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Llinares & Romero, 2007). Those studies found that whole class activities such as “Show and Tell” encouraged a wider variety of communicative functions or speech acts in students’ performance (Llinares 2007b) than group work activities. In this article, the results obtained from those previous studies on pre-school students’ pragmatic performance in the L2 are compared to parallel CLIL students’ pragmatic performance in English at primary and secondary levels. The results of the analysis show that, contrary to the findings reported at the pre-school level, the learners at the primary level perform a wider variety of functions in group work than in whole-class discussions. The study shows the effects of activity type on CLIL students’ pragmatic performance in the L2, as well as the differences and similarities across educational levels.

Elizabet Pladevall

Thursday 15:00, Room 2

Does Limited Exposure to CLIL Make a Difference in Primary School? Autònoma University, Barcelona The emerging focus on the study of Young Language Learners and the various forms in which early teaching of foreign languages is carried out (Nikolov and Mihaljevic Djigunovic, 2011; Dalton-Puffer, 2011; Edelenbos et al. 2007) requires rigorous research on whether one of the most commonly used methods to enhance early language learning, namely CLIL, is clearly effective among this type of learners. Within the context of the CLIL-SLA Project, a funded two-year longitudinal study on the implementation of CLIL and its effect on the students’ foreign language proficiency and attitude in five primary schools, the present study explores how 5th grade students exposed to EFL instruction alone (control groups) and to EFL+CLIL instruction (experimental groups) developed their language skills over the first year of the study. Three of the five schools taking part in the study implemented CLIL in their Science classes (N=165) and the remaining two did it in their Arts and Crafts classes (N=51). Control and experimental groups had been exposed to the same amount of input at the time of testing, which is crucially important if real language gains are to be determined. Exposure to English previous to the study, extracurricular exposure to English during the study and whether the students were high or low achievers prior to the study were taken into account in the statistical analysis. Results of the listening and reading and writing tests indicate modest language gains in both EFL and EFL+CLIL groups in both the Science and the Arts schools. Yet language gains are greater in the EFL groups than in the EFL+CLIL groups in all schools, with significant differences in favor of EFL students in Arts and Crafts schools. This difference in favor of EFL students in all schools becomes more 61

Profile for UAM CLIL

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

Profile for uamclil
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