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ADJOA SKINNER Songs For Tall Women And The Short Men Who Love Them There is a quirky and circus fanfare to “God Made Me Tall”. From that the lyrics accompany it in a suitable fashion. With the off the cuff styling it sufficiently brings everything to heel on it. “Bikini” plays those aspects of the sound rather well. Here the brass and piano develop a concerto appeal to it that furrows through. The sensible running to it evokes something imaginative and plays that card finely. Her voice calmly comes to bear on it also. A session styling is finely felt on “The Recession Song”. There is a truthful and watchful feel to how it plays. What is portrayed in the rhythm is rather significant in terms of how refined it sounds. Shouldering all that sees it all come into its own with serious aplomb and merit. Steadying itself is “Freedom”. Traipsing along on the jazz influences in her sound sees a sophistication exude here with abundant splendour. This is a classy affair which resolutely busies itself around those points. Softly applying the acoustic guitar brings “The Way You Hold Me” across with a distinct allure. Her voice flashes across it with a soothing and inviting feel that sees it savour the moment. It plays the affluent card rather well. “Universe” seems to be styled similarly. The pace is set aside and holds steadfast. In doing so there is a fine enclosure created around the way it sounds. “This Dark Night” is another languid affair. It makes the best use of the solemn tone derived from the playing. It captures the finer points in how it operates and neatly fastens the slower tempo to how it is arranged.

8 The piano is a curt feature in the sound on “Don’t Leave Me Hanging”. It keys in nicely and with her dulcet tone creates something succulent that takes hold of the song. The quality in the delivery is a blissful turn that situates everything where it should be. Then “Near” follows which embraces a prominent acoustic guitar on the intro. There is a purity located in the song that artfully comes into the reckoning. It is finely balanced in terms of how it is delivered and played. The closing track is an acoustic version of “Freedom”. It brings something smooth and mild to it all that is able bodied. With the difference to the approach it is also able to handsomely show through for the right reasons.

................................................................................ MEL PARSONS Red Grey Blue

The first song on the album is “In My Heart”. The styling grasps an elegant tone and suitably runs with it. The innate hold from it draws from the sound to marvellously complement everything. That is followed by “I Won’t Let You Down” which forges ahead in terms of the rhythm. It derives a consistency on many fronts. Soothing the song are the vocals which smartly sit alongside the tidy showing. Everything that needs to line-up on it beautifully does so. On “I’ll Go” the country influence on her sound shows. The circumstantial way that it all coast along draws you in on it quite intently. A sorrowful tint comes forward from her voice that equates upon things rather well. Skipping along on A Tex-Mex appeal is noted on “Bones” that parlays finely in the background of the song. From there her voice projects finely on it all. It is very precise in the ample way that it glides across but what is also a strong showing here is the steady way that the track is all managed. “Damages” is a truly wonderful tune to here. Exceptional for the tone that is the basis for how it progresses, it is all the more enigmatic for the finesse shown in the ambience. On that aspect the prim qualities of it are apparent. Hanging off the heartfelt is “Saturday Night”. The nostalgic reflection suits the lucid texture that the playing generates. It is very lush and pronounces without overdoing things. “Springtime Sin” is a bright and lavish affair that can rely upon the vibrant tempo running through. What appropriately shows is the measured way the catchy aspects seamlessly play into it here.the beat is a fine guitar rhythm that steadies it all. “Things Will Get Good” has a weight felt from the sombre tone playing out on it. That is stared down and met head on. By doing so, the narrow

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points allow the sweeping hold on the song to settle in and bring the bittersweet moments to bear on it quite well. A rich bluegrass styling finely shuffles along on “True Story”. There is a LINDA RONSTADT feel to it and also reminds you of an Irish band called I DRAW SLOW for the dignified way that it all comes across. Possessing a sturdy and lean style, it is underlined by the violin that plays through.There is something about “We Will Find Love Again” that places an emphasis on playing a safe card. The track is soft in the approach and dutifully brings around a showy rhythm. The guitar breaks into a strong running that brings it all together sensibly. The last track is “End Of The Day” and longingly drifts along with a sense of closure in how it plays. This also pushes out a soothing sentiment and careens nicely along off the back of this.

Profile for Unsigned & Independent

June issue 2013  

The June Issue of U&I Music Magazine contains interviews with Glastonbury and Knockanstockan bound band LAND OF THE GIANTS, ROB STEENSON, RA...

June issue 2013  

The June Issue of U&I Music Magazine contains interviews with Glastonbury and Knockanstockan bound band LAND OF THE GIANTS, ROB STEENSON, RA...