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Vol. 106, NO. 56 UATRAV.COM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

: All Work and No Play by BRITTANY NIMS Asst. News Editor

Editor’s Note: The New Normal is a series highlighting new norms for college students in this day and age.

In a nation where student loan debt exceeds credit card debt, according to finaid.org, some UA students have turned to other ways to pay for college, avoiding student loans completely. The average UA student is in $21,000 of student debt when they graduate from their undergraduate program, said Kattie Wing, UA director of financial aid. “If you have to take out debt in order to get an education, I think it’s a good thing. It’s an investment. It makes a difference in your life, your entire life, not just in the short-term,” she said. For students like Denise Wick, a senior kinesiology major, loans are not an option. Wick, a first generation college student, will graduate debt-free with her undergraduate degree in May, she said, after paying for her tuition almost entirely out-of-pocket for three years. “It’s been really hard. Everything I have I’ve paid for. Most [student’s] see WORKING on page 3

BRITTANY NIMS ASST. NEWS EDITOR

Denise Wick, a UA senior kinesiology major, pays for all of her tuition out-of-pocket, with no financial aid assistance. Wick, whose family owns a dairy farm in Oklahoma, goes home each weekend to work on the farm, about 10 hours each day. She also works in the UA Student Support Services in the basement of Gregson Hall.

In This Issue

UA Officials Add Sorority Chapters by MANDY MCCLENDON

News

SEC Student Governments Head South About 85 students and advisers from all 14 Southeastern Conference schools will be attending the SEC Exchange Jan. 27 to 29.

Page 2

News

New Outreach Group for RSOs

Staff Writer

As UA enrollment continues to grow, sororities are tasked with accommodating up to a hundred new members each year. The Panhellenic Council officials hope to add two sorority chapters by 2013, officials said.

In August, each of the 10 sorority houses on campus welcomed pledge classes of up to 136 members, for a total of nearly 1,100 new members. That’s up significantly from 2007, when 460 students pledged a sorority. The sharp increase has complicated the recruiting

process, said Emily Harvey, a junior English major and member of Zeta Tau Alpha. “Our houses simply cannot accommodate such a large number of girls. It is more difficult on our kitchen staffs, our house mothsee SORORITY on page 2

Lending a Helping Hand

A new organization called SOOIE is open to any student who is already in an RSO.

Features

Page 2

First-Year Upperclassmen: Transfer Students Find a New Home

Transfer students face different challenges than first-year freshmen.

Page 5 Features

Music On The Road A run-down of all the great concerts worth traveling throughout the region for this spring.

Page 6

Opinion

Sports

Hogs Get Blown Out No. 2 Kentucky dominated inside and routed Arkansas 86-63 in Rupp Arena on Tuesday night.

Page 8

The Election Before The Election A close look at Romney versus the remaining GOP candidates, plus what the U.S. needs in its next leader.

Page 4

BRITTANY WULF STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Volunteer Action Center members sponsored a volunteer day in the Connections Lounge in the Union on Tuesday. UA students made ham and cheese sandwiches for the homeless. The VAC aims to develop opportunities for students to participate in meaningful service experiences.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012 VOL. 106, NO. 56 8 PAGES UATRAV.COM

WEATHER FORECAST

TODAY 53°

THURSDAY 54°

FRIDAY 61°

SATURDAY 63°

SUNDAY 66°

Parking Spaces Closed for Athletic Construction by JACK SUNTRUP Staff Writer

During winter break, Lot 67, adjacent to the HPER center, was transformed into a dirt field as workers prepared for construction of a new athletic training center. The result was a loss of 500 parking spaces. Some students, who said parking spaces were already scarce before Lot 67’s closure, were upset at the change but adjusted all the same. “I knew it was going to be pretty full here (Lot 73) and I was like, ‘whatever, I’ll park in the back,’” said sophomore Melanie Fonction. “I thought I could get out of [the shortage] but apparently not.” Most students interviewed found a parking spot after about 10 minutes of looking, and there were a few open spots in Lots 72 and 73 at 9:00 a.m. “I actually got really lucky because someone was pulling out of a spot,” said graduate student Janet Hughes. “If that wouldn’t of been available I would’ve gone further down Razorback Road to park.” “It wasn’t too bad considering everything,” said Marci King, junior. “I was expecting it to take a lot longer, that’s for sure.” “I used the HPER parking lot every day because I’m an athlete. It was always hard to find a spot in there so I was not looking forward to that being closed,” she said. In addition to Lot 67 closing, Lot 2, with 91 spaces was also shut down in order to construct a new multi-department building, said Andy Gilbride, parking and transit representative. However, the impact of losing nearly 600 parking spaces will be, the marching band not needing Lot 56 for practice. This will hopefully ease any potential shortages, Gilbride said. Lot 46, next to the University Police Department on Razorback Road, was also filled with cars yesterday, Gilbride said. “Lot 46 was three-fourths full when normally it’s not even half full,” he said. In addition to the band using the lot in the fall semester, a large freshmen class will pose more challenges to the already stretched parking facilities, Gilbride said. “We’re going to have more freshmen, more kids on campus, with less parking, unfortunately,” he said.

MONDAY 65°

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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

PAGE 2

ABOUT THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER MADDIE LOGAN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The eight standing Panhellenic sororities may potentially need to make room for a ninth in the future because of over-registration of PNMs (potential new members). The last sorority to be added to the university was Alpha Omicron Pi in 2006.

SORORITY from page 1

ers, and greatly decreases the number of girls that will have the opportunity to live in the house,” which is an essential part of the sorority experience, Harvey said. The selection process for the new chapters began

in September when representatives from the National Panhellenic Council visited the UA campus to meet with administrators, tour sorority houses and discuss housing options. The visit resulted in a proposal for two additional chapters. Greek Life members and UA officials “hope to

work closely with the National Panhellenic Council to show that the University of Arkansas will have a viable Greek system for years to come, and that new sororities will thrive at the University of Arkansas,” said Ashley Tull, senior associate dean of students to the UA. Parice Bowser, director

of Greek Life, said she is delighted to see so many women interested in joining a sorority. “This speaks volumes about our programs, services, chapters and alumni. We are truly grateful to have this opportunity to positively impact lives in a major way,” Bowser said.

The Arkansas Traveler, the student newspaper of the University of Arkansas, is published every day during the fall and spring academic sessions except during exam periods and university holidays. Opinions expressed in signed columns are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Traveler. The editor makes all final content decisions. One copy of The Arkansas Traveler is free to every member of the UA community. Additional copies can be purchased for 50 cents each. Mail subscriptions for delivery within the continental United States can be purchased for $125.00 per semester. Contact the Traveler Business Manager to arrange.

CONTACT 119 Kimpel Hall University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR 72701

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STAFF EDITORIAL SABA NASEEM

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CHAD WOODARD

News Editor 575-3226 travnews@uark.edu

MATTIE QUINN Managing Editor travmgr@uark.edu

BRITTANY NIMS

LAUREN LEATHERBY

UAPD and Fayetteville Fire Department officials respond to a medical emergency near the UA bus station Tuesday.

CRIME REPORT: Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011 Driving While Intoxicated

A student was arrested in the parking lot at 1240 North Garland Avenue (Fast Trax Convenience Store).

Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2011 Theft of Motor Vehicle

A faculty member reported someone stole his scooter from Lot 71. The faculty member later found the scooter abandoned at Center Street and Hill Avenue.

Thursday, Dec. 29, 2011 Theft of Property

A construction company representative reported someone stole a “Sidewalk Closed” sign from Duncan Avenue, north of Center Street.

Friday, Dec. 30, 2011 Theft of Property

A student reported someone stole his bicycle from the southeast corner of the Farmhouse Fraternity House.

Saturday, Jan. 7

Driving While Intoxicated

A non-affiliated person was arrested at Oak Avenue and Cedar Street. A subsequent breath test for blood alcohol content returned a reading below the legal limit. The person was not charged with DWI but was charged with reckless driving, driving without headlights and driving while license suspended/ revoked.

Monday, Jan. 9

Breaking Or Entering; Theft of Property

A staff member reported someone stole a parking permit from his vehicle while the vehicle was parked in the parking lot at NCREPT at the Arkansas Research and Technology Park.

Wednesday, Jan. 11 Arrest On Warrant

(Contempt Of Court on an original charge of No Insurance out of Rogers Police Department) A student was arrested in Lot 46.

Saturday, Jan. 14

Possession Of a Controlled Substance (Marijuana); Possession of Drug Paraphernalia A student was arrested in Yocum Hall.

Sunday, Jan. 15

Underage Driving Under The Influence Of Alcohol

A student was arrested in the circle driveway at Pomfret Hall.

Monday, Jan. 16

Theft of Property (Shoplifting)

A student was arrested at the University Bookstore.

KRIS JOHNSON STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

SEC Student Governments Head South by SARAH DEROUEN Staff Writer

About 85 students and advisers from all 14 Southeastern Conference schools will be attending the SEC Exchange Jan. 27 to 29. “The goal of the conference is for student governments to network and exchange ideas,” said Emily Evans, event planner. SEC Exchange will include networking events, presentations and a break-out session. Student government presidents will present analyses of their governments and special programs. The break-out session will allow different groups of people with common interests, including presidents and vice presidents, to get together and discuss governing strategies, Evans said. UA ASG will showcase programs that are different from what other schools are doing during SEC exchange, said Michael Dodd, ASG President. One specific thing that ASG will look at is what to do in

times of grief, such as the November death of football player Garrett Uekman. Dodd will discuss the special vigil that took place in Uekman’s honor. Other things ASG will discuss include: a partnership with the UA judicial system, making ASG more accessible, ASG diversity and the reconstruction of some ASG policies, Dodd said. Conferences that bring together student governments from different schools are popular, Evans said. The Big 12 division, for example, has a similar event. Schools in the SEC include University of Alabama, UA, Auburn, University of Florida, University of Georgia, University of Kentucky, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, University of South Carolina, University of Tennessee and Vanderbilt, according to the SEC. Students from Texas A&M and the University of Missouri will also be attending, Evans said.

New Outreach Group for RSOs by KAREN STIGAR Staff Writer

The UA Registered Student Organizations welcomed a new outreach group this semester, Student Organization Outreach and Involvement Experience, officials said. SOOIE is open to any student who is already a member of an RSO, said Robyn Barthel, assistant director for RSOs. Barthel developed the group last semester with Laura Keath, graduate assistant for RSOs, to “provide students with opportunities for co-curricular growth,” Keath said. SOOIE combines outreach and involvement, Barthel said. “SOOIE members involved in outreach will be trained to lead customized presentations and workshops for RSOs. SOOIE members interested in RSO outreach will also be trained to lead icebreakers and team-builders,” Barthel said.

Keath said she thinks SOOIE will encourage RSO members to work collectively to reach out to uninvolved students. “I want to reach out to as many students as I can because getting involved in a university organization will contribute to personal growth, connect students with similar interest, and empower students to be active citizens of the community, and foster a sense of belonging that connects the student to the university,” Keath said. SOOIE will meet Feb.13 at 5 p.m. and Feb. 14 at 3 p.m. in Arkansas Union 507. “I do believe this program can be an asset and, with the right leadership, can change the UA, because it will help students become more involved in the diverse RSOs here on campus,” said Raven Cook, president of the UA Black Students Association.

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CORRECTIONS The Arkansas Traveler strives for accuracy in its reporting and will correct all matters of fact. If you believe the paper has printed an error, please notify the editor at 575.8455 or at traveler@uark.edu.

CAMPUS NUMBERS NEED EMERGENCY HELP? CALL UAPD 575-2222

The women and men of the University of Arkansas Police Department, in partnership with the community, are committed to protecting the future of Arkansas by promoting a safe and secure environment.

HAVE A TICKET? CALL 575-7275 TO RESOLVE IT

The Transit and Parking office handles parking permits and passes and transit for students, including bus routes and GoLoco Ride Sharing. Students with parking violations can contact the office to appeal their citation.

NEED A RIDE AT NIGHT? CALL 575 - 7233

Otherwise known as 575-SAFE, the mission of the Safe Ride program is to provide students with a safe means of transportation from any uncomfortable or inconvenient situation. Safe Ride brings you home safely.

NEED TICKETS? CALL 1-800-982-4647 Don’t forget to call early and reserve your student football tickets for the 2010-2011 season. The ticket office is located on Razorback Road next to Baum Stadium.


PAGE 3

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012 WORKING from page 1

parents might pay for their car or their phone or will buy them groceries, but I have to do that all on my own,” she said. About 1.7 million undergraduates graduated debtfree between 2007 and 2008, according to a report on finaid.org,“Characteristics of College Students Who Graduate with No Debt.” Additionally, students who graduate from a public college are more likely to graduate with no debt, according to the report. Wick has no financial aid or scholarships this year, she said, but manages to pay her tuition in addition to her apartment, utilities, phone, groceries and transportation. “I’ve had a job since I was about nine,” she said. “Part

of the only reason I’ve been able to do this is because I’ve been saving this whole time. My parents instilled in me at an early age that I need to work for everything that I want.” Wick’s family moved to the U.S. from Switzerland in 1996 when she was in grade school, she said. They now own a dairy farm in Oklahoma, where she goes to work on the weekends, 10 hours each day. During the week, Wick works every day with the UA Student Support Services, roughly 20 hours each week. UA students work more hours than students enrolled “in the comparison group of the benchmark institutions,” which include Louisiana State University, Vanderbilt University, Auburn University, University of Florida and University of

Mississippi, among several others, according to a UA report called Destination Graduation 2010. Additionally, UA students are less likely to apply for federal aid programs compared to students from those institutions. The ideal way to go to school, Wing said, would be not working. “But sometimes life is not ideal,” she said. Students who pay their way through college work several hours each week and take fewer credit hours than most, according to an Associated Press article, “The other student loan problem: too little debt.” They’re also more likely to live at home, be parttime students and are less likely to graduate, according to the article. Wick is an exception. She is taking 17 credit

hours this fall, she said, and has maintained a cumulative 3.6 GPA. “I feel like it’s an accomplishment and a reflection on yourself of what you can achieve,” she said. Working while going to school can help students, if they work on campus, said Karen Hodges, co-chair of the UA Retention Council. “If you can get a job like this [on campus], it’s going to increase your success,” she said. “If you work too many hours and it’s not connected [to your degree], I think it can be detrimental.” Some UA students, however, view loans as a springboard to other tuition payment options. Kate Chapman, a UA graduate student studying higher education in student affairs, received her undergraduate degree in community health promotion from the UA in May. As an undergraduate student, Chap-

man had scholarships, but she did not have enough to cover full tuition, she said. “Whatever I didn’t have to cover it, I would take out a loan because I could pay on the loan, but I couldn’t pay all the tuition that was left all at one time,” she said. “I would take out a loan and then pay on it, so I don’t owe any interest on my loans. “I don’t owe as much in student loans anymore, just because I’ve paid on it for so long,” she said. As a graduate student, she owes about $7,000 on the loans she took out as an undergrad, she said. Chapman was offered an assistantship within her graduate program that covers her full cost of tuition, she said, and she receives a stipend that she uses for rent, utilities and other expenses. “I don’t have to have an extra job, I don’t have to do a lot of the things I used to,” she said.

During her undergrad years, Chapman worked anywhere from 20 to 50 hours each week. She worked several different jobs during that time, both on and off campus, she said. Students that left the UA cited financial issues as their main reason for leaving, according to the Destination Graduation 2010 report. If loans are the only way a student can get the education they want, then a loan should be considered, Wing said. “It’s important to have funding for your education and loans are part of that funding,” she said. “It pays for itself in the long run.” If it was necessary for her to complete her degree, Wick said she would take out a loan, but would be conservative about it.

7HUJOV:HUJOLa

Poncho Sanchez and his Latin Jazz Band Friday, Jan. 20 Tickets start at $10

Keb’ Mo’ Band 2LI»4V»

Wednesday, Jan. 25 Tickets start at $29

waltonartscenter.org Box Office: 479.443.5600 Media support for Poncho Sanchez is provided by NWA Business Journal. Additional support by Billie and Joe Fred Starr.


OPINION THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

EDITOR: SABA NASEEM MANAGING EDITOR: MATTIE QUINN

FROM THE BOARD

Spring Semester Brings Big Opportunities The first few days of school are filled with stress, excitement and resolutions to work harder in the upcoming semester. On one hand, a schedule of new classes gives us hope that we can raise our grade point averages and gain a scholarship or two. On the other, the idea of getting up before the sun rises to catch the bus, instead of spending another week lounging around, makes us grimace. It’s hard to imagine only having time away from the classroom every weekend rather than every day. The spring semester has finally come, and for many of those graduating in a matter of months, it’s a semester of marking off those last elective classes on the degree plan. For the rest of us, it’s another term of working towards one day having our names on the senior walk. While many look forward to coming back to town for the fall semester after a long, 3-month summer, the excitement for the following spring sometimes seems a little less enticing. However you’re feeling about the next few months of school, remember that the spring semester can be just as exciting as the fall. Though the spring doesn’t offer a mountain of free pizza at Razorbash or Saturdays at the stadium, there is still so much to enjoy and anticipate. Not only does the university offer much to look forward to, like a baseball season of grilling out on left field, spring break and the occasional outdoor class, but Fayetteville also comes alive as the weather warms up. Devil’s Den State Park becomes overrun with student campers and hikers, and the farmer’s market once again returns to the square. Whatever your fancy, the spring semester offers something for everyone and deserves a little more credit. We all know how hard it is to get out of the door in the freezing January temperatures – maybe that’s the reason spring semester is so hard to crack. In the fall, the weather is bright and warm, so the excitement for returning to campus comes naturally. The first few months of spring, however, are cold, murky and tiresome, and the campus has a sleepy vibe until the sun finally begins to shine around the time we all leave for spring break. Be prepared to fight through the foggy mornings and keep your head up high. Don’t skip class because of the weather, but rather enjoy the wintery bliss and grab a hot drink on your trek across campus. Use the first few cold months to focus solely on school work while Fayetteville attractions seem few and far, so that the end of the semester can be spent wrapping up last minute projects, spending time with friends, and relaxing on Old Main lawn. Instead of dragging your feet to class for the first few weeks, try to enjoy all that Fayetteville has to offer, while using it as a time to get everything together for a successful semester, whether it’s your first or last year here at the UA. Welcome back to campus for a spring semester that we can really look forward to. Make the best of your classes, learn something new and take advantage of every opportunity you get. Our college days are few in the grand scheme of things, and if we can’t enjoy life now, when our responsibilities are far from what they will be in 10 years, when can we? It’s time to make a change in our thinking of what each semester can bring, so instead of coming back with the attitude of making it through until the summer break, take charge of your time here at the University of Arkansas and enjoy every minute of it.

Traveler Quote of the Day “I’ve had a job since I was about nine. Part of the only reason I’ve been able to [avoid student loans] is because I’ve been saving this whole time. My parents instilled in me at an early age that I need to work for everything that I want.” - Denise Wick, senior kinesiology major, “All Work and No Play”, page 1

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR Saba Naseem MANAGING EDITOR Mattie Quinn OPINION EDITOR Emily Rhodes The Arkansas Traveler welcomes letters to the editor from all interested readers. Letters should be at most 300 words and should include your name, student classification and major or title with the university and a day-time telephone number for verification. Letters should be sent to traveler@uark.edu.

MARCUS FERREIRA STAFF CARTOONIST

The Election Before the Election Good To Know

by WILL SIMPSON

Traveler Columnist

Let me tell you a political story. Terrible opener for a first date—trust me—but I think it works in a newspaper. The Republicans are nominating their candidate to face an incumbent Democratic president. A man swept into office by his personal charm, but who has seen that glamor tarnished by high unemployment and a public opinion moodier than Kris Jenner. The GOP frontrunner, conversely, is a blue-state Republican who flipflopped on abortion. That story would be from 1980, and the primary race that churned out Ronald Reagan to lay an electoral smack down on president Jimmy Carter. Before all my fellow conservatives have a hernia and stone me for blaspheming the name of Reagan, I’ll clarify - Mitt Romney is no Ronald Reagan. Though he does have the hair—and the assuring, resonant speaking voice.

Arkansas Republicans still have some reservations about our presumptive nominee. And, by the time we vote on “Super Tuesday, (May 22), Romney’s momentum will be well on its way to taking the whole kit and caboodle. In the meantime, it is worth comparing Mitt and his record to the rest of the candidates. It’s like eating in Brough cafeteria—even if the pizza doesn’t look great, just compare it to the tofu stir-fry. First, there’s Mitt, coming fresh off a big win in New Hampshire. Gallup polls show that there are still twice as many selfidentified conservatives as liberals in America, and a Republican candidate needs them to get nominated. A lot of conservatives are scared of his health care plan in Massachusetts, the sheer fact that he lived in Massachusetts, and his appeal to moderates. Some like punchy TEA-party-rally-style speeches that end with calls to abolish half the federal government, end the fed and privatize Mount Rushmore, which, frankly, sounds like a great idea to me -they need to build some restaurants or something to make it worth the drive. Listen to Mitt talk in 2008 and it feels like you just ran a pie chart through a laminating machine. This time around he stepped up his game. His victory speech in New Hampshire was a scath-

ing series of one-liners that contrasted his platform with Obama. He has a penchant for economics, and uses that to plug his job creation plans at every opportunity. He loves to say that he has faith in people while Obama has faith in government. But his strongest rebuttal to critics on the right may be his ability to govern right-of-center in one of the most radically leftist states in the union. Romney answers half his criticisms from conservatives by explaining that he was not hired in Austin or Atlanta. Judicial appointments? Had to be approved by Democrats. More tax cuts? Needed to coax the liberal legislature. Gun control? He is an NRA member who tried to roll back a heavily anti-gun state. Still, he inherited a budget deficit and eliminated it without raising tax rates. The conservative Club for Growth credits “tremendous spending cuts he forced down the legislature’s throat,” and says he fought to cut his state’s tax rates. We balance all that, of course, against his problems, like a health care mandate and some technocrat tendencies that set him at odds with what we in the vast right-wing conspiracy call “movement conservatives.” That is enough to bother us, so we shop around a bit, first looking at Newt Gingrich. Newt

is a former Speaker of the House, and a Ph.D. historian who waxes poetic about Jefferson and makes you want to listen to him narrate an audiocassette tour of a Civil War battlefield while you eat frozen lemonade. But, his reputation of being an erratic leader in the 90’s endures today. That was the era when his personal scandals appalled conservatives, and his Republican colleagues forced him out of leadership for his irascible temperament. Then there’s the plucky sweater-vest guy, Rick Santorum—or Andy Samburg from SNL, as you may know him. He virtually tied the first caucus in Iowa, but he was known for being a big spender in Washington, and spent his last re-election bid as Pennsylvania’s Senator getting trampled like a Walmart greeter on Black Friday. By the time we’re done, it’s worth scaling back this quixotic quest for a patron saint of the Republican Party. Students are concerned about jobs when the graduate and federal debt they will inherit. Facing these challenges doesn’t require a Ronald Reagan, it just requires a president who is willing to empower people, not expand the federal government. Will Simpson is a sophomore economics and finance major, and a columnist for the Arkansas Traveler.

A Systematic Problem: Moving Our Nation Forward by MIKE NORTON

Guest Columnist

With Iowa and New Hampshire behind us, and South Carolina and Florida coming in the next two weeks, we are definitively in the presidential primary season. Yet, despite all of the noise, I have continued to hear a similar message among my friends and classmates as the GOP debate action has unfolded. A simple message in itself - is this the best we can do? Is this truly the absolute best we can produce to lead this country? Frankly I don’t think it is, but they are the product of our system, and that system is precisely what must be reformed first if we are to tackle the problems facing our nation. The most obvious problem, which we are feeling now, is the excessive influence of early states in primaries, particularly Iowa and New Hampshire, who together represent 1.4 percent of the U.S. population. A national primary comes to mind as a

simple solution to the problem, yet even then a single voting date would be a death sentence to the underdogs (or should I say the underfunded). Instead, a more encompassing solution would involve four primary dates with one-month intervals in between them, plus a randomized lottery system to assign which states get which date for a given primary round. Such a system would finally make a candidate’s position on a policy as relatively minute as corn ethanol subsidies proportionally relevant in the race to the White House, separated from the opinions of a few voters in Ames and Des Moines. Yet, presidential politics aren’t the only blight ailing our country. The real enemy nowadays seems to be Congress, who at a job approval rating in the low teens, have proved how little 535 individuals can accomplish in a year. Today, contention reigns over compromise and the party overshadows the populace; hyper-partisanship is at the root of

congressional tomfoolery. The problem can be traced back to congressional redistricting, which after years of gerrymandering by party officials have become electoral monopolies for either party, leaving us with politicians on the far right or left of the spectrum. One solution out there proposes post-census redistricting occur under the guidance of non-partisan commissions, individuals with no political capital at stake who are more likely to base borders off of natural geographical and cultural divides rather than the political ideologies of certain towns and counties. California had the first go at such a system after the 2010 census. As politicians do, state leaders once again tried to distort the lines to their party’s advantage, but we should not give up on such a system just yet. Sadly, there are more things wrong within the legislative branch than just polarization. Our Congress is bought, not by you or me with our vote, but by

Super PACs and 527s. The Federal Election Commission must stop the influx of soft money that has corrupted our political system, yet they do not have the power to reform, Congress does. Ironically, the real hope for campaign finance reform lies precisely in the hands of the individuals who are gaining from such a corrupt system. I’ll admit though, in the end votes are what really count to win an election, but a war chest of PAC money never hurt a campaign. Gen. X has failed us and it is time for our generation to elect real reformers. Our country will not improve until we put individuals in office who have the courage to make changes without the fear of losing political donors or the praise of party officials. Real leaders take action with the people in mind; real people take action with the future in mind. I hope you’ll take action. Mike Norton is a guest columnist.


FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

PAGE 6

by MIKE MAHARDY Contributing Writer

While talented musicians make their way through Fayetteville frequently, sometimes a road trip is necessary to see bigger name bands putting their talents on display in large arenas. With the new semester here, music fans have a lot to look forward to in the first half of 2012, with several music giants to see as a break from studying. If you have the spare money for tickets and a tank of gas, here are some amazing options to consider.

Fans of the Dropkick Murphys will inevitably love Flogging Molly, an unconventional Irish rock band that incorporate flutes, a fiddle and an accordion, along with the more traditional rock instruments. Blending Irish folk and rock provides a softer sound than the aforementioned Murphys, but the song lineup of Molly has also been known to depict governmental issues across the globe. With several Grammy-nominated albums under their belt and consistently high-energy shows, Flogging Molly lights up arenas across the continents.

Starting off the semester with this band would guarantee an amazing first weekend. Generally grouped into the progressive rock genre, Tool blends visual arts with music, promising an epic show for those who appreciate both. With ties to heavy metal and alternative rock, Tool is a genre-blending band that tells their story of personal evolution via music, and fans that are lucky enough to see them live will find it an unforgettable experience.

For fans of alternative rock, the English band Radiohead is a no-brainer. With electronic rock influences thrown into the mix, the legendary vocals of Thom Yorke along with guitarists Ed O’Brien and Jonny Greenwood always prove to astound fans of all genres. With low key and high-energy songs alike, these shows will provide a unique experience no other group can provide.

The rock duo from Akron, Ohio, consisting of guitarist/vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney, prove one thing with their new album El Camino: they know how to make people dance. Songs such as Lonely Boy and Gold On the Ceiling have a traditional rock feel to them while also simultaneously sounding completely fresh and unique, as evidenced by the multitude of television commercials that use these songs. The new album will be featured on the song list, while older songs from Brothers and Attack and Release will please long-time fans. The band is currently touring across Europe and will end their tour in America during the mid-spring.

For an early summer show, Coldplay is an obvious option. Arguably one of the most critically acclaimed bands alive today, this British alternative rock band has emotional anthems that music fans love, and love even more live. If you live in the area or will be around over the summer, make an attempt to be here — Coldplay is said to have breathtaking live shows that bolster their already sterling musical prowess. COURTESY PHOTOS

BEAUTY

from page 5 is. These natural oils are some of the best products you can use for your entire body. These natural oils act comfortably with your body’s natural chemistry and don’t just sit on top of your skin leaving you feeling like you just showered in grease. They give your skin a beautiful shine and keeps your skin feeling soft, supple and healthy. Tree Hut’s Shea Body Butter is one of the best products for moisturizing. It’s “certified organic,” smells great and works perfectly after a shower or bath. Hair care in the winter time also tends to be a relentless battle. The soft, sun-kissed locks of summer are far gone. This is due to the damaging effects of wind and overuse of heat. Straighteners, blow dryers and curling irons are tools that get every girl through the day or the week. When used often, these tools cause hair to

become brittle and more fragile, allowing for easy breakage. Hair is more vulnerable in the winter because of the harsh natural conditions to which it is exposed. To fight back against fragile, dull hair in the winter, start using a deep moisturizing conditioner weekly. Hair masks are great and can really bring life and body back into hair during the winter. When rinsing the conditioner out, be sure to rinse with cold water to close the pores of your scalp so that it can retain the vitamins and moisturizers. When drying hair, use a thermal hair protecting product. Spray it throughout the strands and pull your fingers through your hair. If using a blow dryer, set it on “warm” instead of “hot.” This allows for a more natural drying effect that still won’t take as much time as air-drying and therefore less harm is done. With these tips, you should be ready to be even more glowing and gorgeous on The Hill this winter and into the spring.

Having a variety of lip balms comes in handy during the winter months for UA sophomore Kaity Dye, who prepares for a cold walk to class.

LAUREN HUSBAND STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

PAGE 6

by MIKE MAHARDY Contributing Writer

While talented musicians make their way through Fayetteville frequently, sometimes a road trip is necessary to see bigger name bands putting their talents on display in large arenas. With the new semester almost here, music fans have a lot to look forward to in the first half of 2012, with several music giants to see as a break from studying. If you have the spare money for tickets and a tank of gas, here are some amazing options to consider.

Fans of the Dropkick Murphys will inevitably love Flogging Molly, an unconventional Irish rock band that incorporate flutes, a fiddle and an accordion, along with the more traditional rock instruments. Blending Irish folk and rock provides a softer sound than the aforementioned Murphys, but the song lineup of Molly has also been known to depict governmental issues across the globe. With several Grammy-nominated albums under their belt and consistently high-energy shows, Flogging Molly lights up arenas across the continents.

Starting off the semester with this band would guarantee a an amazing first weekend. Generally grouped into the progressive rock genre, Tool blends visual arts with music, promising an epic show for those who appreciate both. With ties to heavy metal and alternative rock, Tool is a genre-blending band that tells their story of personal evolution via music, and fans that are lucky enough to see them live will find it an unforgettable experience.

For fans of alternative rock, the English band Radiohead is a no-brainer. With electronic rock influences thrown into the mix, the legendary vocals of Thom Yorke along with guitarists Ed O’Brien and Jonny Greenwood always prove to astound fans of all genres. With low key and high-energy songs alike, these shows will provide a unique experience no other group can provide.

The rock duo from Akron, Ohio, consisting of guitarist/vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney, prove one thing with their new album El Camino: they know how to make people dance. Songs such as Lonely Boy and Gold On the Ceiling have a traditional rock feel to them while also simultaneously sounding completely fresh and unique, as evidenced by the multitude of television commercials that use these songs. The new album will be featured on the song list, while older songs from Brothers and Attack and Release will please long-time fans. The band is currently touring across Europe and will end their tour in America during the mid-spring.

For an early summer show, Coldplay is an obvious option. Arguably one of the most critically acclaimed bands alive today, this British alternative rock band has emotional anthems that music fans love, and love even more live. If you live in the area or will be around over the summer, make an attempt to be here -- Coldplay is said to have breathtaking live shows that bolster their already sterling musical prowess. COURTESY PHOTOS

BEAUTY

from page 5 is. These natural oils are some of the best products you can use for your entire body. These natural oils act comfortably with your body’s natural chemistry and don’t just sit on top of your skin leaving you feeling like you just showered in grease. They give your skin a beautiful shine and keeps your skin feeling soft, supple and healthy. Tree Hut’s Shea Body Butter is one of the best products for moisturizing. It’s “certified organic,” smells great and works perfectly after a shower or bath. Hair care in the winter time also tends to be a relentless battle. The soft, sun-kissed locks of summer are far gone. This is due to the damaging effects of wind and overuse of heat. Straighteners, blow dryers and curling irons are tools that get every girl through the day or the week. When used often, these tools cause hair to

become brittle and more fragile, allowing for easy breakage. Hair is more vulnerable in the winter because of the harsh natural conditions to which it is exposed. To fight back against fragile, dull hair in the winter, start using a deep moisturizing conditioner weekly. Hair masks are great and can really bring life and body back into hair during the winter. When rinsing the conditioner out, be sure to rinse with cold water to close the pores of your scalp so that it can retain the vitamins and moisturizers. When drying hair, use a thermal hair protecting product. Spray it throughout the strands and pull your fingers through your hair. If using a blow dryer, set it on “warm” instead of “hot.” This allows for a more natural drying effect that still won’t take as much time as air-drying and therefore less harm is done. With these tips, you should be ready to be even more glowing and gorgeous on The Hill this winter and into the spring.

Having a variety of lip balms comes in handy during the winter months for UA sophomore Kaity Dye, who prepares for a cold walk to class.

LAUREN HUSBAND STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


You can check out the Traveler online at uatrav.com or by scanning here:

THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

DOWNTIME PAGE 7 WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2011

Comics, Games, & Much Much More!

LAUGH IT UP

SUDOKU

Q: What does a computer eat when it’s hungry?

A: Chips -- one byte at a time. Q: When should you charge a battery? A: When you can’t pay cash. A patient said to a psychiatrist, “I keep wanting to cover myself in gold paint.” The psychiatrist said, “Sounds like you have a gilt complex.”

Difficulty:

TODAY’S SOLUTION

Q: What’s the strongest bird? A: A crane.

WELCOME TO FALLING ROCK

Josh Shalek

THAT MONKEY TUNE

Michael A. Kandalaft

BREWSTER ROCKIT

Tim Rickard

BLISS

Harry Bliss

CALAMITIES OF NATURE

CROSSWORD ACROSS

DOWN

1 Seller’s caveat 5 Whistle blower 8 Fight 14 Congeniality 16 Edit 17 Online data movement 19 Extinguish 20 Clinch a deal, in slang 21 Thing to do on the cautious side? 22 “Man in Black” singer 27 Tempt with, as a carrot 30 “Typee” sequel 31 Highfalutin 35 Steak order 36 Symphony or sonata 38 High-tech party notice 40 Jungle queen 41 Enjoy a 10-course Chinese meal 42 Categorize 46 Pending 52 VCR button 53 Big name in transmission repair 54 Cardio-boxing workout regimen 56 Conforms, or what each last word of 17-, 22-, 36- and 46-Across literally does 61 Intensely devoted 62 Shanghai setting 63 Woody’s wife 64 Mar.-to-Nov. setting 65 Count (on)

1 Put up with 2 Arizona neighbor 3 How board game players play 4 Ladies 5 First pres. to visit China while in office 6 Farm song refrain 7 Sell for 8 Hatch on the Hill 9 Boglike 10 Adobe file format 11 Bungler 12 Lab subj. 13 And so forth: Abbr. 15 Valuable rock 18 Top rating 22 Yoda, notably 23 Venomous snakes 24 Wild way to run 25 Numbered Chan relative 26 Groundbreaking tool 28 Protein in wheat products 29 Zap 32 Suffix with tact 33 Code word 34 Draft choice 35 A whole bunch 36 Former iPod model 37 Sport 38 Academic Web letters 39 Bigwig 43 End of a threat 44 Heat again, as water for tea 45 Like most streets 47 Lion-colored 48 French-speaking republic 49 CPR expert 50 Was sore 51 Smidgens 54 First day of spring, to Vietnamese 55 Miles away 56 Total blast 57 Au, on a Spanish periodic table 58 Tokyo, once 59 Bigwig on the Hill: Abbr. 60 Post-WWII pres.

Crossword provided by MCT Campus

SOLUTION

Tony Piro


SPORTS THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

PAGE 8

Scan here to go to the Sports section on uatrav.com:

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

SPORTS EDITOR: JIMMY CARTER ASST. SPORTS EDITOR: ZACH TURNER FOOTBALL

Johnson on Board

New linebackers coach follows mentor from Ohio State by JIMMY CARTER Sports Editor

Paul Haynes and Taver Johnson’s phone conversation didn’t take long. “Come on, let’s go. MCT CAMPUS We’re ready. We can do New Arkansas linebackers coach Taver Johnson spent the last five this,” Haynes told Johnseasons at Ohio State. son.

Not long after, Johnson accepted the associate head coach/linebackers coach position at Arkansas, leaving Ohio State to join Haynes, the Razorbacks’ new defensive coordinator hired in December after seven seasons coach-

ing the Buckeyes. “(Haynes) really didn’t have to sell me too hard,” Johnson said. “Once he got here, I could hear the excitement in his voice.

PIG ROAST Wildcats rout Hogs in Rupp

63

by JIMMY CARTER Sports Editor

Arkansas’ losing streak in Rupp Arena will be extended at least two more years. No. 2 Kentucky led throughout and beat the overmatched Razorbacks 8663 for its 45th consecutive home win. The Hogs shot just 40 percent and had 13 shots blocked by the nation’s leading shot blocking team. “It opened up some of our guys’ eyes,” Arkansas coach Mike Anderson said. “Our guys have progressed, but when you come into an environment like this, you’ve almost got to play a perfect game … What I told our guys, all sickness ain’t death. It’s just one game. Hats off to Kentucky. They were the better team tonight.” The Wildcats (18-1, 4-0 Southeastern Conference) jumped out to a 17-6 lead and led by double digits the rest of the game. “We just didn’t even get off on the right start,” Anderson said. “We wanted to be in attack mode defensively where we really turn it up a little bit because of their size advantage.” Arkansas (13-5, 2-2) fell to 0-5 outside Bud Walton Arena this season and again shot poorly away from home after entering the game shooting just 35 percent on the road. Kentucky led by as many as 24 points in the second half and shot 57 percent in the game. “They started attacking our pressure defense,” Anderson said. “We went to a zone. It just seemed like anything we went to, we just

MCT CAMPUS Kentucky starters, including Terrance Jones and Anthony Davis, led the No. 2 Wildcats to a 86-63 win against Arkansas on Tuesday night. couldn’t make enough stops to mount an attack. We cut it to 12 or 14 in the second half and I thought we could make a run at them, but we didn’t.” Wildcats freshman center Anthony Davis scored a career-high 27 points, grabbed 14 rebounds and had seven blocks as the Kentucky kept the Razorbacks from scoring inside. “The Davis kid probably had one of his best nights since he’s been in a Wildcat uniform,” Anderson said. “It just seemed like every time we tried to do something, Kentucky, the big fellow, he’d either block a shot

TRACK

All-American out for season by ZACH LIGI

Old Fashioned 3-Point Play

or get an offensive rebound and stick it back.” The Wildcats were able to block shots without the Hogs scoring much from the free throw line. Arkansas entered the game averaging 24.3 free throw attempts, second in the SEC, but made just 12 of 18 on Tuesday. The Razorbacks couldn’t score outside, either, missing their first seven 3-pointers and finish-

see KENTUCKY on page 9

ZACH TURNER

zwturner@uark.edu Since the hiring of coach Mike Anderson on March 23, 2011, the majority of Arkansas’ basketball buzz has revolved around what the program once was. With Anderson on the bench as an assistant and under the tutelage of former Hog coach Nolan Richardson, the Razorbacks were at a peak in the school’s basketball history. Arkansas appeared in three Final Fours in a span of six years including winning the national championship in 1994. During that time the Razorbacks were 108-67 in Southeastern Conference play and played in front of crowds that averaged 16,442 fans during the stretch. Since the opening of Bud Walton Arena, Arkansas has been in the top 15 in attendance average in the nation 16 different seasons. Attendance numbers steadily declined each of the four seasons coach John Pelphrey was guiding the Razorbacks, but since Anderson’s takeover and commitment to a team identity, the attendance numbers are slowly climbing. Contribute this to whatever factor you choose, there are potentially many. The big name hire in Anderson who is familiar with Arkansas, the style of playing/attempting to replicate the famed “40 minutes of Hell”, economy and ticket prices possibly being more affordable? I think the answer lies in an entertaining style of basketball being played by a talented bunch of players, that even when overmatched physically, outwork the opposing team. Discipline is something that lacked in the Pelphrey era, but is evident by Anderson’s team. Since the regular season started, Anderson has not suspended any players on his squad or dealt publicly with off the court issues involving players. This was a common trend for Pelphrey coached teams, especially in his final two seasons. Even suspending the faces of the team in Rotnei Clarke and Marshawn Powell, a clear sign Pelphrey didn’t have too much of a handle on the program. With discipline has come belief. Belief in the system and practice techniques that Anderson has installed.

see COMMENTARY on page 9

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Keeping it Local Fayetteville native Calli Berna playing major minutes

by MONICA CHAPMAN Staff Writer

Staff Writer

Senior jumper Tarik Batchelor is out for the season with a torn patella tendon in his jumping knee. The four-time All-American injured the knee before the dual meet against Texas and will miss the remainder of the season. “Tarik is one of those outstanding athletes for us, a stalwart in the jumps, and just doing a simple drill in practice he ruptured his patella tendon,” Arkansas coach Chris Bucknam said. “We still feel that we have a lot of greater things to accomplish and that we can live up to the rankings.” Batchelor the 2011 SEC indoor champion, is a huge loss for the Razorbacks. He will also miss the outdoor season, but will be able to attain a medical redshirt and return next season. Despite his injury, the Hogs are off to a fast start through the first two meets of the season and are ranked No. 2 in the nation following a win in the Arkansas Invitational and against the No. 10 Longhorns. Arkansas beat the Longhorns 89-81 in a meet that came down the final event. “We continue as a staff to be really impressed with the Texas dual meet mainly because it gives

Evidence “Glory Days” Could Be Returning

see JOHNSON on page 9

BASKETBALL

86

COMMENTARY

Arkansas senior pole vaulter Tina Sutej is off to a solid start for the No. 3 Razorbacks womens’s track team. Sutej became the first athlete in the nation to post a national qualifying mark of 4.35 meters

Arkansas women’s basketball coach Tom Collen didn’t have to search far to add a point guard to his roster. A native of Fayetteville, freshman Calli Berna simply drives a little further down the street from Fayetteville High School to find her new home at Bud Walton Arena. “It’s really great because I think that it’s somewhere that people in Fayetteville and kids in Fayetteville look up to getting to watch the Razorbacks play,” Berna said. “That’s something that I’ve grown up watching and being able to watch them play, so it’s really great to actually be here and get in the game.” Despite being a freshman, Berna has quickly made her mark, starting 14 of the team’s 17 games this season. Collen said he can see the contributions Berna makes during the game and knows she can really give her team a boost on the offensive end. “Calli is really a great shooter, you know,” Collen said. “She’s one of those

see TRACK on page 9

see BERNA on page 9

us a sure program and allows our kids to compete head to head with another team,” Bucknam said. The next meet is the Razorback Invitational, hosted in the Randall Tyson track center on Jan. 27-28. Sutej excelling early for Razorback women

LOGAN WEBSTER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Arkansas freshman point guard Callie Berna is second on the team in made 3-pointers with 14.


PAGE 9

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012 from COMMENTARY on page 8

MCT CAMPUS Kentucky freshman point guard Marquis Teague scored seven points and dished nine assists in the No. 2 Wildcats’ 8663 win against Arkansas on Tuesday at Rupp Arena. from KENTUCKY on page 8 ing 5 of 15. The Hogs had just five assists on 23 field goals. “We didn’t shoot the ball great,” Anderson said. “You can tell when we don’t play Razorback basketball. We had five assists. It means a lot of individual play. Against a team like Kentucky, you’ve got to have great ball movement, people movement and be in attack mode.” Arkansas didn’t break into double digits scoring until senior forward Marvell Waithe’s reverse layup with 8:36 left in the first half. Shortly after, the Wildcats had stretched their lead to 33-13.

from BERNA on page 8 kids, I feel the same way about Lyndsay Harris, that whenever they’re open and their feet are set, they’re going to make shots. Calli’s stepping up and making those. We need her to be a bigger scorer for us because the one thing she can do is make open shots.” The 5-foot-10 guard is second on the team in made 3-point baskets with 14. Rather than being comfortable as second, she wants to keep building on her skills. “There’s always room for improvement,” Berna said. “I’m definitely not satisfied with the amount that I’ve made, but I know I can get better and I know all I

from JOHNSON on page 8 Coach Haynes is a mildmannered guy, so once he gets excited you know it’s something really good.” Johnson is reunited with Haynes, a mentor and friend since meeting him at a national coaches convention in 1994. The two worked together at Ohio State for the last five years. “Being around him for the last five years, for sure, working with him, I understand how he thinks, his expectations,” Johnson said. “They will be through the roof for the coaching staff as well as the players. Accountability will be key, which is always the cornerstone of having a successful program.” Johnson will bring a different personality to the defensive coaching staff than the laid-back Haynes. “I wear my emotions on my sleeves,” Johnson said. “You guys will see that day in and day out. There’s no facades around here.” He met with Razorbacks coach Bobby Petrino, who, in addition to the linebackers coach job, offered him the assistant head coach title, a job with responsibilities Johnson said he and Petrino haven’t discussed yet. “That was the first time actually, after speaking with Coach Petrino, that really sparked my interest, in terms of, ‘Wow. There’s go-

Davis led five Kentucky in double figures, including sophomore guard Doron Lamb’s 14 points, sophomore forward Terrance Jones’ 13, senior forward Darius Miller’s 11 and freshman guard Michael Kidd-Gilchrist’s 10. “This is more of a learning situation for our young guys,” Anderson said. “You want to be where a team like (Kentucky) is, where you’re recognized around the country. People watch you and they say, ‘Man, these guys really get after it, they play together, play the right way.’ This is part of that process. It just doesn’t happen overnight. Going through this experience can hopefully only help our basketball team.” need is a few more shots to go in and my confidence will be there and hopefully the shots will start falling. I know my team has confidence in me so that will help keep me going.” Being able to play so close to home has its’ advantages for Berna. She said that she doesn’t have to look to far in the stands before she sees a familiar face that came to cheer her on. “I mean there’s definitely other players that have families here, but my family can consistently come watch me play and that’s definitely encouraging,” Berna said. “And coaches I’ve had throughout the years can come and watch. That definitely is encouraging to be able to ing to be an opportunity to be a head coach, for sure,’” Johnson said. “So that definitely played into it.” Previously Johnson and Petrino had only crossed paths when Arkansas and Ohio State met in the 2011 Sugar Bowl and in 2003, when Petrino’s Louisville team lost 49-28 to Miami (Ohio), where Johnson was an assistant. “I always admire the way his guys played and his coaching philosophy,” Johnson said. “I know he’s tough. He’s more like a defensive coach out there when you see him on the sideline with the energy and the passion that he has. That was something that was definitely appealing.” Johnson coached cornerbacks for the Buckeyes, but will handle linebackers at Arkansas, a position he coached the four years he was at Miami (Ohio). He takes over the position Reggie Johnson vacated when he followed former Razorbacks offensive coordinator Garrick McGee to Alabama-Birmingham to serve as his defensive coordinator following the Cotton Bowl. “(Coaching linebackers) was another thing that really excited me about the position of coming to Arkansas is getting an opportunity to come back to Arkansas,” Johnson said. “That’s probably my natural position, being with the front seven … Getting back to linebackers,

Razorbacks sophomore guard Mardracus Wade had a team-high 12 points, while Waithe and freshmen guards Ky Madden and BJ Young each had 10. The Hogs host another top-25 team, No. 19 Michigan, on Saturday in their final nonconference game. The Wolverines beat No. 9 Michigan State 60-59 on Tuesday. “We’ve got to get this taste out of our mouth,” Anderson said. “It’s got to hurt ‘till midnight. We’ll turn our attention to get ready for a Michigan team. We’ve done well at home so maybe that’s what our team needs -- a little dose of home medicine.”

look up in the stands and see people I know out there watching.” Berna is still getting adjusted to playing college basketball. “Just getting more shots up and practicing,” Berna said. “It’s a different transition. In high school you can kind of just shoot, especially when I played I was expected to shoot and keep shooting. “Here I kind of get a few threes up and those are the ones I need to make, so I just need to work on my consistency because I know if I make those shots it’s going to boost our offense and it will get me going on offense too and I think that’s what the team needs.”

those guys right in the middle that grit their teeth and can get it done. “That’s definitely something that I’m looking forward to.” He inherits a linebacking corps losing graduating seniors Jerry Franklin and Jerico Nelson, a duo that combined for 82 starts and 651 tackles during their careers. Johnson and Haynes will work with a defense that ranked higher than No. 9 in the Southeastern Conference just once under former defensive coordinator Willy Robinson in coach Bobby Petrino’s first four seasons. Johnson met with his new linebackers for the first time Monday night. “I said, ‘Hey, congratulations. You guys had an awesome year. Awesome year. Cotton Bowl victory. There is nothing wrong,’” Johnson said. “If anything, I told them I wanted to get on board and get going. Let’s try to enhance this thing and go to the next level.” Despite the Hogs’ struggles defensively, the program won 21 games the last two seasons, including a BCS berth and Cotton Bowl victory. Arkansas recorded just its third 11-win season and first top-five finish since 1977 in 2011. “Like I told the players (Monday) night, the way that this train is rolling, it’s going pretty fast,” Johnson said. “To tell you what, we didn’t mind trying to hop on board.”

The undersized Razorback squad has the identity of a fearless team that presses the entire game and takes advantage of turnovers, most caused by onball traps. Don’t believe me, check the stats. Arkansas is first in the SEC in turnover margin with a mark of plus-4.82. The Razorbacks have turned their opponents over 312 times, which ranks second in the nation, only behind the No. 1 ranked Syracuse Orange. Guys like Mardracus Wade and Julysses Nobles help serve as a backbone defensively for the younger players on the squad, such as leading scorer, freshman BJ Young, as well as leading rebounder, freshman Devonta Abron. The inexperienced Razorbacks have an unblemished mark of 13-0 this season at Bud Walton Arena, but have failed to win away from Fayetteville, going 0-4. The home court advantage

in the SEC is none more evident than the opening weekend of conference play. With all 12 teams in action January 7, only one accomplished the feat of winning on the road, with Alabama topping Georgia 74-59. With the home teams going 5-1, two of the SEC’s ranked members went down on the road. No. 14 Florida went down in Knoxville, Tenn., to the Volunteers 67-56 before Arkansas pulled off an upset of No. 15 Mississippi State 98-88. Correlation for the Razorbacks? That could be attributed to attendance. Bud Walton was host to 12,744 fans on that Saturday night, the third-highest crowd of the season. Another road loss and a week later against LSU, Arkansas managed to play in front of an season-high 14,800. Even attendance numbers helped the struggling Razorbacks last season. Arkansas’ highest attendance number came against No. 22 Kentucky with an estimated crowd of

13,472. The outcome? Arkansas extended the game into overtime and pulled out a 77-76 thriller over the eventual Final Four team and Pelphrey’s alma mater. With No. 19 Michigan rolling into town for a mid-afternoon, nationally-televised matchup Saturday, attendance numbers are expected to set the season-high mark again. Add in the football team being presented the Cotton Bowl trophy in front of the home crowd and hosting three fivestar recruits on the same day, no telling what will happen. Regardless of the outcome when the Hogs travel to Kentucky on Wednesday, coming back home to Fayetteville for the first home game against a Big Ten school since 1981, magic could be in store for the Razorbacks against the Wolverines. Zach Turner is the assistant sports editor for The Arkansas Traveler. His column appears every Wednesday. Follow him on Twitter @zwturner.

from TRACK on page 8 while winning the event during the Kentucky Invitational. “Tina has very high expectations of herself,” coach Lance Harter said. “She is a supreme competitor. She is truly a leader of this team.” Arkansas has gotten off to a solid, winning eight total events in the season-opening Arkansas Invitational, when junior Stephanie Brown set a school record in the 1,000 meters. The Razorbacks won four events in the Kentucky Invitational on Friday and Saturday. “We were elated. Kentucky proved to be very very positive for us.” Said head coach Lance Harter “We have some national leaders, Regina George leads the 400 nationally. We have the fastest mile relay in the U.S. Tina Sutej leads the vault and we have seven positions in the top three nationally ranked.”

UA Media Relations Arkansas Senior Tina Sutej looks to win the NCAA national title in women’s indoor pole vault after winning the outdoor title last season.


SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2012

PAGE 10


Jan. 18, 2012