls Before Swine

Dilbert

Calvin and Hobbes

Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

Sudoku Stephan Pastis

Scott Adams

Bill Watterson

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Crossword

Doonesbury

Non Sequitur

Garry Trudeau

Wiley Miller

By Adam Prince

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

ACROSS 1 Stir-fry additive 4 [frog lands in pond] 8 Remote control battery 14 Baba of folklore 15 Bindle carrier 16 “Zip your lip!” 17 Diarist Anaïs 18 “Gotta hit the hay” 20 Future snakes, perhaps 22 Regards highly 23 Elementary school fundamentals 25 Cut from the same cloth 29 Lemon and lime 30 Swift means of attack? 32 Put into words 33 Poe’s “ungainly fowl” 36 D.C. athlete 37 Mom’s behavior warning 41 __ of Good Feelings 42 Gives the heave-ho 43 Rap’s __ Wayne 44 With-the-grain woodworking technique 46 Theater sections 48 Canadian pump sign

49 Marks to brag about 54 “Why bother?” 56 Color property 57 Canned pasta brand 61 “Characters welcome” network 62 Receive, as a radio signal 63 South American country at 0 degrees lat. 64 Looney Tunes collectible 65 Structural threat for many a house 66 Gels 67 Towel lettering DOWN 1 “The Balcony” painter 2 Insult 3 Cookies with a bite 4 Chi preceder 5 Solitary sorts 6 Beyond zaftig 7 Baudelaire, par exemple 8 Evaluates 9 Quark’s locale 10 Global networking pioneer 11 Girl in a pasture 12 Gossipy Smith

13 OCS grads, usually 19 “__ Rosenkavalier” 21 Bed or home ending 24 “Over here!” 26 Reader with a sensitive screen 27 Modern site of Mesopotamia 28 Keeps after taxes 31 Like Big Ben 33 Big chunk of Eur. 34 Framed work 35 No. twos 37 Nothing more than 38 Eye part 39 Surpassed in extravagance 40 Elie Wiesel work 45 Large eel 46 Took it on the lam 47 Grandchild of Japanese immigrants 50 Little one 51 Traditional doings 52 “That has __ ring to it” 53 Elite Navy group 55 Kent State’s home 57 Norm: Abbr. 58 Water filter brand 59 Whichever 60 Airline to Oslo


“Making Your Journey Worthwhile” Companion Editor: Nick Brothers Assistant Companion Editor: Shelby Gill Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Page 5

The Smoky Side: Where to Get the Best Barbecue at the Rally

Georgia Carter Staff Writer Today the rumbling of motorcycles will be heard throughout Fayetteville as thousands of bikers ride into the Ozarks for Bikes, Blues and BBQ. The event, which runs until Sept. 29, is one of the nation’s biggest bike rallies, bringing not only bikers, but also bike enthusiasts, tourists and locals, to Fayetteville. Not only does this event have a car show, motorcycle races, a poker run and concerts each day, Bikes, Blues and BBQ will host a variety of barbecue vendors and a barbecue contest. Even if you are not parTraveler Archive Ph otos ticularly interested in bikes or blues, the rally is worth a visit for any barbecue lover. The first Bikes, Blues and BBQ rally occurred in Fayetteville in 2000. In the past 12 years, this event has grown steadily, putting Fayetteville on the map for motorcyclists and motorcycle rally aficionados. With this increase in the rally’s popularity, the barbecue aspect of the event has grown. Barbecue vendors will be located on and around Dickson Street, selling delicious barbecue and side items to rally attendees. The Bikes, Blues and BBQ headquarters booth, located at the Bank of Fayetteville on Dickson Street, will provide all rally-goers with a map displaying where each vendor is located. To get an idea of how exactly how much barbecue will be available, booths will be sited along Dickson Street at the Walton Arts Center parking lot, in the lot between Hammontree’s and Hog Haus Brewery, and in the parking lot of the Rowdy Beaver and Chipotle. The parking lot of Baum Stadium will also host barbecue vendors. Many of these vendors will be restaurants from Fayetteville and the surrounding Northwest Arkansas area, so locals will have a chance to visit their old favorites in a different environment, and visitors will be able to get a taste of Northwest Arkansas barbecue. The barbecue contest will host 35-50 competitors at the Washington County Fairgrounds Friday night at 6:15 p.m. This event will cost $6 for the public. Attendees at this event will be able to sample barbecue from all participants and cast their vote for the People’s Choice award. This event is perfect for cheap — or even broke — college students, with a ticket price lower than an average restaurant meal that offers much more food. It’s also great for students who consider themselves foodies and want to sample a great variety of barbecue. Students may also wish to enter a raffle at the contest to win a trailer-hitch smoker. Motorcycles, barbecue and music may not seem closely related, but this event pulls them together to create a unique experience. “Barbecuing meat is a very hands-on, personal experience, much like riding or working on your motorcycle,” said Coleson Burns, associate director of Bikes, Blues and BBQ. “Once the barbecue has finished, it is then time to enjoy and share with your friends. “This is very much like a bike rally. You get to go experience great rides, events and vendors, all the while enjoying and sharing the experience with friends.” With just a walk down Dickson Street, one can see people showing off their motorcycles, which have often been customized to a T, and get the chance to eat some of the best barbecue in the area, all while listening to music and soaking up the atmosphere this event is known for.

Traveler Archive Photo Bikes, Blues and BBQ has been around for more than a decade, growing from small crowds to one of the biggest motorcycle festivals in the U.S.

Sarah Villegas Staff Writer Bikes, Blues and BBQ is known for bringing countless motorcycles, jive music, distant and local vendors, great food, and lots of culture to Dickson Street and the rest of the city. But this ever-popular bike rally wasn’t always the largest event to come to Fayetteville. Bikes, Blues and BBQ had its first run in 2000 with just over 300 riders, according to the rally’s history website. Today, the event attracts people on a global level, with 400,000 people from all 50 states and a few other countries coming together last year. It is no doubt the rally has seen significant changes in the past 12 years by those who call Fayetteville home. “I think the greatest change is that this whole thing started as a poker run to help raise money for Meals on Wheels,” said Coleson Burns, assistant event director.

bikers and businesses in the area, the idea for a rally was presented to the Chamber of Commerce and approved, according to the Bikes, Blues and BBQ event history website. The founders decided from the beginning that the rally would not only be a great place for bikers to come hang out, listen to music and enjoy the company of other bikers, but it would be a charitable way to give back to the community. An annual poker run was established to benefit the Meals on Wheels program, which quickly became one of the most popular events at Bikes, Blues and BBQ. The poker run is now run through the Fire Fighter’s Association with over 1,200 participants, according to the Bikes, Blues and BBQ event history website. The rally quickly became popular, with numbers growing every year. It became so popular that there became a need for more entertainment, events and vendors, Burns said.

“I think the greatest change is that this whole thing started as a poker run to help raise money for Meals on Wheels.” Coleson Burns

Assistant event director The original founders of Bikes, Blues and BBQ were Richard Watson, Fayetteville’s then-police chief; Steve Ward, president of the Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce; and Neal Crawford, owner of Jose’s Mexican Restaurant. The three of them discussed hosting a motorcycle rally in Fayetteville for six years and created “Bike Night” at Jose’s before Bikes, Blues and BBQ was even a poker run. Bike Night served as a way to get local bikers a chance to voice their interest, and predict the interest of others, in a bike rally in Fayetteville. After positive feedback from

Although Dickson Street draws most of the rally’s attention, Bikes, Blues and BBQ has expanded to other venues, including Baum Stadium and Jose’s, because of its growing size. “We’re at the full capacity of a bike rally with beer gardens, bikes shows and demo rides from manufacturers,” Burns said. Even with continued growth, the Bikes, Blues and BBQ staff has never lost sight of the rally’s original purpose: to give back. In 2010, Bikes, Blues and BBQ donated to 36 charities directly, and 20 charities were able to generate funds through the event, Burns said.

“We are so much more than just one charity,” Burns said. Bikes, Blues and BBQ is not exclusive to bikers, either. Every year, UA students, faculty and staff come out to celebrate with the entire Northwest Arkansas community. “I have been to Bikes, Blues and BBQ since my freshman year,” said Andy Peterson, first-year graduate student. “Last year I even saw some of my teachers out on Dickson. It was awesome.” Rumbling from the rally can be heard anywhere on campus, drawing curious freshman out of the dorms to see what all the hype is about. “I keep hearing people talk about Bikes, Blues and BBQ, but I don’t really know what it is,” said freshman Rachel Soria. “I’ll probably go. I guess it’s a big (deal); that’s what it seems like, anyway.” Bikes, Blues and BBQ is a big deal to the charities, the people, the local businesses and the community. And despite the rally’s rapid growth, Burns said the staff doesn’t want to stop here. “We’re in our 13th year, and we’re already on a level comparable to those other guys like Daytona with national attention,” Burns said. Event staff are working on a five-year plan that includes reaching out to and working with more entities in the area in hopes of allowing for more expansion, Burns said. Larger rallies like Daytona, which has been around for over half a century, get the entire county and surrounding areas involved, and that’s the goal for Bikes, Blues and BBQ, Burns said. “We want to expand to have events in Eureka Springs because it is such a beautiful place to ride,” Burns said. “There are people who never even make it (to Fayetteville) because they just stay there for a week. We want them to have the full experience of our rally, too.” Bikes, Blues and BBQ is one of Fayetteville’s most popular events, never failing to have a rich variety of people, food, music and experiences for anyone to enjoy.

Can’t Stand the Noise?

How to Have Fun Avoiding the Rally

Caitlin Murad Staff Writer

Courtesy Photo Bikes, Blues and BBQ brings dozens of vendors to Fayetteville every year, from barbecue to soul food.

The city of Fayetteville opens its doors every year to Bikes, Blues and BBQ, the largest charitable motorcycle rally in the U.S. It is the one time of the year where nothing can be heard over the gunning of engines and music coming from Dickson Street. If roaring engines and bikers in leather studded jackets aren’t your ideal way of spending a weekend, Fayetteville has plenty of other options for you and your friends. If you plan on staying around Fayetteville for the weekend, the Square has boutiques like Riffraff, The Mustache and SavoirFaire. Their prices are made for

a college budget, and their fun displays are perfect for window shopping. You can also shop on College Avenue at the unique vintage boutique Grey Dog. Grey Dog is a vintage clothing store operated out of an Airstream trailer. It was the first of the Airstream trailers to set up in the parking lot on College Avenue between Maple Street and North Street. Grey Dog sells clothing, shoes and accessories. Vintage Violet, another vintage shop, opened up just last year on College Avenue. In addition to clothing and accessories, Vintage Violet sells furniture and home goods. The town of Prairie Grove is located 15 miles outside of Fayetteville and is home to tons of antique shops. It is a perfect

place to look for antique furniture and get some fun ideas for gifts or decorating your home. Trying to avoid the Fayetteville traffic? Head toward Devils Den and go hiking while the weather is still warm. It is free and located only 20 minutes away from campus. The view of the Ozark Mountains is a perfect alternative to the craziness of Fayetteville this weekend. Another alternative is to go to Beaver Lake in Rogers. With fall quickly approaching, this will probably be one of the last times you can enjoy the lake without bracing yourself for the icy water. You and your friends can bring a picnic and hang out by the shoreline. If you are over 21, you can rent a boat starting at $50 an hour and enjoy the lake with your friends.

About 30 miles north of Fayetteville, you can enlighten your mind and refine your tastes at Crystal Bridges Museum. The museum is free to all visitors and includes famous artwork from American history like the iconic “Rosie the Riveter” and portraits of George Washington. In addition to the artwork in the museum, you can also enjoy the trails around the property, which feature several pieces of artwork and beautiful landscaping. Whether you plan on staying in Fayetteville for the weekend or plan on venturing to the neighboring cities, there are plenty of things to do to keep you away from bustling Fayetteville during Bikes, Blues and BBQ.


Page 6

The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Comics Pearls Before Swine

Dilbert

Calvin and Hobbes

Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

Sudoku Stephan Pastis

Scott Adams

Bill Watterson

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Crossword

Doonesbury

Non Sequitur

Garry Trudeau

Wiley Miller

By Adam Prince

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

ACROSS 1 Stir-fry additive 4 [frog lands in pond] 8 Remote control battery 14 Baba of folklore 15 Bindle carrier 16 “Zip your lip!” 17 Diarist Anaïs 18 “Gotta hit the hay” 20 Future snakes, perhaps 22 Regards highly 23 Elementary school fundamentals 25 Cut from the same cloth 29 Lemon and lime 30 Swift means of attack? 32 Put into words 33 Poe’s “ungainly fowl” 36 D.C. athlete 37 Mom’s behavior warning 41 __ of Good Feelings 42 Gives the heave-ho 43 Rap’s __ Wayne 44 With-the-grain woodworking technique 46 Theater sections 48 Canadian pump sign

49 Marks to brag about 54 “Why bother?” 56 Color property 57 Canned pasta brand 61 “Characters welcome” network 62 Receive, as a radio signal 63 South American country at 0 degrees lat. 64 Looney Tunes collectible 65 Structural threat for many a house 66 Gels 67 Towel lettering DOWN 1 “The Balcony” painter 2 Insult 3 Cookies with a bite 4 Chi preceder 5 Solitary sorts 6 Beyond zaftig 7 Baudelaire, par exemple 8 Evaluates 9 Quark’s locale 10 Global networking pioneer 11 Girl in a pasture 12 Gossipy Smith

13 OCS grads, usually 19 “__ Rosenkavalier” 21 Bed or home ending 24 “Over here!” 26 Reader with a sensitive screen 27 Modern site of Mesopotamia 28 Keeps after taxes 31 Like Big Ben 33 Big chunk of Eur. 34 Framed work 35 No. twos 37 Nothing more than 38 Eye part 39 Surpassed in extravagance 40 Elie Wiesel work 45 Large eel 46 Took it on the lam 47 Grandchild of Japanese immigrants 50 Little one 51 Traditional doings 52 “That has __ ring to it” 53 Elite Navy group 55 Kent State’s home 57 Norm: Abbr. 58 Water filter brand 59 Whichever 60 Airline to Oslo


Sports Editor: Kristen Coppola Assistant Sports Editor: Haley Markle Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012

The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

Page 7

CLUB SPORTS

SOCCER

Eric Harris Staff Writer

First Ranked SEC Opponent

Rugby Club Calls on Tradition Soccer Beats Rugby is the oldest club sport at the UA and recently has been one of the most successful. Dating back to 1971 with the team practicing on the Old Main lawn, the club was founded by Bob Hamilton, Freddie Ligon, Mike Hacker and Craig Hull. The club’s tradition grew as the team moved from playing field to playing field. At times, the team played at Fayetteville High School or Walker Park. The Razorbacks continued to play and even got the opportunity to play at the Liberty Bowl in Memphis, but the club folded in 2004. In 2007, Michael Pope and other officers re-established the Razorback Rugby Club and they currently play in the Heart of America Conference. Since its re-establishment, the club has grown tremendously in the past five years and current players have noticed a growing interest on campus. “My first year was 2007, when we were rebuilding the club, and there was a total of 12 guys at practices and we didn’t have a coach,” senior Ryan Boggs said. Warren Fyfe has been the head coach of the Razorbacks since 2008 and has led the team to success and numerous titles, including the Ozark Tournament Collegiate Bracket in his first season. In Fyfe’s second season, the Rugby Club had a season

Haley Markle Asst. Sports Editor

Photo courtesy of Arkansas Rugby The Razorback rugby club engages in a scrum with their opponent last season. The club plays Iowa State Saturday in Fayetteville. to remember. The Razorbacks had an undefeated regular season resulting in the Heart Of America Conference Championship. The Hogs also had a deep run in the Regional Tournament and their first win over a Division 1 opponent. Last season, the club added assistant coaches Jake McCormack and Frans Schimper. After doing so, the team won the OSU Tournament as well as the Heart of America 7’s tournament. Boggs says that just being with his teammates is the best experience. “We’ve won so many different championships and matches, but honestly those wouldn’t be the best because it’s just hanging out with the team and things like that,” Boggs said.

“Traveling, going to away games, going to hotels. The further the trip, the better, because it helps you get a lot closer and builds the camaraderie around the team,” senior Collin Jackson said. Boggs and Tucker Shaw are the two captains of the club. Jackson and TJ Christensen are financial officers. Other officers include Charles Ajarrista and Dylan Chester for marketing and Brett Schreiber and Tony Zambrano for organization. The future looks bright for the rugby team as well. So far the team is undefeated in their fall schedule. Boggs says the growing financial support and alumni base is helping the team grow. Brotherhood is a strong value expressed by the Rugby

team, and it shows in its strong alumni base. Many continue to support the club even after graduation and continue to play at their local rugby clubs. Many of the players on the team are former football players, but others like Jackson have been playing rugby since high school. The Hogs practice on the intramural fields on Mondays and Wednesdays from 8-10 p.m., and annual dues for the club are $50. The team competes in both 7’s and 15’s competitions, and the team has high goals for both. “Our goal is to win the Heart of America 7’s tournament and go to nationals like we did last year,” Jackson said. “For 15’s we want to win our conference and go as far as we can in that.”

The Razorback soccer team opened their home Southeastern Conference schedule last weekend with a win over No. 18 Kentucky and a double overtime tie with South Carolina. The team looks to continue the success this weekend against Tennessee and Florida. The win against Kentucky was the first win over a ranked opponent in the history of the program. “Overall, obviously extremely excited about the win and the girls really felt like they earned it,” said head coach Colby Hale. The team is getting better at scoring goals and attacking, and the confidence of the team on that side of the ball is increasing, Hale said. However, defensively, the team still needs to improve. “We’ve been giving up some goals and we need to sort some of that out,” Hale said. South Carolina is traditionally one of the best teams in the SEC and is the defending regular season champion. The team did not play great in the first half, Hale said, but

were able to improve in the second half and overtime to earn the tie. “I don’t know the whole history, but I’ve done quite a bit of research on the history of the soccer program and you could argue this was as good, if not the best, weekend in SEC play,” Hale said. Freshman forward Lindsey Mayo scored two goals in the win over Kentucky and was named the SEC Offensive Player of the Week. Now the focus shifts to the upcoming games against Tennessee (7-2-2, 2-1-1 SEC) and Florida (6-3-1, 3-1-0 SEC), both on the road. Tennessee and Florida played Friday night, with Florida earning the win, 2-1. “They’re going to pose a lot of challenges for us,” Hale said of the Volunteers, who the Razorbacks will face Friday night in Knoxville, Tenn. The Volunteers are coming off a big win Sunday afternoon when they defeated Mississippi State 6-0. The team will then travel to Gainesville, Fla., to take on the Gators. Florida has won the regular season championship five of the last six years. Florida defeated Georgia 4-1 Sunday.

VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball to Play a Pair of Tigers After a Week Haley Markle Asst. Sports Editor

The Razorback volleyball team earned wins in their first Southeastern Conference road games of the season last weekend over No. 21 Tennessee and Georgia. The four-set win over the Volunteers Friday night was the first victory for the team in Knoxville, Tenn., since the 2007 season. The team improved to 4-1 in matches played away from home Sunday with a straightset victory over the bulldogs in Athens, Ga. “Anytime you can go on the road and come out of it

2-0, it’s a very, very successful weekend, especially in this conference,” said head coach Robert Pulliza. Senior middle blocker Janeliss Torres-Lopez has been named the SEC Defensive Player of the Week. She averaged 1.57 blocks per set and helped hold opponents to a .117 hitting percentage throughout the road trip. Torres-Lopez hit .419 with 2.29 kills per set in the two matches. “Janeliss has been playing really well all along, since the season started,” Pulliza said. “So seeing her get recognized was exciting for everybody on the team.” The team will play a pair

of Tigers this weekend in Auburn (12-2, 3-1 SEC) and LSU (5-8, 1-3 SEC). Auburn is coming off a successful weekend with victories over South Carolina, who was unbeaten before facing the Tigers, and Alabama. “The fans can expect an unbelievable match,” Pulliza said of the match up with the Tigers. “Auburn is a lot fun to watch, as well as we are.” LSU split their weekend matches with a win over Kentucky Friday night and a loss to SEC newcomer Missouri Sunday. The game against Auburn is Friday at 7 p.m. and the match with LSU will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday.

Rebekah Harvey Staff Photographer UA women’s volleyball coach, Robert Pulliza, talks about the team’s progress in the season thus far at the Olympic Press Conference Sept. 25.

COMMENTARY

Ignore the Dead Horse, Focus on the Razorbacks Liz Beadle Staff Writer

As I sat up somewhere around the ozone layer in the overflow student section Saturday night, there was a moment, if ever so brief, in which the goosebumps on my limbs stopped reflecting the windy weather and started reflecting something else entirely. I felt it — that magic that makes college football what it is. That not knowing who is going to win. That feeling when the crowd affects the game. Those false starts and offsides calls. The feeling when the ball is snapped and anything can happen. Everyone stops thinking about where they’re going next and when they’re leaving and stops complaining about the person next to them and stands captivated, mesmerized

by the thing in front of them. We still had the power to do that. The Razorbacks were on the way to their third loss of the season, and yet we could still stop the world on its axis for just a moment. I don’t mean that the players could do that, and surely the coaches could not. We had that power — the fans. Anyone who tells you that winning is not the most important thing in the world clearly does not understand the concept of sport. Winning is the point and not winning makes these moments I am describing few and far between. Normally, these moments would be plentiful on a beautiful game day in Fayetteville, but this one was isolated in a sea of average. Average is in no way acceptable. Average is for schools in Mississippi. But I, like many across this state, am just sick of hearing all the complaining.

It’s hard, I know, because there is not a lot to say when things aren’t going well — all you want to do is complain, but that has never done anything for anybody. So here’s what we’re going to do: we’re going to be good fans in a bad situation. And don’t take “good” to mean “rah-rah supportive.” That is not what it always means. My point is that fans still have power. Here’s the game plan, and unlike the Hogs, let’s execute it: The University of Arkansas is in the middle (and I say middle because it is not in the beginning and it is not in the end) of a search for a head football coach. Pete Roussel, the recognized authority on college coaching changes, wrote earlier this week that coaches “notice the tendency of a fan base: do they want to stick together and make the best of the situ-

ation and look forward to the future, or would they rather just beat a dead horse.” And beating a dead horse is exactly what a lot of Arkansas fans have been doing lately. John L. Smith will not be employed at this university when his 10-month contract is over, but he will be employed at this university until then. I agree that his dealings with the media have been erratic and confusing at best, but who cares? He will be here this season and not next season and that is a fact, so it really just does not matter that much what he says or what you think should happen to him — his fate is already decided. So our energy should be focused on moving forward. It seriously broke my heart to see a tweet from Brandon Mitchell over the weekend that read “What are y’all talking about next year already for? We still got 8 more games to get this

thing right.” I think his optimism is encouraging, I really do, and the thing is, we can create a winwin situation here. By cheering on the 2012 Arkansas Razorbacks in a supportive, all-weather fashion, we are helping the 2013 and 2014 and 2015 Razorbacks. Recruits notice booing in the stands, and potential coaches notice it even more. Fan behavior is by no means the most important thing a recruit or coach looks at when choosing a school or job, but it is a factor — and unlike all other factors, it is one fans can control. Attacking John L. Smith is the epitome of pointless. All we can do is support this program and its future. Please do not misunderstand me — this is not a “you better be in those stands with a smile on your face no matter what” kind of column.

The administration of this school needs to know that mediocrity will not be tolerated and potential coaches need to know that expectations are high, but people who could potentially be cogs in the future of this program also need to be aware that Arkansas is a grand place to be. And we have to keep a sensible, focused, supportive and serious attitude as a fan base so that those we are trying to draw in can see clearly why this place is so grand and why we feel the passion we do. It’s still in our power to create those magic moments so that sooner rather than later those moments start lasting from late August to early January year after year after year. Liz Beadle is a staff writer for The Arkansas Traveler. Her column appears every other Wednesday. Follow the sports section on Twitter @UATravSports.


Page 8

Wednsday, Sept. 26, 2012 The Arkansas Traveler Newspaper

CROSS COUNTRY

GOLF

Men’s Golf Finish in 11th Place Hogs Receive SEC Weekly Recognition Haley Markle Asst. Sports Editor

Photo courtesy of Athletic Media Relations Senior Austin Cook recorded a one-under par 71 Tuesday to lead the Razorbacks to an 11th place finish in the PING/Golfweek Preview in Atlanta, Ga.

Cameron McCauley Staff Writer

The Arkansas Razorbacks men’s golf team tied for 11th place at the PING/Golfweek Preview at the Capital City Club in Atlanta, Ga., after three days of play. Arkansas finished the tournament 29-over par, though none of the teams finished under par for the tournament. “It was a tough course, but fair for every team,� head coach Brad McMakin said. “I know that we are capable of playing better than we did the last three days and will work toward that.� The Razorbacks were led by senior Austin Cook, who shot one-over par, 71, Tuesday for his final round, and four-over

par for the tournament. He tied for 22nd as an individual with a record of 214 over three rounds. “I was pleased with the way that Austin played,� McMakin said. “He responded really well after a difficult opener and showed why he was an AllAmerican as a sophomore.� Freshman Taylor Moore got off to an impressive start Sunday, shooting a 2-under-par 68 on the first day of the tournament, his first round to score in the 60s at the collegiate level. Moore, a highly-touted recruit from Edmond, Okla., paved the way for the Razorbacks, who finished the first day in sixth place in the team standings. Moore added a 3-over-par 73 on Monday, keeping him only five strokes off of the lead

after the second day of the tournament. But the Razorbacks regressed as a team on Monday, falling back six spots to 12th place. Junior Sebastian Cappelen had a tough first day, starting off with a 7-over par 77, but shaved four strokes off his score on Monday and finished with a 73. He was able to make up for the first round by recording threeover par in the second round. The Razorbacks were able to move up from 12th to 11th on Tuesday, despite struggles by Moore to maintain his high scoring from the first two rounds. The event included eight of the top nine teams ranked in Golfweek.com preseason polls, making it one of the more important events of the fall season.

The Razorbacks were ranked seventh in that poll to start the season. The Crabapple Course at the Capital City Club in Atlanta is the same course the NCAA National Championship will be at in late May 2013. The tournament is a great event for a championship contender such as the Razorbacks to get a preview of the national championship course in the fall. UCLA held the top spot after the second day, followed by UNLV and the host team Georgia Tech. After the second day, the teams were not separated by many strokes, meaning the Razorbacks could have made a strong push for a higher finish as the tournament commenced. Kristen Coppola contributed reporting.

A pair of Razorbacks earned Southeastern Conference weekly honors after turning in impressive performances in the Panorama Farms Invitational Saturday. Junior Kemoy Campbell was named the SEC Runner of the Week. He turned in a time of 24:04.7 to win the Invitational in Earlysville, Va. Campbell was competing in his first event as a Razorback after transferring from South Plains College.

“That’s a tough course to run your first collegiate 8K. I thought he did an outstanding job,� Bucknam said. The team finished second

Wallace

Campbell “He showed his talent and I think it was just the tip of the iceberg for him,� head coach Chris Bucknam said of Campbell. “We’re really happy with his race.� Freshman Cale Wallace was named SEC Freshman of the Week after turning in a time 25:10.3, good for fifth on the team and 28th overall.

overall, behind No. 4 Oklahoma. Senior Eric Fernandez turned in a time of 24:19.4, good for third overall. Solomon Haile finished the course in 24:24.1. His time was fifth overall and the third top five time for the Razorbacks. The final score that counted toward the Razorback’s team score was Layne Nixon’s time of 24:55.0, good for 24th overall. “All in all, I was pleased with our effort,� Bucknam said. “It was probably the most difficult course that I’ve had a team run on for quite a while and I thought that our kids handled it pretty well.� The next event for the Razorbacks is the Wisconsin Adidas Invitational in Madison, Wis., Friday, Oct. 12.

         

        

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September 26, 2012  

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