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(e.g. MacIntyre, 2007; Peng, 2007; Díaz-Pinto, 2009). Although WTC is largely understood as a variable related to the learner, there is evidence that it also is strongly affected by the learning context. With the aim of broadening the range of studies in this area, this study examines the relationship between WTC and achievement in CLIL and non-CLIL learning contexts, trying to provide an answer to the following research questions: Does the CLIL learning context influence the learners’ WTC? Is there a relationship between language achievement and WTC in CLIL contexts? The sample consisted of 185 students of Compulsory Secondary Education from three semi-private schools set in the Balearic Islands. Data were collected through the adapted version of the WTC Scale (Díaz-Pinto, 2009) and the WTC Thermometer (Kamprasertwong, 2010). The results of the between-subjects analyses indicate that CLIL participants exhibit WTC levels above their non-CLIL counterparts, and that learners with higher WTC get better grades in the foreign language. Moreover, within-subjects analyses show that there is no significant variation between CLIL learners in the CLIL context (social science in English) and in the conventional formal instruction context. This study analyzes and discusses the results of research and its pedagogical implications.

Kristiina Skinnari

Thursday 11:30, Room 1

Teachers’ Beliefs on Integration of Content and Language in CLIL University of Jyväskylä Integrating content and language is the core of teaching. In the growing body of CLIL research, there is yet a rather open question about how integration can be defined and how, where and when does it actually happen, in relation to teaching and learning different subject contents and language (s). In addition to meta-level conceptualizations, the practitioners’ understandings and beliefs of integration are central since they affect the actual practices in the classrooms. As beliefs have been shown to be context-specific, information from different CLIL contexts is needed to provide a general view of how integration works in learning content and language. This paper introduces preliminary phases of a study on what integration means to CLIL teachers in Finnish comprehensive school. Although there has been CLIL teaching in Finland for over twenty years, the common curricular guidelines are very general and there is hardly any support from policy makers concerning teacher training or material production. Since the decisions for the implementation of CLIL are made on local school or municipality level teachers’ personal understandings of CLIL affect how teaching is organized and practiced in the classrooms. The study will seek answers to the following questions:

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Profile for UAM CLIL

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

Profile for uamclil
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