Page 42

This talk will discuss findings yielded by my mixed-method doctoral project on the interplay of thinking skills and language in the output of eleven pupils following a bilingual programme in Romania. The language associated with higher-order thinking (Bloom 1956, Anderson and Krathwohl 2001) is contented to be distinctly different from the language triggered by lower-order thinking (Cummins 1986, 1999, Baker and Hornberger 2001). A basic interpersonal communicative skill (BICS) is linked to lower-order processing whereas higher-order processing leads to the accruement of cognitive academic language proficiency (CALP). For higher-order thinking to occur, pupils need to be in mediums where rich, complex input is available and equally complex output is required. Theoretically, the dual focus in the CLIL approach allows for a capitalisation on content as a means of triggering both lower, but mostly higherorder thinking and hence an efficient development of CALP. However, research is yet to demonstrate if this is the case. This study was conducted over a period of ten weeks in two schools in Iași, Romania. Three main data collection tools were employed. The case study consisted of eleven focus pupils selected through a stratified sampling procedure. Structured observations of ten EFL and ten CLIL consecutive lessons were used to map the pupils’ ability to think and express themselves adequately in English as a result of the two teaching practices. Also, the eleven focus pupils participated in eight purpose-built consecutive content-based tasks and eight consecutive linguisticbased tasks in English. These tasks sought to examine if pupils drew on their CALP and HOTS and whether there were any differences in the two task types. Semistructured interviews with the pupils and the teachers completed the data collection. NVivo10 was employed to code the data first from a linguistic perspective followed by a cognitive one. Codes were created employing both a bottom-up and top-down approach. Discourse analysis at utterance level was used to identify and label evidence of CALP and HOTS. Findings were yielded by comparing frequency runs of CALP and HOTS in the linguistic-based and content based tasks at pupil level and group level. The same frequency runs were performed for the classroom data (i.e. the EFL and CLIL lessons).

Nagore Ipiña & Pilar Sagasta

Saturday 11:30, Room 1

Attitudes Towards English in a Multilingual Context: A Diagnosis of Infant-Teacher Education Students Immersed in a CLIL Experience University of Mondragon University of Mondragon 42

Profile for UAM CLIL

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

Profile for uamclil
Advertisement