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Ultimate Athlete Magazine

Dear Readers, Now that the school year has started again, we will see an exciting fall season of high school sports. With an exciting season, we can also count on seeing many aspiring young athletes right here on Long Island. Fall is definitely thought of by most as “Football Season,” and we have some of the most talented Long Island football teams featured in our Fall I 2013 edition of the Ultimate Athlete Magazine. From Nassau to Suffolk, and north shore to south shore, we’ve scoured the island for highly ranked and promising teams. Featured on the cover is the Connetquot High School Football team, the Thunderbirds, who enter their season ranked number three in Division One. Along with the Thunderbirds, inside this issue there are many high school football teams featured, including: Sachem North, Sayville, Babylon, Massapequa, MacArthur, Farmingdale, and John Glenn/Elwood, and Northport. Fall is not just football season, and we haven’t forgotten about our other hardworking athletes who also start their seasons when the school year begins. We have some great features on soccer players kicking off their soccer seasons, or those who play volleyball getting back on the court. Inside the Fall I edition, there are also features on staying fit, nutrition and psychology, provided by experts in the field. Whether the teams are full of seasoned players in their senior year of high school, or younger classmen filling the places of the players who have recently graduated, they find a balance as a team to become successful. The pieces of information provided by the coaches regarding their teams make it evident that the teams are all quite skilled at sportsmanship and cooperation. All teams are striving for the championship titles, but all the teams featured in this edition have earned the appreciation of their teammates and coaches. All-inall, these athletes are all in for a great season. Emily Soper Assistant Publisher Ultimate Athlete Magazine

PUBLISHER/CEO EXECUTIVE EDITOR ASSISTANT PUBLISHER

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR SENIOR MEDIA MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNER

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER CONTRIBUTING WRITER

PAUL CORACE N.J COMANZO EMILY SOPER

LOUIS H QUACH PONNUTHURAI JEYATHAS MELISSA FEARON WIN-KYE CHEONG

RICHARD BROOKS KEVIN FREHEIT DR. TOM FERRARO SANDY SARCONA MIKE MEJIA CSCS JACLYNKELLI KRONEMBERG MORGAN WELLINGER BRIAN COLEMAN KEVIN SPERANDEO KATARINA BARONE

IN-HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY

KEVIN SPERANDEO KEVIN FREIHEIT MORGAN WELLINGER

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

MORGAN HARRISON

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY

MORGAN HARRISON

How to contact us Phone: 1-800-680-3213 Email: info@ultimateathletemagazine.com Ultimate Athlete Magazine (ISSN 1931-5295) is published 12 times a year by Ultimate Athlete, Inc., 24 Woodbine Ave, Northport, New York 11768. All contents copyright 2012 by Ultimate Athlete Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use in whole or part of the content without the prior written consent of Ultimate Athlete, Inc. is strictly prohibited. All logos and trademarks are properties of thier respective owners. Although the writers and the publishers have exhaustively researched all sources to ensure the accuracy and the completeness of the information contained in this publication we aassume no responsibility for errors, inaccuracies, omissions, or any inconsistency herein. The opinions expressed in all materials are those of authors and do not neccesarily represent those of Ultimate Athlete, Inc or Long Island’s Ultimate Athlete Magazine.

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LONG ISLAND FALL VOL. I 2013 6

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PG 10

BABYLON

PG 12

BRENTWOOD

PG 18

CONNETQUOT

PG 22

FARMINGDALE

PG 26

JOHN GLENN (ELWOOD)

PG 32

LINDENHURST

PG 34

MAC AUTHUR

PG 38

MASSAPEQUA

PG 40

NORTHPORT

Football

Boys’ Soccer Football Football Football

Girls’ Soccer Football Football Football

PG 42

NORTHPORT Boys’ Soccer

PG 48

SACHEM NORTH Football

PG 53

SAYVILLE

PG 56

SMITHTOWN EAST

PG 58

SYOSSET

PG 63

WEST ISLIP

PG 66

NUTRITION

PG 68

PSYCHOLOGY

PG 70

TRAINING

Football

Boys’ Volleyball Boys’ Soccer Girls’ Soccer

Super Smoothies Sport Psychology of The Future A Hot Mess

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SPE ED PHOTO BY KEVIN SPERANDEO

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THE PANTHERS ON THE PROWL FOR ANOTHER CHAMPIONSHIP SEASON

Story by Brian Coleman | Photos by Kevin Sperandeo

Babylon has a proud football tradition, and we will continue to demonstrate that.

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COACH PUNZONE


B

abylon Football has been one of the most successful programs on the island since the inception of the Long Island Championship back in the early ‘90s. Since 1992, when the Long Island Championship started, the Babylon Panthers have captured the title five different times. The Panthers’ fifth title came last season in 2012, and head coach of 11 years, Rick Punzone, believes that last year’s championship was one of the most important in the program’s history. “Last year was special because we were able to run the table and also won the Rutgers Cup,” said Punzone. The Rutgers Cup is voted on by the coaches, and goes to the top team in Suffolk and Nassau counties. “It means a lot to be recognized by the coaches you compete against as the top team in the county,” Punzone added. Babylon went 12-0 and blew

BABYLON FOOTBALL out Roosevelt in the Class IV Long Island Championship last year, and with a lot of returning players, including those at the skills positions, the Panthers are poised to repeat as champions in 2013.

but they have done a good job for us so far.”

Babylon hasn’t shown any signs of a letdown thus far in 2013, outscoring its three opponents (Shoreham-Wading River, BayportEric Schweitzer, Nick Santorelli Bluepoint and Port Jefferson) 126and Jake Carlock were all major 21, setting the standard for football contributors in 2012, that are back in the Suffolk Class IV Conference. for Babylon this season. Through Despite the high expectations, the the first three games of the season, Panthers know repeating as Suffolk quarterback Nick Santorelli has County Champions will not be an nine passing touchdowns, while easy task. Glenn, Mount Sinai and Schweitzer and Carlock have Shoreham-Wading River are poised combined for 11 touchdowns to lead to make runs at the Suffolk crown. the potent Panther offense that has Babylon has set the standard in dominated opponents early on in its conference though, and has been 2013. one of the top programs on the island The one question mark heading for decades, which is something into the season for head coach Rick Punzone knows his players are Punzone was putting together a proud of. young offensive line to help protect Coach Punzone concluded, his skill players. “Early this season we wanted to make sure we could “Babylon has a proud football square the offensive line away,” said tradition, and we will continue to Punzone, “It’s a work in progress demonstrate that.”

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INDIANS Story by Kevin Freiheit // Photos by Morgan Harrison

BRENTWOOD BOYS SOCCER 12

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or the past decade, the Brentwood Indians soccer team have made a name for themselves, proving that they have what it takes to be competitive year in and year out. The Indians have posted more than just winning records, but have become the team to beat, in not only the county, but in the entire state. The Indians have won eight of the past 10 county championships, including each of the last five, and are looking to continue that success this season. Expectations have always been high for the Indians, and that will be no different this year. Brentwood soccer has had

a history of success, and last season, the Indians finished with a 22-1 record. When asked what the team could improve on, head coach Ron Eden said “We’d like to win more games.” Eden has been the head coach for the past 17 years, and has been with the team for 34 years overall. His plan is no different than it has always been, and he is confident his team can keep winning games. Brentwood was the second ranked team in the nation last year, but lost 2-1 in the state final. “It was a thrill to make that run.” Eden said. However, the Indians lost 19 seniors after last year, and

have holes to fill both on offense and defense. “We have a new defense after all three of our starting defenders graduated,” Eden said, “We have new players in the back, so I’m not sure what to expect from them. However, by the end of the year, we should be solid and if we stay healthy I think we can make a run.” Brentwood is poised to make another strong run this season, despite a touch of inexperience on the back end. With the amount of success and leadership that the Indians have, they are still candidates to win the county championship for their sixth straight season.

BRENTWOOD BOYS SOCCER 13


BRENTWOOD

Whether or not this happens really depends on the performance of some of the newer players. The Indians are a bit younger than usual, but still have highly skilled players, who are capable of scoring goals. One of those players is junior Ever Torres, a two-time all-county athlete, who put up 19 goals and 18 assists last season. He may be the Indians’ most dangerous scorer, and certainly one to keep an eye on at all times. Torres has led the team in scoring during the past two seasons. “We have a very good attacking team,” Eden said, “We are the number one ranked team on Long Island, and we’re hoping to continue that.” The

INDIANS

Indians have a streak of five consecutive championships, and they hope to add to it.

Another player that the Indians are relying on is Eric Molina, who Eden considers one of the fastest players in the county. This season will be a test to see if the younger players can excel under the pressure in being part of such a dominant team. “They know what it is like to be in a Brentwood uniform,” Eden said, “We always have a bulls-eye on our backs.” The Indians are everyone’s intended target once again this season, but the question is whether or not someone can actually stop them.

The Indians started off their season with a 5-0 victory over Bay Shore. Moises Gomez scored a pair of goals, while goaltender Jose Cerna stopped all four shots that he faced for the shutout. Brentwood has already begun on a positive note, and the confidence and momentum of the team may be difficult to stop. “The players come from a strong tradition of winning and don’t want to let it down,” Eden said, “They want to win and carry on that tradition.”

BRENTWOOD BOYS SOCCER 14

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CONNE

THUNDE

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ETQUOT “

Every year our goal is to win the Long Island Championship.

ERBIRDS 19


CONNETQUOT

ThunderbirdS aspire for the

long island championship

Story By Jaclynkelli Kronemberg / Photos By Morgan Harrison

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he Connetquot varsity football team enters the season ranked number three in Division one in Suffolk County. Leading the Connetquot Thunderbirds is head coach Mike Hansen. Hansen is entering his 11th season as the head coach. Last season, Connetquot ended the season with eight wins, two losses, and lost in the Suffolk County semifinals. “This year our goal is to try and win every game,” said Hansen, “Every year our goal is to win the Long Island Championship.”

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A few of the players from last season have since graduated, and the Thunderbirds have only three offensive returning starters, and three defensive returning starters. “We have a solid team this season,” Hansen said, “We have skilled players and a good defense.” There are a couple of players looking to make an impact this year, and help get the team to the championship game. Senior wide receiver Tyler Nason (5’10” 185 lbs.) was one of the top receivers on Long Island last year with 38

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receptions. “Tyler is athletic, has nice hands and runs great routes,” Hansen said, “I’m looking forward to him being a big impact player this season.”

“There are a lot of kids that have the potential to be real impact players this season for us,” said Hansen, “This is a great team and it’s a pleasure to coach them.”

Senior running back/ linebacker Marcus Gutierrez (5’9” 180 lbs.) is another key player to watch for this season. “Marcus is a tough hard runner,” Hansen said, “He will carry a lot of the load this year.” The offensive line features three seniors DJ Gallino (6’2” 270 lbs.), Rob Dawson (6’1” 270 lbs.) and Jimmy Oliver (5’11” 250 lbs.). “We have a solid offensive line,” Hansen said, “DJ, Rob and Jimmy are the anchors of the offensive line.” The defensive line features junior Sean Moore (6’0” 250 lbs.), Gallino and Oliver. “Our defensive line is physical and work hard.” Hansen said. Connetquot takes their first step toward the Long Island Championship on September 11, 2013, when they open the season against Patchogue Medford.

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THE FARMING

A TRADITION OF

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GDALE DALERS

F EXCELLENCE

Story and Photos by Kevin Sperandeo

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he Farmingdale High School Football team continues their tradition of excellence, remaining undefeated (3-0) in the first half of the 2013 season. The Dalers tradition for excellence reflects their past success. Farmingdale football writes up 25 Big Four Champion years for the past 28 seasons and 20 conference championships since 1965. The 2001 team won a Long Island Championship.

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Last season, Farmingdale went 7-1 and won the Nassau County Conference I Championship against Baldwin, 21-9. The Dalers lost to William Floyd for the Long Island Championship. Head Coach Buddy Krumenacker has been leading the Dalers to victory since 1993. He has been coaching for over 40 years, holds over 200 wins and is one of the most recognized high school football coaches on Long Island. Krumenacker is known for being a coach who teaches fundamental football and pushes his players to achieve the most that they can. With a good start for the 2013 seasons, the Dalers are working towards another successful season. A strong running and passing offense has accounted for 16 touchdowns in three games. Senior running back Curtis Jenkins averages 7.2 yards per carry so far this season. He rushed for 266 yards and 5 touchdowns in

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the first three games. Vinny Quinn, senior quarterback for the Dalers, has passed for 402 yards, including 7 passing touchdowns. He averages 134 yards passing per game. Quinn has rushed for 88 yards, averaging 4.6 yards per carry. The Dalers have two senior receivers: Tom Kennedy and Robert Jones. Kennedy has received for 205 yards on 10 catches. He averages 20.5 yards receiving yards and has three touchdowns. Jones averages 17.67 yards receiving on 3 catches for 53 yards. Jones has received for 2 touchdowns. Halfback Michael Outing, a junior, has rushed for 56 yards on 12 carries and received for 53 yards on 3 passes. Senior linebacker, Joe Lee leads the Dalers’ defense in tackles with 21 solo tackles and 15 assisted. On the defensive line, Thomas Ammirati, Senior defensive end has made 14 solo tackles and 6 assisted. Xavier Sanabria, a senior cornerback, made 12 solo tackles and 2 assisted. Junior safety, Nick Butler has recorded 2 interceptions and 4 tackles. The Dalers’ defense has only let up 27 points to their opponents thus far in the season. After a conference championship year, the pressure is on for the 2013 Dalers. Farmingdale will be put to the test during their next game, playing conference rivalry Massapequa on October 3rd. Both teams are currently undefeated at 3-0.

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JOHN GLENN HIGH SCHOOL

If we work hard and play turnover free football we’ll put ourselves in a good position to go far.”

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Coach Shanahan WWW.ULTIMATEATHLETEMAGAZINE.COM


JOHN GLENN KNIGHTS

WORKING HARD

TO SUCCEED STORY & PHOTOS BY KEVIN SPERANDEO

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he John Glenn Elwood Knights football team is all about “hard work, pushing yourself, and coming together as a family”, says seasoned coach Dave Shanahan. Coach Shanahan has been coaching the Knights for 19 years. In the past three seasons, John Glenn has won two Long Island championships. Coach Shanahan states, “We’ve been fortunate the past few years to win a lot of games. Last year we took a little dip, but prior to that, we had four county championships. Hopefully, we can get back.”

Returning from camp, Shanahan described the week as a great experience and that, “the team really came together and we worked hard. Being together collectively builds chemistry.” Attending an afternoon practice, it’s no secret that the team comes to work and gets better every day.

The Knights kick off the 2013 season against Hampton Bays on September 12th. Hampton Bays beat the Knights last year for the first time in a while, according to Shanahan. “They’re a good program,” describes Coach Shanahan, “Hopefully we can change After losing some top players, last the outcome. There’s good competition years season (4-4) was tough for the this year.” Knights. Despite having some greatly Coach Shanahan says the future skilled players, a young offensive and looks bright for the Knights. He states, defensive line couldn’t give the team “If we work hard and play turnover free the push they needed. Shanahan football we’ll put ourselves in a good says, “a lot of those players are back, position to go far.” they’ve matured. Hopefully they can give us the push we need at the line of scrimmage.”

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OHN GLENN HIGH SCHOOL WOMEN’SJBASKETBALL

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LINDENHURST ’ soccer girlskick-off

their season Story and Photos by Kevin Sperandeo

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ast year under head coach Ed Colgan, the Lindenhurst Bulldogs made big strides and fought their way to co-league champions of girls’ varsity soccer. However, a disappointing loss early in the playoffs ended their 2012 season. Charles Brostowski, first year head coach of the Lindenhurst Girls Varsity Soccer, has been with the program for the past five years coaching at the middle school and junior varsity level. Coach Brostowski hopes his 2013 team can make a deeper run into the playoffs this year with the many returning starters. Teaching the game is important to Coach Brotowski, “I want to play fast, and not necessarily us moving fast, but have the ball moving as fast as possible.”

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Captains, Keirsten Gustavson, Emily Burkard and Brianna Doran, are all returning starters, and will lead the Bulldogs for 2013 season. Leading by example, on and off the field, Gustavson is a strong defender and carries a 103 grade point average. With junior Rebecca Conway by her side, these two will be the anchors of the Bulldogs’ defense. Conway, a fierce defender, was all-conference as a sophomore. “Conway tackles hard and is also very technical. She can join in on the attack and become dangerous”, says Coach Brostowski.

Taylor Trovato, Claudia Cagnina and Captain Emily Burkard at midfield with Gina Marie Weis as a striker. In a competitive league, Coach Brotowski says, “We’re going to take it one game a time.” The Lindenhurst Bulldogs’ season kicks off against Bayshore on September 17th. With a positive outlook for the upcoming season, Coach Brotowksi explains, “It’s a team effort, and if we can get everyone clicking on all cylinders I think we can look really good. We’re getting there.”

Junior Brianna Doran is a returning striker with excellent work-rate, and her movement of the ball will be a key factor for the Bulldog offense. Brotowski describes, “She has an unreal knack for the goal and we are looking for her to score a ton of goals this year.” Brianna Doran was all-league last year as a sophomore. A well-rounded player, Ashley Claud is a threat on both sides of the ball. Described as one of the teams most athletic and technical players, Claud is described by Coach Brotowski as, “Dangerous as a striker, a solid defender and anywhere inbetween.” With an experienced senior class, and the junior players also stepping up, Coach Brotowski says, “We’ve got a good core; we’re going to try to make it great.” Other returning starters include Trista Searra,

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Macarthur High School

The Generals Perfect Their Skills for the 2013 Season Story By Jaclynkelli Kronemberg // Photos By Morgan Harrison

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he MacArthur varsity football team, the Generals, enter the season with a preseason ranking of four in conference two in Nassau County. Last season, MacArthur lost in the semifinals to Wantagh 14-13 in overtime. This season they are looking to improve on their performance from last season. “Our conference is always competitive and we always come up against a lot of tough teams,” said MacArthur varsity football coach Bobby Fehrenbach, “We take it one game at a time and don’t look ahead but our goal is always to make it to Hofstra.” Fehrenbach is entering his 14th year as head coach of the MacArthur varsity football team. “It’s a pleasure getting to coach here,” said Fehrenbach, “These kids are easy to coach and want to play football. It is also great that the team gets support from the community and from the district.”

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The football team graduated 24 seniors last year but has most of their offensive line returning this season. Unfortunately, they don’t have any returning skill players, and will be looking for someone to step up and make big plays throughout the season. There are players looking to step up and fill the void. One is offensive lineman/ defensive lineman, Nick Cuciti (6’4” 235 lbs), and a senior player. Cuciti is returning all-conference player from last season. At 5’11”, 210lbs, junior Paul Giuliano is a running back/defensive lineman and another returning allconference player. First year starter and wide receiver/running back/defensive back Tom McAndrew (5’9” 150lbs) is looking to make an impact in his senior year. “Tom is a versatile player,” said Fehrenbach, “He can do a lot of things on the field and we are looking forward to him making big plays this season.”

linebacker James Knoebel (5’10” 160lbs). Knoebel was a starting linebacker last season. “James is also extremely versatile,” Fehrenbach said, “He can play a lot of different positions for us and will be a big part of our offense.” First game for the MacArthur Generals is September 12, 2013 against Long Beach. “It’s important to come out and get a win right away. We can’t afford to fall behind,” said Coach Fehrenbach, “We are inexperienced at the skill position and will look to improve upon that. We will learn from each game and continue to get better as the year goes on.”

Another player looking to fill a void is senior running back/wide receiver/

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MASSAPEQUA HIGH SCHOOL 36

MASSAPEQUA Ch Pre-season Con Story by Jaclynkelli Kronemberg Photos by Kevin Freiheit

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hiefs Ranked First at

nference 1 MASSAPEQUA FOOTBALL PREVIEW

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he Massapequa varsity football team enters the season with a number one preseason ranking during Conference 1 in Nassau County. “Our expectations are the same every year,” said Massapequa varsity football coach Kevin Shippos, “We want to win the Nassau County Championship and the Long Island Championship.” Shippos is entering his third year as the head coach of the Massapequa varsity football team, The Chiefs. Last year, Massapequa lost to Farmingdale in the Nassau County semifinals, but they are looking to come back this year and go even farther. Nassau County’s Conference one is always tough, and there are a number of teams that can claim the title. “There are a lot of good teams in our conference,” Shippos said, “There isn’t one stand out team and that’s what makes our Conference exciting to watch and coach in.” Farmingdale, Oceanside, Freeport, East Meadow and Baldwin are all looking to make it hard for Massapequa to claim the title. Massapequa has a few three year starters returning this season that will look to make an impact and get them back to the semifinals. At 6’0” and 185 lbs., senior wide receiver/linebacker Nick Balzone is a three year starter for Massapequa. Balzone is a captain for the Chiefs, and was awarded all county last year. “Nick is humble and a hard worker,” Shippos said, “He is an irreplaceable great player for us.” Another three year returning starter, senior running back/safety Jack Korber is 5’6” 165 lbs. In addition, he also returns punts and kickoffs. Despite getting hurt last season, Korber still made second team, All-Long Island. “Jack is an exciting player,” Shippos said, “He is a highbred player and can play either wide receiver or running back. He makes a lot of big plays for us.”

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MASSAPEQUA HIGH SCHOOL 38

Senior wide receiver/defensive back Craig Berge is 6’1”, and weighs in at 175 lbs. Berge is the kicker, punter and a three year starter. “Craig is a great athlete,” Shippos said, “He has reliable hands and is an outstanding receiver. On the defensive side, he has a nose for the ball and is a good cover corner.” At 5’10” and 175 lbs., three year starter Nick Capuana is senior that plays running back, defensive back, and returns punts and kickoffs. Last year, Capuana had two interceptions that he returned for touchdowns. “Nick has a low center of gravity making it difficult for defenders to tackle him,” Shippos said, “He is great in the open field and has the ability to change direction in a split second.” Captain Jake Fitzsimmons is a 5’11” and 220 lbs. three year returning starter. Fitzsimmons plays offensive tackle and linebacker. He was asked to fill in as a middle linebacker towards the end of the season last year, and will be continuing to play that position this season. “Jake is a leader by example,” said Shippos, “He is smart and always knows where he has to be.” And finally, there is senior captain Rick LaRocco at 6’3” and 235 lbs. He is an offensive tackle and defensive end. This is LaRocco’s second year as a starter. “Rick has become one of the best defensive players on the team and is a great offensive lineman,” Shippos said, “He put on 25 lbs. of muscle in the offseason, and we are expecting big things from him this year.”

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Massapequa has all the weapons to end up as champions. They have veteran players that know how to win games. The Chiefs will start their season on September 12 against Freeport. “This year’s team is experienced,” Shippos said, “The seniors came up with me from junior varsity as sophomores. If we can stay healthy and continue to work hard I expect big things from this team.”

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TIGERS PULL FOR SUCCESSFUL SEASON Story & Photos by Kevin Freiheit

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he Northport Tigers are coming off of a successful season in which the team almost won it all. Northport started last season with three straight losses, but adjustments were made and head coach Kip Lukralle saw his team rattle off six straight victories before losing to Sachem East in the end of the season. One of the reasons that the Tigers were able to find success was largely in part due to their offense. Northport outscored its opponents 287189 and reached at least 30 points in half of their games. Now, the Tigers are looking to get back to where they were and go farther, but they are going to have to do this with some newer, younger players. Northport will now have to rely on its younger players to carry the team. While this may be a difficult feat to accomplish, they are willing to work together to make an

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impact this season. “Our goal is to win every game,” Lukralle said, “We have a really nice group here.” Northport comes into this season with three seniors on offense, a key point for a team trying to duplicate success. The Tigers have started this season with a 2-1 record, defeating Longwood and Sachem East. Northport ended up dropping their homecoming game to William Floyd by a 14-7 score as they were unable to generate any form of offense. The lone touchdown came on a blocked field goal, which was returned 80 yards for the score. “That’s probably the worst offensive performance I’ve seen us have,” Lukralle said, “If we can play that poorly offensively and still be in a game against a No. 1 seed, that’s a plus, but we have to find out a way to get better.”

outcome, but is confident that the Tigers will improve, and they have done just that. “Our expectations are high and losing to Floyd at home 14-7 isn’t going to deter that,” Lukralle said. Following the loss, the Tigers bounced back the following week, defeating Sachem East 20-0 and getting revenge from last season’s playoff defeat. The Tigers offense is starting to gel together and Northport is on its way to have another winning season. Freshman quarterback Connor Quinn has already become an important part of the team, as expected. He’s been able to deliver up to this point, but will need to continue to do so. “It’s really one of those groups and we have an opportunity, still, to do something special here,” Lukralle said.

Lukralle wasn’t pleased with the

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NORTHPORT FOOTBALL

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Northport KEEPS KEEP

in Beginning their 2 T

he Northport Tigers Boys’ Soccer team seemed bright and enthusiastic upon greeting the opponent, Cold Spring Harbor, for the beginning of their 2013 season. Warming up for the game, the Northport Boys Soccer team was excited to play their first opponent in hopes of attaining a first win of the season, a very exciting and promising feat for any high school team starting their season. The coach Don Strasser, a very motivated and dedicated coach of 13 years, spoke very highly of his team. This year, the varsity team consists of 24 boys, and of those are 15 seniors who stand ready to take on the season, providing big competition for other schools. Tyler Kurano, John Kentino, and Kyle Faraba, the three senior captains, are ready to motivate the team to work hard and push themselves further than they have before. Tyler Kurano is very talented, and praised as a past winner of All Leagues. Having Tyler as an addition on the team sets a high standard for the rest of the boys to persevere and work hard. Although the senior captains are exceptional, it is apparent that all of the players are equally talented, thus contributing to the success of a dedicated soccer team. Last year was 10-1-1 season, when they victoriously took the #1 title of their league, and moved onto play-offs. However, they were presented with Hurricane Sandy, which annihilated most of Northport and devastated the community, deterring them from succeeding through to the play-offs. This year, they are back with determination

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and inspiration, and it is clear that the boys are excited to start the season off right. They are seen running together smiling doing drills before the game, and a positive attitude is a key to success for the team. Coach Strasser is unsure of, “who is going to come out of the woodwork” when asked of the most notable players. Strasser has a positive demeanor and a great presence, not only as a soccer coach, but as that of a positive influence to the boys. They all have their strengths, which provide for a functional and successful team. The challenges that they face are familiar to each soccer team, Coach Strasser suggests, “pointing out that passing the ball successfully to each player is a key point to work on.” Strasser also says that controlling the ball and strategically working together to pass the ball around the field needs improvement. They communicate their strengths, or pass to the players who are known to be stronger offense, as well as calling in the defense when needed. The game against Cold Spring Harbor that day was impressive. The two teams battled for control of the field and fought fiercely against their opponent.  Cold Spring Harbor only scored in the 59th minute, making this long game unpredictable and enthralling.  Anticipation was held, until finally the teams had to settle with a tie in the 79th minute of the game. Andrew Gormal tied the score for Northport in a non-league tie against Cold Spring Harbor. A very long and grueling game, both teams walked away with a great experience. They both

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Photos by Morgan Harrison

attitude is a key to success for the team.”

Boys’ Soccer

“...a positive

Boys’ Soccer

Boys’ Soccer

By Katarina Barone

Boys’ Soc

PS S High Hopes 2013 Season

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Boys’ Socc Boys’ Soccer Coach Strasser also warns, “Defense is our strength, we prove a difficult challenge when an offense tries to score on the

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Boys’ Soccer

boys, they are resilient.” Hopefully, they will defend their title and move onto play-offs again this season. After making play-offs for ten seasons, and winning five of those to Leagues, fans look forward to seeing how the Northport boys’ soccer team does this season!

oys’ Soccer

proved to their opponent that they wanted the first game victory, and to show how far they were willing to go to gain said victory. Each parent looked on anxiously waiting for Northport to score to tie the game even. The Tigers are excited to play some of their rivals, Hills East and Bay Shore to get an idea of their standing and winning their league’s title this year.


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SHUT TER

SPE ED PHOTO BY MORGAN HARRISON

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Football in Story by Brian Coleman Photos by Kevin Sperandeo

T

he Sachem North Flaming Arrows football team enters the 2013 campaign with high expectations. The team suffered a tough loss in the Suffolk County Class I semifinals in 2012, falling eventually to Long Island champion Floyd. The Flaming Arrows actually held a 7-0 lead in that game, before Floyd rattled off 32 straight points on its way to another Long Island title. With many players from last year’s team still in the locker room for Sachem, head coach David Falco has high goals and expectations for 2013. “Our expectations are always to win a county and Long Island Championship,” said Falco, who is entering his 11th year as the Flaming Arrows head coach, “Leadership is always important and we have created many leaders on our team over the past year and look forward to watching them lead our team.”

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Sachem North will be very reliant on its strong rushing attack led by Quarterback Trent Crossan. Crossan, who missed much of 2012 with a leg injury, is part of what is a three-headed backfield along with Malik Pierre and Kevin Bragglia.

capture the Suffolk County Class I crown this season, with the other favorite being longtime foe Floyd. If Sachem North hopes to capture a county title, Falco knows that his team will most likely have to go through Floyd.

Crossan rushed 10 times for 162 yards with three touchdowns in the season opening 35-6 victory over Sachem East, displaying the kind of talent that will be the catalyst for Sachem North in 2013.

“Floyd is at the top of the mountain and we are trying to get there,” said Falco, “We will not give up in our pursuit of a championship. That pursuit is taking all of our thoughts and energy.”

“As he goes, we go,” said Falco, “He looks good right now and we will have to keep an eye on his progress.” Sachem North is one of the favorites to

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THUNDERBIRDS

CONNETQUOT “

Every year our goal is to win the Long Island Championship.

THUNDERBIRDS CONNETQUOT

ThunderbirdS aspire for the

long island championship

Story By Jaclynkelli Kronemberg / Photos By Morgan Harrison

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he Connetquot varsity football team enters the season ranked number three in Division one in Suffolk County. Leading the Connetquot Thunderbirds is head coach Mike Hansen. Hansen is entering his 11th season as the head coach. Last season, Connetquot ended the season with eight wins, two losses, and lost in the Suffolk County semifinals. “This year our goal is to try and win every game,” said Hansen, “Every year our goal is to win the Long Island Championship.”

A few of the players from last season have since graduated, and the Thunderbirds have only three offensive returning starters, and three defensive returning starters. “We have a solid team this season,” Hansen said, “We have skilled players and a good defense.” There are a couple of players looking to make an impact this year, and help get the team to the championship game. Senior wide receiver Tyler Nason (5’10” 185 lbs.) was one of the top receivers on Long Island last year with 38

receptions. “Tyler is athletic, has nice hands and runs great routes,” Hansen said, “I’m looking forward to him being a big impact player this season.”

“There are a lot of kids that have the potential to be real impact players this season for us,” said Hansen, “This is a great team and it’s a pleasure to coach them.”

Senior running back/ linebacker Marcus Gutierrez (5’9” 180 lbs.) is another key player to watch for this season. “Marcus is a tough hard runner,” Hansen said, “He will carry a lot of the load this year.” The offensive line features three seniors DJ Gallino (6’2” 270 lbs.), Rob Dawson (6’1” 270 lbs.) and Jimmy Oliver (5’11” 250 lbs.). “We have a solid offensive line,” Hansen said, “DJ, Rob and Jimmy are the anchors of the offensive line.” The defensive line features junior Sean Moore (6’0” 250 lbs.), Gallino and Oliver. “Our defensive line is physical and work hard.” Hansen said. Connetquot takes their first step toward the Long Island Championship on September 11, 2013, when they open the season against Patchogue Medford.

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CONNETQUOT HIGH SCHOOL


GOLDEN FLASHES

the

WORKING

TOGETHER &

HOPING TO WIN

Story by Kevin Freiheit // Photos by Morgan Harrison

F

ollowing an 11-1 season last fall, the Sayville Golden Flashes have become a much younger team. The Sayville football team has lost 18 of their 21 starters from a year ago due to graduation, thus making the players less experienced, but not necessarily less talented. The team, with help from Coach Robert Hoss, looks to gain experience and work together as a team to emulate the successful past season.

SAYVILLE FOOTBALL 53


SAYVILLE FOOTBALL

T

he amount of talent that Sayville had last season was so high that they were able to put wins together right from the start and made it all look so easy. All 11 starting defenders have since graduated, and Sayville will now have to look to its younger players to carry the team. This may be a difficult feat, but they are willing to work to make impact this season. Perhaps the biggest key player this season will be freshman quarterback Jack Coan. Hoss said that this year’s team will have to work together if they want to win. “It’s a collective effort,” Hoss said, “Last year we had so much talent. We’re trying to figure everything out this year. We need to step up together.” The team will need to work together to have a stellar season, but there are some key players to look for this season. Junior Matt Selts (5’9”, 165 lbs.) acts as the running back, wide receiver and safety. Hoss says of Selts, “He’s explosive. He is our most dynamic player and one of the top players to watch in the county.”

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As mentioned before, 6’2” quarterback, Jack Coan is also a key player this season and Hoss said, “He’s experienced beyond his years and is very calm and cool under pressure.” Junior Chris Rupp is a wide receiver and a linebacker for the Golden Flashes. At 6’2” and 180 lbs., Rupp is an emotional leader on the field. He plays a smart and physical game, and is an excellent addition to the team. On the offensive and defensive lines are juniors Bobby Boos (6’1”, 230lbs.) and Tim Fraccalevieri. Boos is the glue for offensive/ defensive line and a very smart player. Fraccalevieri is another young player looking to make an impact on the line. Overall, the Golden Flashes will have to work hard to achieve what they had accomplished as of last season. With a great group of players, all of whom are willing to pitch in for their team, the Sayville Golden Flashes know what teamwork is all about. The road greatness may not be as easy to pull off as last year, when the team made winning look easy, but Coach Hoss will make sure that they are playing their best. “My goal is to get them playing their best football when it really counts and get them ready by the playoffs,” said head coach Robert Hoss.

SAYVILLE FOOTBALL 55


mithtown mithtown “ The team is full of

good athletes that all have experience playing other sports. ” - Coach Aiello

Savino (senior). This year, the team captains are Rob Talay, Will Engellenner and Chris DiPaola.

S

tarting their season with an unlucky streak, The Smithtown East Boys’ varsity volleyball team, the Bulls, lost their first two games 0-3 against Half Hollow Hills and 1-3 to Sachem, but the team of talented athletes plans to bounce back. Coach Kelly Aiello, Coach Al Nucci, and trainer Dave Tor do have high hopes for the Smithtown East Boys’ Varsity Volleyball team. “The team is full of good athletes that all have experience playing other sports,” says Coach Aiello, “They are great kids and all work well together, but we just have to fine tune certain things on the court.” The Smithtown East team consists of ten seniors and six juniors. While all the team works together for a fine performance, the key players for the Bulls this season include: James Baxley (junior), Chris DiPaola (senior), Will Engellenner (senior), and Dom

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Coach Aiello wasn’t exaggerating when she said that the players were all well-rounded athletes, all who have dedicated their time to playing other sports as well. In addition to the volleyball team, the majority of the players all play a variety other sports. Even the seniors, with their busy last year of school work and preparation for college, play many other sports

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Volleyball Team Photos and Story by Morgan Wellinger in addition to being part of the varsity volleyball team. Senior Engellenner is a dedicated badminton player, senior DiPaola plays basketball and soccer, senior Savino plays both baseball and soccer, and teammate Talay is a promising lacrosse player. “Right now, we are an inexperienced team,” says Aiello, as she explains her coaching strategy, “We are trying to see where everyone fits, and see who the best six are to get out there, and who works together the best. We have to work on our defense and serve receive.”

their team throughout the season. “We would also like to get into playoffs as well,” adds Aiello. With such a set of versatile athletes, the Smithtown East Boys’ varsity volleyball team are working together to have a great season. The Bulls play Sachem East on September 11th, and face off against Sachem North on September 18th.

The team hopes to have a successful record and develop

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Syosset

Braves

The Braves Rally After Championship Year Story and Photos by Kevin Freiheit

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he Syosset Braves are coming off of a soccer season that they will never forget. After finishing with an 11-3-1 record, the Braves won the county championship. Syosset outscored its opponents 36-12, en route to a highly successful season. They achieved this feat behind head coach Brett Waxer, who will be returning for his 9th year, and the team is looking to duplicate last season’s run. Waxer and his Braves enjoyed the past season, but are still looking for more. “We had a great year,” Waxer said, “We’re not satisfied. We are very much looking to get back to that championship game. It’s a long journey and it takes a lot of coming together, chemistry and overcoming obstacles.” Syosset lost about a dozen seniors to graduation, but Waxer believes that the team will be able to make up for the lost players. “We have core players returning and we have enough guys back that we have a good, experienced team,” Waxer said. “We are expecting great leadership from the seniors and having them compete every single day.” Senior midfielder Nico Valentino agreed. “We’re very confident because of what we accomplished last year,” Valentino said, “We’re going to create opportunities and finish in front of the net. We have a team that has spent a lot of time together.” The Braves will have Douglas Enga once again, who has already proven to be a legitimate scoring threat every time he’s on the field. Enga is one of the captains, and will be entering his senior season.

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Despite winning the county championship last season, the Braves understand that their focus has to be on this year. “We’re staying focused,” Waxer said, “Last year is last year. We have to focus each and every game, so right now; we’re not looking past anything.” It’s easier said than done, but the Braves will have to do just that if they want to make it two straight championships. “I expect the same season that we had last season, and hopefully we go beyond the county championship,” Enga said, “We like to have the mindset of ‘state champs or bust.’” Enga added that he wants to improve and not be the exact same team from last season. “As a team I would like to build off of our success from last year,” Egna said. “If we can possess the ball, control the game and force our opponents to play our style of play, we will be a tough team to beat.” Enga believes he and the rest of team will be able to take the positives from last year and apply them to this season in order to maintain the right attitude.

Waxer said he feels the same way. “We were in every game,” Waxer said, “There’s poise. There’s belief. And there’s no panic. That’s the attitude coming into this season. It takes a lot more than just showing up to play. That’s our focus. Another returning player for the Braves will be Scott DeBenedittis, a three year captain. A very calm and composed player, DeBenedittis will look to lead by example on the field. “He just wants to go out there and play at a high level and he’s going to figure out how to do that,” Waxer said, “He benefited from good players in the past but he has also made others so much better.” In the case of every championship team, once a win is gained, the team becomes a target for the next season, and the Braves are on everyone’s radar this year. Waxer knows it will take more hard work and commitment from his players if they want a repeat performance, so he’s taking

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the next step and working on his strategies. “As far as scheming and formations, we’re going to change up some things,” Waxer said, “We’re focused on our defensive shape. We’re putting pressure on the ball at all times. It’s crucial for us to communicate.” Communication is key, and it is one aspect that the Braves will make sure is fully covered. As far as the team-first approach goes, everyone is on board. “We want to work together as a team to make smart plays and move the ball up the field,” Enga said, “We want to win states and will do whatever it takes to achieve that.” Having an experienced coach like Waxer only helps the potential of Syosset. Fans got the opportunity to see what the Braves could do, and now, they want to see it again.

always finds something good in every player on the team. His goal as a coach is to help his players reach their full potential. He wants us all to succeed and be the best we can be.” Waxer has already proven that he can help bring out the best in his players. With the championship year behind them, the Braves have already begun this season and are aiming high, yet again. “Every day is a competition out there,” Waxer said, “I really enjoy this group. I don’t have to motivate them. They know their reason for them to be a part of this. When you wear the jersey, you represent more than yourself. We know it’s a long journey, but we’re excited for it, and ready to go.”

The players have grown accustomed to Waxer, but they show signs of respect and appreciation for him as well. “Coach Waxer is a great coach who knows the game extremely well,” Enga said, “He

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BRENTWOOD HIGH SCHOOL INDIANS

Unstoppable

INDIANS OFF TO A STRONG START

Story by Kevin Freihart // Photos by Morgan Harrison

BRENTWOOD

F

or the past decade, the Brentwood Indians soccer team have made a name for themselves, proving that they have what it takes to be competitive year in and year out. The Indians have posted more than just winning records, but have become the team to beat, in not only the county, but in the entire state. The Indians have won eight of the past 10 county championships, including each of the last five, and are looking to continue that success this season. Expectations have always been high for the Indians, and that will be no different this year. Brentwood soccer has had

BRENTWOOD BOYS SOCCER

a history of success, and last season, the Indians finished with a 22-1 record. When asked what the team could improve on, head coach Ron Eden said “We’d like to win more games.” Eden has been the head coach for the past 17 years, and has been with the team for 34 years overall. His plan is no different than it has always been, and he is confident his team can keep winning games. Brentwood was the second ranked team in the nation last year, but lost 2-1 in the state final. “It was a thrill to make that run.” Eden said. However, the Indians lost 19 seniors after last year, and

have holes to fill both on offense and defense. “We have a new defense after all three of our starting defenders graduated,” Eden said, “We have new players in the back, so I’m not sure what to expect from them. However, by the end of the year, we should be solid and if we stay healthy I think we can make a run.” Brentwood is poised to make another strong run this season, despite a touch of inexperience on the back end. With the amount of success and leadership that the Indians have, they are still candidates to win the county championship for their sixth straight season.

Whether or not this happens really depends on the performance of some of the newer players. The Indians are a bit younger than usual, but still have highly skilled players, who are capable of scoring goals. One of those players is junior Ever Torres, a two-time all-county athlete, who put up 19 goals and 18 assists last season. He may be the Indians’ most dangerous scorer, and certainly one to keep an eye on at all times. Torres has led the team in scoring during the past two seasons. “We have a very good attacking team,” Eden said, “We are the number one ranked team on Long Island, and we’re hoping to continue that.” The

BRENTWOOD BOYS SOCCER

INDIANS

Indians have a streak of five consecutive championships, and they hope to add to it.

Another player that the Indians are relying on is Eric Molina, who Eden considers one of the fastest players in the county. This season will be a test to see if the younger players can excel under the pressure in being part of such a dominant team. “They know what it is like to be in a Brentwood uniform,” Eden said, “We always have a bulls-eye on our backs.” The Indians are everyone’s intended target once again this season, but the question is whether or not someone can actually stop them.

The Indians started off their season with a 5-0 victory over Bay Shore. Moises Gomez scored a pair of goals, while goaltender Jose Cerna stopped all four shots that he faced for the shutout. Brentwood has already begun on a positive note, and the confidence and momentum of the team may be difficult to stop. “The players come from a strong tradition of winning and don’t want to let it down,” Eden said, “They want to win and carry on that tradition.”

BRENTWOOD BOYS SOCCER

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WEST ISLIP

THE WEST ISLIP LIONS

WORK HARD and WORK TOGETHER Story by Jaclynkelli Kronemberg // Photos by Morgan Harrison

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he West Islip girls’ varsity soccer team, the Lions, enter this season looking to get back to where they finished last season, to hopefully redeem themselves as a team, and to go farther this season. “We have a strong shot to win the league,” said head coach Nick Grieco, “We

have a very good chance to win league back to back.” Last season the Lions were the league three champions, and finished with a league record of 12 wins and no losses and an overall record of 14 wins one loss and one tie. Unfortunately, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast, and the playoffs were put off for three weeks. When the team came back, the Lions lost the number one spot in the quarterfinals. This season they are looking to go farther.

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“We are off to a nice start,” said assistant coach Jim Albert, “We had a good summer and are off to a solid start. The team is progressing and we are looking to only get better in the second half of the season.” They are currently in first place in league three with four wins and no losses, and an overall record of seven wins and one loss. They have to keep playing their best due to league three being one of the toughest for varsity soccer, with teams like North Babylon, Smithtown East and Half Hollow Hills West battling for the championship. “We have a really great bunch of kids,” said Albert, “They have a blue collar work ethic and push themselves out of their comfort zone.” The team is focusing on being a team and having everyone contribute. “We can accomplish more as a team than as an individual,” said Grieco, “We preach everyone makes a contribution and everyone on the team is important to our success. We believe in team first and individual second.” Grieco is in his sixth season as the head coach. With Grieco as the head coach, West Islip won the Suffolk County and Long Island Championship in 2009. The West Islip girls’ varsity soccer team has done that only one other time in 1989, when they were the New York State Champions. Assistant coach Albert has been with the program for many years as head coach of the boys’ soccer team and the girls’ soccer team, and he has spent the last six years working with Greico as the assistant coach. “Nick does the heavy lifting,” said Albert, “He is knowledgeable, passionate and a great game day coach. He passes his passion onto the kids and teaches them how to be successful and work hard.” Last year, the Lions graduated eight seniors but the West Islip girls’ soccer team still has a roster of 28 players this year looking to work hard and continue to be successful. “Nick gets virtually everyone in the game,” said Albert, “Everyone makes a contribution and is ready to play. We have great depth this season and we are looking to capitalize on that.” This year they have 12 seniors, nine sophomores and the rest is made up of

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juniors. Carly Kohler is a junior, who plays center mid-fielder. “Carly has a great work ethic,” said Grieco, “She is extremely strong, has good skills and leaves everything on the field.” Senior Shannon Walter plays center mid-fielder and was all-county last season. “Shannon has a wicked left foot,” said Grieco, “She can dribble around anyone and is dangerous when she has the ball. Shannon is a nice threat for us offensively.” Another all county player from last season is senior defender Nicole Crofton. “Nicole is in charge of covering the opposing teams best forward,” said Grieco, “She has great closing speed and is great at denying the opposition the ball.” Vanessa Costantino started last year as a freshman and plays outside midfielder. “Vanessa has great explosion and an unbelievable work ethic,” said Grieco, “She is the real deal, can score with either foot, and is a big time player for us.” The West Islip girls’ varsity soccer team is currently ranked as the number seven team on Long Island after starting the season unranked. They are continuing to get better and stronger as a team as the season goes on and are hoping to take that into the post season. “I enjoy coaching here. We’ve had a lot of success over the last five years,” said Grieco, “We continue to focus on being a team and being a true family. We believe in each other, care about each other and know that in order to be successful we have to do it as a team. These girls have great personalities and work hard.”

WEST ISLIP GIRLS SOCCER 65


Super Smoothies By Sandy Saracona

S

tudent athletes are sometimes too busy to prepare healthy foods. If you own a blender or even a hand or immersion blender, a smoothie is a great way to get a mix of ingredients to provide the nutrients you need for ultimate performance in your sport. Some smoothie pros include: keeping you hydrated, providing vitamins and minerals, and delivering extra protein and fiber. When you are in a hurry, smoothies are a quick way to start the day and offer the right mix of carbohydrates and protein for a recovery snack after a workout. In addition, smoothies can taste delicious!

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Try these simple combinations and blend them together: •

Start with milk, juice or soy milk as your liquid base.

Add any kind of fruit: fresh, canned or frozen (bananas, peaches, berries, and pineapple are popular).

Get extra protein from pasteurized liquid egg whites, peanut butter, whey or soy protein powder, dry milk powder, and/or yogurt.

Supplement even more vitamins and minerals by adding fresh spinach or kale leaves.

Most athletes think of smoothies as just a protein drink, and yes, it is plentiful in all of the essential amino acids, but athletes need more than just protein. Milk, soy milk and yogurt will provide added calcium and Vitamin D that are typically challenging for athletes to meet the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of. Fruits and vegetables deliver vitamins C and A, antioxidants, and are chock full of fiber. Due to this balance of nutrients, a smoothie is not just a snack, but can serve as a meal. Buying a smoothie already prepared from a café can be just as nutritious, but beware of an abundance of added sugar. If you are cautious about calories, pick one that meets your needs. At home it is more economical and fun to experiment with different ingredients to find your favorite combination of flavors!

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SPORT PSYCHOLOGY OF THE FUTURE By Dr. Tom Ferraro Athletes will get stronger and equipment will get better as sports advance over time. But what about their mental treatment? is always fun to think about the future of any field. Baseball will be different in the future and so will cross country and golf. Equipment is always improving as is fitness. Athletes will be stronger and faster. All this is certain. Anyone who plays a sport seriously sees the changes happen on a yearly basis. But what about sport psychology? What will the changes be in this field?

IT

1

Behavior Modification

Having worked with a variety of professional and elite amateur athletes has made it abundantly clear that they are typically in need of some help. Athletes usually come in after many months or years of suffering and only with great reluctance. Usually, they are in a career-ending slump, have lost all ability to perform up to ability and are hoping for immediate relief. The nature of competitive professional sport is extremely demanding and this lends a feeling of immediacy to the work. The last thing they want is three times per week analysis. The patient is in need of an immediate turnaround and the referral will often come from either the coach or the general manager who wants to know what happened to their $150 million investment. What I usually do is begin the work with a variety of behavioral interventions, which will range from

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hypnosis, RET, visualization, verbal instruction, goal setting, homework, relaxation autogenics, anger management, etc. This part of sports psychology will improve over time so that emotional control on the playing field will be easier to administer.

Athletes will continue to be treated with hypnosis and other techniques to manage emotion on the playing field.

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2

Supportive Psychotherapy

It is also very obvious to me that these very same patients have a right to be treated with long term supportive psychotherapy in order to be able to ventilate, receive solace, get help with problem solving, gain some reality testing, find comfort and receive much needed encouragement. We establish a long-term and weekly structured working relationship, and it is there that they feel the support that they need amidst all the chaos of their profession. In the future, we will see that this element of sports psychology will continue to expand.

Athletes will also be given more supportive techniques in the future to help them cope with stress and sadness.

3

Psychoanalitic Psychotherapy

Athletes also have a right to be diagnosed and treated for their various anxiety disorders, depression, drug or sex addictions, narcissistic or conduct disorders. We see evidence on a daily basis that suggests that athletes have serious issues that need treatment. Tiger Woods had a sex addiction which cost him about $500 million in endorsement money. Michael Phelps’s foray into pot smoking cost him about $50 million in lost endorsement money. General managers and coaches will all eventually learn the hard way that their elite athletes have a hard time coping with day-to-day activities under constant pressure, and will have no choice but to turn to a clinically trained sport psychologist for help. When diagnosis is made and a long term therapeutic relationship is established, we begin to use It has not been difficult to see that this three-part process will become the standard treatment in sports psychology. The world of competitive sports is demanding, and adds high pressure and strain to an athlete’s already complicated and demanding lifestyle. This is what makes it so much fun, but also what causes such emotional damage to the athlete. Short-term cognitive behavioral techniques will continue to be used in the future, but

analytic techniques to help them explore their underlying conflicts and motivations. This is when dream analysis and transference analysis is introduced. This usually saves careers and this part of sport psychology will blossom in the future.

The truth is that athletes suffer with the same neurosis that the rest of the public have and will be treated for this as well.

you will see a growth of more long-term supportive psychological work as well. All serious athletes need a place to ventilate pent up emotions that they have been sitting on for many years. Having worked in this field for as long as I have, I feel certain that this field for as long as I have, I feel certain that this three-part model is the future of sports psychology. You first deal with symptoms, then establish a supportive relationship and

finally treat underlying neurosis. This makes for comfortable athletes, happy coaches and general managers, and an overall better lifestyle and living environment for an athlete to feel relaxed, but also feel confident in their day-to-day abilities in their sport throughout their professional career.

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A HOT

MESS

Avoid Common Summer Training Mistakes by Mike Mejia, CSCS

T

he summer months offer young athletes a great opportunity to get into the best shape possible for the start of school year, and club sports in the fall. Unfortunately, they also serve as the perfect breeding ground for a variety of potentially dangerous training mistakes. From kids training with more weight they can handle in the gym, to coaches and trainers allowing shoddy technique on various speed and agility drills, things get messy in a hurry once the calendar hits July. Before we can truly eradicate this problem, though, we have to know exactly what we’re looking for. This short list is compiled of some of the most glaring summertime workouts blunders. Take a look and see if you’re guilty of any the following infractions.

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1

Rushing Through, or Completely Skipping Warm-Ups: Unfortunately, this is something that is occurring with increasing frequency. From eager young athletes who make a beeline for the weights as soon as they enter the gym, to coaches who start sprinting kids after a couple of rudimentary stretches, this failure to adequately prepare young bodies for intensive training is not only no good for a workout, it’s dangerous. Prior to every workout, practice and sports competition, athletes need to engage

in a thorough, full-body movement prep. Drills like jumping jacks, hip bridges, traveling lunges with rotation and side shuffles will help kids transition from a state of active rest, to rigorous athletic movement. In addition to being sequential in nature—progressively increasing in both intensity and range of motion—it’s imperative that all the drills contained in these types of warm-ups be done with proper technique. Failure to do so may actually increase an athlete’s risk of injury!

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TRAINING UA

Try These Warm-Ups Before Your Next Work Out WARM-UP EXERCISE

REPS

Flings

20

Reverse Lunge with Overhead Reach (alternating sides)

10

Prisoner Squats

10

Spidermans (alternating sides)

10

Supine Hip Bridges

10

Iron Crosses

10

Lateral Lunge with instep touch (alternating sides) Leg Swings (forward & backward)

10

Hip Cradle Walk

10

Prisoner Squats

Lateral Lunge with instep touch (alternating sides)

10 strides

Inch Worm

5-6

High Knees

15 yards

Butt Kickers

15 yards

Side Shuffles

15 yards Reverse Lunge with Overhead Reach (alternating sides)

Hip Cradle Walk

Inch Worm

Supine Hip Bridges

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2

Doing “Speed and Agility” Drills:

Seeing a group of athletes running through agility ladders, or around various configurations of cones with little if any attention being paid to proper running/ change of direction mechanics is another common mistake. While there’s no arguing that these types of drills can go a long way towards helping kids improve their speed, agility, quickness and coordination, they need to be done with proper technique to achieve those results. When the sole emphasis is on how fast the drills are done, and not whether or not the athlete is employing good movement mechanics, any gains that are made will likely be short-lived.

In order to have a lasting effect, speed and agility training must first focus on improving strength and mobility. This way, athletes will not only learn how to apply the necessary force into the ground for effective acceleration and deceleration, but they’ll also be better able to get into the proper positions to avoid injury while doing so. Regular practice of form running drills and proper directional changes (pictured below) will have a much greater impact on speed.

Urine Chart

3

Failing to Fuel and Hydrate Properly: Summer schedules may offer growing athletes more time to sleep, but their lack of structure often throws theta dietary habits out the window. Waking up late and not getting in enough fuel poses a real problem for kids who engage in afternoon sports practices or strenuous training. Getting up late and working out in the afternoon while working out on the bagel with cream cheese you ate an hour earlier will do your body no good. Not taking in enough fluids is another big problem. Many young athletes walk around in an at least a partial state of dehydration as it is; add in outdoor workouts in the summer sun and things can get dangerous in a hurry! While sports drinks can help during intense activities that last over an hour in duration, more often than not, all kids really need to do is increase their intake of good old-fashioned H2O.

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Target

Here’s a great tool for assessing an athlete’s hydration status, along with a few good pre-workout meal/ snacking ideas from a registered dietician, Cristina Rivera, of Nutrition in Motion in Bethpage.

Dehydration

Pre Workout (1-2 Hours Prior to Training) •

1 large apple or banana with 1tbs of nut butter.

Whole wheat pita with 3oz turkey and 1 slice of reduced fat cheese.

PB&J on whole wheat bread, 1tbs of nut butter & 1 tbs of fruit spread.

Trail mix: 1/2 cup of almonds with 1/4 cup of dried fruit & 1/2 cup of pretzels.

1 protein bar: Balance Bar, Cliff Bar, Power Bar or Luna Bar.

Severe Dehydration

—Your target is to make sure your urine is the same color as 1, 2, or 3. —Colors 4 and 5 suggest dehydration. —Colors 6, 7, and 8 suggest severe dehydration

WWW.ULTIMATEATHLETEMAGAZINE.COM


TRAINING UA

3

Rushing Into Advanced Forms of Training: I get it—towing weighted sleds, working the battle ropes, jumping up on platforms and flipping tires looks really cool...especially to motivated young athletes! The truth is though, as effective as these training modalities can be, they’re not suitable for everyone. Most teens have enough work to do in terms of improving things like mobility and core strength before they should even consider going anywhere near these types of exercises. Seeing kids trying to lift a heavy tire off the ground with the posture of a shrimp, or land from a plyometric jump with the inside of their knees practically touching each other is not the way a young athlete should be working out. It’s better to stick to the basics and practice until you’re in great physical shape, and then work on form before jumping into this advanced type of training. It may work great for the RG IIIs and Kobe Bryants of the world (who, by the way, have a lot more training experience under their belts), but perhaps it’s not the best idea for the JV football team.

Instead of trying to be the next Crossfit superstar, focus on the proper execution of staple lifts like squats, dead lifts, bench presses, rows and cleans. Keeping the weights manageable and mastering good technique will help you build a solid training foundation for more advanced forms of training down the road. Besides, summer goes by way too fast to waste valuable time and effort on training the wrong way.

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ULTIMATE ATHLETE


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