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CONCENTRATION:

Academic Librarianship

Academic librarianship is a dynamic, evolving profession dedicated to meeting the information and research needs of students, faculty, and other members of academic communities.

Qualifications Academic Librarians are sometimes expected to hold an additional advanced degree or subject specialization as well as an ALA-accredited masters degree.

Work environment Academic librarians are employed in institutions including: • community colleges • specialized schools • four year colleges • research universities Many academic librarians assist undergraduate and graduate students, as well as faculty and staff with their information needs. Others work behind the scenes, developing technical and other services to facilitate research and teaching. They may also work in archives and special collections, part of or closely connected to the library. In addition to other Academic librarians, professionals in this field work with Information Technology specialists, Archivists, faculty, and students.

Responsibilities Traditional areas of work include: • Reference • Collection Development And Management • Acquisitions • Cataloging • Circulation The field is changing, however. Today’s academic librarians may be expected to perform duties including: • Outreach and marketing • Teaching academic research classes • Designing course materials with faculty • Design and management of institutional repositories • Creation of digital information products • Building websites with faculty to enhance the curriculum or support faculty research • Serving as members of research groups • Contributing professional scholarship • Acquisitions licensing and contract negotiation • Database design and maintenance • Preservation activities • Facilitate scholarly communication • Data curation

Recent developments in Academic Librarianship According to a report by the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee, the top trends reported by academic librarians in 2010 included “expanding the library’s virtual presence through involvement in course management systems and online social networking sites, the creation of online tutorials and other instruction aids, and more vibrant and interactive Web sites.” Challenges included working to “convey the value of the complementary nature of the physical and online services to support the teaching and instruction mission of the university to campus administrators presents an ongoing challenge.”

Professional Association The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association.

Academic Librarianship – Suggested Classes Distributed Electives: Evaluation of Information Resources • IRLS 518: Information Quality • IRLS 524: Information Resources and Services (Public Services) • IRLS 532: Online Searching (Public Services) • IRLS 560: Information Resource Development (Public Services; Collection Management) • IRLS 572: Government Information • IRLS 585: Information Literacy Instruction (Public Services) • IRLS 589: Scholarly Communication • IRLS 671: Introduction to Digital Collections Management • IRLS 561: Academic Libraries Practice and Administration • IRLS 608: Planning and Evaluation of Libraries and Information Centers • IRLS 613: Decision Making for Library and Information Professionals • IRLS 673: Managing the Digital Environment Information Technology • IRLS 570: Database Design and Management (Technical Services) • IRLS 571: Introduction to Information Technology • IRLS 573: Information Technology in Libraries • IRLS 574: Digital Libraries (Digital information specialties) • IRLS 575: User Interface and Website Design (Public Services) • IRLS 614: Information Theory and Transfer • IRLS 672: Introduction to Applied Technology • IRLS 674: Preserving Digital Collections • IRLS 675: Advanced Digital Collections (continued on the back)

School of Information Resources & Library Science • Academic Librarianship 1515 East First Street • Tucson, AZ 85719 Tel: (520) 621-3565 • Fax: (520) 621-3279 For questions about this program, please email: sirls@email.arizona.edu


Cultural Perspectives • IRLS 550: Information Environments from Hispanic & Native American Perspectives • IRLS 553: Issues in Culture and Informational Technology (Systems and Public Services) • IRLS 557: Documenting Diverse Cultures and Communities • IRLS 559: Marketing Library and Information Services to Communities Other Electives: • IRLS 530: Cataloging and Metadata Management (Technical Services) • IRLS 531: Indexing and Abstracting (Technical Services) • IRLS 540: Introduction to Archives (Archives) • IRLS 541: Preservation (Archives and Collection Management) • IRLS 584: Introduction to Copyright • IRLS 601: Theory of Classification (Technical Services) • IRLS 630: Controlled Vocabularies (Technical Services) • IRLS 693 / 694: Internship / Practicum

School of Information Resources & Library Science • Academic Librarianship 1515 East First Street • Tucson, AZ 85719 Tel: (520) 621-3565 • Fax: (520) 621-3279 For questions about this program, please email: sirls@email.arizona.edu


CONCENTRATION:

Special Librarianship including Biological Informatics, Health Informatics

Information professionals implement information-based strategies to promote their organization’s missions; they develop, manage, and deploy information resources and services.

Qualifications Special library careers work out well for those with ALA-accredited master’s degrees who also have experience or education in non-library fields. Additional professional degrees are required for some special library positions.

Job titles Job titles for special librarians may include: • Military Librarian • Intelligence Analyst • Corporate Librarian • Information Specialist • Records Manager • Research Specialist • Cataloging Director • Information Services Manager • Medical Librarian • Museum Librarian • Science Librarian • Knowledge Manager • Technical Library Coordinator Omission of the term ‘librarian’ in these titles does not necessarily mean a library is not involved in work responsibilities. Some special librarians report being given the opportunity to create their own job titles.

Work environment Librarians in special libraries work in diverse settings, most of which are not referred to as libraries at all. Special libraries include the following types of environments and more: • Government or military libraries • Corporate or private business libraries • Research laboratories • Advertising agencies • Museums • Information management consulting firms • Professional associations • News offices • Unions • Medical centers and hospitals • Law firms • Religious organizations

Responsibilities In Working Knowledge: How Organizations Manage What They Know (Harvard Business School Press, 1998), Davenport and Prusak find corporate librarians can be “indispensable knowledge brokers,” who make connections between those who seek knowledge and those who have it, because they have contact with employees from many departments in the corporation. The Special Libraries Association lists the following as common responsibilities of special librarians: • Preparing research reports in response to staff requests for specific information • Gathering competitive intelligence • Identifying research done at other organizations to avoid unnecessary duplication • Verifying facts for external and internal reports and publications • Creating databases for organizations to access their internal information • Searching patents and trademarks • Evaluating and comparing information software and sources of data prior to purchase • Training other staff to efficiently and cost-effectively use online databases

Recent developments in Special Librarianship In the 2009 report entitled The Changing Terrain of Special Librarianship, the Workforce Issues in LIS Group found that despite closure and staff reduction trends in corporate libraries, there is still a need for new MLIS graduates to replace retiring special librarians. It was also suggested that those who have worked in special libraries may retain advantages over other library job seekers due to the versatility and managerial responsibilities required within many special library roles.

Professional Association The Special Library Association (SLA), a member-driven organization connecting and supporting special library information professionals, students, and job seekers, includes information work in nontraditional settings in its scope. There is also an SLA Arizona Chapter offering a listserv, the SLA-CAZ Discussion List. Finally, SIRLS Students in Tucson can join the AZ SLA Student Chapter. The Arizona Chapter of the American Society of Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T) is being re-vitalized under the leadership of SIRLS Faculty and Students.

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There is great variability in work environments across and within library settings. Potential employees should carefully evaluate workplace conditions to ensure a good match to their professional goals.

School of Information Resources & Library Science • Special Librarianship 1515 East First Street • Tucson, AZ 85719 Tel: (520) 621-3565 • Fax: (520) 621-3279 For questions about this program, please email: sirls@email.arizona.edu


Special Librarianship -- Suggested Courses Distributed Electives: Evaluation of Information Resources • IRLS 518: Information Quality • IRLS 532: Online Searching • IRLS 533: Medical Online Searching • IRLS 572: Government Information • IRLS 587: Information Seeking Behaviors • IRLS 660: Business Information Resources • IRLS 671: Introduction to Digital Collections Management • IRLS 564: Corporate Library Administration and Practice • IRLS 565: Health Sciences Library Administration and Practice • IRLS 608: Planning and Evaluation of Libraries and Information Centers • IRLS 613: Decision Making for Library and Information Professionals • IRLS 546: Managing Healthcare Information: Theory & Practice • IRLS 673: Managing the Digital Environment • IRLS 681E: Law Library Practice and Administration

Cultural Perspectives • IRLS 550: Information Environments from Hispanic & Native American Perspectives • IRLS 551: Equity of Access • IRLS 553: Issues in Culture and Informational Technology • IRLS 556: Health Information in Ethnic-Cultural Communities & Environments • IRLS 557: Documenting Diverse Cultures and Communities • IRLS 558: Group Information Rights • IRLS 559: Marketing Library and Information Services to Communities • IRLS 651: Information Policy and Cultural Perspectives Other Electives: • • • • • • •

IRLS 531: Indexing and Abstracting IRLS 584: Introduction to Copyright IRLS 586: Economics of Information IRLS 601: Theory of Classification IRLS 617: Social Epistemology and Information Science IRLS 630: Controlled Vocabularies IRLS 693 / 694: Internship / Practicum

Information Technology • IRLS 570: Database Design and Management • IRLS 574: Digital Libraries • IRLS 575: User Interface and Website Design • IRLS 614: Information Technology and Transfer • IRLS 624: Health and Medical Informatics • IRLS 634: Data Management in Health Care Systems • IRLS 650: Theory of Information Systems • IRLS 672: Introduction to Applied Technology • IRLS 674: Preserving Digital Collections • IRLS 675: Advanced Digital Collections • IRLS 689a: Teaching Legal Research

School of Information Resources & Library Science • Special Librarianship 1515 East First Street • Tucson, AZ 85719 Tel: (520) 621-3565 • Fax: (520) 621-3279 For questions about this program, please email: sirls@email.arizona.edu


UA SIRLS Masters Concentrations  

The disciplinary foundations of UA SIRLS are library science, information science, and interdisciplinary perspectives on the social phenomen...