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Hogs Get Head Start page 10A PAGE 1 A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

Vol. 105, NO. 28 UATRAV.COM

Rain Closes UA for First Time by MATTIE QUINN Staff Writer

BEN FLOWERS Staff Photographer A student walks down a staircase on Old Main Lawn at the corner of Arkansas Avenue and Dickson Street after the campus closed because of flooding April 25.

After nine inches of rain hit the Northwest Arkansas area in the past three days, UA officials canceled class at 3:30 p.m. due to areas of severe flooding on campus, Fayetteville and Washington County. “We were confronted with rising water and localized flooding, which impacted the Tan, Blue and Red bus routes, because they travel the farthest away from campus,” said Mike Seither, associate director of Transit. “We sent out an operations supervisor to survey the areas, and it became obvious that travel was just going to get worse as the day went on. We then notified UA officials that there were going to be lengthy delays on those routes, but then shortly after we learned that Fayetteville officials had closed certain roads, which would

mean certain routes wouldn’t be able to run at all,” Seither said. “We didn’t feel it was fair to have students staying on campus who needed to get home, so we contacted administration to hold an emergency meeting to close the university.” Looking at issues pertaining to public safety and the ability to get to and from campus are important factors in deciding to close the UA, all of which were a problem yesterday, said John Diamond, associate director of university relations. Diamond confirmed that the UA had never before been closed due to excess rain. Once the UA closed, making sure all students who rely on buses to get home became first priority. “We sent officials up to Union Station, and from 3:305 p.m. we continued to operate services to make sure students got home. We made students

group up according to where they were going and officials would decide when buses would leave,” Seither said. “We ran on an emergency schedule and dispatched para-transit vans in addition to buses.” Housing officials saw little bits of flooding in a couple of dorms around campus. “The basement of Holcombe did flood, which was an issue that we were aware could happen before the flood, but just were not able to address in time,” said Reggie Houser, assistant director of UA housing. “Beside Holcombe and a couple of isolated rooms in Humphreys flooding, which was a great inconvinence for those girls who live there, our dorms were able to withstand the conditions very well. Our students are resilient, they can laugh about anything afterward,” Houser said. While on-campus housing remained relatively unscathed,

students living off-campus were not always as lucky. “When I got home I opened my bedroom door and I realized it must have been flooding because it smelled awful. At that point the closet, and all of my shoes, were completely soaked,” said senior Sheli Grooms, who lives in an apartment off Garland Avenue. “When it finally stopped raining the water stopped coming in the kitchen, but by then the water in the bedroom had spread to pretty much the entire room. I now have to move everything except my bed out of my room so that the carpet can dry.” Even those who did not have damaged homes were taught the dangers of traveling during floods. “Going home I had to take

see FLOOD on page 2A

Major Issues Change with Student Body ASG Senate Passes by SABA NASEEM Staff Writer

Just as students come and go, fashions regularly change and people go from wearing Livestrong Bracelets to Silly Bandz, major issues on campus come and go. What were once major issues on campus eventually die down and become part of campus life. Three years ago, the UA banned tobacco on campus. Two years later, the state prohibited smoking on campus through the Clean Air on Campus Act. Smokers were enraged and even some non-smokers fought for the individual rights of smokers. One year later, however, the talk has died down and the university rarely receives complaints from students, said Daniel Pugh, dean of student affairs. The question now is whether the law has been effective. The reason for the ban is to help mitigate the health risks posed by second-hand smoke on campuses across Arkansas, according to the law. “We’ll definitely see a curb in those few people who violate the policy, because now there’s a fine attached and that hits people in their pocketbooks,” said Scott Flanagin, in a 2010 interview. Flanagin is the director of communications and outreach for the division of student affairs.

There has been a considerable decrease of smoking on campus, said UAPD Lt. Gary Crain. “Last semester we only had to give out four or five citations and received around 19 complaints,” he said. However, in an interview in August of 2010, health officials said that the UA community was missing the point of the policy. “I think that people are taking more the letter of the law rather than the spirit of the law,” said Susan Rausch, health educator at the pat Walker Health Center and co-chair of the FRESH committee. The FRESH committee educates students on the tobacco policy and strives to help people lose the smoking habit. Students and staff who want to smoke now tend to go across the street to get off of school property, Pugh said. This, however, creates problems for the community. There have been complaints from community members about students who smoke on sidewalks where children going to school need to walk. One such area is the sidewalk in front of the Sunshine Place Apartments, next to Leverett Elementary School. “We have to send housing staff there to clean up the mess people leave behind,” Pugh said. Another issue is enrollment, which brings many other con-

Gender-Blind Housing by MATTIE QUINN Staff Writer

SARAH CHAMPAGNE Photo Editor Students take a smoke break Sunday night after long hours of studying. Once a contentious issue, the debate about smoking on campus has died down. cerns such as housing, parking and classroom size into the picture. In 2007, there were 18,648 students enrolled, in 2008 there were 19,194, in 2009 there were 19,849 and in 2010 there were 21,405. While, the numbers have been steadily increasing since 1999, according to the office of institutional research reports, the general trend ranges from 500 to 700 added each year. However, last year, student enrollment increased by 1,556 students, more than twice the average. In 2008, when enrollment hit 19,000, an increase in traffic was noticed on campus, especially in regard to scooters and bicycles, said Andy Gilbride, program advisor at the UA Transit and Park-

ing Department. In 2008, students using scooters were required to purchase permits and were only allowed to park in allocated scooter parking locations. By the next year, the Parking Department had seen an almost 300 percent increase in scooter and motorcycle permit purchase and added scooter parking areas across campus to accommodate this increase. In 2009, a surge of bicyclists led to Parking Department officials requiring permits for bicycles. They “wanted to figure out where the bicycles are and how many there are so we can get

see ISSUES on page 3A

Staff Writer

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011 VOL. 105, NO. 28 UATRAV.COM

WEATHER FORECAST

TODAY 56°

THURSDAY 67°

see ASG on page 3A

Drug Arrests Increase with Student Population by HAILEY RAY

ANDREW HAGOOD Staff Photographer Sgt. Aaron Mahan of UAPD talks to a driver involved in a traffic stop Friday afternoon in front of UAPD headquarters. With an increased student population expected, crime at the UA is expected to increase proportionally, officials said.

Amid concern and praise, the Residents’ Interhall Congress and Associated Student Government passed a bill that will begin investigation of the possibility of gender-blind housing at the UA, which would allow students to live with whomever they wanted, no matter the gender. “The idea of the bill came about two years ago from RIC Sen. William Hogan. It’s been something we’ve been talking and thinking about since then, and we just decided that we needed to be proactive,” said Kaleb Cox, co-author of the resolution and former RIC president. “So we finally wrote the resolution and have brought it forth for the students to see what they think.” Despite being located in what is considered by some a socially conservative state, the UA seems to be on track with other colleges and universities around the nation with the gender-blind housing trend. “Most of the talk of genderblind housing started in 2008, and has been growing rapidly ever since. So we are not exactly trailblazers, but we are not lagging behind the rest of the nation either,” Cox said. Many colleges and universi-

ties across the nation that have adopted gender-blind housing, though they all have approached the subject in different ways. “At Harvard it is only open to trans-gender students, at Michigan it is treated as a case-by-case basis and at George Washington University it is open to everyone, for example,” Cox said. “Personally I would like to see it open to everyone, but how realistic that is, I don’t know. We don’t have to make that giant leap just yet, really any kind of progression in this area is good progression.” The newly-elected RIC executive board for the 20112012 school year is also planning on pushing for the bill to become a reality for students. “Why is it that our freshman year we can’t have anyone we choose be our roommates, but the second we move off-campus we have that freedom?” said Cameron Mussar, newly-elected president of RIC. “People who are afraid of this resolution coming into effect need to realize that even if students have the option, most students are still going to live with someone of the same sex.” Other students found the idea of gender-blind housing a step in the right direction.

Although the number of thefts on campus remained consistent during the last year, other types of crime have seen dramatic increases, according to UAPD records. In the fall semester, only three more thefts were reported than in the previous year, and this semester’s average is almost one less theft per week than the spring 2010 semester, according to UAPD crime logs. Theft is consistently the most common crime on campus. “That never changes,” said UAPD Lt. Gary Crain. “Most are crimes of opportunity,

FRIDAY 77°

WEEKEND 67°

[residence hall doors] are left open, students leave items unattended.” Burglaries were almost twice as common last semester than the previous year, however this semester shows a decrease in burglaries so far. The amount of crime from year to year is pretty steady, Crain said. “Raising the student population by a 1,000 or 1,500 students doesn’t mean you’re getting 1,000 crooks.” Because of societal norms, this will add very few people who would commit crimes, he said. The undergraduate population increased by 1,412 students, almost nine percent, according to the university’s reports for the 2009-2010 school year, and the 2010-2011 school year. Arrests for possession of controlled substances, commonly marijuana, showed a sharp increase this school year. Fall 2010 had 40 arrests, while

the previous fall only had 12. This semester has already surpassed the 22 arrests in spring 2010 with 36 arrests. The number of Driving Under the Influence/Driving While Intoxicated arrests also decreased in both semesters this year, and 23 arrests have been made so far this spring compared to 51 arrests in spring 2010. Public intoxication arrests have also increased. Fall arrests increased from 82 to 99 this year, and spring arrests have been slightly more common on average. “More crimes occur when alcohol is involved,” Crain said. “People make poor decisions when they drink too much.” Students can protect themselves by avoiding drinking too much, and avoiding others who drink too much.

see CRIME on page 5A


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011 PAGE 2A

PROFILES FROM THE HILL

A Conversation with Benjamin Grob-Fitzgibbon by KRISTEN COPPOLA Staff Writer

Benjamin Grob-Fitzgibbon is in the midst of an eventful 2011. This summer will mark the release of his third book and his fourth year as a professor at the UA. With his deep love for history, FitzGibbon is making waves with the fresh perspective provided in “Imperial Endgame: Britain’s Dirty Wars and the End of Empire.” Q: How did you end up at the UA? A: When I finished my Ph.D. at Duke, I did a national job search, and the criteria for that job search was I wanted to be at a research university. It was my preference to be at a state university, and I wanted a university that would allow me to both continue my research and provide and excellence in teaching. The UA seemed to fit that bill. Q: Where are you from originally? A: I’m originally from the United Kingdom. I was born in a little seaside town called Blackpool, which is just outside of Manchester in the Northwest of England, but I grew up in the northeast of England in a county called Northumberland where Newcastle is. Q: Why did you come to do studies in America? A: I moved to the United States before I went to Duke. My parents moved over when I was in my last year of high school, so I came up with them to upstate New York. Q: book

When be

will your released?

A: It will be released in two weeks on May 6 in the U.K., and July 18 in the U.S.

from FLOOD on page 1A several detours and so my car only had to travel through a couple of inches of water. I have still never seen so much rain and never witnessed a flood before, so this was a whole new experience for me,” said junior Sarah Mattingly. “It is definitely

Q: What is your latest book about?

ABOUT THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

A: It’s a book that I’ve been working on for the past threeand-a-half years. I originally conceived [the idea] my first semester here. The book is looking at the end of the British Empire at British de-colonization and in particular at the various insurgencies and counterinsurgencies that occurred at the end of empire.

The Arkansas Traveler, the student newspaper at the University of Arkansas, is published every Wednesday during the fall and spring academic sessions except during exam periods and university holidays. Opinions expressed in signed columns are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Traveler. The editor makes all final content decisions. One copy of The Arkansas Traveler is free to every member of the UA community. Additional copies can be purchased for 50 cents each. Mail subscriptions for delivery within the continental United States can be purchased for $125.00 per semester. Contact the Traveler Business Manager to arrange.

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Q: What was the most interesting thing that you discovered while researching for your book? A: I think in some ways the most interesting thing I discovered was how closely the events of the present day - what we’re currently experiencing in Iraq and Afghanistan and even today in Libya – how closely those mirrored the events in the end of the British Empire in Palestine, Kenya, and Cypress. The parallels between ideology, between action, and even between rhetoric to a certain extent are surprisingly similar. Q: What sparked your interest in history?

119 Kimpel Hall University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR 72701 479.575.3406 [main] 479.575.3306 [fax] traveler@uark.edu

SERGIO MALDANALDO Staff Photographer Benjamin Grob-Fitzgibbon is pictured in his office. Fitzgibbon recently finished a book titled “Imperial Endgame: Britain’s Dirty Wars and the End of Empire.” British culture, in British heritage and in the British landscape. When I moved to the U.S. when I was 16, I turned that instinctive interest into an actual academic interest. Q: What do you teach?

A: In some ways I’ve always been interested in history ever since being a small child. My parents were card-carrying members of two organizations in the U.K., one called the National Trust and one called English Heritage. These are two organizations which owned a lot of the stately homes, a lot of the gardens and a lot of sites in the U.K. We would spend the weekends at various stately homes and gardens, not so much for the history, but to play hide and seek, to run around and to let us little ones blow off some steam. Because of that I became very steeped not just in British history, but also in

A: My teaching load currently is split between two programs; the history department and the international relations department, which I’ve been working with for about the past year. Each semester I teach the international relations seminar, which is the core course required for all international relation seniors before they graduate. In the history department I teach a two-year sequence in British history.

something I will remember for a while and use it as a reminder for myself to not take risks driving in high water. Once I made it home I didn’t dare go back out for the rest of the day.” While the flooding claimed the lives of five people in Northwest Arkansas, UAPD did not have an issue with people around campus.

“Our involvement in a situation like this is responding to people who are unable to get around campus, but thankfully we didn’t get called to rescue anyone,” said Lt. Gary Crain for the UAPD. The UA has an inclement weather alert that Diamond encourages students to stay opted into.

Q: What were your previous books about? A: The very first book I wrote was called The Irish Experience

within the Second World War, and it actually developed from my undergraduate honors thesis. I had studied in Ireland for a little bit as an undergraduate and for my undergraduate honors thesis I had done an oral history of the Irish experience during the Second World War. The second book I wrote was based on my doctoral dissertation, and that one was called “Turning Points of the Irish Revolution: the British Government, Intelligence and the Cost of Indifference.” I essentially argued that it was a huge intelligence failure and that a lot of that violence could have been prevented. Q: Who is your favorite composer? A: Elgar. I like “Nimrod” and “Chanson de Matin.” “We discourage people from opting out of our inclement weather alerts, because it allows students to get sufficient warning when severe weather is in the area,” Diamond said. For student photos of flooding around campus and Fayetteville, visit uatrav.com

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CAMPUS NUMBERS NEED EMERGENCY HELP? CALL UAPD 575-2222

The women and men of the University of Arkansas Police Department, in partnership with the community, are committed to protecting the future of Arkansas by promoting a safe and secure environment.

HAVE A TICKET? CALL 575-7275 TO RESOLVE IT

The Transit and Parking office handles parking permits and passes and transit for students, including bus routes and GoLoco Ride Sharing. Students with parking violations can contact the office to appeal their citation.

NEED A RIDE AT NIGHT? CALL 575 - 7233

Otherwise known as 575-SAFE, the mission of the Safe Ride program is to provide students with a safe means of transportation from any uncomfortable or inconvenient situation. Safe Ride brings you home safely.

NEED TICKETS? CALL 1-800-982-4647

Don’t forget to call early and reserve your student football tickets for the 2010-2011 season. The ticket office is located on Razorback Road next to Baum Stadium.


PAGE 3A

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

Hog’s Head Invitational Quidditch Tournament

COURTESY PHOTO Chasers for Rhodes College play in the UA Quidditch Club’s first tournament on April 16. Teams from Louisiana State University, Texas Christian University, Oklahoma City University, Kansas University, Rhodes College and Hendrix College traveled to Fayetteville to particpate. LSU took top honors.

Series of Events Planned for Week of Dalai Lama Visit by MATTIE QUINN Staff Writer

A multitude of Tibetan cultural events are planned beginning May 4, one week before the Dalai Lama delivers his lecture in Barnhill Arena and UA officials are working to ensure things go smoothly. On May 4 there will be a Mandala opening ceremony in the Walton Reading Room in Mullins Library, which marks the beginning of the creation of the Mandala. An exhibition of Tibetan artifacts, photographs and the completed Mandala will be on display May 5. The Mandala is a sacred design made with colored sand by Tibetan monks, and often represents the most important tenets of Tibetan culture. The

monks designing the Mandala are from the Drepung Loseling Monastery, and will also create a butter sculpture on May 6 in the Walton Reading Room. The monks will perform for audiences on May 6 at 7 p.m. in the Verizon Wireless Ballroom in the Union and from 6:30 a.m. to noon on May 7 at the Fayetteville Town Center. A potluck picnic will be held on the afternoon of May 8 at Wilson Park. Anyone is welcome to join and bring food to share with other picnic goers. On May 9 at 6:30 p.m. there will be a lecture on the Tibetan exile in Giffels Auditorium in Old Main. To wrap up the festivities on May 12, the day after His Holiness speaks at the Walton Arts Center, the monks will sweep up the Mandala

and distribute half of the sand to the audience and the remaining half to Scull Creek. Tickets for the keynote address are sold out, and plans fell through for a means of recycling tickets for those who decide against using their own. “[The Dean of Students Office] was more concerned about student money and it being a conflict or not using a resource that students had paid for,” said Patsy Watkins, a journalism professor who helped with the potential ticket exchange. “We decided that made sense, and we weren’t going to push for it.” Though ticket exchange program will not be available, Sidney Burris, co-chair

see DALAI on page 5A

from ASG on page 1A “Not only does it benefit gay and transgender students, it also is beneficial for opposite sex relatives and those who feel more comfortable living with the opposite sex. Living with someone uncomfortable with your sexuality or gender can be incredibly stressful and awkward,” said sophomore Camille Wallace. While the bill was passed in both RIC and ASG, the resolution is still non-binding. “It requests that the administration begin investigating the requirement for such a policy to become a reality here at the University of Arkansas. As far as a timeline for implementation, we are most likely looking at a multiyear timeframe,” Cox said. All we authorize with this legislation is that someone should advocate on behalf of ASG, said ASG Sen. Tammy Lippert.

from ISSUES on page 1A more parking, keep them from parking in the wrong spot and keep them from tearing up the landscape,” Gilbride said in an interview in 2009. Two years later, students are generally complying with the bicycle permit rule, Gilbride said. As student, bicycle and scooter traffic increases on campus, so does the number of cars and the need for parking. In 2005, the university opened the Harmon Avenue Parking Garage, which cost approximately $29 million and has 2,149 parking spaces. “At that time people criticized the size of the garage, saying it was too big and a waste of money,” Gilbride said. “Now it’s perfect and we’re glad we looked ahead and built it.” As enrollment continued to increase the university invested in another parking deck — the Garland Parking Garage — that cost a total $26,082,633 to build. Although 2008 was a time when many people were suffering because of the economic

ASG members passed their gender-blind bill approximately two weeks after RIC members passed their version. We felt that it [ASG senate passing the legislation] would be a good gesture of support and continue the relationship between ASG and RIC, Hogan said. ASG’s representative for the talks will be their liaison to RIC, the RIC VicePresident Tyler Priest. During the debate, an amendment was proposed to change the bill to ASG’s support of exploring gender-blind housing, but not supporting gender-blind housing until the final details of the policy were known. The amendment failed. The bill shows student support for the idea, but does not guarantee support from the administrative side. “Due to the nature of the investigation, it is difficult to ascertain exactly how long it will

take for the administration to fully investigate this policy and then enact it; or if the university will choose to address this issue at all,” Cox said. Mussar supports the bill because it lets students make their own adult decisions, he said. “When we get to college we are considered adults and are making a lot of our own decisions, but then we have to live on campus as freshman and then on top of that we can’t live with whoever we want? This resolution gives students a voice,” Mussar said. Making sure students feel comfortable in their own space is a large reason students have decided to support the bill. “This isn’t a matter of living with someone for romantic reasons; students should feel safe, unjudged, and comfortable within their dorm room,” Wallace said. Jordain Carney contributed reporting to this story.

recession and many continue to suffer, the UA has aimed to make college finances manageable for students, Pugh said. From 2009 to 2010, there was no tuition increase, according to the Office of Institutional Research reports. Since 2008, there has not been more than a 5 percent increase in tuition and fees at the university. Also, instead of cutting salaries and losing staff and faculty, the UA has worked to retain the numbers in the last couple of years and this year the UA hired new faculty to accommodate for the increasing number of students. “We are trying to keep this place as low-cost as possible,” Pugh said. “We are keeping housing rates low, we are providing more financial aid to students, and we actually had a salary raise for faculty for the first time in three years.” Another issue that arises seasonally is the flu. In 2009, the swine flu outbreak hit the UA campus, bringing in hundreds of flu cases. “We knew it was coming the summer of ‘09,” said Mary Al-

ice Serafini, director of the Pat Walker Health Center. “That fall was the most flu cases we have ever had and it had a big impact on students’ academic lives,” she said. “However, it died out by the Spring of 2010.” In the fall of 2008, health officials gave more than 1,000 doses of vaccine for the swine flu and dealt with more than 600 flu contacts, she said. The spring of 2010 only brought 81 flu cases. Serafini also identified chlamydia as an increasing trend among students. “Chlamydia has always been a problem, but we’ve seen an increase in cases in the last year,” she said. Serafini did not identify any specific reasons for this increase. Students identified parking as the biggest issue on campus, they said. “Receiving tickets is so common, it almost seems like a rite of passage for students on campus,” said Billy Fleming, president of the Associated Student Government.


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

You can check out the Traveler online at uatrav.com or by scanning here:

PAGE 4A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Thank you for a great magazine with great articles. I found us discussing the articles and commenting on how well written it was. It certainly showcased the writing skills of the authors. In “Ain’t Nobody Normal” you had me in the first two paragraphs. I wanted to know Dr. Linda Ford and thoroughly enjoyed her edgy practice (a bit too much colorful language – slightly overdone). My other favorite article is The Tyson Faith Initiative. I didn’t know that Tyson Foods had a Faith Program and find it admirable. They now have my complete loyalty because of their excellent product and their employee care — primarily in the area of Faith. It was interesting reading about the inception of the program and its evolution, thanks to John Tyson, into an important part of the benefit package they offer employees. Kudos! PENNY MCGEE UA Altheimer Laboratory I am writing in response to the editorial written last week under the title, “From the Board.” Because it was an editorial, I cannot refute the opinions expressed. However, I would like to defend my organization because false information was presented as being factual. After reading last week’s editorial, my first thought was that some light needed to be shed on how the Office of Student Activities is organized. The largest mistake that the editorial made was that it grouped the three branches of the OSA into one office and called them all “University Programs.” The three OSA branches are Distinguished Lectures Committee, Headliners Concerts Committee, and UP. These three different branches have very different mission statements. The mission statement put foreword by UP’s constitution is as follows: “The purpose of University Programs shall be two-fold: 1) to provide a balanced schedule of diverse cultural, social, educational and recreational events for the enjoyment and benefit of the university community by making wise use of the allocated student activity fee; and 2) to provide the opportunity for student development and leadership through the initiation of these events.” I have been with UP for three years and I am currently the president of the organization. I can assure you that my organization is making constant strides toward improving the variety of events held, and that we stand by the chancellor’s slogan, “Students First.” This year UP has been actively surveying students at our events to see what they would like us to bring with their student fees, however, our surveys have nothing to do with Headliner Concerts or Distinguished Lectures events. My organization coordinates over 200 on-campus events throughout the year and our events are designed to cater to a large variety of students. I hope that students who read this realize all of the efforts that our university has made to keep students entertained, and the even greater effort to create a culturally educated student body. I also hope that students understand the willingness of their university to listen to their opinions. OSA is located on the sixth floor of the Student Union in room A683, and I encourage anyone wanting to share their input to stop by and talk to us or email me at uppres@uark.edu. MATTHEW CHAVEZ University Programs, President

Thanks For A Great Year, ASG

Letter from the Editor

Bailey Elise McBride

traveler@uark.edu In the interest of fulfilling our duty as the fourth branch of government, we at the Traveler don’t shy away from criticizing the members of the Associated Student Government when they don’t do their best to serve the student body or fail to address an issue that is of significant student concern. It is also our duty, however, to commend the ASG when they do good, and for that reason, we offer a sincere thank you to ASG President Billy Fleming, the rest of his

by Jody Barbaree Opinion Writer

Just the other day I caught myself talking in complete sentences, pronouncing words without the hint of a southern twang, and using so few contractions I didn’t even recognize my own voice. Being from south Arkansas this is all very new to me. My southern accent has been pointed out on several occasions, but since I’ve been in college it seems as though it has partially disappeared. My roommate on the other hand is from Little Rock. It may not seem far from south Arkansas, but when it comes to grammar and accent, it’s a long way from home. But what does this mean? I came to the conclusion that being around my roommate and communicating with him on

Samantha Williams

Nick DeMoss The Arkansas Traveler welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be at most 300 words and include your name, student classification and major or title with the university and a day-time telephone number for verification. Letters to the editor can be sent to traveler@uark.edu. Letters are edited for grammar and length, not content.

was just one example of how the ASG has worked to really gauge what students want and release that information to officials across campus and to us at the Traveler. This year has also represented, in my opinion, a new level of transparency between the various members of the ASG and student media. Besides continuing our normal news coverage and live blogs of the ASG senate meetings this year, we have been informed well in advance of a number of events and initiatives, and invited to meetings we were not welcomed to before. Professors and advisors with much more institutional knowledge than I often speak of the hostile relationship the ASG and the Traveler have had in the past, but I can say without question that that is not the experience I have had, and I really appreciate being allowed to concentrate on delivering news rather than fighting petty battles. President Fleming mentioned many of the other impressive accomplishments of

the ASG last week: the development of student advocates to lobby for student rights on the state and national level, the implementation of earth tubs to continue campus sustainability efforts, the promotion of volunteer opportunities such as the literacy outreach initiative and the endowment of programs like Safe Ride and a scholarship to benefit students who might not otherwise be able to fund their education. This year’s ASG officers, senators and cabinet members have set the bar high, and left a number of initiatives just short of completion (because honestly, who ever gets to fulfill all of their campaign promises). Michael Dodd and Lauren Waldrip, the incoming president and vice president, respectively, have big shoes to fill. If they can work to continue the work started this year, in addition to implementing their ideas for the campus, the student body is in store for another good year.

a day-to-day basis over the past two semesters has had a profound effect on the way I talk. When you’re around someone for a long time you start picking up things they say or do whether you realize it or not. In college, your roommate has a bigger influence on who you are and how you act then you probably ever imagined. Multiple studies have shown that living with a roommate can have several good and bad consequences. Nicholas A. Christakis, a co-author of “Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives,” said in an interview with The New York Times that for each “happy friend” a person has their probability of being happy increases by 9 percent. Conversely, each “unhappy friend” decreases one’s probability of being happy by 7 percent.

It’s not surprising that a roommate can have such a strong impact on your mood. When you are constantly interacting with someone, it’s natural to begin mirroring the same internal emotions. Not only can they influence your mood, but they can affect your grades too. Researchers at the University of Western Ontario found that students whose roommates played video games had grade-points that were an average of 0.2 lower than students with nongamer roommates. They also tended to study a halfhour less per day than students with roommates who didn’t play video games. Still not convinced that who you live with actually matters? Take a look at one more study conducted by Harvard University that showed a non-binge drinker was more likely to binge when paired with a drinker,

and also get poorer grades. Pair two heavy drinkers together and their grades are two-thirds of a point lower. For students rounding off the school year, the next thing on the agenda is applying for a dorm, finding a house, or getting an apartment for next year. This is not a small step that should be taken lightly, especially when it comes to choosing who you will live with. Remember that your new housemate is more than just someone to pay half the rent or help with the chores. They have the potential to affect your grades, your behavior and your overall wellbeing. Step back and ask yourself if your potential roommate is someone who will make you a better version of yourself. If so, then you’re on the right track. But if not, you should reconsider who you surround yourself with. Make sure they are a reflection of who you want to be.

FROM THE BOARD

Bailey Elise McBride Mille Appleton

executive cabinet and the ASG senate for the work they have done this past year. Starting off with an unusually seamless transition, this administration has done a great job from Day 1 scouring all populations on campus to make the ASG as inclusive as possible and working with administrators across campus on a variety of initiatives to make the campus a better place. During the past two semesters, we have specifically been impressed by a couple of initiatives. First, although the student poll was conceived under Carter Ford’s presidency in 2009-2010, this year the ASG seems to have finally figured out the process of question vetting and the release of results so that it can occur in a timely manner. This timely release of information allows the current administration to act on what students want during their administration, and not push student concerns off to another year and another administration. This

You Are Who You Live With

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR OPINION EDITOR NEWS EDITOR

Courtesy MCT Campus

Anna Salomaa STAFF CARTOONIST

EDITOR: Bailey Elise McBride MANAGING EDITOR: Mille Appleton

In the April 20 issue of the Traveler, our editorial board published a critique of University Programs, the Headliner Concert Committee and the Distinguished Lectures Committee, that regrettably contained a few errors. At the Traveler, we strive for accuracy and hold our

staff to the highest journalistic standards. We would like to issue a retraction and apologize for the following mistakes. Last year HCC brought Third Eye Blind and not O.A.R. Additionally, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and financier T. Boone Pickens were not part of the Distinguished

Lecture Series. O’Connor served as the keynote speaker at the dedication of the law school, while Pickens was sponsored by the Sam M. Walton College of Business. The article also stated that UP distributes surveys at their events to gauge student interest in upcoming performers and speakers. However, HCC

distributes their own surveys, not UP. This information was obtained from aformer member of UP and was unfortunately misinterpreted by the Traveler. We would also like to clarify that the Dalai Lama is being welcomed by the DLC and not UP.


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

from CRIME on page 1A “A high percentage, maybe 75 to 80 percent involve alcohol somehow,” Crain said. Students can also protect themselves from crimes by avoiding other dangerous situations and planning ahead, Crain said. Avoid walking alone at night, call a friend or a service such as Safe Ride or Night Owl, he said. “I feel safe during the day but not at night, especially when it’s really dark outside,” said freshman Hayley Scholes. “[That’s why] I love Razorback Patrol. It’s a great program.” “Some people think that by talking on the phone, they’re safe. It can alert someone that something is going on, but it

takes time [for them to contact help]. A person should not be so distracted by their phone call that they don’t notice what is going on,” Crain said. “Students can call UAPD and have a car sent by. No one will bother you with a cop car around.” Most recently, taillight assemblies were stolen from several Chevy Silverados and GMC Sierras parked in lots 72, 73 and 46 along Razorback Road. The UAPD has stepped up surveillance and patrols in the area, Crain said. He urged drivers to check on their vehicles frequently. “You can’t go days without checking [on your car.]” Although most students feel safe on campus, many students had their confidence shaken in November, when a

student who had been working late at Kimpel reported that someone attacked her when she left. “That changed my habits and behaviors of walking or running alone at night,” said Kirsten Steusser, a junior premed student. “I had been running in that area earlier that night. It is comforting to know that UAPD is there whenever you need them. During the day campus seems safe and inviting, while under the cover of night a blue light is a beacon of reassurance.” Crain encouraged anyone on campus to call UAPD if they see any suspicious persons or activity. The department can be reached at 575-2222, or they can call 911 and the dispatcher will transfer

their call. “If you see someone lurking around an area, being suspicious, call the police,” Crain said. “We would like to be notified, we can find out who they are, and why they are in that area.” If students think they are being followed at night, they should contact a dispatcher through one of the blue information poles around campus, Crain said. “The dispatcher knows exactly where you are… If you’re being followed by someone, push the button, stay and talk. If they continue to advance, tell the dispatcher… ‘I’m gonna head to the chemistry building’ or ‘I’m gonna go to the library,’ so they will know and be able to send an officer.”

see DALAI on page 5A of the Dalai Lama committee, does not believe that it will be an issue and that most everyone who has a ticket will use it, he said. Those who were not able to obtain a ticket to the lecture may get a ticket to the morning panel. “Only two other people are on the panel, so you’re going to hear the Dalai Lama talk a lot,” Burris said. “I think it will be a revealing session because you’ll be able to see the Dalai Lama interact with other people.” Tickets are still available for the panel, but are expected to sell out. Those interested can get a ticket from the

Walton Arts Center. The panel is called “Turning Swords into Ploughshares: The Many Paths of Non-Violence”, and will last from 9:30 to 11 a.m. and doors will open at 7 a.m. “Everything is going as smoothly as one might expect only a few weeks out from such a large event,” Burris said. “You have to arrange for everything from his accommodation to his security to ticket design to program design.” Even with so much on the plates of members of the committee, they are making progress with help from numerous volunteers. “Right now, we’ve gotten so many offers to help – a list a mile long,” Burris said. More information is available at DalaiLama.uark.edu.

Commencement Preparations Underway for May Ceremony by LIBBI STURM Staff Writer

Preparations for the 2011 All-University Commencement have been different than in the past because the Dalai Lama’s keynote address will take place in Bud Walton Arena the same week. “The Dalai Lama actually makes our preparations easier this year,” said UA Registrar Dave Dawson. The change, he said, is nice because the stage, seating and other setup will already be done by a production company. “We will go in Thursday, May 12 to finish the physical set up but will leave most of what was used for the Dalai Lama the same,” said Ruth Hirsch, assistant to the registrar. The rehearsal for graduate students will then take place on Friday, May 13. The process to prepare for commencement began in November at the end of the fall semester, Dawson said. Graduation is a campus-wide effort, including involvement from sectors ranging from Parking and Transit to UATV. What’s left to do in the next couple of weeks is

to coordinate all of the elements, he said. Logistics like organizing the faculty members who will be marshals and banner carriers are still to be done, along with the final edits and publishing of the program. “We are still communicating details to some of the honorary degree recipients,” Dawson said, “and the chancellor is writing his speech.” But other elements of the ceremony, such as Schola Cantorum and the Wind Symphony, will not be difficult to bring together at the end, Dawson said, because they are so experienced that it will be a smooth process. Senior English/Journalism Major Tyler McBride said although he is not looking forward to the long graduation ceremonies or trying to figure out what to do with his degree, he is excited about earning his degree. “It will feel so great to finally have that piece of paper,” he said. “It feels like all of my time over the past few years has led up to this single moment.” Four years have gone by fast for Emily Hanzlik, who is grad-

uating with a degree in biology. “I cannot believe it’s time to graduate,” she said. “It will be bittersweet as all the people you have met during the past four years go their separate ways to new things.” But Clay Mohr, graduating with a degree in accounting said, “While some people might consider it bittersweet or even sad, I can’t wait to start my life beyond college.” Mohr said he’s going to be so busy in the days leading up to the ceremonies, he won’t really have time to think much about it. On the day of graduation, it’s important for students to be aware that there are no decorations allowed on robes or on mortar boards, Dawson said, and that all cell phones should remain off throughout the ceremony. Students should also remember, Dawson said, to inform their guests about certain rules and procedures that are in effect that day. Strollers and umbrellas must be left outside of the arena. Wrapped presents are also not allowed, and any bags or purses will be checked as a security

measure. Dawson said that to ensure the day goes smoothly, students and their guests should be aware of parking information ahead of time by visiting the Parking and Transit Web site at http://parking.uark.edu/234.php. Those participating in the All-University Commencement should arrive at Bud Walton arena no later than 8:00 a.m. Saturday morning and should be prepared to stay through the duration of the program, which will be over by 11:45 a.m. Undergraduates will not be individually recognized at the All-University Commencement, but the colleges are hosting six individual ceremonies throughout the day May 14 where undergraduates will receive individual honors. Details about these ceremonies can be found at www.uark. edu/home/commencement, and questions should be directed to the individual colleges. Seniors will receive an email outlining specific instructions for graduation day, including information about golf carts transport and parking for disabled guests.

Commencement Schedule for Each College Sam M. Walton College of Business 12:30 p.m. in Barnhill Arena Fay Jones School of Architecture 1:00 p.m. in the Arkansas Union Ballroom J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences 1:00 p.m. in Bud Walton Arena College of Engineering 3:30 p.m. in Barnhill Arena College of Education and Health Professions 4:00 p.m. in Bud Walton Arena Dale Bumpers College of Agriculture, Food and Life Sciences 6:30 p.m. Barnhill Arena The School of Law will host its graduation ceremony May 21 at 2:00 p.m. at the Fayetteville Town Center.


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

You can check out the Traveler online at uatrav.com or by scanning here:

PAGE 6A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

FEATURES EDITOR: Lindsey Pruitt ASST. FEATURES EDITOR: Erin Robertson

Glitz Doesn’t Always Follow Rich

Local Project Helps Fayetteville Teens Afford Prom by EMILY POTTS Staff Writer

Emily Potts STAFF WRITER

UA student Alexa Eddy gathers formal dresses and shoes to donate to the Fayetteville High School Glass Slipper Project during their last weeks before prom.

UA students can grant a wish for Fayetteville High School girls unable to attend prom this year through the “Glass Slipper Project.” The “Glass Slipper Project,” a national organization that founded a local program in Northwest Arkansas in 2006, attempts to ensure that girls who are financially incapable of attending prom have the opportunity to enjoy their special night. “The organization provides the perfect prom for low-income, homeless or ‘at risk’ girls at Fayetteville High School,” said Jenny Higgs, Panhellenic vice president of community relations. Through donations, and volunteer work, the project collects gently-used prom dresses, handbags, jewelry and shoes and gives them to girls who would otherwise not have the funds to participate in the prom festivities, Higgs said. The girls are nominated by teachers, counselors and others, and can also ask to be invited into the “Glass Slipper” program. “The girls are sent an invitation and have the choice to R.S.V.P. yes or no. Those who reply yes are given a personal shopping day each Saturday in April,” Higgs said. “Once the girls show up,

they get to pick out their dress and accessories,” she said. The personal shopping day is only the beginning for the girls. “On prom day, which is May 7 this year, they come back and get their hair and makeup done by stylists and volunteers who help to get everything ready for prom,” Higgs said. Headed by Director Marian Riner and Co-Director Shay Hopper, the program “provides a unique opportunity for Fayetteville High School students where one might not otherwise exist.” In addition to outside donations and volunteers, several UA sororities decided to donate to the project. “Through talking to girls in Chi Omega, we donated several dresses and formal shoes to the Glass Slipper Project,” said Caitlin Lamb, sophomore and Chi Omega member. “The program is great because it is a way for people to directly give back to women in the community. Prom is a milestone in a girls life, and everyone should be able to go regardless of cost.” Experiencing huge growth in the past few years, the “Glass Slipper Project” hopes to soon cover helping girls attend Homecoming, Higgs said. “Last year, we served more than 70 girls, and this year it is even more. The program

grows larger every single year.” Donations are taken yearround and can be dropped off at the program location or to program directors, and contact information can be found on the local “Glass Slipper” Facebook page. “This year especially, we need modern, plus-size dresses as well as small things like deodorant, bobby pins and nail polish,” said Higgs. Through spreading the word around chapters, the UA Panhellenic Council donated more than 200 dresses, 20 handbags and several other accessories over the span of a month, Higgs said. UA Panhellenic Council also offered an extra opportunity for participants this year, donating a limo ride for one girl and eight of her friends. “As women, we deal with empowerment and the project goes a lot deeper than just sending girls to prom,” Higgs said. “These girls may have never received help and by being a part of the program, we can make them feel important and build their self-esteem.” “For many girls, the project tells them that they deserve to be treated like women and have their special night.” Higgs said. “Everyone has a prom dress that they don’t need. Something as simple as donating can make a girl’s year by having the perfect outfit.”

Student Volunteers Othello Returns to the UA After 60 Years Needed for Local Susan G. Komen’s Race for the Cure

Ben Flowers STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Othello, played by Justin Cunningham, talks sweetly about his wife Desdemona in the University Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Othello. by SHELBY GILL Staff Writer

Courtesy Photo

Susan G. Komen for the Cure is the world’s largest breast cancer organization. This year the UA Volunteer Action Center is working with the organization to recruit 100 more volunteers for the race in downtown Rogers this weekened. by ANDREW VAN GENDEREN Staff Writer

Nearly 20,000 pink-shirted runners and walkers will flood downtown Rogers this weekend as the Pinnacle Hill Promenade hosts the 2011 Komen Race for the Cure on Saturday, and UA students

will likely play a prominent role in ensuring the success of this event. The UA Volunteer Action Center has taken the reins this year as Komen’s personnel hub for their annual

see RACE on page 8A

Love, jealously and betrayal, often the recipe for spicy entertainment, are gracing campus in the tragic drama of Shakespeare’s acclaimed Othello. For the first time in 60 years, the University Theatre will perform this popular tragedy. The UA theatre will show their audience the passionate love story behind Desdemona and Othello, along with its insidious end. “The play’s a psychological thriller; we’re voyeurs watching the unraveling of a loving relationship,” said director Michael Landman. Othello, known as the Moor of Venice, is a very successful mercenary general who falls in love with Desdemona, the beautiful daughter of a Venetian senator. Othello is seen as a man of physical power, but he is also very young, which makes him easy prey for those seeking to usurp his power. Desdemona comes across

as the typical meek woman of that time, but throughout the play shows her determination to fight for her marriage. “She is the fair and young wife of the great General Othello,” said Molly Carroll, playing the character of Desdemona. “She is a bright soul, educated, well versed in all manners of the home and a talented artist, but above and beyond all that, her mind and heart are both filled with her love for Othello. She is on cloud nine and nothing can bring her down. It’s hard not to be drawn to her positivity, determination and trust. I love that she is in love, but some of the most exciting elements about her are her flaws.” This is not your typical love story. It’s plagued with bigotry and the malevolent acts of Othello’s ensign, Iago. In a fit of rage over not being promoted to lieutenant, Iago turns into a ravenous villain, set on destroying the relationship of Othello and Desdemona.

“Iago, before the events that lead to this play, was one of the most just, noble and verdant members of society,” said Jim Goza, playing the character of Iago. “So much so that he was soon trod upon by the more selfish individuals around him; so, in the play, when you hear my character consistently referred to as ‘honest Iago,’ it is because he truly was at one point. He’s finally had enough, though, and through the course of this play, the audience watches him snap and begin to enact his revenge.” The character, Iago, also brings a lot of laughs to the stage. “Iago is a very humorous individual as well,” Goza said. “This is because Iago uses laughter and wit to mask his severe pains of loss and jealousy. This is why the audience is the play’s most important character to Iago.” And the audience is sure to relate to the characters in more ways than just humor.

“I think the story of Othello is something every person can relate to. Love, jealousy, trust, honor, faith and what they mean to each individual. We can see in these characters what we also might see in ourselves and others. Whether grotesque or beautiful, it is all human,” Carroll said. Through Shakespeare’s legendary iambic pentameter and the UA Theatre’s diligent work to perfect the play, Othello will soon be brought to life on campus. “We’re confident students will love this production -even those who might not yet have ever seen or enjoyed Shakespeare before. It’s a beautifully designed and honestly and brilliantly acted show -- not to be missed,” Landman said. Although they are staying true to the plot, UA Theatre has their own modern twist on the play.

see OTHELLO on page 7A


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

‘Shot Book’ Scrapbooks Recreate Birthday Memories for Students by EMILY POTTS Staff Writer

UA students approaching the big 21 can now record their first night of bar hopping with the increasingly popular “shot book” trend. The 21 shot challenge, common with college students indulging in their right of passage, now comes with a pre-designed keepsake of the occasion. Created to record the commemoration of each year of life with a shot of alcohol, the task of drinking 21 shots on the big night is becoming a tradition for bar hopping birthday celebrations. “Shot books are so much fun to make, and even better to receive from your friends,” said Charlotte Bowsher, junior international business student, who has helped make three of the keepsakes for friends. Quotes like “Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the drunkest of them all” are written above a plastic mirror stuck in Bowshers’ shot book, along with photos and signatures from friends. “The 21 pages for 21 shots” gifts are made by friends and include scrapbook pages loaded with pictures and fill-in information including the bar location, drink name and thoughts about the beverage. More popular among female students, the books come pre-decorated with photos, memories and increasingly messier signatures from the recipient. “I personally love scrapbooking, and I understand wanting to commemorate your 21st birthday,” said Lauren Johnston, a junior English major. “It’s a special day, kind of like your last big birthday.” Though male students do

Emily Potts STAFF WRITER

UofA student Lindsay Stewart puts together a shot book for an upcoming friends 21st birthday with magazine clippings, photos and quotes. not generally participate in the shot book trend, many think it’s an interesting and fun way to celebrate birthdays on Dickson Street. “Shot books are fun for girls, but when a guy turns 21, I don’t think he would make it past the 3rd or 4th fill-in-the-blank before being too drunk to finish it, at least I wouldn’t have on my 21st,” said Michael Lech, international marketing major. Bowsher and other female students give and receive shot books for each friend’s birthday, and the trend is growing among those approaching their 21st birthdays. Many students around campus host “shot book” parties, where a group of girls get together and make multiple books with old

magazines, photos and scrapbooking materials. “I had a shot book for my 21st birthday, and I loved it,” Bowsher said. “A friend of mine got 20 friends to each make two pages, one with the shot information and one with pictures, quotes and memories of our friendship.” Though a unique way to remember a 21st birthday night on Dickson Street, the books can be dangerous for students attempting to drink 21 shots in an evening. “Twenty one shots on one night is too much alcohol for anyone to drink, especially a brand new 21-year-old who may have never had a drink in their life,” Johnston said. “When students binge drink, their alcohol blood

Floods Create Need for Alternate Routes

Courtesy Photo

The low-water bridge on Gregg Street near Sigma Chi Fraternity flooded during Tuesday afternoon’s storms causing bicyclists to find alternative routes.

Jon Shorter Band Knows How to ‘Shake It’ by EDDIE GREGG Staff Writer

After only four shows, Fayetteville up-and-comers Jon Shorter Band have taken flight and established themselves within the ranks of the Dickson Street music scene. Although the band has only been together a couple of months, they have already garnered a coveted weekend headlining gig at George’s on

Friday, May 13. Jon Shorter Band is comprised of front man and namesake Jonathan Shorter, 24, who sings and plays the keys and guitar, Skyler Greene, 23, on guitar, and Tyler Bottje, 23, behind the drums. I can definitely hear our single “Shake It” being a radio hit, Shorter said. “A lot of people describe us as Dave Matthews meets Maroon 5.

That’s what we’ve been going with. It’s a little pop rock with a twist of funk. It’s music that makes you get up and dance.” Part of the band’s success can be attributed to their high-energy live performances. “It’s just the fun that we have together that kind of

see JON SHORTER on page 8A

level increases rapidly, and it can happen so quickly that they don’t realize and can get alcohol poisoning incredibly fast,” said Mary Alice Serafini, Pat Walker Health Center director. Though the book is a major part of 21st birthday celebrations for many students, awareness of the dangers of alcohol can provide a safe and fun night for all participants. “I’ve witnessed four birthdays with shot books, and none of the girls made it to 21 shots. It is definitely dan-

gerous to take 21 shots, but it is sort of a tradition to at least attempt on your big night,” Bowsher said. “None of my friends encouraged me to drink all 21 shots. They just wanted me to have a good time no matter how much I drank.” Knowing your alcohol tolerance and choosing friends who look out for one another is the key to having a safe night on Dickson Street, said Serafini. “Nobody wants to see friends get to that danger point.”

from OTHELLO on page 6A “We started rehearsals with table work as a group. Each of us translated our lines from Shakespeare’s language into our own words, though still trying to keep the beautiful imagery he creates. That way we knew exactly what we were saying with each word/line/monologue. Being very specific with each word makes it easier to communicate with other characters and actors onstage,” Carroll said. Detail in the elaborate set and costume is key in this performance. “The scenic design consists of platforms and real bamboo, in its natural tan colors. The lighting on the set includes gold [sunlight], blue [moonlinght] and red [passion and love],” Landman said. “The play takes place in two locations:   Venice and Cyprus.   The costumes for Venice are modern and highly stylized, because the Venetians are an advanced, powerful society, ruled by reason and order.   The costumes for Cyprus suggest a primitive, 3rd-world country, whose inhabitants are ruled by their passions.” Students may attend for free on Wednesday and Thursday evenings and Sunday matinees, or pay just $3 for Friday and Saturday evening shows.  

IF YOU GO: Othello will show April 22-23 and 27-30 at 8 p.m., and April 24 and May 1 at 2 p.m.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011 PAGE 8A from RACE on page 6A race, and volunteers are a hot commodity. While Komen and the UA are both optimistic about the turnout, more volunteers are needed, said Angela Oxford, assistant director of the Center for Leadership and Community Engagement. “This is our second year to work with Komen,” Oxford said. “We assisted with their recruitment in 2009 and now again this year. They are a great organization to work with.” The VAC is still trying to recruit 100 more volunteers between now and Saturday morning, Oxford said. “I think our students who are volunteering on the day of the race will learn more about the issue of breast cancer,” Oxford said. “They too will learn the behind the scenes work that it takes to make an event like this one run smoothly. They will also have a chance to network and meet community members who will be volunteering alongside them.” Sophomore Chris McDonough will be leading a volunteer group of seven Air Force ROTC cadets at the Race for the Cure. He and his team are in charge of course set-up prior to the event, and course assistance while the race is in progress. “Komen is a great program,” McDonough said. “I’ve had family run in the race every year for the past ten years. I’ve run before, but I’ve never helped out this way. It’s a nice change.” The Susan G. Komen Foundation is the world’s largest breast cancer organization. They support researchers worldwide in hopes of finding a cure to the disease that, according to the National Cancer Institute, kills nearly 40,000 women each year. The group has raised more than $612 million dollars and invested more than $1 billion toward finding a cure since their beginnings in 1982, according to Komen’s website. “I think that anybody can get something out of almost any volunteering that they do,” McDonough said. “This is just one of the best volunteer opportunities that we have had all year.” McDonough’s family has personal connections to the devastating effects of breast cancer. His grandmother was diagnosed several years ago and recovered successfully after a long series of treatments. “We know how difficult it is, so we like to do everything we can to help out,” he said. McDonough said that it was a shock to find out about his grandmother’s diagnosis. “I knew that breast cancer was out there, but I just never thought that something like that would hit so close to home,” he said. The impact of the annual Komen Race for the Cure is huge for how little it requires of its participants: an early wake up, a small registration fee and a willingness to sup-

Hogs Taste Good, REAL Good

Andrew Hagood STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Julia Nicholson, sophomore communications major, and Adeline Storet, sophomore anthropology major, compare bright red tongues while enjoying their Pig Sooie Suckers in the sun Tuesday afternoon. The hog sucker is one of 14 mascot suckers made by Team Candy Suckers, the only CLC liscensed molded mascot lollipop company. Visit www. teamcandysuckers.com to purchase. port the many breast cancer survivors in one’s community. The National Cancer Institute reported that there were more than 2.6 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S. alone in 2008, and that number continues to climb today. “Its a rough procedure that they go through, so the least you can do is give them a couple of hours out of your day,” McDonough said. Upon arriving at the event, it becomes clear that this is far more than a mere road race. “It’s a way to get all the community and the extended community together,” McDonough said. “Not only does it promote knowledge about breast cancer, but each person that goes to this event tells one of their friends about what they know. It is a great way for people to learn about breast cancer and be more aware about it.” UA Sophomore Aaron McLarty ran last year’s race in memory of his grandmother and is registered to run this year’s race as well. “My grandma passed away from breast cancer. So it was good to remember her that way and honor her,” McLarty said. McLarty found a deep significance in running the 2010 Race for the Cure. “You are trying to find a cure for

other people with cancer so they don’t have to suffer and their families don’t have to suffer,” he said. “Running that race helps you understand who you are running for. The race gives you the opportunity to remember them and honor who you are running for.” Given the abysmal weather of the past week, a gloomy forecast is not unfathomable for the coming weekend. Rain or shine, however, runners tend to show up in droves to participate in this event. Indeed, last year’s race was rain delayed for nearly an hour due to lightning and a downpour. Once the lightning passed, the race went on as scheduled. Hundreds of runners crossed the finished line, drenched to the bone yet smiling in spite of it. “It was raining pretty good that morning,” said McLarty. “But to see all the people that still showed up to support the cause and run the race and not let a little bit of rain stop them - it shows that they know the cause is bigger than themselves.” “I am definitely planning on doing it again,” he added. To learn more about this and other local volunteer opportunities, visit the VAC’s website, volunteer.uark.edu, or call Angela Oxford at 479575-5255.

Courtesy Photos

The group Jon Shorter Band has established their rank on the Dickson Street music scene. The band is currently in the process of recording a four-track demo that will debut in June. from JON SHORTER on page 7A speaks out to the crowd,” Greene said. “People go to have a good time. When they see that you’re having a good time, they can kind of draw off that.” Jon Shorter Band had their debut performance opening for Boom Kinetic and local favorite Randall Shreve at George’s back in February. About 800 people attended that show, most of whom were there to see Boom Kinetic and Randall Shreve, Greene said. But the three band members agreed opening for those bands at George’s was a great way to break into the Dickson Street music scene. “The George’s show is when we started getting serious,” Shorter said. “It’s taken flight, definitely.” The band is in the process of recording a four-track demo, which should be out before the end of June at the latest. Shorter said it would

probably be next year before they release a full-length album, even though the band has nearly 20 original songs. “We’re kind of setting up small, short-term goals,” Greene said. “And the shortterm goal is to get the demo, start playing more places and draw some revenue so we can afford the album.” At present, most of the band’s original material is all music that Shorter wrote as a solo artist before the band got together. “Skyler [Greene] and I just came in and put our own little flavor on his songs,” Bottje said. The band also plays an eclectic set list of nearly 20 covers, including crowd pleasers like “(I’m Gonna Be) 500 Miles” by The Proclaimers and “Don’t Stop Believin” by Journey. Despite their success so far, the guys are happy being an indie band. “We’ve established that staying independent for as long as possible is probably

most beneficial for [everybody],” Shorter said. “As long as we can afford to,” Greene added. “We’re doing as much as we can ourselves. If something good comes our way, we’ll stay open to it, but it’s not really a primary goal to get signed.” All three band members are comfortable playing guitar and drums, something that makes Jon Shorter Band unique, Bottje said. “We’re actually thinking about one of these days doing a show where we kind of flip-flop instruments,” Shorter said. And musical talent runs in the Shorter family. “His dad is a classically trained pianist,” Greene said. “‘Pianist,’ not ‘penis.’ Just to clarify,” Bottje said, with a grin. “Yeah, I said, ‘pianist,’ not ‘penis,’” Greene said, laughing. The band’s official website, JonShorterBand.com is up, but it is still under construction.


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

You can check out the Traveler online at uatrav.com or by scanning here:

PAGE 9A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

Comics, Games, & Much Much More!

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THIS WEEK’S SOLUTIONS

LAUGH IT UP Q: How do you figure out how old an Easter

Q: How many Vulcans does it take to screw in a

A: Check him for grey hares.

A: One. Any other answer would be illogical.

Bunny is?

lightbulb?

THAT MONKEY TUNE Michael A. Kandalaft

WONDERMARK David Malki!

BREWSTER ROCKIT Tim Rickard

CALAMITIES OF NATURE Tony Piro

CROSSWORD ACROSS

1 Downey of “Touched by an Angel” 5 Sitcom alien 8 Flying saucers, for short 9 Joe’s profession on “Wings” 12 Actress Barbara and family 13 Do, re, mi, __, ti, do 14 Payment to a landlord 15 Prefix for medic or legal 16 “__ Big Girl Now” 18 Nation in which “Evita” is set: abbr. 19 Helen of “Mad About You” 20 “One Flew __ the Cuckoo’s Nest” 21 Sitcom for Sherman Hemsley 23 “Runaway __”; Julia Roberts film 24 Cooper or Sinise 25 Biting insect 26 “Car 54, __ Are You?” 28 Arm or leg 29 “__ Improvement” 30 Woman’s undergarment 32 Sullivan and Begley 35 Unrefined mineral 36 Family restaurant chain 37 Make a small cut 38 “__ on a Plane”; movie for Samuel L. Jackson 40 “Ben __”; old medical series 41 Lucy Ricardo’s friend 42 Like a bump on __ 43 Late actor Mineo 44 City in Nevada

DOWN

1 More impolite 2 “Rules __” 3 Helena’s state: abbr. 4 Beast of burden 5 Separated 6 Actress __ Bonet 7 Polly Holliday’s role on “Alice” 10 Role on “Law & Order: SVU” 11 Subdued; made gentle 12 Historical period 13 “The __”; Robert De Niro movie about a baseball player 15 Undersized 17 “People __ Funny” 19 “From __ to Eternity” 20 City in Utah 22 Ms. Winningham 23 Radar screen image 25 “The __ Wilson Show” 26 “__ Wants to Be a Millionaire” 27 Trigger or Mister Ed 30 Discovery in the beach sand 31 “NCIS: __ Angeles” 33 San __, CA; home of the Chargers 34 “I __”; series for Bill Cosby and Robert Culp 36 World’s largest furniture retailer 37 On __; offered at a discount price 39 Sounds of relief 40 “My Mother the __”; sitcom for Jerry Van Dyke

SOLUTION

Crossword by MCT Campus


THE ARKANSAS TRAVELER

You can check out the Traveler online at uatrav.com or by scanning here:

SPORTS EDITOR: Jimmy Carter ASST. SPORTS EDITOR: Zach Turner

PAGE 10A WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

FOOTBALL

Summer Key Newcomers Get Feet Wet in Spring for Mitchell Early enrollees get exerience, compete forplayingtime

by ZACH TURNER

Assistant Sports Editor

Quarterback Tyler Wilson gained national notoriety for his 300-plus yard performance against Auburn last fall. Now, sophomore Brandon Mitchell is waiting for his time to shine. The 6-foot-4 quarterback battled with Wilson, but seemed to be on the outside looking in, as national analysts and fans touted Wilson as the Razorbacks’ next great quarterback because of his stellar performance in relief of Ryan Mallett last season. “I don’t really compare

myself to Tyler,” Mitchell said. “We are just trying to make each other better. He has done a lot for me as well as Ryan and all the other coaches.” When spring practice got underway in mid-March, coach Bobby Petrino addressed the need for competition at the position left vacant by Mallett’s early departure to the NFL. Spring practice is done, but Petrino is looking for Wilson and Mitchell to continue to push each other.

see MITCHELL on page 11A

by JIMMY CARTER Sports Editor

Arkansas’ football program is benefitting from a trend that’s growing around the nation. The Razorbacks got a head start on filling some of the holes on their depth chart this spring. Four true freshmen enrolled in school early and competed for playing time during spring practice after opting to skip their final semester of high school and miss activities like graduation and prom. “I don’t really get it,” Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino said. “I would have never given up the spring of my senior year. I had a good time. Kids are anxious now to get out and go.” Graduating early has become popular to football recruits, though. In 2004, just 35 football players enrolled early at Division I schools. In 2010, there were 141 early enrollees. This year, Florida State had eight early enrollees. “I’m not sure why they want to graduate early,” Petrino said. “We leave that up to them and their parents. The thing that you’ve got to balance out is if you’re going to have a scholarship available at midyear because it goes on how many

RYAN MILLER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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guys graduate at mid-year and how many scholarships you have available.” Offensive tackle Brey Cook, receiver Quinta Funderburk, linebacker Tyler Gilbert and receiver Marques Wade are the quartet that enrolled at the UA and began classes in January. Junior running back Knile Davis and redshirt freshman quarterback Jacoby Walker are other Ra-

zorbacks that skipped their final semester of high school. “It’s a case-by-case,” Petrino said. “I’ve never encouraged it. I remember sitting here with Knile Davis and saying ‘Why do you want to graduate early? Don’t you want to stay and enjoy your spring your senior year and go to the prom?’ Knile said no, he wasn’t interested in the prom. If you remember when he came here, we

practice. Thomas will be a sophomore this season. “I was really happy with Robert Thomas coming in and doing a really nice job of being active, athletic and making plays, which adds a lot to our defensive front,” Petrino said. “Robert’s got great movement. He can really bend. He’s

got great acceleration and is very, very productive. Once he learns to utilize his technique and play within our scheme he’s going to be even better.” “He really plays hard, plays with a great motor. He comes to practice every day with the attitude that, ‘I’m going to get better.’ His motor is running all the time.”

actually let him go home in the spring to go to the prom.” Enrolling early helps some players earn starting jobs as true freshman. Springdale Har-Ber High School graduate Brey Cook was one of the early enrollees and was one of the first-team offensive tackles during spring practice.

see FOOTBALL on page 11A

Thomas Makes Impact in Spring by JIMMY CARTER Sports Editor

GARETH PATTERSON STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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One of Arkansas’ early enrollees didn’t have to miss his final semester of high school. Defensive tackle Robert Thomas graduated from Coffeyville Community College in three semesters and competed for playing time on a deep defensive front in spring

CLUB SPORT

The 6-foot-3, 325-pounder gives the Hogs a large, passrushing presence in the middle of the defense. He arrived on campus weighing around 340 pounds, but improved his conditioning as spring prac-

see THOMAS on page 11A

BASEBALL

Rugby Dominates in Final Division II Season Preparation Pays UA club sport making move to Division I after just five years by PATRICK GRINNAN Staff Writer

Arkansas’ rugby team had another big season this year, finishing 12-2, ranked No. 6 in the nation. The Razorbacks dominated in their final season playing at the USA Rugby Division II level, defeating teams like John Brown University, Pittsburgh State and Central Missouri on their way to an undefeated Heart of America conference championship. Next season, Arkansas will move up to Division I and play against Big

Off for Robinson

XII competition. It’s been a swift rise for a program that didn’t exist several years ago. The rugby program had been discontinued, but was reinstated in 2007. The Hogs didn’t start well, losing the majority of their games that season. The tables have turned. “Where as before, we got murdered in our games, now we are murdering these teams on a regular basis,” senior team co-captain Ryan Boggs said. “It was due to lack of experience that we lost, a new club and new guys.” The Razorbacks set a goal in 2007 to join Division I within 10

see RUGBY on page 12A

by PATRICK GRINNAN Staff Writer

CRAIG JACKSON CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

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Coming into the season, one of the biggest questions for Arkansas’ baseball team was who would replace big-time hitters like Zack Cox, Andy Wilkins and Brett Eibner. Senior outfielder Kyle Robinson has been the answer. Robinson was hitting .313 with seven home runs and 34 RBIs, entering the Razorbacks’ game against St. Louis Tuesday. Robinson’s slugging percentage of .550 is seventh in the Southeast-

ern Conference. He is tied for ninth in RBIs, tied for third in triples and tied for fourth in home runs and sacrifice flies. Robinson transferred from Indian River Community College in Florida, but played in just six games during his junior season. He didn’t play a lot last season, but was where he wanted to be – in the SEC. “It’s been a dream I’ve had ever since I was a little kid,” Robinson

see BASEBALL on page 11A

COMMENTARY

Will the Arkansas Secondary Please Stand Up Old-Fashioned 3-point Play

ZACH TURNER zwturner@uark.edu

Outside of the ongoing quarterback battle between Tyler Wilson and Brandon Mitchell, much of Arkansas’ spring practice news was from the position battles taking place in the experienced secondary. Senior safety Tramain Thom-

as was easily the most outstanding player on the defensive side of the ball during spring. Coach Bobby Petrino said Thomas had shown great improvement and was the undisputed anchor of the secondary after the spring game. However, there is more to the secondary than just the athletic star from Winnie, Texas. The Razorbacks return both starting cornerbacks from their 31-26 loss in the Sugar Bowl to Ohio State and are only having to replace safety Rudell Crim, but with all the experience in the secondary this unit was still the defensive weak link last season. The returning cornerbacks Isaac Madison and Darius Winston competed at field corner this spring after defensive coordinator Willy Robinson said he wanted to see them push each other.

Now, with spring practice concluded, Robinson said he didn’t see what he would have liked out of the two since. Greg Gatson took the starting spot at field corner by the end of the spring, across from boundary corner Jerry Mitchell. If the season started today, I would think both coaches, Petrino and Robinson, would go with last season’s tandem of Madison and Winston to start. The two corners have 27 starts between them and combined for 53 tackles and six pass breakups last season. Although this would be the presumed tandem of corners to complement the established Thomas and new safety Eric Bennett, Robinson seemed to be very high on the skills and physicality of Mitchell, who has only played in seven games and registered eight tackles in his career.

Whatever the opening week secondary lineup looks like, it is the performance that they get out of the experienced bunch returning that is going to make the difference in whether or not this 2011 Arkansas team can reach consecutive BCS Bowl appearances AND win this time around. Arkansas was ranked sixth in the Southeastern Conference a year ago in passing defense, allowing 194 yards per game during its eight conference games. The Razorbacks were only able to intercept 11 passes which was eighth in the conference. For this team to go from cellar dwellers on defense in 2009, to middle-tier of the SEC in last season, to the upper echelon of the conference in 2011, the secondary needs to hold their own. Outside from Thomas do-

ing what he does best and making plays, junior Darius Winston needs to start showing the signs that landed him the five-star tag by Rivals.com and the state’s No. 1 rated recruit coming out of high school in 2009. Winston saw very sparse time his freshman season as he struggled to learn the defensive schemes, but made vast improvement during 2010 season to earn six starts. The same goes for highly-touted Eric Bennett who saw time at corner last year, but will be the team’s starting strong safety next season. Bennett played in 12 games during his freshman season of 2010 and recorded 15 tackles with one for a loss and a fumble recovery. His switch to safety is vital in adding depth to the secondary as a whole, with recruits Tevin

Mitchel and Kelvin Fisher coming in the summer, both of whom could compete for reps in the secondary. Heading into Petrino’s fourth season as the head man in Fayetteville, the secondary has the chance to be the strongest point of a hungry Razorback defense rather than the black hole they have seemed to be in his first three. Fans should expect another stat-stuffing season for the anchor Tramain Thomas, but also hope that the other pieces that have the 2010 season under their belts will take their games to the next level if the Hogs wish to make a return trip to New Orleans in 2012. Zach Turner is the assistant sports editor for The Arkansas Traveler. His column apppears every other week. Follow him on Twitter @zwturner.


PAGE 11A

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011

from FOOTBALL on page 10A “Certainly, it helped a lot with Brey Cook being here,” Petrino said. “His experience throughout spring ball will help him play earlier and develop earlier.” The 6-foot-7, 310-pounder was the Razorbacks’ highest-rated signee in the 2011 class. He’s used the head start to get acclimated to the speed of college football. “I can see myself progressing from getting killed every play that first day, to now doing work a little bit,” Cook said. “They threw me into the fire, but I’m glad they did. I’m glad I was able to come in during spring ball and get those reps against these great players that only make me better. I’m excited and this fall it will only make me better.” The Hogs’ coaching staff has high expecations for Cook, but realize learning the playbook, adjusting to a new academic workload and getting used to the college lifestyle doesn’t happen overnight. “There’s a lot going on with Brey Cook right now,” Arkansas offensive coordinator Garrick McGee said. “He’s trying to learn our offense. He’s trying to learn the defense. He’s going to class everyday. It’s a completely different lifestyle

from BASEBALL on page 10A said. “I always knew it was the perennial powerhouse conference in the country, those players were the ones I saw on TV and the ones I looked up to. I made it my goal. “Our fanbase here is unreal, and the competition is second to none.” Robinson hit .353 in his limit-

for Brey. I like how the kid has handled himself. We’re going to be patient with Brey. Brey is going to be a very good player.” Not everyone adapts as well as Cook, though. Funderburk missed six practices this spring and his high school coach told the Virginian-Pilot newspaper Funderburk quit the team. Funderburk tweeted multiple times about struggling to get acclimated to college football, but rejoined the Hogs for the final three spring practices and the RedWhite game. It’s not uncommon for freshmen to get homesick after arriving at college. “You don’t really know until you get them here,” Petrino said. “Summer helps a lot now because there’s always a period when a freshman comes in, they’re out of their comfort zone, they’re anxious and they don’t perform as well. It used to be two or three weeks into the fall until they finally figure it out, but now it’s in summer school. “That’s why you see more and more freshmen playing now. It’s because they’re able to come in for summer school and get that period of anxiousness out of their system.” Not every recruit lasts. Last August, defensive end LaCraig Brown made it less than two weeks at Ar-

kansas before quitting the team. For freshmen that do stick it out, Petrino witnesses a transformation. “After two weeks of being here, they’re like, ‘Oh, maybe I can do this. This isn’t so bad. I’ve got this figured out,’” Petrino said. “After two more weeks, they’re like, ‘Hey, maybe I’m as good as these guys. I can do this.’” For early enrollees like Cook, Funderburk, Gilbert and Wade, they don’t have to worry about adjusting in the summer. They’ll be seasoned veterans by that point.

ed playing time last year, then improved in summer ball, determined to make his mark as a senior. “He came back in really good shape,” Van Horn said. “We could tell that he was on a mission to have a really good year.” As a junior, he got an opportunity to learn from teammates like Eibner, who he roomed with during roadtrips last year.

from MITCHELL on page 10A

tice progressed. His knowledge of the playbook also improved during the spring. “Trying to learn the defense on the run and do it full speed was probably his major setback,” defensive coordinator Willy Robinson said. “He’s awfully strong. He’s not in shape like he needs to be, but he’s started getting better. I think his development in the spring and having those reps is really going to benefit us.”

“We still have good competition going on,” Petrino said. “This will be something that carries on close to the first game.” Wilson and Mitchell split repititions with the firstteam offense in spring practice, competing to be the starter for the Razorbacks’ season opener Sept. 3 against Missouri State. “I think having a competition going into the fall is beneficial,” Wilson said. “It pushes all players in every position, not just at quarterback. I think it makes a team better.” Mitchell had a rough end to an otherwise solid spring in the ESPN-televised RedWhite game. The coaching staff split the teams evenly, with Mitchell leading the Red squad and Wilson quarterbacking the White team. The outcome was a blowout. Wilson led the White team to a 45-14 win over the Red squad. Mitchell completed just 9-of-23 passes

and threw three interceptions. “I just took the constructive criticism in the next day when we watched film,” Mitchell said. “(Offensive coordinator Garrick McGee and I) really focused on the positive things and the things that went good. Then the things I did wrong and why they went wrong so I could get that fixed.” He had performed well before the game. “I am encouraged by a lot of things he did,” Petrino said. “But when it was the spring game and the scrimmage prior to that, he did perform as well as he had all week in practice leading up to that. He needs to take that step forward.” Mitchell played few snaps in 2010 as the third-team quarterback. The redshirt sophomore played in four games, completing just 1-of3 passing for 16 yards and had one rush for five yards. Dating back to spring practice in 2010, Mitchell grabbed headlines with big play after big play, most notably his 80-yard touchdown

run in the 2010 spring game. With another year under his belt the Amite, La., native said his footwork as a passer has improved. “I think I have made the most strides in being consistent with my footwork,” Mitchell said. “I had kind of shied away from that in the coaching, but that is something I am trying really trying to get back.” The Hogs will have voluntary, player-led workouts in the summer, practices the quarterbacks play a large role in organizing. “My main focus over the summer is to just become a better passer,” Mitchell said. “Really work on becoming a student of the game and really breaking down film.” Mitchell’s ability to make plays with his legs adds a dimension that’s hard to gauge in practice. “I always believe that we may never know how good Brandon is until it’s live, until you see his ability to run out of the pocket and make plays and do things when it’s completely live,” Petrino said.

“Brett Eibner and (Zack) Cox showed me how to work, showed me hot to get it done and how to handle business,” Robinson said. “They told me what you need to do to prepare yourself for SEC ball. I learned how to work last year and this year I put it into practice. I got a feel for what I needed to do to have success.” Robinson is the lone senior on

the 35-man roster and has led by his strong play on the field. “I wouldn’t say I’m too vocal,” Robinson said. “I more lead by example. Hopefully the younger guys will watch how I carry myself. I have to remember that we have a lot of young guys, and they’re looking up to the older guys like McCann, Kuhn and myself. I just have to show them how to handle business.

I have to keep my cool in tough situations and keep an even keel.” The Hogs (28-11, 9-9 SEC) are .500 their last two SEC series, winning a series against Mississippi State and losing a series at Kentucky. Arkansas will take on Georgia in Athens, Ga., this weekend and finish the regular season playing No. 4 Florida, No. 3 South Carolina and Ole Miss. Florida and South

Carolina are tied for the Conference lead and Ole Miss is part of a three-way tie for first place in the SEC West with the Razorbacks and Auburn. “Our goal this weekend is to go on the road and find a way to win that series,” Van Horn said. “If we do that, we give ourselves a chance to stay atop of the West. If we don’t, we’ll be battling it.”

from THOMAS on page 10A


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 2011 PAGE 12A from RUGBY on page 10A

Kevin Lazas

Freshman Decathlon Brentwood, Tenn.

Traveler staff writer Patrick Grinnan caught up with freshman decathlon athlete Kevin Lazas to talk about his success early in his college career, what caused him to take up the decathlon and his favorite dining places in Fayetteville. Lazas set a school record with 7,452 points in his first collegiate meet last weekend at the John McDonnell Invitational. What drew you to the decathlon? In high school, my sister was training with my future high school coach, Gary Kender. I played all sports in middle school, and my sister got me into it and I started training on and off with him. After freshman year when I blew my knee out playing football I started training with Gary year round, seven days a week three to four hours a day. That’s when I realized that I loved it. My high school coach and I became really good friends, and Travis Geopfert (Assistant coach- field events) is a lot like him. How was your first meet as a Razorback? I wasn’t really nervous. The thing is, when I went to the Junior World Championship my senior year of high school, I was a lot more nervous. I freaked out, kind of, because there was 20,000 people watching. It was a good experience before college, because I got used to it. How do you recover for a meet? The Decathlon is ten events in two days, it must take a toll on your body. After a decathlon, I’m three days out of the meet and I’m still really sore. It’s not as bad with the heptathlon, I’m usually alright after three days. What’s your favorite place to eat in Fayetteville? Buffalo Wild Wings. All the decathletes go there every week. What do you do in your free time? I play the guitar. I took lessons when I was younger, and my dad and little brother have played guitar their whole lives. It kind of is in the family. When I came to Arkansas a lot of the decathletes also play guitar, so we play together sometimes.

years. They will have accomplished the goal in half the time, because of a USA Rugby restructure putting schools with Division 1 football programs in Division I or the elite College Premier Division. The roster grew from 13 players in 2007, to 20 the next season and 30 in 2009. Arkansas had 45 players participate in its final practice following this season. The program’s growth was aided when coach Warren Fyfe took over. After reading a local newspaper article about the team’s struggles following a 17-0 loss, Fyfe’s wife took notice. She told her husband about the team and encouraged him to help them. Fyfe, born and raised in South Africa, has been involved with rugby since childhood. When his wife told him about the Razorbacks, he jumped at the opportunity and contacted club president Jacob Clayman, the student responsible for reinstituting the program. Before Fyfe arrived, the team was coached by players. “He has the structure, he has the discipline,” co-captain Tucker Shaw said. “He’s not a put-you-in-theground type of coach. He instructs you by leading by example We’re so much more structured now. ” Shaw and Boggs treat the team as a business, with set goals for the future. The team’s next goal is to have a strong showing in their first season in Division I. “It’s huge for our club,” Shaw said. “Moving up to Division I, we are playing the best of the best and it’s going to be a lot more difficult. One of my main goals is to focus on fundraising more. It will be a lot more clear cut and easier to delegate what each officer will be doing in the fundraising process.” While some players on the team played rugby in high school – including Boggs, Shaw and junior winger Collin Jackson – many players joined the team to stay in shape and be part of a team. Malachi Reeves – 6-foot-6, 235 pounds – is one of the Razorbacks’ standouts, but never played rugby until college. Tony Zambrano was a gymnast in high school and has been

a key player since joining the rugby team. “Rubgy has so much diversity,” Shaw said. “You have so many different types of people, ethnically, peronality-wise, career choice. We have guys from Bolivia, Colombia, England, Zimbabwe. It’s completely diverse, and people have different athletic backgrounds too, so there is diversity in the type of athlete as well. “It’s not a bunch of former football players running around wearing Air Jordan’s and screaming, ‘Put me in, coach.’” There are no tryouts and anyone can join, as long as they are ready for intense fitness and extreme physicality. The team practices two or three times a week, with cardio and teamwork the main focuses. The top 22 players make the playing squad each match. With the switch to Division I, more players will get to see game action. The team is deep in freshmen and sophomore players that will gain experience in the upcoming seasons. The deep roster is necessary for the Razorbacks to make it through a game that has more players and is longer than football. “You got out, it’s 15-on-15, guys literally beating the crap out each other,” Boggs said. “No pads, just a mouthpiece. You get stepped on, its extremely rough, but at the end of the game, you shake hands. You’re not just going through the motions. It’s legit, after every game the home team hosts the visiting team. You spend time with that team that you just fought with for 80 minutes.” A particularly physical game for the Hogs came in a 25-16 win against Central Missouri in the Heart of America championship game. For the first time all sesaon, Arkansas was the smaller team and had to battle for the win. “Up until that point, we had run through every team, easily” Jackson said. “UCM was the only team that was bigger than us at every position. They scored first, they scored three times and it was the first time we’d been down all year. We came back and won in the last ten minutes. It was the most satisfying win I’ve had since I’ve been on the team.” The team will have their first practice for next season in early August.

April 27, 2011  

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