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language leads to longer, more intensive engagement with mathematical content. For example, CLIL learners tend to use the text more profoundly for stepwise deduction of a mathematical model. The talk presents an overview of the methodology and main results of the study, with a special emphasis on the Integrated Language Mathematics Model (ILMM) that has been designed. References Clarkson, P. (1992): Language and mathematics: A comparison of bilingual and monolingual students of mathematics. In: Educational Studies in Mathematics 23(4), 417-429. Dawe, L. (1983): Bilingualism and mathematics reasoning in English as a second language. In: Educational Studies in Mathematics 14(4), 325-353.

Andreas Bonnet & Stephan Breidbach Thursday 13:00, Room 1

The Reflexive Side of CLIL: Theoretical Frameworks and Ongoing Research Related to Identity Construction in the CLIL Classroom University of Hamburg Humboldt University of Berlin As CLIL is moving into the educational mainstream across Europe, the empirical substantiation of its multi-faceted goals is more important than ever before. From different relevant sources (e.g. EU Action Plan 2004-2006), four target areas of CLIL can be identified: CLIL is supposed to foster language competence, subject matter competence, metacognitive abilities and higher order thinking skills, as well as the development of reflexive multilingual and -cultural identities. In terms of language and cultural policy, the last area – the reflexive side of CLIL as one might say – is paramount for the advancement of European integration. Unfortunately though, this area is still almost a blind spot in CLIL research, the bulk of which is still devoted to research into the area of language competence. The paper will discuss how this shortage can be overcome. First, we will give a short account of the patchy research situation in this important area. Second, we will map existing concepts from applied linguistics, cultural theory, education, philosophy, and sociology, such as third space (e.g. Bhabha, Kramsch), subjection (Butler), developmental task (e.g. Havighurst), multilingual and -cultural identity (e.g. Norton, Pavlenko, Piller, Toohey), and Bildung (e.g. Koller), that can be used to model the reflexive side of CLIL. Third, we will sketch related empirical methodologies, such as

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Profile for UAM CLIL

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

ALP-CLIL Abstract Book  

Here you will find all the information about the ALP-CLIL Conference (5-8 June 2013)

Profile for uamclil
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