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(Woods, 1996) system, and in particular with their understanding that they were NOT language teachers. Typical video clips and transcripts will be presented and the major findings of this study discussed, relating them in particular to consequences for PRESET and INSET CLIL. Thus, it is hoped that this talk will be of particular interest to CLIL educators and novice CLIL teachers. References Coyle, D., Hood, P., & Marsh, D. (2010). CLIL: Content and language integrated learning. Cambridge: CUP. Dalton-Puffer, C. (2007). Discourse in CLIL Classrooms. Amsterdam : Benjamins. Edwards, J. (2009). Language and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Presss. Grosjean, F., & Li, P. (2013). The Psycholinguistics of Bilingualism. Chichester: WileyBlackwell. Llinares, A., Morton, T., & Whittaker, R. (2012). The roles of language in CLIL. Cambridge: CUP. Mehisto, P., Frigols , M.-J., & Marsh, D. (2008). Uncovering CLIL. MacMillan. Perez-Canado, M. (2011). CLIL research in Europe:past, present, and future. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism , 1-27. Woods, D. (1996). Teacher cognition in language teaching: beliefs, decision-making and classroom practice. Cambridge: CUP.

Roxana Herescu

Thursday 11:30, Room 2

The Role of Higher-Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL): A Case Study of Learners of English at Two Upper-Secondary Schools in Romania Cambridge University

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Profile for UAM CLIL

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

Profile for uamclil
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