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Gardner, R. C. 1985. Social Psychology and Second Language Learning London: Edward Arnold. Schmitt, N., Schmitt, D. and C. Clapham, C. 2001. “Developing and exploring the behaviour of two new versions of the Vocabulary Level Test”. Language Testing 18: 55-88.

Marta Genís & M. Teresa Martín de Lama

Poster Presentation

Curriculum Integration in CLIL: Connecting Teachers University Antonio de Nebrija University Antonio de Nebrija Curriculum integration has gained many followers in the last few decades mainly for two reasons: 1) because students learn best when they make connections of related ideas coming from different subject areas and they find that what they are learning is meaningful for their lives; and 2) because the integrated curriculum reflects a real-life world experience as curricular subjects are not natural divisions but artificial constructs used to organize human knowledge. These pedagogical considerations have reborn with the growing interest in life-long learning and in CLIL methodology at all education levels. Integrating contents within the curriculum implies much more than two teachers combining their classes or teaching their subject-specific material in the same room at the same time. A fully integrated curriculum combines two or more disciplines in a symbiotic manner so that the knowledge of one subject becomes inseparable from that of another subject. Curriculum integration affects teachers, students and institutions. If we teach in an integrated way, students will have a holistic view of the knowledge. The movement towards an integrated curriculum can be then considered as a move forward to a more meaningful learning where concepts are connected and transferred. Moreover, in nowadays global society, the explosion of knowledge increases the amount of issues to be dealt with in the curriculum, where teachers often experience the feeling that there is just not enough time to teach it all. Besides, both teachers and Institutions need to be aware of the fact that collaboration, joint syllabus, teaching and assessment are necessary to implement curricular integration. This paper will explore the different ways in which teachers (aided by institutions) can possibly integrate the curriculum in order to make students’ learning more meaningful. 80

Profile for UAM CLIL

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

Profile for uamclil
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