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Leon Finds His Home Page 11 PAGE 1 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

VOL. 105 NO. 3

UATRAV.COM

REVERSED

Drug Policy Not Approved by KATHERINE DAWSON Opinion Editor

LARRY ASH Photo Editor Chanting “Education Not Incarceration”, 18 students carried signs in front of the UA Administration building at the Friday lunch hour protesting the chancellor’s reversal of an earlier announcement that campus penalities for illegal use of marijuana would be reduced to the same level as those for illegal use of alcohol. Protestors were members of the UA chapters of the Students for Sensible Drug Policy and the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

UA administrative officials issued a press release Tuesday that “no changes have been made to university policies having to do with alcohol or drug violations” despite their publication last week of a revised on-campus drug policy in the residence halls and on the university housing website. The new policy, as reported in the Aug. 25th edition of The Arkansas Traveler, would equalize the penalties of drug and alcohol violations within the university system. The policy was approved by the RazorCAT board, which is headed by several administrative leaders and serves as a campus disciplinary team. The Tuesday press release, written by Steve Voorhies, manager of university media relations, clearly stated that “the media have reported that certain changes to the guidelines for marijuana and alcohol sanctions on campus have been equalized” and that “this information is not accurate.” Since that statement was

released, administrative officials have admitted to publishing a revised policy and have since retracted that policy. “I think it was an honest mistake,” Voorhies said. “Someone thought the change had been made and wanted to get the policy out there.” “There are procedures in place now to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” he said. Since their statement was released, housing officials have removed fliers that indicate the policy change from residence halls and have edited the policy on their website back to the original guidelines. “Unfortunately it conflicts tremendously institutionally, so the chancellor and executive committee said we can’t do that,” said Daniel Pugh, dean of students. “It’s not where the institution is right now.” Chancellor Gearhart has since admitted the policy change was “a result of miscommunication.” He pointed out that RazorCAT “is not a policy-making

POLICY on page 3

Farmers Market Hits Campus

Beginning Sept. 15, Students Can Purchase Local Produce in Lot 56 by KRISTEN COPPOLA Staff Writer

The University of Arkansas is bringing a farmer’s market to campus on Wednesdays from 8:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. beginning Sept. 15, to promote sustainability and city-campus relations. “[The Associated Student Government] went to Baton Rouge in February for the Southeastern Conference Student Government Exchange. We got the idea from [the University of] South Carolina; they rotate their farmer’s market from one Saturday on campus and one in town,” said ASG President Billy Fleming. A lot of planning went in to bringing the farmer’s market to campus. The ASG had to check out times, look into locations and ensure that the farmer’s market wasn’t seen as an economic move on the part of the University. Wednesday was set as the chosen day to host the farmer’s market, because it is the day of the week when the University has the most students and faculty on campus. “We worked with [University officials] who offered up the band practice area of Lot

56. It’s lower foot traffic and higher vehicle traffic, but there is a bus route that goes down there,” Fleming said. “Once we got those hurdles cleared, we were able to get the go-ahead.” The campus driveway was originally a prospective location, but because of construction, it was thrown out. University staff including Mike Johnson with Facilities Management, Matt Trantham with Razorback Athletics and Gary Smith with Parking and Transit helped to propose Lot 56 as the official location. The Fayetteville farmer’s market is working with ASG to supply all of the vendors and ensure that everything is in line with the sustainability efforts that are being pushed by the University. “It fits very handily in with [sustainability efforts] because of the local food source. It also has a lot to do with the educational aspects because there are a lot of opportunities for research,” Fleming added. Above all else, the farmer’s market is in place to be a fun and enjoyable occasion and also unite the city and the campus. “At Fayetteville’s farm-

er’s market, it’s the social event of Fayetteville’s week. It’s where everyone goes to unwind a bit,” Fleming explained, “it’s about developing the relationship between the city of Fayetteville and the campus. There’s a line that seems to be between campus and the city, and hopefully this will blur that line.” Overall, students are reacting very positively to the approaching prospects offered by the farmer’s market. “I think that the farmer’s market will provide a welcomed change from the food offered on campus, and it will spark conversations between people about eating healthier,” said Taylor Martin, a sophomore kinesiology major. “I also think that it will be very intriguing because I’ve never been to a farmer’s market before.” “I am really looking forward to the farmer’s market, because you get to meet the local farmers growing the food,” said Shannon Maloskie, a freshman psychology major. “Plus, at the farmer’s markets I’ve been to before, the food is cheaper, and it tastes better, too.”

a slight increase with more students enrolling, but an even larger increase in usage of the program. It’s straining the system.” The student fee for SafeRide is 22 cents per credit hour, but Alexander Clark, the director or development who handles the financial aspect of SafeRide, said he doesn’t think the student fee will be increasing anytime soon. “We’re trying to endow the actual SafeRide program to ultimately eliminate the student fee,” Clark

by SABA NASEEM

LARRY ASH Photo Editor

Mark Priest, a vendor at the Fayetteville Farmer’s Market, helps a customer with her okra purchase. The University of Arkansas is planning to bring the Farmer’s Market on campus so students, faculty and staff can more easily buy fresh, local produce.

SafeRide Needs Students Concerned about Bus Overcrowding More Money by JORDAN GRUMMER Staff Writer

Since 1998, the SafeRide program at the UA has been helping students get home safely, but because of a large increase in demand and a general lack of funding the program has become strained, a co-chair of the SafeRide committee said. “Currently, SafeRide is funded by student fees, so our budget increases when there are more students,” said senior Justin Miller, a co-chair on the SafeRide committee. “So we’ve seen

see SAFERIDE on page 5

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 VOL. 105, NO. 3 UATRAV.COM

Staff Writer

For many students who depend on the transit system, it serves as a blessing, but as with any public transportation system, it can bring much frustration. The UA transit system is not limited to students, although they make up the majority of the passengers. The public is allowed to ride the buses, and many residents take advantage of this

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THURSDAY 82°

free transportation system. The public can ride any bus, but they are most likely to ride the tan, blue and red bus, said Richard Womack, a bus driver for two years. This does not really affect the student traffic which is high in the mornings, often at Lot 56. There are an average of more than 1,300,000 passengers per year, most of them students, said Andy Gilbride, education and instruction specialist of the transit and parking depart-

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ment. “Because we are federally funded, we have to open the buses to the public.” The transit system receives close to a million dollars from student fees and more than a million dollars from the federal government, Gilbride said. There are instances when drunken passengers get on the bus and harass others, but these are rare, he said. If a passenger is disrupting the peace of the bus, bus drivers call the UAPD, who deal with the rider. If people continue to disrupt the bus after a warning is issued, they are prohibited from the buses and bus drivers are in-

see BUSES on page 2


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 PAGE 2

PROFILES FROM THE HILL A Conversation with Physics Professor Gay Stewart by JORDAN GRUMMER Staff Writer

Gay Stewart, a physics teacher at the UA for more than 20 years, has dedicated her life to understanding how the universe works. She estimated that she has taught almost 6,000 students in her long career, and she’s showing no signs of slowing down. Stewart took time from grading tests in her University Physics I class to sit down and talk with The Traveler. Q: How did you get into physics? A: I was a business major, because I had a new baby, and they told me if you’re a business major you can get done in a hurry, and make a lot of money, and be a good parent. I was not having a really good time in my classes, so I signed up for an elective class that was being taught in planetary sciences, and the teacher told me I should be a physics major, and they talked to me about the things I could do with a physics degree, so I switched. Q: What made you go into teaching? A: I did my physics research in graduate school, and I had a good time, but I thought, “You know, if I go out I can get a Nobel prize in physics doing something that most of the world doesn’t care about, or maybe I could teach and inspire a few more people to be interested in physics and help them understand that it’s useful and they can go out and do cool stuff.”

BUSES from page 1 formed not to let them on. “I have seen people kicked off the bus for bad language,” said Richard McCarver, a Fayetteville resident who often rides the buses. “There are also a lot of homeless people who get on the brown bus from Dickson, but I think this bus system is good for them because it helps them get around, as they have no other mode of transportation.” McCarver takes the brown bus down to Dickson Street and said he likes how it goes and comes quickly. Students said that most of the time, the rides go undis-

Q: What is your favorite part of teaching?

ABOUT THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

A: When you really see that transition in somebody who probably went through high school thinking science was hard and it was something they couldn’t do. But the day when they realize, “Oh boy I can do this.” That’s pretty fun.

The Arkansas Traveler, the student newspaper at the University of Arkansas, is published every Wednesday during the fall and spring academic sessions except during exam periods and university holidays. Opinions expressed in signed columns are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Traveler. The editor makes all final content decisions. One copy of The Arkansas Traveler is free to every member of the UA community. Additional copies can be purchased for 50 cents each. Mail subscriptions for delivery within the continental United States can be purchased for $125.00 per semester. Contact the Traveler Business Manager to arrange.

Q: What’s the worst part of teaching? A: I hate giving a failing grade to somebody that I know could have got it, but they won’t do the homework and if you won’t do the homework no matter how hard you try...it hurts to see somebody do that to themselves.

CONTACT 119 Kimpel Hall University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR 72701 479.575.3406 [main] 479.575.3306 [fax] traveler@uark.edu www.uatrav.com

Q: What is your most interesting classroom experience? A: When you reach a certain point in the semester with the kids start planning practical jokes, I try to act mad at the time but there have been some pretty creative things that the kids have done to tease me in class. Q: What’s one of those things? A: Let’s see. We’re not going to get into the serenading, that was just embarrassing. One semester they basically built a barrier and trapped me in the back corner after I went back to help somebody. Q: What is your favorite physicist?

turbed and fellow passengers are respectful of each other. There are, however, some instances where students badmouth the drivers or young kids on the bus get rowdy. “Usually, anything that disturbs other passengers will get a person kicked off the bus,” Womack said. “We do have people that are a nuisance, but not as many as you think. People are generally well behaved, especially the students.” A few students told stories about the craziest thing they have experienced on the bus. “On the tan bus, there is a crazy local person who gets on and sings,” said Devrick Ferkins, a sophomore education

Jonathon Gibson STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Dr. Stewart assists students with their lab unit on Kinematics in University Physics I. Physics I is a required course for many students so her classes are usually filled to the brim. A: I guess it’s got to be Albert Einstein. I think there’s the obvious answer that he was brilliant, but he just had a fairly amazing sense of humor. He was so impressed by the universe and the stuff that’s out there to understand. So we’ve got humanity chipping away trying to figure out this huge question, but at the same time we should be having a good time while doing it. Q: What is your favorite musical artist? A: Al Stewart, you probably don’t know who that is. He writes major. “He does this weird type of singing, kind of like opera. Most days it’s just funny, but it depends on my mood.” However, compared to the comedy skits on the New York subway, puppet shows on the Paris metro or entire choirs on the London underground, a singing man is a reminder that this is just a small city transportation system. Another student said that an overcrowded bus has caused her problems in the past. “The purple bus was really crowded and the bus driver kept telling students to move back, but there was no space,” said Alesia Smith, a senior communications major. “And so the bus driver got off,

these sort of interesting storytelling songs, and sometimes the stories are kind of weird, but I like the not just the usual get-the-girl kind of songs, and I can understand all of the words. Q: What has teaching with your husband been like? A: The student’s call it the “Stewart experience” because I teach UPI and he teaches UPII. His sense of humor is better than mine. When I make a joke I have to let you guys know I had made a joke to get a laugh. The students that like us tend to like us both. came to the back of the bus, cussed out all the students and then got back on the bus. Nobody listened; they were just cussing him back.” The surge of students, especially in the first few weeks of school does cause some overcrowding problems, but transit is taking measures to control it, Gilbride said. There were three new buses added this year and a new Maple Express route opened, providing a bus every eight minutes. Students were generally satisfied with the system and said that the biggest change they would like to see is have buses run more often.

Call The Traveler

E-mail The Traveler

STAFF BAILEY ELISE MCBRIDE Editor 575-8455 traveler@uark.edu MILLE APPLETON

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Sports Editor 575-7051 travsprt@uark.edu

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Features Designer

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CORRECTIONS The Arkansas Traveler strives for accuracy in its reporting and will correct all matters of fact. If you believe the paper has printed an error, please notify the editor at 575.8455 or at traveler@uark.edu.

CAMPUS NUMBERS NEED EMERGENCY HELP? CALL UAPD 575-2222

The women and men of the University of Arkansas Police Department, in partnership with the community, are committed to protecting the future of Arkansas by promoting a safe and secure environment.

HAVE A TICKET? CALL 575-7275 TO RESOLVE IT

The Transit and Parking office handles parking permits and passes and transit for students, including bus routes and GoLoco Ride Sharing. Students with parking violations can contact the office to appeal their citation.

NEED A RIDE AT NIGHT? CALL 575 - 7233

Otherwise known as 575-SAFE, the mission of the Safe Ride program is to provide students with a safe means of transportation from any uncomfortable or inconvenient situation. Safe Ride brings you home safely.

NEED TICKETS? CALL 1-800-982-4647

Don’t forget to call early and reserve your student football tickets for the 2010-2011 season. The ticket office is located on Razorback Road next to Baum Stadium.


PAGE 3

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

TUNING STUDENTS IN

LARRY ASH PHOTO EDITOR Cox Representatives visit campus last week to market their services to students. Seen standing on the corner of McIlroy Ave. and Dickson St. The pair was one of many groups on hand during the first two weeks of school trying to encourage students to purchase their services.

Students Skip Renter’s Insurance by JORDAN BURNS Staff Writer

The flood at Yocum Hall on the first day of class left many students scampering to replace their damaged property and questioning the University’s role in protecting their valuables. On the night of the flood many Yocum residents were told to report their damaged property to the University, which left them expecting compensation for items like textbooks, electronics, and supplies. However, the 2010/2011 housing contract states: “…the University is not responsible for loss or damage to students’ personal prop-

erty for any cause or reason. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain renters’ insurance to insure their property.” Most students living in residence halls are unaware of renters’ insurance. Robin Cranston, an insurance agent at State Farm in Fayetteville claimed that very few students living in dorms call about renters’ insurance, though policies cost only $5-$15 per month, depending on the value of a person’s belongings. Cranston said she insured $23,000 of her own property for only $10 per month. According to Insure.com, “renters face the same risk as

homeowner,” because landlord (or university housing) insurance only protects building structure, “not the personal items inside.” The site said that standard policies cover personal property in the event of fire, lightning, hail, theft, snowstorms and the additional living expenses one may encounter if one’s apartment becomes unlivable after a catastrophe. It recommends renters (or dorm residents) take inventory of their important and valuable belongings, and know the difference between policies. “Actual Cash Value” (ACV) coverage will only reimburse

MENDING FENCES

UA Housing Officials Collect Litter from Nearby Neighborhood by PAIGE THOMPSON

Contributing Writer

Though smoking rates are down on campus, said officials at the Walker Health Center , the smoking ban effective this year on campus is having some unintended consequences for UA officials. Rather than quitting their bad habit, some students have found an alternative solution to this new law. They’re leaving campus to smoke their cigarettes, especially those who live on the north side of campus. A majority of those students who live in Maple Hill and Reid Hall smoke is across the street on the sidewalk in front of Sunshine Place Apartments along the rock wall. “We used to smoke up the street past the stop signs, but then we noticed people would come over to this spot and we decided to come here because it’s where everyone seems to go,” said a student last Thursday. Among the smokers was Lacee Quine who said, “if they would just give us something to put our cigarettes in, none of us would mind keeping it clean around here. If we could get a spot on campus that’s more convenient then we wouldn’t have to bother the neighbors.” Neighbors at Sunshine Place could not be reached for comment, but Scott Flanagin, director of communications and outreach of student affairs, has heard

POLICY from page 1 group. It’s just an advisory group.” “We don’t want to send a message to our students or any constituents of the university that its OK to use marijuana because that would be irresponsible on our part,” Gearhart said. “That was a mistake, and it should not have been done. Dean Pugh knows that and should be aware of that. We got the cart before the horse.” Members of the UA chapter of the campus organization Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) have pushed the idea of a drug and alcohol policy change on campus

Maggie Carroll STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Student trash accumulates in surrounding homeowners’ lawns as a result of the ban of smoking on campus. about the issue. He noted that the Chancellor was handling neighbor relations and the letters of complaints from the residents on Cleveland Street and other neighborhoods who have addressed the issue to the University. Steve Voorhies of University Relations said he hadn’t heard about the issue but doesn’t think that the university will make a designated area on campus for smokers. The new law prohibits any tobacco use on campus aPresident of the Resident’s Interhall Congress, William Hogan, has been working on this issue by leading a clean-up effort along Cleveland Street from Garland to Razorback. A group of RIC offi-

cers and student volunteers gathered Monday evening to pick up litter so the neighbors can see that the students are working on addressing the issue. “As an individual, I’m glad I helped out with the clean-up,” Hogan said. “This is my fourth year living on-campus, and I regard it [the U of A campus] as home. For me this was more about keeping my home clean and being a good neighbor than anything else.” RIC is now proposing a neighborhood relations group, promoting a focus on preventing litter of any kind on and off campus, and encouraging student relations.

since 2007. Last April, 67 percent of the student body voted for a referendum to pass a new policy that would equalize the penalties for drug and alcohol violations. “To have such a large percentage of the students vote for something like this and to actually see a policy change is monumental,” said Rob Pfountz, former president of SSDP and a campaign leader for the new policy, in the Aug. 25th Traveler story. Pfountz, current SSDP President Stephen Duke and other members of SSDP hosted a “brief news conference” addressing the events that have happened in the past couple weeks regarding the

potential policy Friday at noon, according to an SSDP press release. About 30 SSDP members and supportive students protested outside of Chancellor Gearhart’s office inside 425 Administration Building on W. Maple Street. “We feel like we can’t trust [the administration],” Pfountz said. SSDP members plan to host New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson at the UA to speak with students about marijuana reform. SSDP officials hope to schedule a meeting between Governor Johnson and Gearhart, Pfountz said. Editor-in-Chief Bailey McBride contributed to this report.

owners with the amount their property was worth at the time it was damaged. Replacement Cost coverage will reimburse owners the full cost of replacing their items. Fire, flood and theft – and therefore property loss and damage – are fairly common in residence halls. Many universities like University of Tulsa and UCA also mention in their housing contracts the importance of renters’ insurance for residents. To find out more about renters’ insurance and to get a quote, visit Renter’sInsurance.com or call State Farm at 521-6505.


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

You can check out the Traveler online at uatrav.com or by scanning here:

EDITOR: Bailey Elise McBride MANAGING EDITOR: Mille Appleton

PAGE 4 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

Traveler Remains Credible Last Tuesday as I sat at my desk in the Traveler office trying, in vain, to stay on task and write my Letter from the Editor, I noticed a press release from the University in my inbox. Normally I don’t do more than skim these documents I get daily—the news section handles all stories we write about the news of the University—but this particular document caught my attention. “University of Arkansas Statement Regarding Sanctions: No change to drug and alcohol policy,” it read. Naturally, as someone who printed a cover story in the Aug. 25 edition regarding the perceived change in policy, I read the email. And read it again. I knew that the story’s author, Katherine Dawson, had done more than her due diligence in reporting: I watched as she called person after person in the administration, repeatedly getting answering machines, promises for calls back and emailed interview questions never answered. I also knew that prior to publishing that article, I had seen the new policy published both on housing.uark.edu and the walls of residence halls across campus, not to mention in an email from Aisha Kenner, Associate Dean of Students, sending the new policy out. I had full confidence that what we printed was correct, and was shocked by the University’s statement that “the media” had reported information that was not accurate . What we discovered the next day, after numerous calls to administrators, student leaders and University Relations officials, was that what we printed was accurate. The question of the great drug and alcohol policy flip-flop really boiled down to a question of semantics: How do you define policy? I would argue that generally, if any member of the administration tell you something policy-related is so, you should be able to believe them. If a policy is declared new in a student handbook and 120 flyers are posted on campus, students should feel confident in assuming that the things they read on these flyers are actual University policy. Administrators such as Chancellor Gearhart, however, believe a policy is not a policy unless “a policy of that magnitude” is approved by the University’s Executive Committee. “Dr Pugh is aware now,” said Gearhart. “Somehow it slipped through the cracks. From this vantage point, he didn’t see it as changing the policy, just reordering the penalties. I think he’s fully aware now that things of that magnitude need to be discussed among the senior leadership.” Obviously now we realize the University had a mishap of the greatest magnitude when it came to communication between administrators and expectations of what needs to be approved by whom. Gearhart, who was on vacation when our first story printed Aug. 25, didn’t even know of the change until other senior administrative officials brought the Traveler article to his attention the following Monday. At that point it was a catch-up game, as the story had already made national news, and the University was left scrambling not only to find out what had gone wrong but also to change the policy (that never changed?) back to its original state. At this point, Daniel Pugh, Dean of Students, Steve Voorhies of University Relations and Gearhart have all confirmed that the proposed change to the least restrictive alcohol and drug sanctions is dead, everything has changed back to its previous form, and everyone is clear on how to make sure this never happens again. So what did we learn from this experience? Despite the fact that the University originally made it seem that the media were wrong, now we know that is not the case. We have come away from the albeit stressful experience rooted in the knowledge that we really must do our job at all times, pursing the story as far (or as high up) as we can. The truth doesn’t always present itself—sometimes it requires effort to extract. The Traveler has never been on one side or the other with this story—the only side we have taken is the truth, whatever it be at the time we are reporting. The motto of the University is “Veritate Duce Progredi,” which roughly translates to “to advance with truth as our guide”. This was the motto of my platform when I ran for my position as Editor-in-Chief last spring, and it will continue to be the motto of our paper. In The Traveler family, this has been a rough week. Newspapers pride themselves on their accuracy and reporting, and having ours called into question so early in the year was an emotional experience. Our number one priority is to provide the students with the truth, however, and that is a mission from which we will never back down.

Letter from the Editor

Bailey Elise McBride

traveler@uark.edu

‘Tireless Minority’ Pushes Drug Policy Marcus Ferreira STAFF CARTOONIST

by Robert Pfountz Guest Writer

“It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people’s minds.” —Samuel Adams President Nixon’s chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, wrote in his diary that President Nixon “emphasized that you have to face the fact that the whole problem is really the blacks. The key is to devise a system that recognizes this while not appearing to.” For those who are unaware of our past president’s racist and anti-semitic remarks, you are probably also unaware that he was successful in devising a system that circumvented the freedoms acquired by the civil rights movement. This system was illustrated in a 1968 letter by J. Edgar Hoover stating that, “Since

the use of marijuana and other narcotics is widespread among members of the New Left, you should be alert to opportunities to have them arrested by local authorities on drug charges.” Ever since then, non-violent crimes of drug possession have been utilized as a tool to disproportionately strip the freedoms of youth and minorities at the will of law enforcement. Today, according to NORML, 74% of all Americans arrested for marijuana offenses are under the age of 30. In large urban areas like New York City, African-Americans account for more than 50% of marijuana arrests despite the fact that they make up only 26% of the population. These massive civil rights violations on our citizenry has led to a prison-industrial complex that America can now proudly claim houses 25% of the world’s prisoners here in the

land of the free. The advent of this new form of slavery has increased state and local expenditures on corrections at a rate of 2.5 times that of education from 1977 to 1999. Our universities are now directly competing for funding with the construction and staffing of state correctional institutions. Students not only suffer higher tuition costs because of this, but they also suffer at the hands of the Higher Education Act’s 1998 aid elimination penalty. This act removes federal financial aid to any student caught possessing any amount of drugs, and essentially reinforcing our school to prison pipeline. Last week, Chancellor Gearhart reversed the new guidelines to equalize the penalties for misdemeanor alcohol and marijuana offenses that were approved by 67% of student voters, and a “vast majority” of

the senior administration on the RazorCat Board. We were warned that to implement these guidelines, we were going to have to overcome some high hurdles, and this reversal was because the university did not want to send the wrong message. Unfortunately, these high hurdles of racism, fear-mongering, and ignorance have existed for over 40 years now, and the message that was communicated was the University of Arkansas wishes to perpetuate them. Marijuana reform is just another medium that we can utilize in overcoming these societal atrocities. Fortunately, this issue is generational, and the old guard will not last very long. This too shall pass… Pfountz is a sophomore political science major and campaign director for U of A SAFER, which has pushed marijuana reform on campus since April 2009.

Mom’s Advice Rings True When Dating by Abby Stuart

Traveler Columnist

Looking back on freshman year, I now realize how naive my friends and I were when it came to dating. Through my own trial and error and listening to friend’s stories, I realize that the old advice I heard from my own mother was actually sound. After spending my freshman year single, I think I learned many valuable lessons I wish I would have known this time a year ago. You see it in high school and it still holds true in the college scene; upperclassman love freshman. They feed off the freshmen’s insecurities and uncertainties that many carry on their sleeves, and unfortunately, they oftentimes take advantage of the situation. Lucky for me, I was able to see through this ploy when an older guy insisted on me coming over all the time. My advice to those who are being

seduced by an upperclassman: really get to know the person in a group before you commit to hanging with them by yourself. Never put yourself in a situation you cannot get out of. I don’t know what the rule is when it comes to how many dates to wait until you “shack” with someone, but I can guarantee you it is more than one. I have talked to a shocking number of girls who have spent the night with a guy right after meeting them. I cannot tell you how many successful relationships start this way, but I can tell you that the amount of lasting relationships that did not start with “shacking” is a significantly higher number. A girl I knew last year ended up falling for a guy she stayed with after the first night they met. However, after talking to him he flat out told me he really liked her too but he would never date a girl who would shack on the first date. All the respect the other per-

son has for you is lost when you don’t respect yourself enough to wait. You think it will form some kind of bond between you and the other, but it will actually weaken your relationship. If you like someone and are trying to impress them by showing how cool and fun you are, never get into a state where you are not in control of yourself. As a freshman, I was exposed to a whole new level of fun and partying that I was not aware existed before that point. No matter how good you looked that night, or how much fun you were having, people will remember you for your actions. If you are just starting to get to know someone, make sure you’re not the one spilling drinks and falling down— trust me, it’s not cute. Go out and make friends, have fun, but at the end of the day make sure you still respect yourself for the actions you made that night. You don’t want to be a hot mess

every time your crush sees you. Also, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. I really started liking a guy at the end of last semester and I would find excuses to talk to him. It didn’t bother me that I was putting so much effort into trying to make a relationship work, except he didn’t put the same effort back. I made myself unavailable to every guy, while he was still keeping his options open. Even though I gave it an honest shot, I should not have cut myself out of other social scenes in hopes that he would notice me more. Dating is confusing enough without complicating it even more. What I learned last year might sound like an echo of your parents advice, but it still holds true from when they were in college. I learned from my own experiences and the experiences of my friends, and as thankful as I am to have learned so many lessons, there are some experiences I could have lived without.

I’m skeptical that it exists. Glenn Beck has certainly said controversial things, but criticizing the 8/28 rally is barking up the wrong tree. WILLIAM SIMPSON Freshman, Economics

sidering Blackboard 8 was fairly good. Furthermore, it’s very slow to use, when it’s working at all. While it has a ton more features, 95% will likely never be used by students or faculty because they are useless. Similarly, the new Razorback CareerLink is just as difficult to use as the old e-recruiting it replaced, but now has less functionality. It can’t even upload a resume greater than 1/5 of a megabyte in size! Instead buying in to the grand promises of software vendors, the University should stick to simple systems that actually work. DOUGLAS MAREK Graduate Student, Industrial Engineering

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR On ‘Glenn Beck: Please Stop’

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR OPINION EDITOR NEWS EDITOR

Bailey Elise McBride Mille Appleton Katherine Dawson Nick DeMoss

The Arkansas Traveler welcomes letters to the editor from all interested readers. Letters should be at most 300 words and should include your name, student classification and major or title with the university and a day-time telephone number for verification. Letters to the editor can be sent to traveler@uark.edu.

Peaceful assemblies and protests are a staple of politics worldwide. When human rights and free speech expand, people express diverse ideas. I appreciate the thoughts expressed by our ASG President last week, but I also feel compelled to acknowledge that there is legitimate dissent. In politics’ cacophony of vitriol, Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally is a yawner. In hours of speeches, it was hardly “closed-minded” or “fear-mongering.” If you read speech transcripts, most of the conversation revolved around God’s hand

in American history, the purpose and hope of our country, and other vague, cliche, apolitical mantras that you wouldn’t be surprised to hear on PBS. In fact, the Washington Post reported that no speaker even mentioned President Obama in the hours of presentation. But was it disrespectful to Martin Luther King’s legacy? Not according to Dr. Alveda King, the late King’s niece and a speaker at the event. She, along with many other civil rights activists, is willing to speak tastefully about America’s place in history. I have yet to meet a critic able to produce any quotes from the rally’s speakers that exemplified this alleged intolerance or disrespect.

Broken software This fall, the University introduced two new large online software systems, Blackboard 9.1 and Razorback CareerLink. Unfortunately, I have found them both to be bitter disappointments, and much worse than the systems they replaced. The new Blackboard has a terrible user interface that makes it difficult to find and use its features, which is surprising con-


PAGE 5

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

Football Game Brings Spike in Alcohol Crimes by MIKE ROACH Staff Writer

The first football game Saturday saw 18 arrests, topping off a wave of crime during the opening week of the school year, predominately for public intoxication, but three students were also arrested on charges of possessing a fraudulent ID, according to police records. Like in any community, an increase in the student population has certain effects, among the more obvious is heightened congestion and crime. On the first week of school between Wednesday and Sunday there were more than 20 separate instances that ranged from criminal mischief, to theft, public intoxication and the possession of controlled substances. Perhaps the most serious of which was a person al-

SAFERIDE from page 1

said. “There’s not going to be an increase any time soon. [ASG president] Billy [Fleming] isn’t going to authorize something like that.” The program is basically breaking even, Clark said. For instance, if one of the four SafeRide vans was damaged in a wreck, Clark said it would be out of commission until the necessary funds were found. “The load that SafeRide is expected to carry is expanding without the funding, and so it’s not meeting the demands that are expected of it,” Clark said. “So it’s really kind of precarious where you have the money needed to maintain the vehicles, the money needed to pay the drivers the money needed for fuel.” Money isn’t the only problem SafeRide is facing. A lack of awareness in how the program is supposed to be used is one reason Miller said he believes the system has become strained. In

legedly found with weaponry in their vehicle Aug. 28 in the early hours of the morning. “A person who came into contact with law enforcement was arrested for driving while intoxicated, and during the event it was found that the person had weapons in their car,” said Lt. Gary Crain of the UAPD. Among the weapons were one handgun, several knives and a stun gun. “We do not have any information or indication of (the person) intentions,” Crain said, “but it is illegal to possess them on campus.” The most common violations for students are public intoxication, and driving while intoxicated, according to the UAPD crime logs. During the first week, arrests for alcohol and drug related crimes were made on Garland Street, both in the parking garage and

on the road itself, Martin Luther King Boulevard, Mezza Luna restaurant and Pomfret Hall, as well as multiple arrests for varying reasons at Maple Hill Residence Hall. “Overindulging in drinking puts a person at risk because they can’t care for themselves and they make poor decisions,” Crain said. “We want to impress upon people that when they go out, one- they don’t over do it, and two- that they stick to whatever their plan was.” In addition to crimes relating to alcohol, narcotics and the isolated weapons incident, there has also been a string of thefts involving both student and faculty property. Items ranged from a staff members parking pass, a students cell phone left in a bag during Razorbash, an entire backpack that had been left unattended at a computer in Mullins Li-

brary and even a service cart that was taken from a staff member and abandoned soon after. “We want everyone to keep control over their own property and not leave it anywhere,” said Crain who stressed personal vigilance and responsibility as an important part of keeping ones belongings safe. A student was also arrested Thursday in Maple Hill West on a warrant from Allen, Texas for manslaughter. The charges precipitated form a motor vehicle accident in Allen, Crain said. Allen police contacted UAPD and sent the appropriate documentation necessary to arrest the student. The student will be taken back to Texas for the formal legal proceedings. If students have a problem when on campus and need assistance they should call UAPD at 479-575-3204.

recent years, students have been using SafeRide like a free taxi service, which Miller said was never the intention of the program. “It’s supposed to be a plan-B last resort,” Miller said. “The plans you made fell through and you find yourself in an uncomfortable situation, and you need to get out of it - or your designated driver falls through. Those are the main reasons for SafeRide to be there.” There are several other problems that seem to have come to a head in 2010. Miller said the dispatch area where the vans are stationed is too small, they need new computers and the vans, most now being five or six years old, are going to need repairs soon. “There’s a lot of need. It’s grown so much,” Miller said. Senior Brian Featherston said he thinks SafeRide is one of the best programs at the UA. “The SafeRide program is very useful to students in times of need,” Featherston said. “I’m a

criminal justice major, and when I hear that SafeRide is out of money, students are sure to make a less logical choice and drive home instead of having a sober ride.” Featherston said he would understand if the student fee had to be increased. “I would be highly in favor of an increased student fee, especially if it meant we could get more SafeRide vehicles on the street,” Featherston said. More vehicles would seem like an obvious solution, but as Miller pointed out, vehicles are simply too expensive. The SafeRide Commission is working on several other methods of dealing with the floods of calls that come through. More efficient call routing is something Miller said he hopes can help clear the traffic at the front end of the system. Instead of a person answering when a student calls, they will get an automated menu to help direct their call. For example, there will be

an option to select on-campus destination, off-campus destination or check the status of a ride. Another thing Miller said he hopes to accomplish is raising awareness of how SafeRide is supposed to be used. Miller met with every resident assistant last week, and plans on having more meetings with campus leaders. He said he wants to make a few things clear, like a SafeRide driver is only allowed to drop a student off at his or her official local address as listed on ISIS. Neither Miller nor Clark were worried about the program disappearing, but Miller has other worries with the strained program. “The biggest thing I worry about is it being overloaded, and us not being able to provide a ride to a student who really needs it because students are using it as a taxi service or people using it as plan A,” Miller said. “The people who really need it get stuck. We’re trying to solve that.”


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

Check out the Features section online at uatrav.com or go directly there by scanning here:

PAGE 6 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

FEATURES EDITOR: Lindsey Pruitt ASST. FEATURES EDITOR: Erin Robertson

w e i v e r P e i v o M l Fal s have already been released, ster kbu bloc get bud bigthe of t mos h oug alth and r, ove ially offic is Summer plenty of great films for everyone to choose from coming this fall.

THE SOCIAL network Director: David Fincher Starring: Jesse Eisenberg, Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield Release Date: October 1 Adapted from the best-selling book, “The Accidental Billionaires,” this film tells the true story of Mark Zuckerberg and the creation of everyone’s favorite social networking website, Facebook. Peter Travers of “Rolling Stone” gave the movie four stars calling it, “The movie of the year that also brilliantly defines the decade.” Starring Jesse Eisenberg of “Zombieland” and brought to the screen by David Fincher, director of “Se7en” and “Fight Club,” this movie is sure to be a hit.

machete Director: Robert Rodriguez and Ethan Maniquis Starring: Danny Trejo, Steven Segal, Michelle Rodriguez, Jeff Fahey, Cheech Marin, Lindsay Lohan, Jessica Alba, Robert De Niro Release Date: Out Now Fans of “Grindhouse” might remember the fake trailer for a movie about a Mexican hitman who goes on a road of revenge after being double-crossed. In “Machete,” Danny Trejo leads an all-star cast as the title character of Machete in Robert Rodriguez’s full-length expansion of the original fake trailer. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the film “delivers the ‘70s-style Bmovie goods with a relentless onslaught of overthe-top violence, extreme gore, gratuitous nudity and cheap laughs, with a healthy dose of up-tothe-minute political satire to sweeten the package.”

by Wyndham Wyeth

the romantics Director: Galt Niederhoffer Starring: Katie Holmes, Josh Duhamel, Anna Paquin, Elijah Wood, Malin Akerman and Adam Brody Release Date: September 10 This romantic comedy tells the story of seven friends reuniting for a wedding. However, problems arise when passion erupts between the groom and the maid of honor, who used to be romantically involved. Katie Holmes returns to the big screen for the first time since 2008’s “Mad Money” in the role of Laura, the maid of honor, and Anna Paquin, of the hot HBO vampire series, “True Blood,” portrays Lila, the bride.

tron: legacy Director: Joseph Kosinsk Starring: Jeff Bridges, Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde, Bruce Boxleitner, James Frain and Beau Garrett Release Date: December 17 After the unexplained disappearance of his father nearly 20 years previous, Sam Flynn discovers a strange signal coming from his father’s abandoned video game arcade. Upon further investigation, Sam becomes transported to a digital world where his father has been trapped. “Tron: Legacy” is the sequel to the original 1982 film, “Tron,” and features original cast members Bruce Boxleitner and last year’s Academy Award winner for Best Actor, Jeff Bridges, reprising their roles. Electronica fans can look forward to the soundtrack which is being done by the band Daft Punk, who also makes a small appearance in the film, according to IMDB.

it looks like there will be

due date

the town

Director: Todd Phillips Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Zach Galifianakis and Jamie Foxx Release Date: November 5

Director: Ben Affleck Starring: Ben Affleck, Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner, Blake Lively, Pete Postlethwaite and Chris Cooper Release Date: September 17

Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis race across the country in this comedy in the style of “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.” Peter Highman (Downey Jr.) is an expectant father who is forced to hitch a ride with aspiring actor Ethan Tremblay (Galifianakis) after missing his flight in an attempt to make it home in time to see the birth of his child. From the director of “The Hangover,” this film is sure to provide plenty of side-splitting laughs and absurd moments.

Ben Affleck returns to the director’s chair following the criticallyacclaimed “Gone Baby Gone,” but this time Affleck works both in front of and behind the camera. Based on the novel “Prince of Thieves” by Chuck Hogan, “The Town” follows four bank robbers as they are pursued by a determined FBI agent. Affleck takes the lead as one of the thieves who wrestles with his newfound love for a bank manager after a recent heist. If this film is anything like “Gone Baby Gone,” movie goers should be in for a treat.

Contributing Writer

Local Art Exhibit to Raise Funds for Bicycle Education by Kristen Coppola

Contributing Writer

The Bicycle Coalition of the Ozarks is hosting an art auction, the Wheels Exhibit and Fundraiser, to raise money for bicycle education programs. The exhibit will be held at the OMNI Center, Art Space, on Lee Street from 7:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 3 until 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 22. Artists are participating by invitation, and among them is the UA’s own Cindy Wiseman, a professor of Art History. Each artist who is participating in the exhibit was given a bicycle wheel to use as they may with the mission of transforming the utilitarian object into a work of art. “I was overcome with the idea of extravagant materials. I began by using embossed metal, then I added satin, gold paint and faux pearls and fur,” Wiseman said. “All the while I kept playing with the circular form, painting gold circles on the metal and fixing pearls along the sides.” Wiseman wanted to portray wisdom and ideas through her artwork. “What are the ‘pearls’ of wisdom that make things go round, that are the jewels that create change? Perhaps, as in this case, it’s an embellishment of an idea, like how we use wheels to take us from one

place to another,” Wiseman said. Wiseman’s piece is called “Pearl Fur-reel” and will be displayed with the works of 15 other artists. The artwork sold will help BCO bring to fruition its bicycle education program. The Bicycle Coalition of the Ozarks is a non-profit organization and was able to get grants from the Arkansas Highway Department to pay for their outreach, but the grants are not paid out until after the program will have started, so the exhibit was organized to help alleviate some of the current financial pressure. “All of the money that the artists want to donate goes to the BCO. It will help pay for all the equipment and bikes that are needed,” said Laura Kelly, BCO spokesperson. “We have grant money to fund most of the program, but it’s really tight, and we need a little extra money.” The arts are a connective media, and Kelly is optimistic about how the exhibit will turn out. “There’s some amazing artwork. I’m really impressed,” she said. The program begins Sept. 8 at Root Elementary and will travel to nine local elementary schools. The curriculum will focus on bicycle safety and making the children aware of bicycling as a safe and healthy activity and mode of transportation.

STAFF PHOTO COUTRESY OF Cindy Wiseman Artist and Professor Cindy Wiseman altered this bicycle wheel for the Wheels Exhibit and Fundraiser.


WEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER8,8,2010 2010 PAGE PAGE 27 WEDNESDAY,

Getting a Masters Degree May Not Be the Answer

THE TOP FIVE Fall Activities #5

Pumpkin Spice Latte

Enjoy a Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte. Red cups are only a few months away now!

#4

Take a Stroll

The trees are starting to turn, and now is the time to soak up the mild weather and the delicious crunch of maple leaves on the sidewalk.

#3

Cold-Weather Wear

Sarah McCormick CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Graduate students John Orr, Painting major, and Gongke Li, Photography major, confer on photographic technique. Approximately 4,000 people are currently enrolled as graduate students, a little under 20 percent of the entire student body.

by Andrew Van Genderen Staff Writer

More than 15 million workers were counted among the unemployed in August, which saw the nation’s unemployment rate climb to 9.6 percent from 9.5 percent in July. Naturally, upperclassmen probing the void for job prospects are apprehensive about their chances of snagging a job. To stand out in a highly competitive, straining economy many students are considering graduate school as an option. Despite the high cost of education, especially in today’s budget stretching times, some feel that they are making the right financial decision by pursuing a master’s degree. Jordan Bryant, sophomore biology and pre-pharmacy major, feels that success in his career field almost mandates a higher degree. “Getting a master’s or a doctorate shows companies that you are both experienced and dedicated,” he said. “It shows you mean business. So it is a huge advantage on a résumé.” When asked about how he intends to pay for the initial education, he expressed little concern. “Money isn’t everything,” Bryant continued. “Once you get your degree, you will be able to pay it off in the long run.” Sophomore Luke Smith feels similarly. “I think graduate school definitely makes you more market-

able. I can get a job while I am in school and probably get a few scholarships, based on my academic performance here at the U of A, and even if I do not get scholarships, the income I will get from having a master’s degree in aerospace engineering will more than make up for it,” he said. Thus, a future-oriented mindset can be observed in students pursuing graduate degrees. Student loans, perhaps two of the foulest words in a college student’s vocabulary, are of no consequence, provided that the end result is a steady, respectable paycheck. “It is an investment,” Smith said. “You are investing in your future, and you are counting on that investment to bring greater returns in the future.” Some career fields are more demanding than others when it comes to education. The importance of distinction and specialization in broad career fields, especially within science, is extremely high. Salaries in such academic focuses are directly proportional to extent of education. Johnathon Faught, senior psychology major, said that “it really depends on your field. For example, a bachelor’s degree in psychology will get you nowhere; you have to go to graduate school if you want to get any sort of job.” Claud Lacy, a UA physics professor put it even more bluntly: “Publish or perish,” he said.

As a physicist and a repeatedly published astronomer, he understands the cutthroat nature of science firsthand. And there are some credentials one simply must possess to even be considered for a job. “If you are an astronomer and you want to teach, you have to get a Ph.D. All science fields are like this,” Lacy said. “A bachelor’s degree in this field can get you a job in research and development, much like engineers, but you cannot teach without a higher degree. It just doesn’t happen.” It follows that record numbers of students, heeding the advice and examples of their elders, are applying to graduate schools this year. However, it would be a mistake to see graduate school as a necessity, and certainly one to see it as being universally beneficial. The stakes are high, nothing is guaranteed and a plain, razor-edged question remains even after one has a Ph.D in hand: “Is this really what I want to do with my life?” Jack Breffle, Gregson CRE, gave his input on the question of graduate school. “What may seem like a certainty now may not be as much of a home run as a student continues to grow and mature,” Breffle said. “Life can change, folks may start families, and working through an on-call shift in an ER may not seem so appealing anymore. Someone can set themselves up for success and happiness if they do not hand-

cuff themselves to a pile of debt they have to pay off in a job they may end up disliking.” Breffle took a year off after completing his undergraduate degree, working a job, saving money and taking time to decide if he wanted to attend graduate school. During that reprieve from academia, he found himself able to reflect on what he truly wanted to achieve. “I had a delayed launch,” he said, “but by the time I started graduate school a year after finishing college, I had developed a hunger for the knowledge and experience I would gain which drove me to be successful in my venture.” For those concerned about paying for graduate school, resources exist to help guide you on your path to higher education. The Princeton Review annually compiles a list of the best graduate schools, sorted by size, cost, quality and area of study. Many large corporations will also grant scholarships for top employees to obtain advanced degrees. Education in today’s market is a win-win situation for both parties involved. The most vital concept to understand in the realm of education is very straightforward, and two-fold. Where do I want to go with my life? And what is the best way for me to get there? Quoting Joseph Campbell, the noted author, Lacy again answered with succinctness. “You should follow your bliss.”

Be it scarves, sweaters or your favorite pair of boots, it’s about that time to pull out the cold-weather wardrobe.

#2

Camping

Camping was made for months like these; there’s nothing better than the smell of a campfire on a cool, clear night in the woods.

#1

Picking Out Pumpkins

Visit a local farm for a sashay through the pumpkin patch to pluck one straight from the vine. Dickey Farms boasts a full field and a fun atmosphere; for more information, check their website at dickeyfarmsupick.com.


PAGE 38 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

Macintosh versus Microsoft. Snow Leopard versus Windows 7. Dock versus taskbar. by Cara Turbyfill, Staff Writer

In short: Mac versus PC.

According to BBC News, Microsoft was founded by Bill Gates and Paul Allen on April 4th, 1975. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple only a year later in 1976, according to the Apple Press Info website. Both Macintosh and Microsoft have been providing quality computers to the market since before the majority of today’s undergraduates were born, but the debate over which is superior still flourishes today.

Mac

PC

are easy to use. “If you want a computer for just basic things, you should get a Mac,” + Macs said Austin Reid, a junior English major.

can be customized. “You can buy every part individually, which results in better hard+ PCs ware,” Brady said. “With Macs, you are stuck with pre-built.”

+ Macs are less prone to viruses. “It seems kind of like a car,” said Alex Abrams, a first year

are more popular. According to the Microsoft website, PCs outsell Macs 10 to 1. Be+ PCs cause of that…

+ Macs are preferable to PCs. J. Michael Plavcan, an Anthropology professor, said, “I prefer

are more compatible. “The reality is that most computer software is developed to run + PCs on PCs,” according to the Microsoft website.

can dual-boot. “You pick your Operating System,” said William Baldwin, a senior + Macs Music major. “Some Macs have it built in when you get it. You don’t even have to buy an extra

+ PCs are cheaper. Kyleigh Strickland said that she got better hardware for cheaper on her

M.A. student. “The easier it is to use and fix, the better.”

CONS PROS

Macs infinitely. I grew up with Macintosh. I love Macintosh.”

laptop, and compared it to a similar Mac model, adding that she basically “got the same machine,” while paying a lot less.

program.”

are more exclusive. Apple’s upper register pricing makes the computer, like the iP+ Macs hone, something of a status symbol.

+

PCs are preferable to Macs. “It’s what I’ve always used…it’s more comfortable for me,” said Taylor Sitzman, a senior Music major.

- Macs are unable to run some programs and applications. “I use PCs,” Dr. Plavcan

-

PCs are more prone to viruses. With the majority of computers sold being PCs, virus makers tend to design viruses specifically for PCs, in order to capture a larger target audience.

- Macs are more expensive. “My problem with Macs is that you are paying a large amount

-

PCs have a more demanding operating system. “It’s not that PCs are user friendly. It’s that PCs are user hostile,” complained Plavcan. “They’re designed for programmers, not consumers.”

hardware isn’t actually that impressive. “People say the performance (of a Mac) - Mac is great, but that is only because the Operating System isn’t very demanding,” Brady said.

-

PCs have a harder time dual-booting than Macs. “There are incompatibility issues with various motherboards,” Brady said.

- Macs have a lack of customization options. “Macs are like Duplo blocks,” said Chris

-

PCs aren’t as durable. This one is hard to say, as there are multiple manufacturers for Windows computers, such as Dell, Toshiba and Asus, but with Apple as the only producer of Macs, you do have the advantage of knowing exactly what to expect.

admitted, despite his dislike of them, and cited as his reason that the bone-modeling software he uses in his lab will not run on a Mac. of money for decent hardware with a smooth Operating System,” said John Brady, a junior Computer Engineering major.

Moon, a junior Business Information Systems major. “They’re big and shiny, but ultimately simple. They’re limited.”

So there you have it. It’s difficult to point to either a Mac or a PC and say which is better outright. The consensus seems to be that it depends on what you’re looking for. For general compatibility or customization, Windows has the advantage. For exclusivity and a smooth operating system, the ball is in Apple’s court. Even PC enthusiast Taylor Sitzman, when asked if PCs were superior to Macs, replied, “I wouldn’t say superior. I guess it’s just a personal preference.”

What do you Voice your opinion in our forums think is better? @ uatrav.com


WEDNESDAY, WEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER8,8,2010 2010 PAGE PAGE 49

UA Students Keep the Spirit of Ramadan Alive by Saba Naseem Staff Writer

The melodic recitation of the Quran fills the air, creating an atmosphere of peace, calm and spirituality in the home of Nilly Al-Banna, an immigrant from Jordan. The sun is about to set, and preparations for Iftar, the breaking of the fast, are underway. Al-Banna quickly moves back and forth in the kitchen, preparing food for her family. Her husband, Husam AbuSafe, joins her in the kitchen and starts his own work, peeling a butternut squash for a special dip he makes. They moved to Fayetteville from Jordan in 1998 and lived here for 10 years before moving to Lebanon for three years. The atmosphere back in Jordan during the month of Ramadan is quite different from here,

Al-Banna said. Everybody is fasting there, there are reduced hours for work and school and there are many different options for food at the markets. “When the girls were young, I would buy Ramadan decorations for the house so that they would know about it and could feel the spirit,” she said of her two daughters Farah and Nur. She would put up Islamic decorations she bought online, hang up balloons and have the children draw illustrations for the walls. “The girls are grown up now and know enough about Ramadan so I don’t focus so much on the decorations anymore. Besides, now that all of the children have seen Ramadan in Lebanon, they have a feel for the spirit,” she said. Although the decorations are missing this year, the clean-

liness of the house, the sound of the Quran and the smell of food brings in the Ramadan spirit. At exactly 7:50 p.m., a computer software program plays the call for prayer, indicating that it is time to break fast. Abu-Safe, who is in the middle of making his dip, drops everything he is doing and goes to the dining room, which has been set by the daughters. A pot of rice, a dish of roast beef, grapes, soup, sandwiches, chips and foutesh, a special salad, are set on the table. Before eating, the family sits and says a prayer, asking God to accept their fast. Ramadan is the holy month of fasting during which Muslims believe the Prophet Muhammad received the first of the Quranic revelations. From sunup to sundown, Muslims must abstain from food, drink

and sexual relations and instead, focus on building a closer relationship with God and doing service for God’s creation. “Ramadan means obedience that I show to my God,” Abu-Safe said. “I do this in different forms of worshipping. I pray five times a day, pray during the night and also keep myself calm during Ramadan. It’s a chance for all of us to control our wild side.” Young children usually keep fasts in small portions throughout the day and began keeping full fasts as determined by their parents. Both the elder daughters, Farah and Nur, were fasting, but the two younger, Zayna, 8, and Karim, 4, are too young to keep a whole fast. “It is a time when you get closer with your family,” said Farah Abu-Safe. “You don’t always get

that opportunity, so it’s good.” Keeping the spirit of Ramadan alive can be hard for many Muslim students on campus because they are far from their families, they have long hours of school and homework and many also work, but they said they try as much as they can. There is an Islamic Center very close to campus, across from the HPER, where anybody is invited to break fast in the evenings and join in prayer. “To me, Ramadan is a month where people become more pious and it brings us closer to God,” said Genta Myrteza, a sophomore nursing major from Albania. “I feel like I have progressed this month, but God knows better. Last Ramadan I could barely read the Quran, and this year I try to read one chapter a day so I can finish the entire

Quran by the end of Ramadan.” For Dusty Caler, a UA student who converted to Islam last year, this Ramadan is her first. “People told me to take it easy, but I’ve fasted every single day that I could and haven’t broken it once,” Caler said. “I’m very proud of that and I try to do everything 110 percent.” “Whenever I converted, I wasn’t expecting to be close to God because I didn’t know very much, but now I feel like he’s right there.” Caler goes to the mosque as many evenings as she can to break her fast and pray. She “likes breaking fast with all the people at the mosque.” “They are all family to me,” she said. “Everyone treats me like I’m their daughter and it’s really enjoyable to be around that culture because that is what Islam is all about.”

Want to be hot? Wear red. by Lindsey Baldwin

Contributing Writer

Red is the new black for men. According to new findings in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, men who wear red are more likely to catch a lady’s eye. For the study, women participants were shown several photos of different men wearing shirts of various colors. After rating each photo, men wearing even the slightest bit of red were considered more powerful, attractive and to have a higher social status. High social status is evident with a bold red hue. In history, classical Romans called the most powerful men in the city coccinati-the ones who wear red. President Obama, currently the most powerful man in the United States, has worn several red ties throughout his campaign and presidency. The red tie exerts power and control. Just as women desire men with power, they are also

searching for romance. Valentine’s Day, the day of love itself, revolves around red roses and red hearts. Women have been wearing the color for years to appeal more sensual using red lipstick, nail polish and lingerie. As for men in red, they can give off an air of romance without whispering a word. Women don’t even realize the reason for the attraction. Jacquelyn Jenkins, UA student, said she has never noticed that she is more attracted to men wearing red. It’s something that we don’t notice, University of Rochester researcher Andrew Elliot said. “It’s fascinating to find something as ubiquitous as color can have an effect on our behavior without our awareness.” Wearing red can only get a man so far, though. A shirt or tie can’t make him more likable to a woman. Although, it can give a great first impression. Red attire can attract ladies as well as boost a man’s confidence. “The red shirt that Tiger

Woods wears on the final day of golf tournaments likely provides him with a confidenceboosting reminder of his alpha status in the golf world, as it simultaneously reminds his competitors that they are probably facing another long day,” Elliott said. University of Rochester psychologists also did the study in reverse. Men rated women on attractiveness and revealed undoubtedly that they are more attracted to women in red as well. An interesting question during the study regarding dating, asked was, “Imagine that you are going on a date with [the man pictured] and have $100 in your wallet. How much money would you be willing to spend on your date?” Results showed that the lady in red would enjoy a much more expensive outing. It’s safe to say, after much research, that red is a sexy color.

MUSIC REVIEWS from KXUA 88.3 FM Album: “Lisbon” Artist: The Walkmen Release Date: September 14, 2010 Tracks: 01. Juveniles 02. Angela Surf City 03. Follow The Leader 04. Blue As Your Blood 05. Stranded 06. Victory In the early 2000s, garage rock revival bands were allegedly the saviors of rock ‘n’ roll. Commercial successes like The Strokes or The White Stripes were lauded by both mainstream and independent media sources, and commercial radio paid some attention to potential breakthrough indie bands like Interpol and Bloc Party. While many of these bands remain popular within niche fanbases, few of these bands have retained their status as trendsetters, with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs being a notable exception. The Strokes never recaptured the pop perfection of Is This It on subsequent albums, and while Jack White remains active, he has yet to release another album on par with White Blood Cells or Elephant. At the end of their tenure with major label Record Collection, The Walkmen appeared poised to fade into obscurity. While the band’s major label debut, Bows + Arrows, had been a major critical hit, their subsequent albums for Record Collection, A Hundred Miles Off and

Pussy Cats, received lukewarm receptions at best. The band returned in 2008 with You & Me, a slow, often lonely and lugubrious stretch of songs that contained no singles. It was the band’s best album since Bows + Arrows. However, many questioned whether the band had truly been reenergized, or had merely released an aberration in the midst of their inevitable creative decline. Fortunately, Lisbon, the band’s first album for Fat Possum, demonstrates that the band’s freedom has reenergized the band. While You & Me was an enjoyable album, it suffered from its own lethargy at times. Lisbon follows the blueprint of the band’s first two releases, juxtaposing slow, melancholic songs with faster, more energetic ones. Chris Zane, who engineered You & Me, returns to produce many of the slower songs. The uptempo songs, meanwhile, provide the energy sorely missed since Bows + Arrows. The album is subsequently an excel-

07. All My Great Designs 08. Woe Is Me 09. Torch Song 10. While I Shovel The Snow 11. Lisbon

lent mix of old and new for the band. “Juveniles” begins the album with a chiming guitar, and the drums establish a strong rhythm from the start. The pleasant beginning makes the listener optimistic about the album, an opinion vocalist Hamilton Leithauser encourages, singing “I see better things to come.” These better things immediately proceed Juveniles. Lead single “Angela Surf City” begins with pounding drums that foreshadow its anthemic chorus. Leithauser sings over subdued guitars in the first verse, his vocals restrained as a simple speak-sing. Just before a minute has elapsed, the song finds the anthemic center - the guitar is strummed continuously, as Leithauser uses his whole vocal range to tower above the instruments in an infectious chorus. “Blue as Your Blood” and “Stranded,” both engineered by Zane, provide relief with mournful minimalism. The former provides optimism

amidst its melancholy, while “Stranded,” with its morose trumpet, is reminiscent of “Red Moon” from You & Me. Late standout “Woe Is Me” uses the same chiming guitars of “Angela Surf City,” but captivates through its singable verse and chorus rather than an anthemic ceiling. The album closes with “Lisbon,” a song with a sparse arrangement that provides a gentle catharsis. The album is not without its faults some of the tracks engineered by Chris Zane are less than inspiring, sounding like mediocre recreations of the wonderfully mournful sounds of You & Me. However, while the individual songs may falter, the album’s pacing and variation makes for one of the more enjoyable and cohesive albums in the band’s catalog, and the presence of two uptempo singles is certain to please casual fans. This isn’t the band’s finest moment, but it certainly proves that in 2010, this band is still far from an afterthought.

- Nathan Rowe

Amanda Springer CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Nick Stoddart, a Bio Engineering major, walks to class wearing a red shirt on a sunny afternoon. Some studies suggest that men who wear the color red are more attractive and confident than those who don’t.


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

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PAGE 10 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

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Coach Fieldgoal Quarterback Huddle Tackle Pass

THIS WEEK’S SOLUTIONS

LAUGH IT UP Q: How are a plum and a rabbit alike? Q: Why was 6 afraid of 7? Q: What’s brown and sticky? A: They’re both purple, except for the rabbit. A: It wasn’t, numbers don’t have feelings. A: A stick. GIRLS & SPORTS Justin Borus & Andrew Feinstein

WONDERMARK David Malki!

BREWSTER ROCKITT Tim Rickard

CALAMITIES OF NATURE Tony Piro

CROSSWORDS

SOLUTION

SOLUTION


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

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PAGE 11 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010

SPORTS EDITOR: Jimmy Carter ASST. SPORTS EDITOR: Danny Meyer FOOTBALL NOTEBOOOK

Mallett, Hogs Poised for Big Game by JIMMY CARTER Sports Editor

Arkansas quarterback Ryan Mallett threw for 301 yards and three touchdowns in the Hogs’ 44-3 season-opening win over Tennessee Tech. The junior might put up better numbers Saturday against Louisiana-Monroe when the Razorback offense faces a Warhawk defense predicated on stopping the run.

“You’d like to come into the game and say, ‘Hey, we’re going to go run the ball and do this,’ but they put so many guys down (in the box), that we’ve got to go in and throw the football,” Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino said. “We’ve got to do a good job of executing our passing game and taking advantage of matchups, throwing the ball until they remove somebody from the box.” Louisiana-Monroe had the top rush defense in the Sun Belt last season, allow-

ing just 110.1 yards per contest. The Razorbacks ran for 196 yards against Tennessee Tech, but Petrino said the Hogs’ four running backs needed to produce more big plays. “It wasn’t good enough, particularly in the first half,” Petrino said about the running game. “I came in at halftime and was not excited about the fact that at that time we had 13 carries for 51 yards, but they did come out in the second half and pushed the defense

off the line. We still have to do a better job of creating chunk plays with our running game. “Our efficiency was pretty good as far as four yards a crack on first down… but we need to get bigger plays in the running game.” Sophomore running back Knile Davis and junior Dennis

see FOOTBALL on page 13

FOOTBALL

Leon Finds Home at Linebacker for Hogs

Ryan Miller STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino said the Hog’s passing attack could have a big game Saturday against a run-oriented Louisiana Monroe defense.

OLYMPIC SPORTS

Inconsistent Razorbacks Head to Missouri in Search of Victory by PATRICK GRINNAN Staff Writer

Ryan Miller STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Anthony Leon (1) led the Razorbacks with eight tackles and two sacks against Tennessee Tech in his first career start at linebacker.

by JIMMY CARTER Sports Editor

Anthony Leon had never played a game at linebacker before. It wasn’t obvious Saturday in Arkansas’ season-opening 44-3 win over Tennessee Tech. The junior started and led the Hogs with eight tackles, four tackles-for-loss and both of Arkansas’ sacks. ThecontestwasLeon’sfirststart at linebacker after moving from safety midway through fall camp. “I feel real confident,” Leon said about playing his new position. “I just played how I practiced and that’s basically what happened. The Razorback coaching staff made the decision to move Leon after watching film in which he was more efficient at safety when playing in the box. “We really liked every time he dropped down into the box from the safety spot when we’d

drop our secondary to try and get an extra guy for the run,” Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino said. “He did an excellent job.”

“He took to it right away. He likes it, he’s got a feel for it and he’s got a tremendous amount of confidence right now.”

Anthony Leon Weakside Linebacker 6-foot-4, 227 pounds, Senior Miami, Fla.

Once Leon switched positions, it was apparent he was at linebacker to stay. “The minute he stepped into that position, it was like, ‘Oh, wow. This guy has great instincts in there,’” Petrino said. “He’s tough and comes in and takes on blocks. His quickness and speed is different than from playing on the back end.

It was a move that Leon said had been suggested to him before, but one he hadn’t been open to making. His cousin, late NFL All-Pro Sean Taylor, starred at safety for Miami in college and Washington in the NFL, and Leon wanted to emulate Taylor. “Every year I’ve played football they suggested (the move), but I wanted to play safety,” Leon

said. “I just always believed I was a free safety. I wanted to be like my cousin and follow in his footsteps.” Leon was rated the No. 10 safety in the country in high school and committed to Florida State. He redshirted as a freshman, then recorded five tackles in eight games in 2007. Leon transferred to the College of the Sequoias junior college in California and was a highly-touted signee – ranked a four-star by both Rivals.com and Scout.com – in Arkansas’ 2009 recruiting class. Despite his lofty billing, Leon started just two games for a Razorback pass defense that ranked last in the Southeastern Conference. He finished STAT on the team with 20 tackles. “At safety you’re more on an island and if you make one mistake, you’re the last man of de-

The Razorback soccer team will travel to Missouri this weekend to face the Tigers on Friday and Missouri State on Sunday. The matches will be the Arkansas’ fourth and fifth consecutive road games and its second double-header in two weeks. The Razorbacks had a roller-coaster weekend, splitting contests last weekend against Miami University and Florida Gulf Coast. We hit our high Friday night against Miami, and we hit our low Sunday night against Florida Gulf Coast,” Arkansas coach Erin Aubry said. “A good indication of a young team is that it is hard for them to be consistent. Us making that step of knowing how to win big games and continue that work throughout the season is key.” The Razorbacks captured a big win against the Hurricanes after losing at Stephen F. Austin. “We played the best soccer we have played since I’ve been here against Miami,” Aubry said. “Coming off of a really poor performance against SFA and in just a week’s time be that resilient and come out and play that high level of soccer, that’s all resiliency.” The Razorbacks will look to build on some of the positives from the Miami game when they face Missouri and Missouri State

this weekend, Aubry said. “We were really able to get a lot of the young players more playing time this weekend,” Aubry said. “They are starting to gain some confidence and starting to understand what a road trip is all about, and all the little things they have to do off the field. They also started to step up into some very powerful roles in terms of their role on the field.” The Razorback coaching staff has had the luxury of many players competing for playing time. “My coaching philosophy is that players that are able to contribute at the moment are going to get in the game,” Aubry said. “We’re not going to stick to just a 12 or 13 person roster, so that is a very positive aspect of the team right now.” Missouri and Missouri State will be a test for the Razorbacks, and Aubry said the team will look to show improvement throughout the weekend in preperation for Southeastern Conference play, which starts in two weeks. “Obviously we are hoping to prepare for the level type of athlete we are going to see in the SEC through our nonconference play,” Aubry said. “That gives us a standard for what we are going to compete against. We learned from Miami that we can make big-time pressure goals. The flip side

see OLYMPIC on page 13

see LEON on page 12

VOLLEYBALL

Change of Plans: Fournier in Fayetteville by ZACH TURNER Staff Writer

She’s only been a Razorback for a short time, but Brooke Fournier is reaping the benefits. The true freshmen libero started each game for the Razorbacks volleyball team this season after being add-

Brooke Fournier

ed to the roster just five days prior to team’s report date. Fournier originally committed to the University of Montana late in her senior year. But after a summer of strong play on the circuit for Southern California Volleyball Club and a great performance at the Junior Olympics, Fournier caught the eyes of

Razorback coach Robert Pulliza and changed her decision to the University of Arkansas. “After Junior Olympics Robbie (Pulliza) saw me and talked to my coach because he knew my coach al-

see VOLLEYBALL on page 13

FILE PHOTO

Senior Laurel Pastor and the Razorbacks went 1-1 in Florida over the weekend.

COMMENTARY

Looking for a New Job? Consider These, for Better or Worse

I spent my Labor Day weekend, hopefully, like most people. I went outside, I relaxed, I spent time with friends, and I thought. Very little, but I did think. I thought about some of the bad jobs I’ve had (picking up rocks at the bottom of a running waterfall) and the good ones (delivering beer for Anheuser Busch). That thought led me to more thinking. And right before I passed out, I pondered about the best and worst jobs in sports. One of the best sport gigs has to be commentating for the PGA. You sit in a booth in great weather and watch the best golfers in the world play the best courses in the world. And how much strategy

can there be? “Oh, he hit that one in the bunker David. That’s going to be tough.” I could do that. But what I couldn’t do is cad-

This Space for Rent

DANNY MEYER dxm010@uark.edu

dy for Tiger Woods. I mean, Steve Williams, Tiger’s caddy

since 1999, did make $1.27 million in 2006, according to Forbes. And I guess you could argue Williams should earn two wages, one for a caddy and one for a bodyguard. Williams is known for lashing out at hecklers and photographers, once throwing a $7,000 camera into a pond after the photographer snapped a picture of Tiger in mid-swing. But Williams deals with not only the most demanding player on Tour but also the largest throng of fans on the course. Couple that with Tiger’s recent bad play and rumors that Williams is on the chopping block and you can count me out. What about a championship-

winning race horse? Race, eat, breed, sleep, repeat. But keep winning, for this is a double-edge sword. Start to lose, and the situation might get a little sticky. Being Manny Pacquiao’s sparring partner wouldn’t be fun. Neither would working for Floyd Mayweather’s public relations. They’ve been dealing with Mayweather’s apparent ducking of Pacquiao for months, and now Mayweather piles on the workload with his recent profanity-ridden and homophobic video rant of Pacquiao. Classy. How about coaching Kobe Bryant? That has to almost take care of itself. Or the guys who wipe up the sweat on the

court. Watching the game from right under the rim only to run out and wipe up sweat every time a guy falls is pretty sweet. I wouldn’t want to be the dude that fields the foul balls in MLB, though. I can’t field a squeeze bunt much less a grounder. And now I have to do that in front of 40,000 people? No thanks. You couldn’t pay me to be in a NASCAR pit crew. I have to change tires in under 15 seconds while dodging guys who have been in the car for 300 miles with no bathroom break? Not happening. But I would give the guy who runs out and gets the kicking tee in a college football game the day off. And speaking of college foot-

ball, its best job is heading-up USC. Lane Kiffin has got it going on. Both critics and fans are expecting the Trojans to be down this year, so if they are, Kiffin has a get out of jail free card. But if they do well, which their roster reads they can, it’ll be a surprise. Being the head coach of the biggest football gig in the second largest city in the nation is a good career choice no matter the record. Collegiate football’s current worst gig? Head east 1800 miles; Ole Miss didn’t have the greatest Labor Day weekend. Danny Meyer is the assistant sports editor for The Arkansas Traveler. His column appears every Wednesday.


WEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER8,8,2010 2010 PAGE PAGE122 WEDNESDAY,

ARKANSAS - LOUISIANA-MONROE BREAKDOWN Arkansas run offense vs. Louisiana-Monroe run defense The Razorbacks opened their season against Tennessee Tech with its four-headed backfield combining for 197 yards and three touchdowns. Sophomore Knile Davis who ran for 67 yards on six carries to lead the Hogs, while junior Dennis Johnson chipped in 60 yards on just three totes. Last season Louisiana-Monroe held opponent to a measly 3.3 rushing yards per attempt. Their defense will be led by returning starter, senior linebacker Theo Smith. Smith had a tackle in every game last season and finished sixth on the team with 57 tackles. The Razorbacks run game should be able to stay productive and allow the passing game to move the ball down field in a hurry for the second week in a row.

Louisiana-Monroe passing offense vs. Arkansas pass defense

The Razorback’s much-maligned pass defense held Tennessee Tech to 109 yards in the air, 39 of which came on one play on the game’s first drive. ULM will bring a more dangerous passing attack than the Golden Eagles, though. Warhawks quarterback, 6-5 221 pound senior Trey Revell, threw for 1,739 yards and 12 touchdowns in 2009, averaging 173.9 yards per game. Nine of his 12 touchdowns went to LaGregory Sapp and Darrell McNeal. Sapp was the War Hawk’s big-play receiver, finishing with 784 yards. McNeal averaged 45.2 yards per game with 542 total receiving yards. While the Warhawks have a dangerous pass offense that averaged 13.5 yards per passing play last season, the Razorbacks’ secondary has a chip on their shoulder. Look for the Hogs to play the pass aggressively and take away ULM’s big-play passing game.

Arkansas-Louisiana Monroe Predictions Jimmy Carter, Sports Editor

Advantage: Arkansas The Hogs should roll to their second consecutive easy win. Quarterback Ryan Mallett and the Razorback offense will score at will and Arkansas defense gets a final confidence booster before its litmus test at Georgia the following week.

Advantage: Arkansas

ARKANSAS 41, LOUISIANA-MONROE 10

Arkansas passing offense vs. Louisiana-Monroe pass defense

Arkansas special teams vs. Louisiana-Monroe special teams

Mallett was effective passing the ball in the first game of the season, completing 21-of-24 passes for 301 yards and three touchdowns as the passing game broke off huge plays. Louisiana-Monroe only returns one starter in the secondary this season – junior safety Nate Brown. Brown is returning from a 2009 season in which he intercepted two passes and had six pass breakups. The secondary looks to be the weakest part of the Warhawk defense, a unit which allowed 16 passing touchdowns a year ago. Mallett and the Hogs’ receivers should be able to produce similar statistics to what they had last week against Tennessee Tech.

The Arkansas special teams unit was relatively quiet in the first game of the season. Only one punt was returned for seven yards by Joe Adams and two kick returns made by Dennis Johnson for a combined 50 yards. Freshman kicker Zach Hocker, who looks to have won the starting job from incumbent Alex Tejada, connected on all six of his extra point attempts. In 2009 the Warhawks did not return a punt or kick for a score. Kicker Radi Jabour is returning for his junior season and last season went 12-for-20 on field goals with a long of 48 yards. Kick returner Luther Ambrose is back from a season which he averaged nearly 22 yards per kick return. Arkansas’ special teams should get their first chance to attempt a field goal. With Johnson returning kicks the Razorbacks look to have a slight advantage.

Advantage: Arkansas

Advantage: Arkansas

Danny Meyer, Assistant Sports Editor

The Razorbacks will keep the points flowing; another 300-yard passing and multi-touchdown game for Mallett is in store. The defense will have another solid night. Louisiana-Monroe will have trouble finding any rhythm in their opening game of the season. ARKANSAS 48, LOUISIANA-MONROE 9

Jordan Grummer, Senior Staff Writer Louisiana-Monroe run offense vs. Arkansas run defense Arkansas’ defense looked improved against the outmatched Tennessee Tech offense Saturday. The Hogs only gave up 79 rushing yards in the game and the Razorbacks’ defense got consistent penetration. Moving Anthony Leon to weakside linebacker added speed to the Hogs linebackers corps. Leon had two sacks and four tacklesfor-loss against Tennessee Tech. Louisiana-Monroe running back Frank Gordon will be a bigger threat for the Hogs. He ran for1,184 yards and 13 touchdowns last season. Louisiana-Monroe has a talented offense and could see some success on the ground, but should not have the size or talent to give the Razorbacks’ major problems on the ground. Advantage: Arkansas

Arkansas coaching staff vs. Louisiana-Monroe coaching staff

ULM head coach Todd Berry is a 27-year coaching veteran, but 2010 will be his first as the Louisiana Monroe head man. He helped the guide the Warhawks to the 2005 Sun Belt Conference Championship as offensive coordinator. He was Army’s head coach from 2000-03, and in 1998 was a finalist for the Eddie Robinson award, which is awarded to the top collegiate coach at the division I-AA level. His career record is 29-60. Petrino’s offense started on a high note against Tennessee Tech and will look to put Berry’s defense to the test. Petrino improved to STAT in seasonopeners as a college coach with the win over the Golden Eagles.

The Arkansas Razorbacks cruised to an easy victory last Saturday, and the Hogs should do the same this weekin Little Rock. Lousiana-Monroe almost beat the Hogs two years ago, but expect the second team to get plenty of work again this week as the Hogs will dominate before their first real test in Athens the following week. ARKANSAS 42, LOUISIANA-MONROE 14

Zach Turner, Staff Writer

Advantage: Arkansas

from LEON on page 11 fense,” Leon said. “At linebacker, if you make a mistake, it probably won’t cost you as much as at safety, so I can just play fast. If I’m going to make a mistake, I’m going to make it fast.” Leon was listed as a starter on the Hogs’ pre-spring depth chart, but the coaching staff moved senior Rudell Crim from corner to first-team safety, again relegating Leon to back-up duty. Senior cornerback Andru Stewart was moved to safety early in fall camp, before the coaching staff made the decision to move Leon. The 6-foot-4, 227-pounder gives the Hogs added size and speed at linebacker. “I think the No. 1thing is his instincts since getting down in the box and being in-

side are really good,” Petrino said. “He sees the blocks, he’s quick and he’s physical.” Despite Leon practicing at linebacker for just two CHECK weeks, his teammates weren’t surprised by his play Saturday. “He lit the stadium up,” senior cornerback Ramon Broadway said. “He was impressive, but I wasn’t surprised.” Leon said if he had moved to linebacker he “could have probably mastered the position” already. Despite his efforts in the season-opener, he said he still has much room for improvement. “I’ve just got to keep studying the playbook,” Leon said. “I haven’t had that much time to master the position, but I’m just doing the best I can. I’m just going to try and get better every game and make more plays than I made last game – get addicted to making plays.”

The Razorbacks passing game looked flawless with quarterback Ryan Mallet under center against Tennessee Tech. The Razorbacks have never lost to Louisiana-Monroe winning all eight games they have played. If the Razorbacks defense steps up big for the second week in a row, another blowout should be in store. ARKANSAS 45, LOUISIANA-MONROE 13

Patrick Grinnan, Staff Writer

The Razorbacks will have to play better than last week to have the same sort of showing that they had against Tennessee Tech, but not much. With the offense firing on all cylinders early in the season, the ULM defense will have to play the game of their lives to stop the Hogs from scoring. The Razorbacks can’t afford to look past ULM, and will need to come out strong and continue to improve from week to week if they want to contend in the SEC West. ARKANSAS 44, LOUISIANA-MONROE 7

Bailey Elise McBride, Editor

The Razorbacks had a good game in their season-opener against Tennessee Tech last week, and should be able to come out strong in their second game against Lousiana-Monroe. Playing in War Memorial Stadium, the Hogs should be able to draw on the energy of the Little Rock crowd (at least of the people who don’t get too drunk to miss the game) and take the lead early in the first half. As long as the Hog defense can come out and perform this week, this should be an easy win for the Razorbacks.


3 WEDNESDAY, PAGE 13 WEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER8,8,2010 2010 From FOOTBALL on page 11 Johnson both fumbled on the Hogs’ first scoring drive Saturday. The Razorbacks recovered both fumbles, but Mallett threw an interception, backup Tyler Wilson was picked off and senior tight end Ben Cleveland fumbled after catching a 6-yard pass. The Razorback defense failed to force any Tennessee Tech turnovers. Arkansas ranked second in the Southeastern Conference and sixth nationally in turnover margin last year, and Petrino said the Hogs need to flip their minus-three stat line from the Tennessee Tech contest. “We’ve got to get it switched to where we’re the one creating (turnovers) and we’re the ones taking care of the football,” Petrino said. “We’re lucky we didn’t have more turnovers; we put the ball on the ground two more times, which we cannot have. That’s something that we’ll really concentrate on and make sure we take care of the football.” The Razorbacks went scoreless in the first quarter and Petrino said getting off to a fast start will be important against Louisiana-Monroe. “We don’t want to have that difficulty at first,” Petrino said. “We need to come out of the locker room and execute and do things right, right off the bat and make sure that we don’t make critical errors early in the game. We’ve got to challenge our offense to do a better job in preparing to take the field and starting fast.” The Razorbacks will be making the first of two trips to Little Rock on Saturday. “Whenever you ask about Little Rock, there’s always a smile on a guy’s face,” Mallett said. “The crowd here is awesome, but there is something different about Little Rock. The whole time you can’t really hear anything. “They are always loud and know when to cheer. They know when we have the ball not to cheer, and I think that gives us a big advantage.” Razorback defense preparing for new-look ULM The Arkansas defense has had to work overtime in preparation for the LouisianaMonroe offense, Petrino said. The Warhawks had a bye Saturday and Todd Berry will be making his head-coaching debut for the Razorbacks. Berry had served as co-offensive coordinator at UNLV alongside first-year Arkansas offensive line coach Chris Klenakis. “It’s kind of hard because when they have a new staff, we’ll be preparing for what we believe they’re going to do, but you don’t get to see their players doing it,” Petrino said. “We also went back and made highlight tapes of (Louisiana-Monroe’s) skill guys and what plays they made, so we can study the scheme and the personnel.” The Razorbacks held Tennessee Tech to just 155 yards and held an opponent to single-digit points for the first time in Petrino’s tenure at Arkansas. The effort wasn’t perfect, but Petrino said the Hogs energy and technique was solid. “We weren’t aligned correctly all the time and we missed assignments here and there,” Petrino said. “I was really happy with the way we utilized our technique. We have to continue to build on the fact that we played with great effort and sprinted to the football. “We got 10-to-11 guys to the ball a lot, so we build on the positive and correct the things we need to work on.” The Hogs last played Louisiana-Monroe in 2008 and had to rally for a 28-27 win in Petrino’s second game at Arkansas, but the coaching change means the Razorbacks

will face a different offense. “I’ve talked to Coach (Willy) Robinson, and he says that they have a lot of different tendencies this year,” junior linebacker Jerico Nelson said. “We need to communicate. We need to look at formations and recognize them faster.” Tennessee Tech quarterback Tre Lamb completed just 6-of-13 passes against the Hogs’ defense. Arkansas will try to pressure Warhawks’ redshirt freshman Kolton Browning, who will be making his first career start, Nelson said. “We always try to get the quarterback rattled early in the games, tee off on him if you can and send blitzes,” Nelson said. “Get him nervous, because once he gets a little shaky, you never know what can happen after that.” Tejada, shine on

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Hocker teams

Senior Alex Tejada wasn’t the Hogs’ placekicker against Tennessee Tech, but the Springdale product made his mark kicking off for the Razorbacks. Tejada had four touchbacks in seven kick-offs and his average kick traveled to the goalline. Arkansas didn’t record a touchback until the South Carolina contest – the Razorbacks’ eighth game – last season. “He did a really good job in the weight room and he’s bigger than he was a year ago,” Petrino said about Tejada. “He’s stronger. He worked harder on his flexibility and concentrated more on kickoffs than he did the previous summer and off season. That really showed up the first time we did kickoffs in camp, the fact that he was knocking the ball into the end zone. It wasn’t something that just happened the other night; it’s been going on the entire camp.” Freshman Zach Hocker handled the placekicking duties and hit all six of his extra point attempts. Hocker earned the starting job, despite not being in the competition at the beginning of fall camp. Tejada and freshman Eddie Camara competed for the job until the Razorback coaching staff added Hocker to the mix midway through fall camp. “We started off camp and thought it was a two-guy race for that and that Zach would compete for the punter and kickoff,” Petrino said. “He did an excellent job in kickoffs and a nice job punting the ball. I was very impressed with his demeanor and his confidence and the way he carries himself, and I thought, ‘Let’s give him an extra shot to kick extra points and field goals,’ and right from day one he’s done a really nice job.” Hocker and Tejada would have swapped duties if the Hogs had scored again, Petrino said. “We went into the game saying we didn’t want to have too many kick-offs by Tejada,” Petrino said. “There was a time a few years back (at Louisville) that we probably had one player kickoff too many times. His leg got sore and he was never the same. “We had a number in mind and once we hit that number, we were going to switch the two of them.” Quick-hitters t1FUSJOPTBJEIFXBTVOTVSF if reserve linebacker Brett Harris and senior defensive tackle Patrick Jones would be available Saturday against Louisiana-Monroe. Both were on the sideline dressed in game jersey and sweat pants during the Tennessee Tech game. Freshman defensive tackle Jeremiah Jackson saw action because Jones was unable to play, Petrino said. Jackson started fall camp at defensive end, but was moved inside. “Jeremiah’s a very, very intelligent football player,” Petrino said. “He’s very explosive inside and can use his hands. We felt like with the number of games we have left, we were not going to redshirt him. He did a good job. He was productive when he got into the game.” t1FUSJOP EFDMJOFE UP DPNment about the status of junior defensive tackle Zach Stadther. The 6-foot-1, 295-pounder started eight games last season, but wasn’t on the sideline during the Tennessee Tech game and had practiced with the scout team the week leading up to the contest. “We’ll determine (if he’s available this week) and at some point you’re going to have to understand that I’m going to talk about guys who play and practice,” Petrino said.

From OLYMPIC on page 11 of it is that we need to even out or stability and come out and finish off the weekend.” Brown, Gillespie have solid meets for Razorbacks The Arkansas women’s cross country team opened the season Friday with the 4k Arkansas Invitational against Missouri Southern. Among the standouts for Razorback coach Lance Harter’s squad were redshirt freshman Stephanie Brown and junior Kristen Gillespie. “We continue to train very aggressively,” Harter said. “We look forward to running in a race with a lot of bodies, and getting used to what we will see in some of our bigger meets. Any positive is something that you springboard with.” Brown was named the SEC Freshman of the Week. She was a quarter-mile and half-mile runner in high school and only began running cross-country once she came to the UA. “She is beginning to see that it doesn’t matter what the distance is,” Har-

ter said. “If it’s tiddlywinks or ping-pong it doesn’t matter. She’s a great competitor.” Brown is the Arkansas’ wildcard, Harter said. “Her learning curve is still in its infancy, so she is still trying to figure things out,” Harter said. “She wants to be told what the race plan is and what is realistic and she will go out and figure it out.” Gillespie is another crossover athlete for the Razorbacks cross-country team. She came to the UA with the intention of playing basketball, but changed to cross country in order to continue competing athletically. “She figured out that her future is very bright when it comes to distance running,” Harter said. “Her body is very much that of an elite distance runner and she should be a real dandy for us.” The Razorbacks’ next meet is Sept. 18 at the University of California-Riverside Invitational in Riverside, Calif. Men’s cross country opens season on strong note. The Arkansas men’s crosscountry team also started the season on a positive note in

File Photo

Senior Lane Boyer tied for second in the Arkansas Invitational on Friday.

the Arkansas Invitational 6.6k against Missouri Southern. The Razorbacks had the top 10 finishers in the event. “We are blessed with some talented mile runners, some outstanding 10k kids, and we are still young,” Coach Bucknam said. “I love the range that our kids have.” Standouts in the 10k included sophomores Eric Fernandez and Solomon Haile, who both ran less than 29 minutes last year. The Razorbacks have impressed Bucknam in prac-

tice by improving every day and showing maturity. “We have been showing toughness in training recently,” Bucknam said. “Anytime your team shows toughness it’s a good thing.” Fernandez was injured in the spring but is back training with the team. “He looks great,” Bucknam said. “It’s really encouraging having him back.” The Razorbacks next race is Sept. 18 at the Missouri Southern Stampede (8k) in Joplin, Mo.

From VOLLEYBALL on page 11 ready,” Fournier said. “After that I just kind of decided I liked this place way more.” The Redondo Beach, Calif., native started all four seasons during her prep career at South High School in Torrance, Calif. During her junior and senior years Fournier was named league MVP and also helped her team to three Pioneer League Championships. Although Fournier enjoyed her time in California growing up, she wanted to go to school somewhere out of state. After visiting Montana, Fournier liked the girls on the team and the coach and thought it was the place for her. “(Arkansas) is a way better school,” Fournier said. “The whole SEC is going to be a better challenge. It is more fun and you always play better when you are playing better teams.” Fournier’s role with the team heavily increased after incumbent starter Phoebe Bautista was sidelined with a knee injury. Fournier competed hard in practice and quickly found herself in the starting lineup for the opening match against UMKC. Fournier has totaled 88 digs for an average of 3.26 per set, entering Tuesday’s match against Oklahoma. She said she was pleased with her effort, but believes she can reach the five-digs-per-

The Razorbacks will be looking to make their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 2006.

set average Pulliza said he would like to see her achieve. “I probably want it to be higher, but that is good for the first couple weeks,” Fournier said. “I think they told me I need to average around five digs per set.” Pulliza said he was pleased with what he has seen out of his freshman libero in the first seven games of the season, attibuting it to her volleyball upbringing. “Brooke knows the game of volleyball really well,” Pulliza said. “She has been playing at a high level for a long time.” While still getting the hang of the speed and emo-

tions of the college game, Fournier put in her best effort of the season against Chattanooga on Sept 3. She finished with a team-high 22 digs and also chipped in one assist. “We are lucky to have a player like that playing that left back position,” Pulliza said. “She is a freshman, but I think she has handled the matches with great maturity.” Fournier said her passion for the game comes from playing multiple sports growing up. While at South High School, she was a two-year starter on the Spartans soccer team and was named team MVP.

File Photo

“Volleyball has been the one thing that I never get bored with,” Fournier stated. Arkansas’ goal is to make it to the NCAA Tournament, Fournier said. The Razorbacks have not been to the tournament since 2006 when they lost to Missouri St. in the opening round. Fournier’s production will go a long way in determining the outcome of the Razorback season. Pulliza said once Fournier gets more comfortable, her game will be even better. That should help Arkansas reach its goal.


WEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER8,8,2010 2010 PAGE PAGE144 WEDNESDAY,

Travis Swanson

Center, Redshirt Freshman 6-foot-5, 305 pounds Kingwood, Texas

Arkansas Traveler staff writer Zach Turner sat down with Razorback center Travis Swanson and discussed his first start and the best basketball player on the football team. You redshirted last season, how was getting back on the game field Saturday for the first time in more than a year? It felt really good getting out on the field as opposed to watching it from the stands or the sidelines you know. What were your thoughts on winning the starting job at center to start the season over incumbent starter Seth Oxner? You know it is great. It is a good feeling, but me and Seth are good friends and will stay friends. Just to know that I won it for this week, and hopefully the oncoming weeks is a good feeling. How do you think you gradout after watching your first game film? I think for my first game it was good, but obviously not what it needed to be for these next couple weeks coming up. For my first game though it was good. ed

What do you think is the biggest strength of this offensive line from the first game and going forward? Biggest strength that we have is our camaraderie. How well we play together, because we understand how each person on the line plays, which I think is a great plus. Outside of your football schedule, what do you spend the majority of your time doing? Relaxing. Just trying to relax honestly because coming to football everyday it is just so grind and intense that I like to relax. In your opinion who is the best basketball player on the Razorback football team? The best basketball player is Brandon Mitchell. Brandon Mitchell, by far. Editor’s Note: Mitchell played in four games for the Razorbacks basketball team last season. He averaged 1.3 points and 1.3 rebounds per game.

Sep. 8, 2010  

The student-run newspaper at the University of Arkansas

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