Page 1


UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT HOPE AND TEXARKANA

2017-2019 College Catalog Volume XXII

1


Chancellor’s Welcome Welcome to the University of Arkansas at Hope and Texarkana For more than 50 years, the University of Arkansas at Hope and Texarkana has been committed to providing our students with a world class education at the most affordable cost in the State. At the same time we are committed to connecting students and community partners to a high quality education, and committed to supporting a culture of academic, occupational, personal growth and enrichment programs throughout the region. As you explore all the opportunities awaiting you at UA Hope-Texarkana, I am confident you will discover that we are your bridge to a brighter future through education. With campuses in Hope and Texarkana, Arkansas, we are committed to serving the entire region. Our faculty and staff pride themselves on the quality, student-focused education we provide our students. This fully accredited, open access institution will help you achieve your educational goals and career dreams. Whether you are seeking your first two years of a traditional college education or seeking to gain needed training in a specialized field, UA Hope- Texarkana is ready to help you succeed. UA Hope-Texarkana is a proud member of the University of Arkansas System. We work very closely with the University of Arkansas family to maximize opportunities for our students and communities. In addition, UA Hope-Texarkana also partners with other institutions to offer select bachelors and master’s degrees through distance learning, as well as partnering with area high schools to provide concurrent credit for students. UA Hope-Texarkana is proud of its reputation for excellence in teaching and its commitment to providing personal enrichment opportunities for our diverse student population. We are committed to expanding opportunities for the region we serve while remaining one of the most affordable higher education institutions in Arkansas. Our college catalog provides you with important information about UA Hope- Texarkana courses, programs, services and policies. All these opportunities and more are waiting for you at UA Hope-Texarkana. To learn more, visit our website at www.uacch.edu or come by one of our campuses and let us show you around.

Chris Thomason

Chris Thomason, Chancellor 870-722-8201 * chris.thomason@uacch.edu

2


Student Responsibility Students are responsible for knowing the information contained in this catalog/handbook. It should be read carefully for rules, regulations, policies, etc. While the College makes every effort to make changes only as revisions to this document, the College reserves the right to make changes to policy contained herein as circumstances may require. The latest version of the college catalog is available online at www.uacch.edu.

3


Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chancellor’s Welcome..................................................................................................................................2 Student Responsibility .................................................................................................................................3 UAHT Academic Calendar...........................................................................................................................9 Online Calendar...........................................................................................................................................10 Important Information - emergency contact list & severe weather policy..................................................11 Who to see ..................................................................................................................................................12 Who to see - Texarkana campus specific ....................................................................................................16 GENERAL INFORMATION.......................................................................................................................17 Equal Opportunity Statement .....................................................................................................................17 Student Responsibility ................................................................................................................................17 Accreditations .............................................................................................................................................18 Advisory Committees .................................................................................................................................19 UA Hope-Texarkana profile .......................................................................................................................20 History.........................................................................................................................................................20 Mission Statement .....................................................................................................................................20 Institutional Purposes .................................................................................................................................20 Vision Statement .........................................................................................................................................21 Value Statements.........................................................................................................................................21 Computer Service Policy.............................................................................................................................22 Institutional Advancement ..........................................................................................................................23 UAHT Foundation.......................................................................................................................................23 Library.........................................................................................................................................................23 Bookstore.....................................................................................................................................................24 Food Services..............................................................................................................................................24 ADMISSION INFORMATION...................................................................................................................25 Admissions Policy.......................................................................................................................................25 Unconditional Admissions Policy...............................................................................................................25 Conditional Admissions Policy...................................................................................................................25 Institutional Student Success Plan Enrollment............................................................................................26 Non-Credit...................................................................................................................................................27 Transfer Students.........................................................................................................................................27 Arkansas Course Transfer Systems (ACTS) ..............................................................................................27 Admissions Appeals Process.......................................................................................................................28 Freshman Assessment and Placement Program at State Colleges and Universities in Arkansas................28 Academic Skills...........................................................................................................................................28 UAHT Placement Chart .............................................................................................................................28 COMPASS Testing......................................................................................................................................30 College Credit Opportunities for High School Students.............................................................................31 High School Student/Concurrent Enrollment Admissions Policy...............................................................31 International Student Admissions Policy....................................................................................................31 Prior Learning Assessment..........................................................................................................................32 College Level Examination Program (CLEP).............................................................................................33 Advanced Placement (AP)..........................................................................................................................34 College Catalog...........................................................................................................................................35 Catalog Privilege.........................................................................................................................................35 Classification of Students............................................................................................................................35 Academic Clemency....................................................................................................................................35 Application for Re-Admission....................................................................................................................36 Attendance...................................................................................................................................................36 4


Adding Classes............................................................................................................................................36 Auditing a Course........................................................................................................................................36 Withdrawal from Courses............................................................................................................................36 Repeating Courses.......................................................................................................................................37 Minimum Class Size and Cancellation of Classes......................................................................................37 Credit for Courses.......................................................................................................................................37 Course Loads...............................................................................................................................................37 Request for Course Overload......................................................................................................................37 Course Length.............................................................................................................................................37 Grades and Grade Points.............................................................................................................................38 Incomplete Grade Policy.............................................................................................................................38 Vice Chancellor’s List.................................................................................................................................38 Chancellor’s Honor Roll..............................................................................................................................38 Academic Probation/Suspension.................................................................................................................38 Social Security Number...............................................................................................................................39 Student Records...........................................................................................................................................39 Arkansas Course Transfer System...............................................................................................................39 Catalog Changes..........................................................................................................................................39 Articulation Agreements..............................................................................................................................40 The Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009..................................................................................40 General Graduation Requirements..............................................................................................................40 Graduation Rates.........................................................................................................................................40 TUITION AND FEES.................................................................................................................................41 Residency Requirements.............................................................................................................................41 Fee Schedule Per Semester..........................................................................................................................41 Health Professions Courses/Programs Additional Fees..............................................................................42 Lab Fees......................................................................................................................................................42 Student I.D. Cards.......................................................................................................................................43 Refund Policy..............................................................................................................................................44 Refund of Registration Fees........................................................................................................................44 Continuing Education and Community Education refunds.........................................................................44 TUITION WAVER POLICY.......................................................................................................................45 FINANCIAL AID...........................................................................................................................................47 General Information ...................................................................................................................................47 Financial Aid Application Process (FAFSA)...............................................................................................47 Financial Aid SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY.......................................................47 Credit Hour Requirement............................................................................................................................47 Maximum Lenght of Time..........................................................................................................................47 Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility.....................................................................................................................48 Good Standing for Financial Aid a student must:.......................................................................................48 Financial Aid Warning.................................................................................................................................48 Financial Aid Probation, Suspension, and Reinstatement ..........................................................................49 Financial Aid SAP Appeal...........................................................................................................................49 Transfer Students.........................................................................................................................................50 Repeated Courses........................................................................................................................................50 Pre-College Level Courses..........................................................................................................................50 Financial Aid Refund Policy.......................................................................................................................50 High School Transcripts .............................................................................................................................51 Ability-to-Benefit (ATB) Policy..................................................................................................................51 Student Status: Dependent or Independent.................................................................................................51 5


Majors..........................................................................................................................................................52 Priority Deadlines for Financial Aid...........................................................................................................52 Federal programs.........................................................................................................................................52 Pell Grant.....................................................................................................................................................52 Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)...............................................................52 Federal Work Study (FWS).........................................................................................................................52 William D. Ford Direct Student Loan Program..........................................................................................52 Scholarship Stacking Policy........................................................................................................................52 UAHT Institutional Scholarships................................................................................................................52 Chancellor’s Scholarship.............................................................................................................................53 Valedictorian/Salutatorian Scholarship.......................................................................................................53 Honors Scholarship.....................................................................................................................................53 Bridge Scholarship......................................................................................................................................53 GED Scholarship.........................................................................................................................................54 UAHT Foundation Scholarships.................................................................................................................54 UAHT Waiverts...........................................................................................................................................54 UAHT Foundation Scholarships.................................................................................................................54 Other Programs............................................................................................................................................54 Department of Veterans Affairs...................................................................................................................54 STUDENT SERVICES.................................................................................................................................55 Statement of Student Services.....................................................................................................................55 Statement of TRiO Student Support Services.............................................................................................55 Accidents or Illness.....................................................................................................................................55 ADA Student Referral Process....................................................................................................................55 Admissions Appeals Committee.................................................................................................................55 Counseling and Guidance............................................................................................................................55 Career Center...............................................................................................................................................55 Career Pathways Initiative...........................................................................................................................56 Student Advising System.............................................................................................................................56 Student Advising System.............................................................................................................................56 Testing Center..............................................................................................................................................56 ACCUPLACER...........................................................................................................................................56 ACCUPLACER Test Fee Schedule ............................................................................................................56 Proctored Exams..........................................................................................................................................57 ONLINE COURSE MIDTERM and/or FINALS ......................................................................................57 GED®..........................................................................................................................................................57 NOCTI.........................................................................................................................................................57 ATI-TEAS...................................................................................................................................................57 NLN-NACE.................................................................................................................................................58 Tutoring Center...........................................................................................................................................58 Student Rights Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)......................................58 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES...............................................................................................................58 Rights and Responsibilities as a Student ....................................................................................................58 Student Conduct..........................................................................................................................................58 Reporting Violations....................................................................................................................................59 Discipline Procedures..................................................................................................................................59 Response to Drug and Alcohol Abuse and Drug-Free Campus Policy.......................................................61 UAHT Policy for Discrimination, Harassment, Retaliation and Sexual Misconduct.................................61 Housing.......................................................................................................................................................76 Parking/Traffic Regulations.........................................................................................................................76 6


Tools............................................................................................................................................................76 Campus Security..........................................................................................................................................77 Health Professions Students Criminal Background Check.........................................................................77 Student Complaint/Appeals/Grievance Procedures....................................................................................77 Grade Appeals.............................................................................................................................................78 UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS ON-LINE CONSORTIUM STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEAL...........79 Clubs/Organizations ...................................................................................................................................81 Arkansas Licensed Practical Nursing Association (ALPNA).....................................................................81 Campus Crusades for Christ (CRU)............................................................................................................81 Fine Arts Club.............................................................................................................................................81 Funeral Services Club.................................................................................................................................81 Information Technology Club.....................................................................................................................82 Multicultural Club.......................................................................................................................................82 Phi Theta Kappa (PTK)...............................................................................................................................82 Shooting Sports Club...................................................................................................................................82 Student Government Association (SGA)....................................................................................................82 T&I Club.....................................................................................................................................................82 TRiO Student Success Club........................................................................................................................82 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS...........................................................................................................................83 General Education Statement......................................................................................................................83 Academic Skills...........................................................................................................................................83 State Minimum Core Required for Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, and Baccalaureate Degrees.83 Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS).................................................................................................85 Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009.........................................................................................85 Degree and Certificate Options Explained..................................................................................................85 Associate of Arts (AA)................................................................................................................................85 Associate of Science (AS)...........................................................................................................................86 Associate of Applied Science (AAS)..........................................................................................................86 Associate of General Studies.......................................................................................................................86 Technical Certificate (TC)...........................................................................................................................86 Certificate of Proficiency (CP) ...................................................................................................................86 Certificate of General Studies......................................................................................................................86 List of Degrees and Certificates..................................................................................................................86 Recommended Courses of Study and Degree Requirements......................................................................88 Student Responsibility.................................................................................................................................88 Programs of Study.......................................................................................................................................89 Accounting..................................................................................................................................................89 Business.......................................................................................................................................................91 Commercial and Residential Equipment Maintenance Repair....................................................................95 Criminal Justice...........................................................................................................................................96 Diesel Technology......................................................................................................................................100 Early Childhood (Day Care Professional)..................................................................................................102 Emergency Medical Services.....................................................................................................................105 Funeral Services.........................................................................................................................................108 General Education with Transfer Options..................................................................................................114 General Technology....................................................................................................................................117 Health Professions......................................................................................................................................121 Health, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning.....................................................................................................122 Human Services..........................................................................................................................................123 Industrial Electricity ..................................................................................................................................125 7


Industrial Maintenance...............................................................................................................................126 Information Technology.............................................................................................................................128 Medical Office Management......................................................................................................................130 Nursing.......................................................................................................................................................132 Power Plant Technology.............................................................................................................................138 Power Plant Technology.............................................................................................................................141 Welding.......................................................................................................................................................143 Partnership Programs.................................................................................................................................144 Industry Training and Continuing Education.............................................................................................155 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS........................................................................................................................156 Course Descriptions...................................................................................................................................156 GOVERNANCE, STAFF, AND FACULTY ...........................................................................................184 Campus Maps...............................................................................................................................................192 General Index...............................................................................................................................................194

8


UAHT Academic Calendar Fall Semester 2017 August 1 (T) August 3 (TH) August 16-18 (W-F) August 21 (M) August 21 – 23 (M-W) August 29 (T) September 4 (M) September 5 (T) October 13 (F) October 16 (M) October 27(F) October 27 (F) November 1 (W) November 20-21 (M-T) November 22-24 (W-F) December 8 (F ) December 11-14 (M-TH)

New Student Orientation Hope New Student Orientation Texarkana Extended Hours Fall Registration 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Classes Begin LATE Registration Last Day to change from Audit to Credit College Closed (Labor Day) Census Day Fast track I classes end Fast track II classes start Last Day to Withdraw from Classes Last Day to change from Credit to Audit Spring Registration Begins No Classes, campus open College Closed (Thanksgiving Holiday) Last Day of Classes Final Exams- Faculty unavailable for registration this week Final Grades Due to Registrar’s Office by 11:00 a.m. Deadline to return fall books Campus Open for students Campus Closed

December 15 (F) December 15 (F) December 18 –20 Dec 21-Jan 1, 2018 Spring Semester 2018 January 2 (T) January 3 (W) January 8 – 9 (M-T)

Offices Open Reporting Day for Faculty Extended Hours Spring Registration 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. M-T Classes Begin LATE Registration-8:00- 6:00 p.m. (W-TH); Friday 8:00-5:00 pm College Closed (M.L. King, Jr. Birthday) Last Day to Change from Audit to Credit Census Day Fast track I classes end Fast track II classes begin Last Day to Withdraw from Classes Last Day to change from Credit to Audit Spring Break – College Closed No classes, campus open Campus Closed Fall & Summer Registration Begins Last Day of Classes Final Exams-Faculty unavailable for registration this week Final Grades Due to Registrar’s Office by 11:00 a.m. Deadline to Return Spring Books Faculty on campus. May Intersession Begins Graduation Campus closed on Fridays May Intersession Ends Grades Due by 11:00 a.m. College Closed (Memorial Day)

January 10 (W) January 10– 12 (W-F) January 15 (M) January 18 (R) January 25 (TH) March 2 (F) March 5 (M) March 16 (F) March 16 (F) March 19-23 (M –F) March 19-22 (M-TH) March 23 (F) April 3 (T) April 27 (F) April 30- May 3 (M -TH) May 4 (F) May 4 (F) May 7 (M) May 7 (M) May 8 (T) May 14 to July 27 May 24 (TH) May 28 (M) 9


May Intercession (Maymester 2018) May 7 (M) May 24 (TH)

May Intersession Begins May Intersession Ends Grades Due by 11:00 a.m.

First Summer Semester 2018 May 29 (T) May 30 (W) June 5 (T) June 14 (TH) June 27 (W) June 27 (W) June 28 (TH)

Classes Begin (Summer I) Last Day to Register for Summer I Census Day Last Day to Withdraw from Classes Classes End/Final Exams Deadline to Return Summer I Books Final Grades Due to Registrar’s Office by 11:00 am

Second Summer Semester 2018 July 2 (M) July 3 (T) July 4 (W) July 10 (T) July 19 (TH) August 1 (W) August 2 (TH) August 2 (TH) August 3 (F)

Classes Begin (Summer II) Last Day to Register for Summer II College closed- Independence Holiday Census Day Last day to Withdraw from classes *Last day for administrative withdrawal Classes End/Final Exams Deadline to Return Summer II Books Final Grades Due to Registrar’s Office by 11:00 am

Online Calendar

Online Fall 2017 October 4 (W) October 9-11 (M-W) November 9 (Th) November 30 (Th) December 4-6 (M-W) December 7 (Th) Online Spring 2018 January 9 (T) noon January 10 (W) January 25 (TH) March 5-7 (M-W) March 9 (F) March 12 (M) March 12 (M) March 16 (F) April 20 (F) April 23-25 (M-W) April 26 (F) May 4 (F) Online Summer 2018 May 29 (T) May 30 (W) June 4 (M) June 12 (T) July 25-26 (W-Th) July 27 (F)

Spring Syllabi/Textbook Adoptions due to campus contacts Midterm grades due by 11:00 am Last day to DROP Last day to withdraw from an online course with a “W” Proctored final exams Final Grades due by 11:00 am Registration for online classes end at noon Classes Begin Census Day Mid-Term Exams Fast track I classes end Mid-Term Grades Due (11:00) Fast track II classes begin Last day to student withdrawal Last day for *administrative withdrawal Final Exams Online Grades Due Deadline to Return Spring Textbooks Last day to register for online class Online courses “open” Online assignments begin Census Day (10th day from June 4) Final Exams/Return Summer Textbooks Final Grades are due

*Administrative withdrawals are done through the Vice Chancellors office for extenuating circumstances and are for courses taken through UAHT only. See student handbook for full procedure. 10


Important Information - emergency contact list & severe weather policy In Case of Emergency UA Hope-Texarkana Student Services Hope Police Department Hope Fire Department Medical Park Hospital Pafford EMS Ambulance Hempstead County Sheriff’s Office Texarkana Campus (fire, ambulance, police)

911 722-8227 777-3434 777-2311 777-2323 777-3334 777-6727 911

Severe Weather Policy If severe and unexpected weather conditions should force the University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana to close offices and/or cancel classes, the Chancellor will instruct the Department of Institutional Advancement to notify area media which will then broadcast the decision. This decision will normally be made by 6 a.m. If students do not hear a media announcement that the College is closed, classes are canceled, or classes will begin late, they should proceed as usual. Students should exercise judgment for personal safety regardless of College announcements since UofA Hope- Texarkana administration is unable to review all road conditions throughout the College’s service area. Should a situation arise during the normal workday after students, faculty, and staff have arrived on campus, the Chancellor will announce the decision through normal campus communications such as e-mail. If the decision involves the cancellation of evening classes, area media will also broadcast the announcement.

11


Who to see FOR ACADEMIC PROBATION/ SUSPENSION ADA COMPLIANCE

ADMISSIONS ADVERTISING

ARTS AND HUMANITIES DIVISION ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE ONLINE AUDIOVISUAL NEEDS BOOKSTORE - IRON HORSE DEPOT BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY, AND EDUCATION DIVISION

WHO

WHERE

STUDENT CENTER, DIANA SYATA, REGISTRAR SECOND FLOOR (SC 229) BRIAN BERRY, STUDENT CENTER, VICE CHANCELLOR FOR SECOND FLOOR (SC 229) STUDENT SERVICES JUDY ANDERSON, STUDENT CENTER, FIRST DEAN OF ENROLLMENT FLOOR (SC 103) MANAGEMENT AMANDA LANCE, ADMINISTRATION ADVERTISING/ BUILDING (AC 153) PUBLICATIONS COORDINATOR DISTANCE LEARNING JAN WHATLEY, DEAN CENTER (DL 104 ) DISTANCE LEARNING MELANIE DILLARD CENTER (DL 201) INSTITUTIONAL TECHNICAL AND TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIAL BUILDING COORDINATOR (TI 190) JILL BOBO

STUDENT CENTER DISTANCE LEARNING CENTER, FIRST FLOOR (DL 142)

EDWARD LAMB, DEAN

PHONE 722-8220 722-8227

722-8174 722-8243

722-8236 722-8167 722-8292 722-8230

722-8262

CAMPUS EVENTS CALENDAR CAMPUS CRIMES

HEATHER EASTERLING

HEMPSTEAD HALL

722-8565

MIKE FIELDING, CHIEF OF POLICE

CAMPUS POLICE OFFICE (AC)

CAMPUS TOURS

MELISSA MULLHOLLAND, DIRECTOR OF STUDENT RELATIONS SONYA THOMAS, DIRECTOR CAREER PATHWAYS DEMECHIA ROWE, COORDINATOR OF CAREER SERVICES ADADEMIC ADVISOR SANDRA CHAMPION, PROGRAM CHAIR JENNIFER BAILEY

STUDENT CENTER, FIRST FLOOR (SC 108)

722-8570 703-6764 331-1403 722-8228

LEIGH QUILLIN, DIRECTOR OF TESTING

TESTING CENTER, STUDENT CENTER FIRST FLOOR (SC 107) RAPERT LIBRARY COMPLEX HEMPSTEAD HALL 104

CAREER PATHWAYS

CAREER SERVICES CENTER CHANGES IN SCHEDULE CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE PROGRAM COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR ACCUPLACER TESTING

COMPUTER LABS LIBRARY COMMUNITY EDUCATION

LIBRARY ANNA POWELL

12

STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER

722-8527

STUDENT CENTER (SC 119) 722-8222

FACULTY OFFICE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 148) TEXARKANA PROFESSIONS BUILDING (TKP)

722-8208 722-8109

722-8247

722-8250 722-8102


FOR

WHO

WHERE

PHONE

BRIAN BERRY, VICE COUNSELING SERVICES CHANCELLOR (PERSONAL AND CAREER) FOR STUDENT SERVICES

STUDENT CENTER, SECOND FLOOR (SC 229)

722-8227

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM

JAN WHATLEY, DEAN

DISTANCE LEARNING CENTER (DL 104 )

722-8236

DIESEL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

REGINALD ROY, PROGRAM CHAIR

TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDING (TI 151)

722-8110

DISABILITY COUNSELOR

STEVEN OGDEN, ADA COUNSELOR STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 136)

722-8248

DROP/ADD CLASS

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

FACULTY OFFICE

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM

SANDRA CHAMPION, PROGRAM CHAIR

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 148)

722-8208

FEES

BUSINESS OFFICE

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 104)

722-8213

STUDENT CENTER, SECOND FLOOR (SC 213)

722-8264

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 153)

722-8516

FINANCIAL AID

FOUNDATION FUNERAL SERVICE EDUCATION PROGRAM

BECKY WILSON, DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AID JILL BOBO, INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT KAREN DAVIS, PROGRAM CHAIR

HEALTH PROFESSIONS DIVISION

KAREN DAVIS, DEAN

HEMPSTEAD HALL

DOLLY HENLEY, DIRECTOR

GRADUATION APPLICATIONS

DIANA SYATA, REGISTRAR

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER (ST 120) SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER (ST 120)

LEO RATELIFF

I.D. CARDS

ENROLLMENT SERVICES

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY PROGRAM

MICHAEL HOLCOMBE

INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

SCOTT BITTLE, PROGRAM CHAIR

INDUSTRY TRAINING

ANNA POWELL, DIRECTOR OF INDUSTRY AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

13

722-8278

HEMPSTEAD HALL (HH 103)

722-8565

STUDENT CENTER, SECOND FLOOR (SC 226)

722-8220

TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDING (TI 107)

HEATING, VENTILATION, AND AIR CONDITIONING PROGRAM

722-8206

STUDENT CENTER (SC 103) TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDING (TI 131) TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDING (TI 121) HEMPSTEAD HALL (HH 104)

722-8109

722-8524 722-8112

722-8113

722-8162


FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH LIBRARY LOST AND FOUND MARKETING

WHO

WHERE

JILL BOBO, ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT JOHN HOLLIS, DEAN OF INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS JOHN HOLLIS, DEAN OF INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS DANITA ORMAND, INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH OFFICER MARIELLE MCFARLAND, LIBRARIAN ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT CASEY CURTIS, COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

MATH AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISION

MICHAEL COX, DEAN

MEAL TICKETS

BUSINESS OFFICE

MEETING ROOM SCHEDULING PARKING STICKERS

ENROLLMENT OFFICE

PERSONAL COUNSELING

PHYLLIS HAMILTON, COUNSELOR

POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGY

CLAYTON MARTIN, CHAIR

PRACTICAL NURSING PROGRAM

CYNDI GRAHAM, PROGRAM CHAIR

RECRUITING SCHOLARSHIPS

SECURITY/ EMERGENCIES

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 153)

722-8516

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, (AC 166)

722-8209

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, (AC 166) ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 103) RAPERT LIBRARY COMPLEX (LB 101) STUDENT CENTER FIRST FLOOR (SC 103) ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 153) DISTANCE LEARNING CENTER (ST 125) ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

CASEY CURTIS, COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN

MEDIA RELATIONS

PHONE

722-8251 722-8524 722-8241 722-8280 722-8213

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING (AC 153)

722-8241

HEMPSTEAD HALL

722-8565

STUDENT CENTER, SECOND FLOOR (SC229 & SC 103) STUDENT CENTER, SECOND FLOOR (SC 229) TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDING (TI 172) SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER (ST 118)

722-8220, 722-8524 722-8225 722-8109

722-8505

PRESLEY CAPPS, ENROLLMENT SPECIALIST JUDY ANDERSON, DEAN OF ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

STUDENT CENTER, FIRST FLOOR (SC 107)

722-8172

STUDENT CENTER, FIRST FLOOR (SC 110)

722-8174

MIKE FIELDING CHIEF OF POLICE

CAMPUS POLICE OFFICE (AC)

722-8570 OR 703-6764

STUDENT CENTER, SECOND FLOOR (SC 229)

722-8227

BRIAN BERRY, VICE STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND CHANCELLOR ORGANIZATIONS FOR STUDENT SERVICES

14


FOR STUDENT SCHEDULES TEACHING (AAT) PROGRAM TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL DIVISION TESTING TEXARKANA CAMPUS TEXTBOOKS TRANSCRIPTS TUITION AND FEE PAYMENT TUTORING UA-FAYETTEVILLE DISTANCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS UAMS RN AND DISTANCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE CONTENT MANAGEMENT/SOCIAL MEDIA WELDING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM WITHDRAWAL FROM CLASS WORK STUDY PROGRAM

WHO

WHERE

STUDENT CENTER REGISTRAR’S OFFICE SECOND FLOOR (SC DISTANCE LEARNING EDWARD LAMB DL142 TECHNICAL AND JENNIFER BAILEY, DEAN INDUSTRIAL BUILDING (TI 107) TESTING CENTER, LEIGH QUILLIN, STUDENT CENTER FIRST DIRECTOR OF TESTING FLOOR (SC 107) TEXARKANA CAMPUS JOLANE COOK, DIRECTOR CENTER (TKA 116) RAPERT LIBRARY LIBRARY MANAGER COMPLEX (LB 106) STUDENT CENTER, DIANA SYATA, REGISTRAR SECOND FLOOR (SC 229) ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS OFFICE BUILDING (AC 104) MARY WHITE, DIRECTOR ADMINISTRATION OF STUDENT BUILDING (AC 135) SUPPORT SERVICES UNIVERSITY GLOBAL CAMPUS OF ARKANSASFAYETTEVILLE, ARK. SUSANNE TULLOS, RAPERT LIBRARY INSTRUCTOR COMPLEX STUDENT CENTER, FINANCIAL OFFICE SECOND FLOOR (SC 110) AMANDA LANCE, ADVERTISING & ADMINISTRATION PUBLICATIONS BUILDING (AC 153) COORDINATOR TECHNICAL AND CHARLIE SCOGGINS, INDUSTRIAL BUILDING PROGRAM CHAIR (TI 181) STUDENT CENTER, DIANA SYATA, REGISTRAR SECOND FLOOR (SC 229) BECKY WILSON, STUDENT CENTER, DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL SECOND FLOOR (SC 213) AID

15

PHONE 722-8221 722-8262 722-8152

722-8247 870-474-0021 722-8250 722-8220 722-8213 722-8249 800-952-1165 TOLL FREE 722-8185 722-8264

722-8243

722-8117 722-8220 722-8264


Who to see - Texarkana campus specific FOR

WHO

WHERE

CAMPUS CRIMES

LYNN SANDERS, CAMPUS POLICE

TEXARKANA PROFESSIONS BUILDING (TKP)

COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR (C.A.R.E)

JENNIFER BAILEY

TEXARKANA PROFESSIONS BUILDING (TKP)

ID CARDS LOST AND FOUND PARKING STICKERS STUDENT SERVICES TEXARKANA CAMPUS

866-963-5060

722-8109

TEXARKANA PROFESSIONS BUILDING (TKP)

COMPUTER LAB E-LIBRARY

PHONE

TEXARKANA CAMPUS CENTER (TKA 103) DONNA CARTER, RECEPTIONIST DONNA CARTER, RECEPTIONIST DONNA CARTER, RECEPTIONIST MISTY HUGHES, STUDENT SERVICES SPECIALIST JOLANE COOK, DIRECTOR

16

TEXARKANA CAMPUS CENTER (TKA LOBBY) TEXARKANA CAMPUS CENTER (TKA LOBBY) TEXARKANA CAMPUS CENTER (TKA LOBBY) TEXARKANA CAMPUS CENTER (TKA 101) TEXARKANA CAMPUS CENTER (TKA 116)

866-963-5060 866-963-5060 866-963-5060 866-963-5060 870-474-0021


GENERAL INFORMATION Equal Opportunity Statement University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana Equal Opportunity Statement The University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana is an equal opportunity college. Discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, disability, age, veteran status, or any other category protected by law is prohibited. Any questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the College’s Affirmative Action Officer. 2500 South Main Street/P.O. Box 140 Hope, Arkansas 71802-0140 Phone: (870) 777-5722 Fax: (870) 777-5957 www.uacch.edu

Student Responsibility Students are responsible for knowing the information contained in this catalog/handbook. It should be read carefully for rules, regulations, policies, etc. While the College makes every effort to make changes only as revisions to this document, the College reserves the right to make changes to policy contained herein as circumstances may require. The latest version of the college catalog is available online at www.uacch.edu

17


Accreditations • The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1413, Telephone: (800) 621-7440, Fax: (312) 263-7462, Web site: ww.ncahigherlearningcommission.org • The Associate of Applied Science Degree and Technical Certificate in Paramedic at the University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756, 727-210-2350. www.caahep.org • The Associate of Applied Science in Funeral Service Education at the University of Arkansas Community College Hope is accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE) 992 Mantua Pike, Suite 108; Woodbury Heights, NJ 08097office (816) 233-3747 www.abfse.org • Approved by: • American Heart Association, 909 West Second Street, Little Rock, AR, 72201, (501) 375-9148. • Arkansas Department of Health by the Office of Emergency Services, 4815 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR, 72205, (501) 661-2000. • Arkansas Department of Human Services Division of Medical Services, Office of Long Term Care, PO Box 8059, Little Rock, AR, 72203-8059, (501) 682-6172. • Arkansas State Board of Nursing, University Tower Bldg Suite 800, 1123 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR, 72204, (501) 686-2786. Membership in: • American Association of Community Colleges • Arkansas Association for Developmental Education • Arkansas Association of College and University Business Officers • Arkansas Association of Collegiate Registrar’s and Admissions Officers • Arkansas Association of Higher Education and Disability • Arkansas Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators • Arkansas Community Colleges • Arkansas College and University Personnel Association • Arkansas Council for Women in Higher Education • Arkansas Economic Developers • Arkansas Institutional Research Organization • Association for Institutional Research • Association of Higher Education and Disability • Community College Business Officers • Council for Adult and Experiential Learning • Hempstead County Economic Development Corporation • Hope/Hempstead County Chamber of Commerce • Instructional Telecommunications Council • National Association for Developmental Education • National Association of College and University Business Officers • National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators • National Council for Marketing and Public Relations • National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development • Society for Human Resource Management • Southern Association for Institutional Research • Southern Association of College and University Business Officers • Southern Association of Collegiate Registrar’s and Admissions Officers • Southwest Arkansas Arts Council • Southwest Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators • Texarkana Chamber of Commerce 18


Advisory Committees The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana and business/industry have mutually benefited through an active advisory committee relationship. These committees, representing each major instructional area, are comprised of members from business and industry who provide a broad spectrum of technical expertise and management. The membership includes representatives from several Arkansas counties. The principle mission of each committee is to provide an advisory function concerning course content, laboratory and shop design, and program development. Another important function is the support and promotion of student recruitment and graduate placement.

19


UA Hope-Texarkana profile History The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana is located on Arkansas Highway 29, at the southern city limits of Hope, Arkansas. Hope is 30 miles east of Texarkana and 110 miles southwest of Little Rock. The College is located on a 72-acre site originally obtained by the citizens of the area for Red River VocationalTechnical School, which was established in 1965. Red River operated as a vocational-technical school until June 30, 1991. On July 1, 1991, Red River Vocational-Technical School officially became Red River Technical College and operated under the guidelines of the Arkansas Department of Higher Education. In 1995, the Arkansas Legislature passed an act that provided for the merger of state two-year colleges and universities. On March 5, 1996, the citizens of Hempstead County approved a 1/4-cent sales tax to support the expansion of the College. On July 1, 1996, Red River Technical College became a division of the University of Arkansas System and was renamed the University of Arkansas Community College at Hope. In 2012, the College expanded its operation to include an instructional facility in Texarkana, Arkansas. The Texarkana instructional site encompasses 22 acres and is located at 3501 U of A Way, Texarkana Arkansas. Mission Statement The mission of the University of Arkansas Community College at Hope is to connect students and community partners to quality learning through effective and timely educational technologies, student-centered support services, and emerging content delivery methods that support excellence in teaching and learning, value in training and workforce development, advancement in life-long learning, and elevation in civic and cultural enrichment. Institutional Purposes 1. To provide quality university parallel courses on the freshman and sophomore level: 1a. for students who wish to obtain Associate degrees, and 1b. for students who will transfer to another institution. 2. To provide quality occupational courses: 2a. for students who wish to obtain Associate of Applied Science degrees; 2b. for students who wish to obtain Technical Certificates; 2c. for students who wish to gain competence in employable skills; and 2d. for employed workers who wish to upgrade their skills. 3. To provide a general education base for liberal arts and technical education. 4. To provide credit and non-credit continuing education courses. 5. To provide community service activities: 5a. by sponsoring courses to meet the interests of various groups; 5b. by offering facilities and professional staff to promote the civic and cultural life of the service area; 5c. by fostering intellectual and social interaction through participation in community life, and 5d. by providing a culture and environment that encourages lifelong learning for all members of the community. 5e. To provide organized academic skills courses designed to improve skills so that success in a program may become possible. 5f. To provide students with counseling, financial, and other support services important to their personal growth by recognizing that each student has his or her own needs, interests, and abilities. The College undertakes, through the above purposes, to foster and support the educational, cultural, and economic development of Southwest Arkansas. 20


Vision Statement The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana envisions itself as a twenty-first century model community college. To make our vision a reality the College will reach beyond traditional boundaries so that students can overcome obstacles, achieve dreams and reach their full potential. We will empower a network of diverse and committed individuals to work creatively and collaboratively toward shared principles and the common goal of student success. Our learning environments will be nurturing, accepting, personalized and student-focused. We will vow to the community that we serve to always be attentive to our mission, cohesive in our approach and responsive to changing needs. As a commitment to our mission and in order to pursue our vision the following core values will serve as the bridge to our future: Value Statements STUDENT-FOCUSED The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana values students. We are student focused in all that we do and highly committed to reaching beyond boundaries to make positive change in the lives of our students. The College fosters individual growth, encourages personal success and provides educational opportunities in an effort to empower students to lead productive and prosperous lives and achieve their full potential. DIVERSITY The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana values diversity. We are a dynamic community of unique and diverse individuals with shared principles and common goals. The College is a cohesive network that works to create a nurturing, accepting and personalized campus that meets the needs of individual students as they strive to overcome obstacles and make their dreams come true. VERSATILITY The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana values versatility. We provide opportunity to the populace in southwest Arkansas through the collaborative efforts of a dedicated administration, faculty and staff. The College is steadfast in its labors to provide quality programs with high educational standards and unwavering in its efforts to train future workforces, to educate individual students and to be responsive to changing societal needs. QUALITY The University of Arkansas at Hope/Texarkana values quality. We are success oriented. College employees are hard-working, devoted individuals who are committed to providing quality education and who stand united and are connected through their efforts to make a difference.

21


Computer Service Policy Computer Lab Access UA Hope-Texarkana offers on-campus computer access to currently enrolled students. Computer labs are located in various buildings throughout the campus. Operating hours are posted outside the computer labs at the beginning of each semester. Community members are provided with limited computer access only in the Rapert Library Complex computer lab (L107). All individuals utilizing UA Hope-Texarkana computer labs must present a valid picture I.D. and adhere to the Computer Services Resource Policy. For more information, contact the Department of Computer Services. Computer Services Resource Policy This policy applies to all of the University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana community, including students, faculty, administrators, staff, alumni, contract employees, and those who may be granted a guest computer account by the system administrator. For purposes of this policy, UACCHnet includes all computers and software owned by the College, any communications hardware and software provided by the College for the purpose of accessing its computers, and any computer network governed in part or whole by the College. Any member of the community who violates this policy is subject to disciplinary action and possible legal action under the Federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act. This statement of policy is not meant to be exhaustive. If there is a question about what is/is not considered acceptable use of computer resources, UA Hope-Texarkana Administration is the final authority. The following conditions apply: 1. All computing and networking resources should be used in an efficient, ethical, and legal manner. 2. No user may permit another to use his/her computer account. 3. Printing e-mail is limited to academic or work-related messages and printing multiple copies is not allowed. Sending e-mail chain letters will not be tolerated as they are considered a federal offense. 4. UA Hope-Texarkana will not tolerate use of College facilities for indecent communication of any kind. The laws of the State of Arkansas govern/prohibit the use of any computer based or telecommunications devices for transmitting obscene, vulgar, profane, lewd, lascivious or indecent language OR to make any suggestion or proposal of an obscene nature OR threaten any illegal or immoral act with the intent to coerce, intimidate, or to harass any person(s). Violation of these may be considered a Class I Misdemeanor. 5. Developing programs that could harass other users or damage or alter software will not be tolerated. 6. Use of computer resources (e-mail and Web publishing) for commercial purposes is prohibited. 7. Use of College computing resources for non-academic chat room activities is prohibited. 8. All other rules/regulations listed in the “Computer Services Resource Policy” found in Library Resources, Registrar’s Office, and UA Hope-Texarkana Enrollment Management office apply. See the Director of Computer Services for more information. The consequence of violating these policies will be the suspension of a user’s privileges, legal action, and/or suspension from the College. 9. Activities that will hinder or impend network performance such as streaming entertainment, movies, games, etc. are subject to throttling and blocking. Ethical Use Ethical, responsible use of the University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana computing resources includes the efficient and productive use of resources. Computers, public terminals, printers, and networks are resources that must be shared equitably. Academic Honesty Any use by a student of the College’s computer resources in a way that constitutes cheating or plagiarism will be handled in accordance with the procedures published in the College Catalog. Computer Services’ Responsibility 22


The Computer Services staff will make every effort to ensure the integrity of the computer resources and information stored on the network file server. However, the University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana is not responsible for any loss of information. Network Security It is the job of Computer Services to ensure the security and integrity of the campus network. It is the right of Computer Services to do so by whatever means necessary, including but not limited to, logging all transactions. Versions of this policy may be found on the UA Hope-Texarkana Web site under Computer Services or in the UA Hope-Texarkana Library, Registrar’s Office, and UA Hope-Texarkana Enrollment Management Office. Institutional Advancement The mission of the Department of Institutional Advancement at the University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana is to present a positive, consistent image of the College to the public by promoting, communicating, and informing U of A Hope-Texarkana’s service area of the opportunities, programs, and services that are available. The Institutional Advancement Office also works to raise private funds to support students and programs. The Office of Institutional Advancement promotes leadership and involvement among individuals who support the mission and goals of the institution and are willing to volunteer to advance the college. The department concentrates on improving private resource development and enhancing the quality of learning experiences on the U of A Hope-Texarkana campuses. To successfully promote the College, it is important that the students remain a key part of the department’s endeavors. Throughout the academic year, Institutional Advancement personnel may take photographs in classrooms, around campus, and at various College events. These photos allow for the creation of publications such as the College Catalog and campus brochures, as well as television commercials and other forms of publicity. All cooperation and assistance is appreciated as Institutional Advancement staff promotes the College and its students. If students have an academic or personal achievement to share with others, they are encouraged to contact the Department of Institutional Advancement. It may be possible to feature students’ information in news releases that are distributed to area newspapers, radio stations, and television stations. UAHT Foundation The U of A Hope-Texarkana Foundation is housed under the Institutional Advancement department and is responsible for raising private dollars for the College which may be used for institutional needs including scholarships. There are currently numerous private scholarships funded by donors from within the community. For more information on these scholarship options, please contact the Office of Financial Aid, or visit the College website. Library The UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Library, located in the Rapert Library Complex, supports the mission of the College by providing access to and instruction in the use of information resources. Library staff assists students in locating information in electronic, print, and audiovisual formats. Many of the Library’s research databases are available to off campus users via password access. Interlibrary Loan services are available to all library users for items unavailable in the on-campus facility. Library staff will provide information on accessing these resources and services. Further information may be found on the Library Website. The Library also serves as an information center for the local community. Select services provided to community patrons include: Interlibrary Loan, book circulation, and Internet access. Please see Policies under Library Information on the Library Web site. 23


The UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Library arranges materials in open stacks, using the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. The Library also serves as a selective depository of Arkansas State Documents. While the Library welcomes donations of materials, the College reserves the right to process donations in the manner most appropriate to Library and College needs. Interlibrary Loan specializes in obtaining materials (books and articles) that are not owned by the Library. We can obtain nearly anything that has ever been published and this service is provided for UA HOPETEXARKANA students, faculty, staff and community members. When you need an item that’s not available in the local collection, please, request this service in the Library. UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Library Fines: Library patrons borrowing materials from the UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Library assume responsibility for the intact return of each piece borrowed. (See CIRCULATION POLICY.) Any materials which are returned to the library so significantly damaged as to be unusable by subsequent patrons, in the judgment of the Librarian, or which are lost, will be replaced and paid for by the patron who lost or damaged the item. The Librarian will attempt to replace the item with an item in comparable condition that is reasonably priced. On occasion, it may be necessary to replace a used item with a new version; costs will be kept as reasonable as possible for the borrower who is responsible for replacement costs. Items which are a part of multi- volume sets will be handled on an individual basis and a reasonable agreement will be established between Librarian and Borrower. Selected items will incur a flat replacement fee; the fee structure is outlined on the Library Web site at http://libraryweb. uacch.edu/. Every attempt will be made by the Library to keep replacement costs as low as possible. In the case of lost materials which patrons find subsequent to payment of fees: fees will be refunded as long as the replacement has not yet been ordered by the library. Once the replacement had been ordered and all fees received; the originally damaged or ‘lost’ item belongs to the patron. Please note: Non-payment of fees for lost or damaged library materials will result in the non-release of semester grades and/or transcripts until all fees are paid. Bookstore The UAHT textbook program provides textbooks and required educational supplies through a student rental textbook program. UAHT will acquire required textbooks and offer them for a flat rental fee for all course hours registered. The textbook rental program provides students the opportunity to pay a per credit hour fee to rent textbooks that would otherwise have to be purchased by the student. The goal of the UAHT book program is to provide a predictable cost that students can budget for accordingly. Consumables required for a course will not be an additional or unanticipated cost for the student taking oncampus classes. Rental fees will be evaluated annually to ensure the lowest possible cost for the student. The UAHT textbook program is located in the Rapert Library Complex. Food Services Food services are housed on the first floor of the UA Hope Student Center weekdays. Students can use their Student ID card as a meal card by transferring financial aid on account or by putting cash on the card in the Business Office. At this time, food services are not offered on the Texarkana campus. Food and drink vending machines are located on both campuses.

24


ADMISSION INFORMATION Admissions Policy The College’s “open door” admissions policy reflects the institution’s philosophy of providing educational opportunities for all citizens within its service area. Virtually every person beyond high-school age who is interested in educational advancement may gain admission to the College. Admission to the College does not insure admission to a particular course or program of study. Students may, in some instances, be required to remove deficiencies before enrolling in certain courses of study. Students seeking admission for the first time should use the following procedure: 1. Complete an application form, which may be obtained in the Enrollment Management Office. If the request is by mail, the address is: Enrollment Management Office University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana P.O. Box 140 Hope, AR 71802-0140 OR Complete the Application for Admission online at www.uacch.edu 2. Submit a high school transcript, GED, and official college transcripts from all previously attended colleges. 3. Provide proof of two (2) immunizations against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). This requirement is mandatory for those students born after January 1, 1957, who plan to enroll for full-time coursework. 4. Take placement tests. Students enrolling must submit ACT or SAT scores or take the ACCUPLACER exam administered at the College. Students must complete all required tests before registering for classes. No transcripts or tests are required for community service courses. The enrollment category of each student will be established initially on the best information available and will be re-evaluated based upon the student’s goals, test scores, past performance, and academic progress during each registration period. 5. Be evaluated for the purpose of determining conditional or unconditional admissions status. Note: Students who do not complete admissions documentation will not receive credit for courses in which they are enrolled. Unconditional Admissions Policy A student admitted unconditionally is a student admitted to the institution without requirements, conditions, or restrictions placed on initial enrollment status. To receive unconditional admissions, the student must have 1. a high school diploma, have successfully completed the high school core curriculum, and a minimum composite score of 15 on the ACT or 62 Reading score on the COMPASS; or 2. a with at least a minimum composite score of 19 on the ACT, 78 Reading score on the ACCUPLACER, or 83 Reading score on the COMPASS. Conditional Admissions Policy All students graduating after May 1, 2002, from Arkansas high schools, out-of-state schools, home schooling, private high schools, and GED recipients shall be evaluated for the purpose of determining conditional, unconditional, conditional-prep admissions status. Act 1290 of 1997 (A.C.A.§ 6-60-208) requires students to have completed the core curriculum or an equivalent standard for unconditional admission to a college. Conditional Admission: A student admitted conditionally is a student admitted to an institution with certain requirements, conditions, or restrictions placed on initial and/or future enrollment status. 1. A student seeking an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, or Associate of Arts in Teaching degree who fails to successfully meet standards for unconditional admission will be admitted as a conditional student. The student must complete twelve (12) hours of core academic courses and any necessary remedial courses with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 within the first 30 semester hours 2. A student seeking an Associate of Applied Science degree who fails to successfully meet standards 25


for unconditional admission will be admitted as a conditional student. The student must complete six (6) hours of core academic courses and six (6) hours of technical courses required for the Associate of Applied Science degree and any necessary remedial courses with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 within the first 30 semester hours. 3. Students enrolling in non-credit courses, Certificate of Proficiency programs, or Technical Certificate programs are exempt from these requirements. Students who are admitted conditionally and do not earn a 2.0 grade point average and/or do not complete the required coursework by the end of the 30 semester credit hour time period will be allowed to re-enroll with limited course enrollment until the deficiency is removed. Transcripts of out-of-state and private in-state school graduates will be evaluated for meeting the standards of unconditional admission. Those students not meeting the requirements will be admitted conditionally. The Registrar’s Office will review applicants’ transcripts and scores and inform students of their admissions status prior to enrolling in courses. Conditional-Prep Admissions: Beginning January 2013, any first-time associate degree seeking student with a high school diploma or GED and/or with a score at or below a 14 composite on the ACT, 690 on the SAT, or 61 on the COMPASS Reading Skills test will be admitted to the institution under the status of conditional-prep. (Note: The conditional admission policy cannot be used to determine student eligibility for federal financial aid or other programs administered by the United States Department of Education.) 1. Students falling into this category with an ACT or SAT score will be reassessed using the ACCUPLACER Reading. A score of 47 or better on the ACCUPLACER Reading (or a 62 or better on the COMPASS Reading) will move the student to Unconditional status. 2. This admissions status does not apply to certificate seeking students. 3. Any student admitted in conditional-prep status must: 3a. Sign an enrollment agreement that outlines the requirements of satisfactory progress and continued enrollment, including an individualized degree plan signed by the student and the student’s academic advisor; 3b. Enroll in EDGE 1003 College Life Skills; 3c. Participate in a comprehensive advising/early-alert system with a hold on registration; and complete any necessary remedial/developmental courses during the first 30 semester credit hours. Institutional Student Success Plan Enrollment Arkansas Code Annotated § 6-61-110 states that an institution must implement a state approved student success plan for students assessed for placement in a developmental course in mathematics, English composition and/or reading. The student must be formally engaged in student success plan activities prior to or while simultaneously enrolled in college-level courses in mathematics and English composition. The UAHT Student Success Plan is designed to support UAHT students to completion of the pre-college course sequences and to contribute to the continual assessment and improvement of pre-college instruction at UAHT. Any student who is unconditionally admitted and who must enroll in any pre-college math, reading or English course will be enrolled in the UAHT Student Success Plan and will remain enrolled under the Plan until they have successfully completed all required pre-college courses with a grade of C or better. Any student who is admitted in the conditional or condition-prep status will remain enrolled under the Plan until they have completed twelve (12) hours of core academic courses and any necessary remedial courses (AA, AS) with a cumulative 2.0 GPA or six (6) hours of core academic courses and six (6) hours of technical courses required for the CTE associate degree (AAS) and any necessary remedial courses with a cumulative GPA of 2.0. In addition to following the requirements of the Freshman Assessment and Placement Program (ACA § 6-61110), students enrolled under the UAHT Student Success Plan must adhere to the following requirements: 26


1. Students will be assigned to a Student Success Plan advisor. Upon successful completion of the required developmental course sequence(s), the student will be reassigned to a program/major advisor. Students must see their Student Success Plan advisor for all enrollment functions: registration, adding a class, dropping a class, etc. Students enrolled under the Student Success Plan are not cleared for online, selfregistration. 2. Students must attend classes regularly. Student Success Plan advisors will monitor the attendance of their advisees. 3. Students must communicate with their Student Success Plan advisor no less than once every two weeks to discuss academic progress and attendance. 4. Students enrolled under the Student Success Plan must take EDGE 1003 College 5. Life Skills their first semester of enrollment. 6. Student Success Plan advisors will: 6a. Maintain a degree checklists on all assigned advisees and review that degree checklist with the student each semester; 6b. Check student grades no less than once every two weeks; 6c. Consult with faculty members as necessary to gain additional information about the student’s academic progress; 6d. 6e. Consult with the student if monitoring results in any areas of concern; and 6f. Recommend and facilitate appropriate support services for each advisee. Non-Credit This category will include those students enrolling in only non-credit continuing education and community service classes. Transfer Students Students transferring from another college or university must request that official transcripts of their academic records be sent to the Registrar at the College. All transcripts must be received and evaluated prior to admission in order to facilitate the advising and course selection process. Courses taken at another regionally accredited college will be accepted in transfer with an earned grade of “C” or higher. Courses taken at other colleges that are not members of a regional accrediting body will be evaluated as to their appropriateness for the intended degree, content, and type of credit awarded (semester/quarter hours or clock hours); and credit may be awarded if the course is found to be appropriate. Credit decisions for these types of courses are made in consultation with appropriate instructional staff. UAHT honors the suspension policy of other institutions; however, students seeking admission as a transfer student who are on academic suspension from another college or university will be considered for admission to UAHT. Admission is not automatic, and the office of the Vice Chancellor for Academics will evaluate the applicants’ transcripts and past academic history in order to make an admissions decision. Please note that courses taken at UAHT while on academic suspension may not count toward your degree at other colleges and universities. Please check with the institution from which you are seeking a degree to determine the applicable policy. Generally, courses taken at foreign universities are not accepted in transfer. Arkansas Course Transfer Systems (ACTS) The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu).

27


Admissions Appeals Process A complete denial of enrollment will occur only in those rare instances when a student clearly cannot benefit from courses offered by the College or if the student is on academic suspension. The counselor will consider the student’s educational goals, test scores, past academic performance, and personal interviews in this process. If a student is denied enrollment and feels he/she has been unfairly evaluated or seeks an exception, the student may petition in writing to the Dean of Enrollment Management. The Admissions Appeals Committee will review the merits of the situation and respond in writing to the student within three (3) working days. Such student petitions must be submitted prior to the end of registration for his/her classes. The decision of the committee is final. Freshman Assessment and Placement Program at State Colleges and Universities in Arkansas Arkansas Code Annotated § 6-61-110 states: All first-time entering freshmen at all state-supported colleges and universities in Arkansas who are admitted in Bachelor degree programs or in Associate degree programs which transfer to the Bachelor degree shall be tested by the admitting institution for purposes of placement in either college-level credit courses in English and mathematics or remedial courses in English composition, reading, and mathematics. Remedial courses shall not provide credit toward a degree. The State Board of Higher Education shall determine the tests to be used, the testing procedures and exemptions, and the minimum scores below which students at all institutions must take remedial courses. The State Board of Higher Education shall base these decisions on consultation with representatives of the institutions of higher education, analysis of the placement procedures presently used by institutions in Arkansas, statewide placement testing programs in other states, and pilot projects involving testing of entering freshmen at selected institutions in Arkansas. The mathematics, English composition, and reading placement standards contained in this document implement Section 23 of Act 1101 of 1991. These standards apply to all first-time entering undergraduate students who enroll in baccalaureate degree programs or associate degree transfer programs at state colleges and universities as defined in the Arkansas Higher Education Information System Manual. Academic Skills Students not meeting the ACT, ACCUPLACER or COMPASS requirements in math and English shall enroll in sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English courses during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student who is required to take an academic skills course must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills. Since general education requirements are in place for technical certificates, students seeking these certificates will be placed in English and math courses according to their placement scores. Students cannot be placed in a course higher than their placement scores indicate without having completed the previous course with a grade of “C or higher or achieving a post test score which qualifies them to enroll in the next level course. Any student who is inadvertently placed in a course higher than their placement scores indicate will be placed back into the lower level course at the first opportunity. UAHT Placement Chart Any student enrolling in a course that requires placement scores is required to take the ACT, ACCUPLACER or COMPASS exam. Any student who has taken the ACT test and scored less than 19 on any subject area is required to take the ACCUPLACER or COMPASS exam in that subject area before registering for classes. All first-time freshmen seeking an Associate degree or technical certificate must provide ACT, ACCUPLACER or COMPASS scores prior to enrolling in any courses. After the first exam has been administered, a fee of $5.00 will be charged for retaking the exam. The following charts provide a breakdown of ACT, ACCUPLACER and COMPASS score requirements for entry into specific academic skills courses for reading, English, and mathematics and the first college-level courses in English and mathematics. This chart should be used along with the student’s Degree Plan. Academic skills courses for the Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees are ENGL 0033 Literacy, ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing, MATH 0043 Introductory Algebra, and MATH 1033 Intermediate Algebra. 28


Academic Skills courses for the Associate of Applied Science degrees are Literacy, ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing, MATH 0043 Introductory Algebra, and MATH 0093 Intermediate Algebra. Note: Any degree seeking student who is required to take an academic skills course must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills. Students not meeting the ACT, ACCUPLACER or COMPASS requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential developmental math, reading and English courses during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the English and math requirements are successfully completed. No mathematics course less sophisticated than College Algebra or Quantitative Literacy may be applied toward a Baccalaureate Degree from a public university in Arkansas. PLACEMENT CHART FOR ENGLISH AND READING SUBJECT

(Use this chart along with the student’s current degree plan.) ACT ACCUPLACER COMPASS COURSE PLACEMENT

Reading Reading

0-14 15-18

0-46 47-77

0-62 82 or less

Reading

16-18

70-77

83 or above

Reading

19-36

78-120

19 or less

English/Writing 0-11 English/Writing 12-18

0-43 44-82

20-79 60-79

English/Writing 16-18

76-82

50 or less

English/Writing 19-36

83-120

60-79

CCAP 0020 CCAP Reading *ENGL 0033 Literacy ENGL 0073 ALP Writing (PILOT) **Accelerated Learning Project (ALP) COMPASS Writing 60/ACT English 16/ ACCUPLACER Writing 76 or above also REQUIRED OR have successfully passed ENGL 0033 ENGL 1013 Composition I COMPASS Writing 80/ACT English19/ ACCUPLACER English 83 or above also REQUIRED *ENGL 0033 Literacy ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing ENGL 0073 ALP Writing **Accelerated Learning Project (ALP) COMPASS Reading 73/ACT Reading 16/ ACCUPLACER Reading 70 or above also REQUIRED OR have successfully passed ENGL 0033 ENGL 1013 Composition I Compass Reading 83/ ACT Reading 19/ ACCUPLACER Reading 78 or above also REQUIRED

*Literacy: This course provides reading and paragraph-writing remediation. **ALP: Students with an ACT 16-18 (or Accuplacer equivalent score) in reading and English/writing may enroll in this co-req course. Each ALP section is paired with a specific Composition I section. An ALP student MUST also enroll in the appropriate paired Composition I section. An ALP student MUST also enroll in the appropriate Composition I section.

29


PLACEMENT CHART FOR MATH (Use this chart along with the student’s current degree plan.) ACT

ACCUPLACER

COMPASS

COURSE PLACEMENT

MATH 0-14

AR 0-30

PA 0-20

*CCAP 0010 CCAP Math

MATH 15-16

AR 31-120 EA 0-62

PA 21-40 AL 0-25

MATH 0043 Introductory Algebra (Formerly MATH 0013/ MATH 0023)

MATH 16-36

EA 37-120

AL 21-99

MATH 1073 AAS Math Technical & Industrial

MATH 16-36

EA 37-120

AL 21-99

MATH 1063 AAS Math Business

MATH 16-36

EA 37-120

AL 21-99

*MATH 1083 AAS Math Health Profession

MATH 17-18

EA 63-76

PA 41-99 AL 26-40

MATH 0093 Intermediate Algebra (Formerly MATH 1033)

MATH 19-36

EA 77-120

AL 41-99

MATH 1053 College Algebra MATH 2013 Math for Teachers I MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy

*In the case of a student having both an ACCUPLACER Arithmetic (AR) and an Elementary Algebra (EA) score, the Arithmetic score will be used for placement. Students with an AR score will determine math placement into CCAP 0010 or MATH 0043. Otherwise, students with only an EA score will be used to determine math placement. If student has AR (arithmetic) score, they will enroll in CCAP or Introductory Algebra IF <31 EA → Use AR score COMPASS Testing *UAHT Student ACCUPLACER Testing Fee: First attempt: FREE Retake Fee: $5.00 **Non-UAHT Student Testing Fee: $5.00 per sub-test * UAHT Student is defined as one who has a current admission application on file with the UAHT Registrar’s Office. **Non-UAHT Student is defined as one who does not have an application for admission on file in the registrar’s office or is not willing to complete one prior to testing, and/or indicates they are not planning to attend UAHT. Proctored Exam Fee for Non-UAHT Students Non-UAHT, requiring test-proctor services Testing Center hours: $15.00 per test. All fees are payable in the Testing Center in advance of receiving service.

30


YOUR BRIDGE TO COLLEGE College Credit Opportunities for High School Students The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana delivers college credit instruction to qualified high school students through a number of options: 1. College courses at area high schools taught by appropriately credentialed instructors from high school faculty. 2. College courses at area high schools taught by UAHT faculty. 3. College courses delivered via Compressed Interactive Video (CIV) and/or online to area high schools. 4. College credit awarded through articulation agreements with area high schools 5. High school students traveling to the UAHT campus to attend. High School Student/Concurrent Enrollment Admissions Policy In accordance with Act 1097 of the 1991 Arkansas Legislature and the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board Concurrent Enrollment Policy passed in April of 2007, any qualified student enrolled in a public or private high school in the State shall upon request be accepted for enrollment in regular college level courses (excluding academic skills courses) as a non-degree seeking, part-time student subject to general institutional requirements. To qualify, each student must meet the following criteria: 1. The student must complete a University of Arkansas Hope-TexarkanaApplication for Admission and attach an official high school transcript, immunization record showing proof of two (2) immunizations against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), and college placement test core report showing sub-test scores in reading, English and mathematics. 2. The student must complete a Concurrent High School Admission Form and have it signed by the high school principal/guidance counselor and parent/guardian every semester of enrollment. 3. High school students in general education concurrent courses for college credit will be admitted to the college or university as non-degree/certificate seeking students. High school students participating in the Dual Enrollment Pell Pilot Project will be admitted as degree seeking. 4. Students must have scored 19 or better on the ACT Reading sub-test or the comparable ACCUPLACER or COMPASS reading score to enroll in any general education concurrent enrollment course. PLAN and/or Explore scores may be used when ACT, ACCUMPLACER or COMPASS scores are not available. *Concurrent enrollment courses in English require a 19 or better on the ACT English and Reading sub-tests (or comparable ACCUPLACER or COMPASS scores). *Concurrent credit College Algebra requires a 19 or better on the math ACT sub-test (or comparable ACCUPLACER or COMPASS score). For more information, please contact: Dr. Ashli Dykes University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana 870-722-8267 ashli.dykes@uach.edu International Student Admissions Policy International students may not officially register for classes until all admissions requirements have been fulfilled. International students must meet the following requirements in addition to the other admissions requirements before an I-20 may be issued. 1. Submit an Application for Admission to the Enrollment Management Office at least 90 days prior to the start of the semester for which acceptance is requested and have a completed file no later than 30 days prior to the start of the semester. 2. Submit an official, original copy of the high school transcript with an official English translation. Original copies of other academic records, such as college transcripts, must be provided with English translations. Proof of two immunizations against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) with English translations, is required if born after January 1, 1957. Any foreign born student must also provide the results of a Tuberculosis Screening. This screening must be done in the United States or Canada within the six months prior to enrollment. Complete I 901 Form - $200. 31


3. All international students should be proficient in the English language prior to enrollment. Students who have taken the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) should submit official documentation of their scores. Those with TOEFL scores of 500 or better will be accepted unconditionally (a score of 197 or better on the computer-based TOEFL). A TOEFL score of 425-499 will enable a student to enroll on academic probation for one semester. Arrangements to take the TOEFL test may be made in writing to: TOEFL Program Director, CN 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, U.S.A. 4. Sumbmit a copy of immigration documents: passport, I-20 from current school (if applicable), U.S. Visa, and I-94 (if applicable). 5. Provide a statement verifying sufficient financial support. The cost of attending UAHT (tuition, fees, books, supplies, room and board, transportation, personal and miscellaneous expenses) is approximately $15,000 U.S. dollars per academic year. 6. An international applicant must purchase health insurance, and present evidence of this, before he or she is eligible to enroll. Such proof must be presented each semester. Health-care in the U.S. is costly, and the College cannot assume financial responsibility for its students. 7. It is the responsibility of the international student to become familiar with the regulations of the Immigration and Naturalization Service and to assume responsibility for complying with these regulations. 7a. UAHT does not provide: 7b. Student housing (dormitories are not available) 7c. Transportation to and from the College 7d. Health insurance or medical/dental care Note: The College reserves the right to impose additional admissions requirements which are in the best interest of the College without prior notice to prospective international students. Prior Learning Assessment UAHT recognizes that students may acquire college-level knowledge and experience outside the classroom. Prior Learning is a term used by educators to describe learning acquired outside a traditional academic environment. This may have been through work experience, employer training programs, military training and experience, independent study, volunteer or community services, and so on. Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) describes the evaluation of an individual’s learning for college credit, certification, and/or advanced standing toward further education or training. (LearningCounts.org) Such students may earn college credit in a variety of courses by the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), the high school Advanced Placement program, by institutional examinations or relevant assessments, and/or by experiential learning. In each case, the following guidelines apply: 1. A student requesting credit for Prior Learning should contact the Registrar’s Office or the appropriate dean prior to registering. To ensure a timely response, petitions for PLA should be made no later than 2 weeks before the beginning of an academic semester. While there is no maximum number of credit hours that can be earned by examination or experience, the UAHT residency requirement for graduation is 25% of required courses. Also refer to UAHT’s General Graduation Requirements located in this UAHT College Catalog. 2. The petition will be reviewed by a committee of UAHT faculty from the appropriate division(s). When it is deemed necessary or beneficial, the Vice Chancellor for Academics or the academic dean may also appoint an outside consultant to review the petition. Students who are recommended for institutional examination must score 80% on the examination in order to receive credit. Examinations will be administered and scored by arrangement with the appropriate academic dean and faculty. 3. The committee will return one of the following recommendations: (1) credit will be awarded; (2) approval to sit for institutional examination or relevant assessment; or (3) no credit will be awarded. Committee recommendations and examination results are final. PLA credit may be requested only once per course. 4. Prior Learning credit may be awarded for a comparable college course that has never been attempted and for which a student has satisfied all prerequisites. If CLEP is available for a course, it should be used as the first option. 5. A notation of “CR” (credit) is given for successful testing or approved experience. The “CR” notation is entered on the student’s transcript after the student has completed the first semester of residency. Note: 32


Credit hours earned by Prior Learning are not used in calculating the grade point average, are not used in qualifying for financial aid, and do not count toward any residency requirement. Transferability: Transfer institutions may not recognize transcripted courses based on prior experiential learning, except as restricted elective credit. Students are urged to explore known transferability needs prior to applying for PLA credit. Clear advising, publicity and articulation work will be done to ensure appropriate student decision-making. The College cannot guarantee transferability of PLA credit to other institutions. 6. Certain divisions and programs may have additional requirements or guidelines. Students are advised to consult with the appropriate academic dean early in the petition process. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) UAHT accepts College Level Examination Program credit for many core requirements of the Associate of Arts degree. Students should contact the Registrar’s Office and present CLEP scores. After a successful CLEP test, a “CR” (credit) notation will be added to the student’s transcript at the end of the first semester of residency. EXAMINATION

CREDIT SCORE

CREDIT GRANTED

UAHT EQUIVALENT COURSE

Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Division American Literature

50

3 Hours

College Composition

50

6 Hours

Spanish Level I

50

6 Hours

American Government

50

3 Hours

50

3 Hours

50

3 Hours

50

3 Hours

Principles of Macroeconomics

50

3 Hours

Principles of Microeconomics

50

3 Hours

Introductory Psychology

50

3 Hours

History of the United States I: Early Colonization to 1877 History of the United States II: 1865 to the Present Human Growth and Development

Western Civilization I: Ancient 50 Near East to 1648 Western Civilization II: 1648 to 50 the Present

3 Hours 3 Hours

ENGL 2203 American Literature I ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1023 Composition II SPAN 1203 Spanish I SPAN 1303 Spanish II PLSC 2103 American Government HIST 2013 U.S. History I HIST 2023 U.S. History II PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology ECON 2003 Macroeconomics ECON 2103 Microeconomics PSYC 2303 General Psychology HIST 1113 World Civilizations I HIST 1123 World Civilizations II

Business, Technology, and Education Division Financial Accounting

50

3 Hours

Introductory of Business Law Information Technology and Computer Applications

50

3 Hours

50

3 Hours

50

4 Hours

ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I BUSS 2203 Business Law CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers

Math/ Science Division Biology

33

BIOL 1204 Biology


Chemistry

50

4 Hours

College Algebra

50

3 Hours

Precalculus

56

5 Hours

Calculus

60

5 Hours

CHEM 1114 Chemistry I MATH 1053 College Algebra MATH 1175 PreCalculus MATH 2015 Calculus I

Advanced Placement (AP) UAHT awards credit to students who participate in high school Advanced Placement (AP) programs administered by the College Board Placement Test Program. Students wishing to obtain AP credit must request the College Board to forward the test scores to the College after students have officially enrolled at the College. Credit will be awarded in the courses listed below to students who earn the indicated score on the appropriate AP exam. AP EXAM

SCORE

COURSE CREDIT GRANTED

Biology

3

BIOL 1204 Biology

Chemistry

3

CHEM 1114 Chemistry I CHEM 1114 Chemistry I and CHEM 1124 Chemistry II ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1013 Composition I and ENGL 1023 Composition II HIST 1113 World Civilizations HIST 1113 World Civilizations and HIST 1123 World Civilizations II HIST 2013 U.S. History I HIST 2013 U.S. History I and HIST 2023 U.S. History II MATH 2015 Calculus I MATH 2015 Calculus I and MATH 2025 Calculus II PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology SPAN 1203 Spanish I SPAN 1303 Spanish II

4 English Language or English Literature

3 4

World History or European History

3 4

U.S. History

3 4

Calculus AB

3

Calculus BC

3

Psychology

3 4 3 5

Spanish Language

AP credit is not awarded for a course the student has already completed at the college/university level. AP credit granted at other institutions will be accepted as credit as any other transfer course. The student must have official documentation of the earned scores.

34


College Catalog The College Catalog is available on the College website. The catalog should be read carefully concerning rules, regulations, fees, standards of progress, transfer credit, etc. The catalog is subject to revision throughout the academic year, and it is the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to be aware of any such changes. For the latest version of the college catalog, visit the college website at www.uacch.edu. Catalog Privilege Students must meet the requirements as set forth for graduation in the catalog for the year of first enrollment, as long as enrollment is continuous, unless he or she elects to graduate under the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of graduation. Students who have continually attended five years or longer and have not completed a certificate or degree may be required to graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of graduation in order to ensure the most relevant course work has been completed. Classification of Students Students who have earned fewer than 30 semester hours of credit are freshmen. Students who have earned at least 30 semester hours of credit are sophomores. Academic Clemency Act 1000 of 1991 gives institutions of higher education the authority to develop guidelines for the establishment of policies on academic clemency. The following guidelines shall be applied to requests for Academic Clemency at the University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana. Academic clemency may be granted to a returning student who has not been enrolled in any regionally accredited institution of higher education for a minimum period of two years. Clemency will not be granted until a student has completed 12 hours of college credit at UAHT with a 2.0 or higher GPA following the twoyear break in college studies. Students can request clemency for up to three semesters of work (consecutive or nonconsecutive). These semesters are to be determined by the student in consultation with appropriate offices (dean, academic advisor, etc.). A decision of clemency includes all coursework taken within the semester(s) at UAHT for which clemency is requested; it is not selectively applied to individual courses within a semester. Academic Clemency clears only your grades earned for the courses for which you are granted clemency. When deciding your eligibility for financial aid, the college must still count all prior credits earned and attempted. For courses taken at UAHT for which Academic Clemency is applied, the official transcript will continue to show all courses taken with the added notation of academic clemency received. Grades and grade points will be shown; however, the credit hours attempted and cumulative grade points will total zero for the Academic Clemency courses and will not be computed for the overall GPA. Any petition for academic clemency must be requested and granted prior to the awarding of a degree. Once the degree is awarded, the record is closed and the academic clemency policy cannot be invoked. Academic clemency may be approved only once. For purposes of degree requirements, a student who receives clemency must follow the provisions of the College Catalog in effect at the time of re- enrollment. All requests for Academic Clemency must be made using the Academic Clemency Petition and submitted to the Vice Chancellor for Academics.

35


Application for Re-Admission Students who wish to return to the College after an absence of one academic year or longer (not including summer terms) must submit an Application for Re-Admission. Attendance Students are expected to attend all classes regularly and punctually. Only absences for College-sponsored events are universally excused. Students must inform their instructors of such absences prior to the absence. Students have the responsibility of making arrangements satisfactory to the instructor regarding all absences. Excessive absences, as defined by the instructor and described in the syllabus for each class, may be penalized, including withdrawal from or failure of the course. It is students’ responsibility to be informed of the course policies of each instructor. In some areas, such as Nursing, Funeral Service, CDA, and EMT, certification requirements may necessitate an absentee policy. In these instances, the matter of certification takes precedence over other policies. Adding Classes Students desiring to add classes should see their advisor to ensure proper course selection. Classes may be added prior to the end of the third day of a regular semester or prior to the first day of a summer session. Requests for adding classes after these dates must have the approval of the Vice Chancellor for Student Services or Vice Chancellor for Academics. Approval for these changes will only be granted when there is clearly a compelling extenuating circumstance. Auditing a Course A student who is auditing a course may, with the permission of the instructor, change from audit to credit status no later than the 11th day of class. A student may also change from credit to audit status no later than the last day to withdraw from classes for the term. Withdrawal from Courses All single course withdrawals should be initiated by the student with her/his course instructor or academic advisor. A student who is completely withdrawing from the College may do so by visiting the Office of the Registrar. Prior to withdrawing from a class or withdrawing from school, students are strongly encouraged to see their advisor in order to determine the consequences of that withdrawal. Failure to attend classes is not the same as officially withdrawing from classes. Students wishing to withdraw from a class or to change classes are governed by the following policy: 1. Drops through the official reporting day, whether by the student tor by the instructor for non-attendance are not recorded on the student’s permanent records. Withdrawals after the official reporting day are conducted in the following manner: 2. Withdrawals after the official reporting day are conducted in the following manner. 2a. Students withdrawing from a credit course prior to 3:00 p.m. on the official day of the end of the 10th week of the fall or spring semester receive a grade of “W” on their permanent records. Students withdrawing from a credit course prior to 3:00 p.m. on Thursday of the third week of the summer session during which they are enrolled will receive a “W” on their permanent records. 2b. Students withdrawing from a credit course prior to 3:00 p.m. on Thursday of the third week of the summer session during which they are enrolled receive a “W” on their permanent records. 2c. Withdrawal privileges are suspended at the end of the 10th week of each semester and the end of the third week of each summer session. After the 10th week and until the 13th week, instructors may continue to withdraw students with a grade of “W” based upon non-attendance or other mitigating circumstances. 2d. After the 13th week withdrawals are processed through the offices of either the Vice Chancellor for Academics or the Vice Chancellor for Student Services. Students must submit a written request to the Vice Chancellor’s office detailing the extenuating circumstances that prevent the student from successfully completing the course. Students receiving a grade of “F” for a class are considered to have earned the grade based upon class performance. 36


Repeating Courses Any student who has taken a course may repeat the course in order to change the original grade. Both courses with their respective grades will appear on the student’s transcript. The highest grade received will be calculated in the student’s cumulative GPA. Minimum Class Size and Cancellation of Classes The College reserves the right to cancel a class under the following conditions: 1. Fewer than ten (10) students enroll. 2. A qualified instructor is not available. 3. Necessary facilities, equipment, or materials are not available. 4. Reasons that would otherwise make the teaching and learning in the class inefficient or ineffective. Credit for Courses The semester hour is the unit of credit and is defined as the amount of credit given for one (1) clock hour in class per week for 15 weeks (or the equivalent). Most classes meet three (3) hours per week and, therefore, carry three (3) semester hours of credit. Additional credit is given for some laboratory courses. Course Loads The normal load for a student during a regular term is 15 semester hours. Six (6) hours is considered a maximum load for a summer term. Generally, 18 hours is the maximum load that a student may carry during a regular semester, although certain technical programs may specify more. Any student wishing to take more than the maximum load must receive special permission from the Vice Chancellor for Academics. Request for Course Overload Permission must be obtained for a student to register for credit hours over the maximum allowed. With advisor approval, a student may enroll in up to seven (7) credit hours in a summer semester or eighteen (18) credit hours in a fall or spring semester. A student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00, have successfully completed a minimum of thirty credit hours, and have his/her advisor’s approval in order to enroll for this number of credit hours. Enrollment in any number of credit hours above these numbers must be approved by the Vice Chancellor for Academics. A “Request for Course Overload” must be filled out by the student and advisor and approved by the Vice Chancellor for Academics. Course Length For each semester hour of credit, classes are required to meet for a minimum of 50 minutes per week for a period of at least 15 weeks plus final testing. Summer session classes will be determined using the above equivalents.

37


Grades and Grade Points The College uses the following system for grading and for computing the grade point average (GPA): Total Hours Attempted/Total Grade Points Earned = Grade Point Average. Grades that count toward the GPA (counted in hours attempted): A Excellent 4 grade points B Good 3 grade points C Average 2 grade points D Passing 1 grade point F Failing 0 grade points Grades that do not count toward the GPA (not counted in hours attempted): AU Audited 0 grade points P Pass 0 grade points U Unsatisfactory 0 grade points W Withdraw 0 grade points X Incomplete 0 grade points Incomplete Grade Policy Incompletes “I” are for emergencies near the end of the semester. An incomplete grade is assigned if, due to personal illness or other emergencies, a student is unable to complete required coursework by the end of the semester. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor, complete the incomplete Grade Completion Contract, arrange a method of completing course requirements, and provide proper documentation as to reason for the request. Students receiving an incomplete “I” have no longer than the midpoint of the following regular semester to complete any make- up work. If the work has not been completed by the date indicated on the Incomplete Grade Completion Contract, the “I” becomes an “F,” and the student must re-enroll in and successfully complete the entire course in order to receive credit. Incompletes are intended only for emergency reasons and extenuating circumstances which occur at the end of the semester. Grades are provided to students electronically at the end of the semester. Vice Chancellor’s List Students will be placed on the Vice Chancellor’s List if they earn a grade point average of 3.25 or higher on 12 or more semester hours completed during a regular semester. All courses attempted will be used in computing the grade point average; however, if a student officially withdraws from a course and is assigned a “W,” that course will not be used in computing the grade point average. The Vice Chancellor’s List will be released at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Chancellor’s Honor Roll A student who achieves outstanding academic success at the College is recognized by being placed on the Chancellor’s Honor Roll. In order to be named to the Chancellor’s Honor Roll, a student must have a grade point average of 3.75 or higher on 12 or more semester hours completed during a regular semester. All courses attempted will be used in computing the grade point average; however, if a student officially withdraws from a course and is assigned a “W,” that course will not be used in computing the grade point average. The Chancellor’s Honor Roll will be released at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Academic Probation/Suspension Students should maintain satisfactory grade levels at the various stages of educational development. Failure to maintain satisfactory grades leads to probation or suspension. Minimum grade levels follow: • On 22 semester hours or less attempted, a student must have a cumulative grade point average of not less than 1.75. • On 23 semester hours or more attempted, a student must have a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.00. 38


A 2.00 cumulative grade point average is required for graduation. Failure to maintain minimum grade requirements results in the student being placed on academic probation. Students who enroll while they are classified as being on academic probation may continue to enroll in succeeding semesters providing they achieve the required minimum grade point average each semester (1.75 in 22 semester hours or less attempted, 2.00 in 23 semester hours or more attempted) even though their cumulative grade point average is still below the required level. Students will be removed from academic probation only when they have achieved the required cumulative grade point average. Students who enroll while on academic probation will be suspended after the succeeding term if they fail to achieve at least the required minimum grade point average (1.75 in 22 semester hours or less attempted, 2.00 in 23 semester hours or more attempted) for that term. Students placed on academic suspension will not be allowed to enroll in the next regular semester following the suspension. They may, however, enroll in summer sessions and attempt to improve their grade point average. Social Security Number Each student is required to submit a Social Security number. However, each student is assigned a student identification number which is used as the I.D. number for them while a UAHT student. Student Records The Registrar’s Office maintains permanent records of all students, coordinates registration, and furnishes forms required for reporting of grades, attendance, enrollment, and withdrawals from class. The Registrar is the custodian of academic records. UAHT transcripts are stored electronically in the student information system and printed on demand. Transfer transcripts are stored in students’ academic file in the Office of the Registrar. Transcripts of matriculated students remain in the permanent academic record. Arkansas Course Transfer System The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu). Catalog Changes The College reserves the right to change rules, regulations, and/or polices at any time. For the latest version of the college catalog, visit the college website at www.uacch.edu.

39


Articulation Agreements UAHT, in association with two-year and four-year colleges and universities in Arkansas, has entered into a number of articulation agreements that will assist students who wish to transfer from one college to another. The Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009 The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees have been approved by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education as meeting the transfer criteria set forth in ACT 182 of 2009, commonly known as the Roger Phillips Transfer Act. ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to admit a transfer student to junior status in a baccalaureate degree program if that student has completed the approved Associate of Arts or Associate of Science transfer curriculum. Further, an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education receiving a transfer student shall not require additional lower division credits for the transfer student if the additional course is considered a general education lower division course. Finally, ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to accept all hours completed and credits earned for a designated transfer degree upon a student’s transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at the four- year public institution of higher education. Courses with a grade of “D” are not guaranteed to transfer. Institutional policies regarding the transfer of courses with a grade of “D” may vary. General Graduation Requirements The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana awards Associate degrees and Technical Certificates to students who comply with the following requirements: 1. Complete all course requirements specified in the program. Transfer students must complete the last 15 hours of work at UAHT or have completed at least 25% of the course requirements at UAHT. 2. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above on all work completed including transfer work (the exception is Practical Nursing. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course. In all other Health Professions courses the emphasis courses must be completed with a minimum “C” grade in order to successfully complete the program and to sit for board examinations). 3. Obtain a graduation application from the Registrar’s Office. 4. Take the completed application to the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar will review the application to determine if graduation criteria have been met. 5. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College. The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana awards Certificates of Proficiency to students who comply with the following requirements: 1. Complete all semester credit hours of the certificate as a regular student at UAHT. These credits must be earned as a regular student rather than by test-out or other means of advanced placement. 2. Certificate of Proficiency candidates must successfully complete all program requirements with a minimum program GPA of 2.0. 3. Obtain a graduation application from the Registrar’s Office. 4. Take the completed application to the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar will review the application to determine if graduation criteria have been met. 5. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College. Graduation Rates In accordance with the Student’s Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990, the College’s graduation rates are published on the UA Hope-Texarkana website.

40


TUITION AND FEES Except for persons who have been certified for a Pell Grant or for continued financial aid award by the Financial Aid office, all tuition and fees must be paid, or formal arrangements must be made for payment in the Business Office, by the payment deadline each semester. The payment deadline is the first day of classes. Tuition Schedule Per Semester The following rates will be charged to all students for each credit hour of enrollment. Hempstead County Residents Per Credit Hour of Enrollment Auditing a Course (per credit hour) Online Classes (per credit hour)

$66.00 $66.00 $103.50

Out-of-County Residents Per Credit Hour of Enrollment Auditing a Course (per credit hour) Online Classes (per credit hour)

$74.00 $74.00 $103.50

Border County Residents Bowie, Cass, Red River, Marion, Morris, and Titus counties, Texas; McCurtain County, Oklahoma; Caddo, Bossier, Claiborne and Webster parishes, Louisiana Per Credit Hour of Enrollment $74.00 Part-Time Student (per credit hour) $74.00 Auditing a Course (per credit hour) $74.00 Online Classes (per credit hour) $103.50 Out-of-State Residents Per Credit Hour of Enrollment Auditing a Course (per credit hour) Online Classes (per credit hour)

$150.00 $150.00 $103.50

Residency Requirements An out-of-state resident is defined as a person who has not lived in the State of Arkansas for six (6) consecutive months prior to his/her enrollment. A Hempstead County resident is defined as a person who has lived in Hempstead County for 90 days prior to his/her enrollment. Fee Schedule Per Semester Required Fees Instructional Support Fee (all students; per credit hour) $10.00 Student Activity Fee (on-campus students; per credit hour) $2.00 Documentation Fee (all students) $5.00 Security Fee (on-campus students; per credit hour) $4.00 Facilities Fee (on-campus students; per credit hour) $4.00 Parking Fee (on-campus students) $10.00 Technology Fee (all students; per credit hour) $5.00

41


Health Professions Courses/Programs Additional Fees EMT FISDAP Fee EMT (NREMT) Exam Paramedic FISDAP Testing Fee (one time only) Liability Insurance (PN, CNA, RN, & EMT Paramedic students)/Enrollment) General Nursing Fee (PN students; each semester) Practical Nursing ATI exams (each semester) ARNEC Testing Fee (Fall, Spring & Summer, ea.) Funeral Service Fee (each semester)

$50.00 $70.00 $120.00 $15.00 $100.00 $165.00 $205.00 $100.00

The educational courses within each program of the Health Professions Division are board examination preparatory. The costs of these exams vary from program to program. Supplies, uniforms, or attire are required and are in addition to the fees listed in the College Catalog. Some of the Health Professions Programs are required by state regulatory bodies to conduct criminal background checks. The costs of required dress, supplies, and background checks will be borne totally by the student. These costs as well as the liability insurance costs may vary depending on the provider.

Lab Fees A $50.00 per course lab fee is required for the following courses: Business, Technology, & Education CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CISS 0033 Keyboarding EDCC 2023 Early Childhood Advanced Clinical Practicum EDUC 2103 K â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12 Educational Technology Health Professions NURS 1103 Nursing Concepts I EMPT 1007 Emergency Medical Technician EMSP 1203 EMS Environment RNSG 2119 Nursing Process I CNAP 1001 Nursing Assistant I FSED 1012 Restorative Art I FSED 1022 Restorative Art II Math and Science BIOL 1204 Biology BIOL 1201 Biology Lab BIOL 1244 General Botany BIOL 1254 Zoology BIOL 2214 Human Anatomy and Physiology BIOL 2211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab BIOL 2224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 2221 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab BIOL 2234 Microbiology CHEM 1004 Introduction Chemistry CHEM 1114 Chemistry I 42


CHEM 1124 Chemistry II PHSC 1024 Physical Science GEOL 1004 Physical Geology Technical and Industrial CARE 1233 Troubleshooting and Repair CARE 1243 Basic Carpentry and Painting DIES 1004 Basic Diesel DIES 2204 Air Conditioning ELEC 1104 Basic Electricity ELEC 1204 Wiring I ELEC 1403 Industrial Motors and Controls ELEC 1603 Wiring II HVAC 1002 Tubing and Piping HVAC 1804 Residential Systems HVAC 1904 Air Conditioning Systems MACH 1205 Machine Shop I MACH 1305 Machine Shop II WELD 1003 Basic Welding WELD 1204 Introduction to Arc Welding WELD 1502 TIG Welding WELD 1503 MIG Welding WELD 1703 Spray Arc Welding Program/Service Specific Fees Applied Music Fee (per credit hour) ACCUPLACER Testing Retake Fee ACCUPLACER Testing Fee (non-UA Hope-Texarkana Student) EMT Advanced Cardiac Life Support Fee Nursing Clinical and Simulator Fee (PN, RN, & EMS students) Late Book Return Fee (per book) Non-Return Book Fee (per book) Proctored Exam Fee (scheduled outside normal Testing Center hours) Public Safety Fee Criminal Background Checks Non-Credit Courses Physical Activity Fee Program Examination Fee Program Liability Insurance Return Check Fee I.D. Card Replacement Fee

$100.00 $5.00 $5.00 per subtest $50.00 $100.00 $15.00 $65.00 $25.00 per test $5.00 $25.00 varies by course $65.00 varies by program $15.00 $35.00 $10.00

Student I.D. Cards All students are issued an identification card that they are expected to carry at all times and show upon request from a College official. I.D. cards are obtained from the UA Hope-Texarkana Library and serve as the student’s library card to be presented whenever books are checked out. A lost card should be reported immediately to the Registrar’s Office. A replacement I.D. card will then be made at the cost of $10.00.

43


Refund Policy No registration fees will be refunded unless the claim is made through the Business Office at the time of withdrawal. The amount of all refunds will be calculated on the registration fee assessed. Refund of Registration Fees Any student who officially withdraws from UA Hope-Texarkana during a fall or spring semester shall be entitled to a refund as follows. Note: “Class days” refers to business days at the College. 1. Up to and including five class days 100% 2. From the 6th - 10th class day 50% 3. The 11th class day and after No Refund Any student who drops one or more courses and continues to be enrolled at UA Hope- Texarkana during a fall or spring semester shall be entitled to individual course refunds as follows: 1. Up to and including five class days 2. he 6th class day and after

100% No Refund

Any student who drops a course or officially withdraws from UA Hope-Texarkana during a summer session shall be entitled to an adjustment as follows: 1. One to four week courses: 1a. Prior to the start of classes 1b. No adjustments after classes have begun 2. Five or six week courses: 2a. Prior to start of classes 2b. Up to and including two class days 2c. The 3rd – 5th class days 2d. No adjustments after the 7th class day 3. Seven to nine week courses: 3a. Prior to start of classes 3b. Up to and including three class days 3c. The 4th – 7th class days 3d. No adjustments after the 7th class day 4. Ten or twelve week courses 4a. Prior to the start of classes 4b. Up to and including five class days 4c. The 6th – 10th class days 4d. No adjustments after the 10th class day

100% 100% 100% 50% 0% 100% 100% 50% 0% 100% 100% 50% 0%

Persons who are enrolled in courses that have been cancelled receive refunds of 100% of the tuition and fees paid. Members of the military who receive orders which transfer them out of the area for a prolonged period, when such transfer interferes with class attendance, may request a full refund at any time during the semester. Continuing Education and Community Education refunds Continuing Education and Community Service course cancellations by the College will provide 100% refund. After the course has begun, no refunds will be made.

44


TUITION WAVER POLICY 1. Tuition for students age 60 and older is waived for credit courses. Individuals under this policy must pay all miscellaneous fees that may be required. Enrollment with the senior citizen waiver is limited to a “space available” basis. Tuition waivers do not apply to independent study courses, private instruction courses, or competitive admission programs. Examples of competitive admission programs include the Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing and Associate of Applied Science in Nursing. 2. Children of policeman and firemen who are killed or permanently disabled in the line of duty in Arkansas are eligible for waiver of tuition and fees for credit courses only. Benefits are limited to the duration of four (4) years or until the attainment of age twenty-five (25), whichever occurs first. 3. officers and fire personnel who have completed the Arkansas Law Enforcement or Fire Academy are eligible to receive a 25% discount on tuition. Section 702 of the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act Tuition Policy BOARD POLICY 520.7 FEES FOR MEMBERS OF ARMED FORCES AND DEPENDENTS For the purpose of tuition and fees applicable for all programs of study, including distance learning programs, effective July 1, 2015, all campuses of the University of Arkansas System shall classify a student as an in-state or resident, if the student meets any of the following criteria regardless of his or her residence: 1. A veteran who was honorably discharged or released from a period of not less than ninety (90) days of active duty in the military, naval, or air service within three (3) years before the date of enrollment in a program of study, 2. A dependent1 or spouse of a veteran under paragraph 1. 3. A member of the armed forces. 4. A spouse of a member of the armed forces. 5. A dependent of a member of the active duty armed forces, when the member of the armed forces: 5a. Is stationed in the State of Arkansas pursuant to permanent change of station (PCS) military orders; 5b. s continuously domiciled in Arkansas for at least six consecutive months before entering active military service and who maintains Arkansas as the permanent home of record while on active military duty, or 5c. Demonstrates a change of bona fide domicile from another state to Arkansas at least twelve consecutive months prior to separation, discharge, or retirement from active military duty. This provision is forfeited if the military person does not return to Arkansas within 36 months after separation, discharge, or retirement from active duty. 6. A veteran using educational assistance under either Chapter 30 (Montgomery G.I. Bill—Active Duty Program) or chapter 33 (Post-9/11 G.I. Bill), of Title 38 of the United States Code, who lives in the State of Arkansas while attending a school located in the State of Arkansas (regardless of his/her formal state of residence) and enrolls in the school within three years of discharge from a period of active duty service of 900 days or more. 7. A spouse or child using transferred Post-9/11 G.I. Bill benefits (38 U.S.C. §3319) who lives in the State of Arkansas while attending a school located in the State of Arkansas (regardless of his/her formal state of residence) and enrolls in the school within three years of the transferor’s discharge from a period of active duty service of 90 days or more. 8. A Spouse or child using benefits under the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship (38 U.S.C. §§3311(b)(9)) who lives in the State of Arkansas (regardless of his/her formal state of residence) and enrolls in the school within three years of the Service member’s death in the line of duty following a period of active duty service of 90 days or more. 9. A person who initially met the retirements set forth in paragraphs 6 7. Or 8 will maintain “covered individual” status as long as he or she remains continuously enrolled (other than during regularly scheduled breaks between courses, semesters, or terms) at the same school even if he or she is outside the 3-year window or enrolls in multiple programs. For purposes of a student who is eligible for in-state tuition solely under sections 6,7, or 8 above, that person must have enrolled in the school prior to the expiration of the three year period following discharge or death described above in sections 6, 7 or 8 and 45


must be using educational benefits under either chapter 30 or Chapter 33 of Title 38 of the United States Code. 10. A member of the armed forces or â&#x20AC;&#x153;covered individualâ&#x20AC;? as identified in Section 702 of the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014. November 20, 2015 (Revised) May 21, 2015 (Revised) January 18, 1985 (Revised) January 1, 1975 For the purpose of this policy, dependents are unmarried children who are legal dependents of the military person as defined by the IRS. 1

46


FINANCIAL AID General Information The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana (UAHT) maintains a comprehensive program of financial assistance for students, including grants, scholarships, and federal work study. To be eligible for financial aid, a student must be accepted for admission at UAHT, be enrolled in an approved degree or technical certificate program, and meet all eligibility requirements as outlined in the Satisfactory Academic Progress section of this catalog. A student is NOT eligible to receive some types of financial aid if the individual has defaulted on a student loan, owes a repayment to any of the federal programs, or does not maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. For financial aid purposes, a student enrolled in at least twelve (12) credit hours will be considered a full-time student. All financial aid refund checks are disbursed via mail (US Postal Service). Financial Aid Application Process (FAFSA) The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the application for all federally funded programs (Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant [FSEOG], Federal Work Study [FWS]) and is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students attending UAHT must list the school code 005732 on their FAFSA application. A student must complete a FAFSA each academic year as most financial aid is not automatically renewed. Each financial aid recipient is required to complete the FAFSA. The financial aid administrator must receive a valid Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR) for each student before that individual can be considered for Title IV financial aid. Financial Aid SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY Federal Regulations require students to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) while working towards an approved degree or technical certificate program at UAHT. All hours attempted at all institutions will be counted as part of the student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress. Academic progress will be reviewed prior to a student’s initial enrollment period and at the end of each semester (fall, spring, summer). It is the student’s responsibility to stay informed of the college’s SAP standards and to monitor his/her own progress. Students seeking financial aid must comply with SAP standards regardless of previous eligibility. SAP is measured in three areas: Cumulative GPA (CGPA), Credit Hour Requirement, and Maximum Length of Time. Credit Hour Requirement Students must complete a minimum of 67% of all credit hours in which they enroll each semester at UAHT. Each credit hour a student enrolls in is considered an “attempted” credit hour for SAP calculations. Credit hours attempted are defined as all classes for which a student receives a passing grade (“A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, or “P”), or a “F”, “AU”, “U”, “W”, or “I”. Maximum Length of Time Students are expected to complete degree requirements after attempting a certain number of credit hours. The maximum attempted credit hours allowed for degree/certificate completion will be 150% of the credit needed to complete that type of degree. For example, if an Associate of Arts degree required 60 credit hours for completion, the 150% time frame would allow a student to attempt up to 90 credit hours for that degree. (60 credit hours X 150%= 90 credit hours. All credit hours attempted will be considered when determining Maximum Length of Time. 47


Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012 (Public Law 112-74) has significantly impacted the Pell Grant Program. Effective July 1, 2012, students are limited to six full years (12 semesters / 600%) of Pell Grant eligibility during their lifetime. This change affects all students regardless of when or where they received Pell Grant funding. Students who have already used 600% of their Pell Grant eligibility will no longer be eligible to receive a Pell Grant. There are no exceptions to this regulation. You can find more information concerning the Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility Used at StudentAid.ed.gov. Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility percentages are based on your annual award at fulltime enrollment status compared to the amount you actually receive in a given year. The amount of aid you received each academic year is divided by the maximum annual award you are eligible for that year and your annual percentage is determined. Percentages from each year is added together to calculate your lifetime eligibility used. Examples: If your annual award is $5550 and you received $5550, you received 100% of your award for that year. If your annual award is $3000 and you received $2250, you received $2250 divided by $3000 or 75% for that year. If your annual award is $5550 and you received a total of $2081 that year, you received $2081 divided by $5550 or 37.495%. If your annual award is $5550 and you received a total of $600 for that year, you received $600 divided by $5550 or 10.81%. Your annual percentages are added together to determine your Lifetime Eligibility Used. The maximum is 600%. Once you reach 600% you are terminated from receiving any additional Pell grants. The UAHT Financial Aid Staff is available to discuss the change in the lifetime Pell Grant eligibility with you or you can view your Pell Grant LEU by logging into www.NSLDS.ed.gov. Good Standing for Financial Aid a student must: 1. Successfully complete at least 67% of all attempted credit hours, AND Maintain a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) as indicated in the following chart: 2. Maintain a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) as indicated in the following chart Total Number of Minimum Credit Hours Attempted Credit Hours Attempted Cumulative GPA 0-22 1.75 23 or more 2.00 3. Attempt no more than 90 credit hours for an associate degree requiring 60 hours. 4. Must be on track to complete degree plan within the maximum time frame.

Financial Aid Warning The first semester a student does not complete 67% of attempted credit hours and/or does not maintain the required GPA, they will be placed on Financial Aid Warning. The student may continue to receive most types of financial aid while on Financial Aid Warning. The student has one semester to correct the SAP deficiencies. The second semester a student fails to meet SAP they will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension and will be ineligible for financial aid.

48


Financial Aid Probation, Suspension, and Reinstatement A student will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension if they: Attempt 90 or more credit hours for an associate degree requiring 60 hours; and/or Cannot mathematically complete the degree within the maximum time frame; and/or Fail to be in Good Standing at the end of the Financial Aid Warning semester; and/or Do not successfully complete any credit hour during a semester. A student, who withdraws from total enrollment, or is administratively withdrawn from total enrollment, or receives all failing/non-successful grades (“W”, “F”, “AU”, “U”, “I”, or a mixture of these grades) will be considered not making SAP and will be suspended from financial aid. Notification of Financial Aid Warning and Financial Aid Suspension will be sent to the student via their UAHT Student Email or, in some situations, a letter sent to the mailing address listed with the financial aid office. All students should check their MyUACCH and their UAHT email regularly. A student who is suspended from financial aid may become eligible to receive financial aid again by fulfilling one of the following conditions: 1. Eliminate all SAP deficiencies by completing the number of credit hours that are lacking, and/or complete enough credit hours to achieve the minimum cumulative GPA, at the student’s own expense. 2. Successfully APPEAL the Financial Aid Suspension status by demonstrating documentable, extenuating circumstances for the semester(s) the deficiencies occurred. Financial Aid SAP Appeal Students have the right to appeal their financial aid status to the UAHT Financial Aid Appeals Committee. A student with documentable, extenuating circumstances who has been suspended from financial aid may appeal in writing by obtaining a Financial Aid SAP Appeal form from the financial aid office or online from the financial aid webpage. For each semester in which the student did not meet SAP (cumulative GPA and/or credit hour completion rate of at least 67 percent), the student must submit information and documentation explaining why the SAP standards were not met and what has changed that will allow the student to meet SAP in the future. The appeal form and all required supporting documentation must be submitted to the UAHT Financial Aid Office within 30 days from the date the student was notified of his/her deficiencies. The financial aid office will respond in writing within 10 business days from the date the appeal was received. Circumstances for an appeal that will be considered include but are not limited to extenuating circumstances such as unexpected injury or illness of the student or immediate family member, work schedule change, unforeseen daycare or transportation problems, or death of immediate family member. For those students who are appealing because they have exceeded the maximum length of time, in addition to the reasons already listed, the appeals committee would consider classes taken toward a second Associate degree. If a student’s appeal is approved, he/she will be placed on Financial Aid Probation. While on Financial Aid Probation, the student may receive financial aid for one semester, after which a student must be making SAP or must be successfully following an academic plan. In order to be eligible for aid for subsequent semesters, the student must meet the terms of the appeal, which may include but are not limited to: 1. Successfully completing all the courses attempted during the semester with NO withdrawals from classes (including withdrawals after the semesters census date, even if the class has not started) and NO final grades of “F”, “AU”, “U”, or “I”. 2. Maintaining a semester GPA of 2.5 or higher. In addition, for students who are on Probation due to the maximum length of time rule, they must also: 49


1. Complete their degree before or by the date listed on their appeal; and 2. Follow the degree plan that was submitted with their appeal. Additional requirements may be listed on the appeal approval notice. Appeals that are approved are not retroactive to previous semesters.

Transfer Students Transfer students are required to submit official transcripts from all previously attended accredited postsecondary institutions to the Enrollment Management office before financial aid will be awarded. Transfer hours accepted will be used in calculating the remaining semesters of financial aid eligibility (CGPA, Credit Hour Requirement, and Maximum Length of Time). If a transcript is received with “in progress” grades, a student will be required to submit a second official transcript with completed grades. Repeated Courses A student may repeat a course that they successfully passed (with a grade of “A”, “B”, “C”, and in some instances “D”) in a previous semester ONE TIME. A limit of two (2) repeated attempts will be allowed for courses the student does not successfully complete. Grades of “F”, “AU”, “U”, “I”, or “W”, and in some instances a “D” are not considered a successful completion. All courses that are repeated will be used in the calculation of a student’s SAP length of time status. Repeated courses will be identified on the student’s grade transcript by an asterisk (*). The highest grade received will be calculated in the student’s cumulative GPA. Pre-College Level Courses Federal regulation states that as long as a student is admitted into an eligible program at the college, the student can take pre-college level classes and still be eligible for their financial aid, even if the student is taking all remedial classes before taking any regular courses. Students are eligible to receive most types of financial aid funding for up to 30 credit hours in pre-college level coursework. Title IV aid will not be paid to student for precollege level coursework in excess of the 30 credit hour limit nor will these credit hours be used to determine the student’s enrollment status for Title IV aid. English as a Second Language courses that are part of a larger eligible program do not count against this 30 credit hour limit. Students seeking multiple Associate Degrees or Certificates are required to submit a Financial Aid Appeal Form and an official degree plan (prepared by the student’s Academic Advisor) to the Financial Aid Office prior to financial aid eligibility being determined. Note: Students not meeting the ACT, ACCUPLACER or COMPASS requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Financial Aid Refund Policy In accordance with the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, recipients of financial aid who withdraw before the 60% point of the enrollment period will be required to return a portion of Title IV funds awarded. The 60% point is calculated using calendar days. Title IV funds to be refunded include Pell Grant, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. Federal Work Study is not included in the calculation. The calculation of the return of these funds may result in the student owing a balance to the College and/or the federal government. In addition, students who withdraw will have all previously awarded aid canceled for any subsequent semesters. Students who intend to return will have their eligibility evaluated under the applicable satisfactory academic 50


progress policy depending on their program of study. Upon complete withdrawal prior to the 60% point, a pro rata refund based on the total length of time attended will apply to students who are veterans and to students receiving Title IV student financial aid. In general, the Title IV student financial aid law assumes that you “earn” your federal aid directly in proportion to the number of days you attend during the semester. If you withdraw from the College (either officially or unofficially) before completing 60% of the semester, you will have to repay any unearned federal monies that were already disbursed to you. Your withdrawal date will be determined by the College as (1) the date you began the College’s withdrawal process, (2) the date your instructors dropped you from all your classes for non-attendance, or (3) your last date of attendance at an academically- related activity as documented by the College. If you have received excess funds, they must be returned to the federal government. If you must return any grant funds, the law provides that the amount you must repay is to be reduced by 50%. This means that you only have to return half of any excess funds you receive. If the return of unearned federal assistance causes any portion of your tuition and fees to become unpaid, the College will bill you. In such cases, you will be required to make arrangement with the Vice Chancellor for Finance to pay the balance owed. Any award money you do have to return is considered a federal grant overpayment. You must either repay the amount in full or make satisfactory arrangements with either the College or the U.S. Department of Education to repay the amount. These arrangements must be completed within 45 days of the date the College notifies you of your overpayment status. Failure to make these arrangements will mean that you are not eligible to receive any Title IV Student Financial Aid at any institution of higher education in the United States. Note: The Return of Title IV Funds Policy is not to be confused with the UAHT Refund Policy. UAHT reserves the right to evaluate high school transcript(s) presented by the student. We may, at any time, request a copy of a high school transcript from the granting high school to validate the student’s high school program completion. As provided in the Federal Register (Section 668.16[p]), we may withhold Title IV financial aid if the validity of the high school diploma/transcript is in question. High School Transcripts UAHT reserves the right to evaluate high school transcript(s) presented by the student. We may, at any time, request a copy of a high school transcript from the granting high school to validate the student’s high school program completion. As provided in the Federal Register (Section 668.16[p]), we may withhold Title IV financial aid if the validity of the high school diploma/transcript is in question. This new requirement does not affect students who completed high school in a home- school setting. Ability-to-Benefit (ATB) Policy To receive Title IV financial aid at UAHT, a student must be qualified to study at the postsecondary level as required by the Higher Education Amendments of 1992 (Ability-to-Benefit). To meet this qualification, a student must: 1. have a valid high school diploma, OR 2. have passed the General Educational Development (GED) Test Student Status: Dependent or Independent The terms “dependent” and “independent” have specific definitions as used for student financial aid. Check with the UAHT Financial Aid Office if you feel you have special circumstances that might affect your dependency status. There must be justifiable reasons for the financial aid administrator to make any adjustments, and you must provide adequate proof to support those adjustments to your student status.and you must provide adequate proof to support those adjustments. The financial aid administrator’s decision is final and cannot be appealed to the U.S. Department of Education. 51


Majors For financial aid purposes, a student may declare a major during registration periods only. Majors changed at any other time will have no effect on financial aid awards. Priority Deadlines for Financial Aid FALL SPRING UAHT Institutional Scholarships April 15 UAHT Foundation Scholarships April 15 November 15 FSEOG July 15 Federal programs Pell Grant Pell Grant is a federal student financial aid program designed to assist eligible students in post-secondary education. Its purpose is to provide a foundation of financial aid to help defray the costs of education. All undergraduate students are eligible to apply for Pell Grant assistance. Student eligibility is based on financial need and is determined by a formula that is applied consistently to all applications. A student must be currently enrolled in at least three (3) credit hours to be eligible for a Pell Grant. These grants are to be used solely for educational purposes. Contact the UAHT Financial Aid Office concerning deadline dates for the Pell Grant. A completed FAFSA is necessary to determine Pell Grant eligibility. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) This grant is for undergraduates with exceptional financial need – that is, students with the lowest Expected Family Contribution (EFC) – and gives priority to students who receive Federal Pell Grants. A completed FAFSA is necessary to determine FSEOG eligibility. Federal Work Study (FWS) The Federal Work Study Program is a campus-based program that provides part-time employment for UAHT students. To be eligible, a student must demonstrate an unmet need as determined by the Pell Grant index, must be enrolled in at least 6 credit hours, and must be making satisfactory academic progress. FWS jobs are available on- campus in various departments and off-campus through the America Reads/America Counts programs. FWS students are paid every two weeks. The amount of FWS funds a student is eligible to receive and the number of hours allowed to work will be determined by the Financial Aid Director and FWS supervisor. A completed FAFSA is necessary to determine FWS eligibility. William D. Ford Direct Student Loan Program As of the 2013-14 award year, UAHT no longer participates in the Federal Student Loan Program. Scholarship Stacking Policy Act 1180 of 1999 prohibits postsecondary institution from using public funds in a student aid package which exceeds the student’s cost of attendance. UAHT follows the Arkansas Department of Higher Education regulations by reducing scholarships amounts which cause awards to exceed cost of attendance. Unless instructed by federal or state regulations, scholarships awarded by UAHT will be reduced first. UAHT Institutional Scholarships UAHT recognizes academic achievement by offering four (4) categories of institutional scholarships for graduating high school seniors: Chancellor’s, Valedictorian/Salutatorian, Honors and Bridge. To be considered for a scholarship (excluding Valedictorian/Salutatorian) applicants must have the following on file in the Enrollment Management Office by April 15th (prior to their high school graduation year): 1. A completed UAHT Scholarship Application (available at www.uacch.edu, Enrollment Management) 52


2. A completed UAHT Application for Admission (available at www.uacch.edu, Enrollment Management Office) 3. A copy of all ACT score reports 4. A 7th semester transcript (includes the fall semester of the senior year) 5. OPTIONAL: A Biographical Information Sheet, which allows the University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana to use the student’s name and photograph in press release statements to area newspapers announcing the receipt of the scholarship. Chancellor’s Scholarship Minimum qualification: Composite score of 25 or higher on the ACT Annual scholarship amount: $3,000 Chancellor’s Scholarships are available to graduating high school seniors only. The recipient must complete at least twelve (12) credit hours during the fall and spring semesters and maintain a minimum 3.00 cumulative GPA to maintain their eligibility for two consecutive years. Valedictorian/Salutatorian Scholarship Minimum qualification: Valedictorian or Salutatorian of graduating class Annual scholarship amount: $2,500 Valedictorian/Salutatorian Scholarships are available to graduating high school seniors only. The recipient must complete at least twelve (12) credit hours during the fall and spring semesters and maintain a minimum 3.00 cumulative GPA to maintain their eligibility for two consecutive years. (Note: For schools not declaring an official Valedictorian or Salutatorian, this scholarship is available to the students designated by the high school as the 1st or 2nd ranked graduate.) Honors Scholarship Minimum qualification: ACT Composite score of 21 Annual scholarship amount: $2,000 Honors scholarships are available to graduating high school seniors only. The Recipient must complete at least twelve (12) credit hours and during the fall and spring semester and maintain a minimum 2.75 cumulative GPA to meet continuing eligibility requirements for two consecutive years. Bridge Scholarship Minimum qualifications: ACT Composite of 19 Annual scholarship amount $1000 Bridge scholarships are available to graduating high school seniors only. The recipient must apply for and receive the Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship. The recipient must complete at least twelve (12) credit hours during the fall and spring semesters and maintain a minimum 2.75 GPA to meet continuing eligibility for one year. The awarding of UAHT Scholarships is contingent upon available funding. In the event the number of qualified applicants for a particular scholarship exceeds the number of available awards, the following procedures will be used to determine the recipients: 1. Date scholarship application was received 2. ACT composite scores – ranked highest to lowest 3. ACT scores on individual sub-test – (Reading, English and Mathematic) – using super score method 4. Cumulative high school grade point average – highest to lowest

53


GED Scholarship Minimum qualifications are 1) a composite 660 on the (official GED) exam that is less than one year old at the time of application and 20 no previous college experience. The Scholarship is based on each semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrollment as follows: 1. Full-time (12 ot more credit hours per semester) $1,000 2. Three-quarter time (9-11 credit hours) $750 3. Half-time (6-8 credit hours) $500 The GED scholarship is renewable for two (2) consecutive years (fall and spring semesters) as long as the recipient maintains a 2.50 cumulative grade point average and successfully completes at least 67% of all credit hours attempted. UAHT Foundation Scholarships The Office of Institutional Advancement is responsible for raising private dollars for the College which may be used for any institutional need, including scholarships. There are currently over 70 private scholarships funded by donors from within the community. For more information on these scholarships, you may contact the Enrollment Management Office or visit our website at www.uacch.edu. You can access the UAHT Foundation Scholarship online application at https://uacch. awardspring.com. NOTE: THE AWARDING OF ALL UAHT SCHOLARSHIPS IS CONTINGENT UPON AVAILABLE FUNDING. UAHT Waivers IMPORTANT NOTICE The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana reserves the right to revoke an institutional scholarship from any student enrolled at UAHT or a student who has been awarded an institutional scholarship if the student is found guilty under a state or federal law for the manufacture, distribution, or use of a controlled substance. Arkansas Department of Higher Education For more information about Arkansas Department of Higher Education Programs, visit: www.adhe.edu Other Programs Department of Veterans Affairs UAHT is approved by the Arkansas State Approving Agency for veterans and veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; beneficiaries who are working on a degree or certificate. Military service veterans and the sons, daughters, wives, husbands, widowers, or widows of deceased or 100% disabled service connected veterans may be eligible to receive benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Contact the financial aid office to determine eligibility, benefits, and/or to receive the appropriate application forms. All students must follow the curriculum outlines for their objectives since only specific courses may be applied toward VA certification and graduation.

54


STUDENT SERVICES Statement of Student Services The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana strives to provide student services that assist students in achieving their educational objectives. These services include enrollment services, financial aid, counseling and guidance, student activities, Career Services, Testing Services, disability services and ADA compliance, and safety and security. The offices providing these services recognize that each student has his or her own needs, interests, and abilities and that services provided must be geared toward allowing each student to grow both personally and educationally. Statement of TRiO Student Support Services TRiO Student Support Services (SSS) is a Title IV federal assistance grant program from the U.S. Department of Education designed to enhance the academic success, retention, transfer, and graduation rates of postsecondary students. The program monitors academic progress and provides services for students who are traditionally underrepresented in higher education. Students are eligible for the services if they are first generation college students, economically disadvantaged, physically and/or learning disabled. Some of the specific services offered are academic assistance, survival and study skills, career awareness and planning, transfer advising and trips, tutorial assistance, and cultural enrichment trips and events. Accidents or Illness UAHT does not have health services on its campuses. If an accident occurs on campus, a UAHT Incident Report form should be completed and submitted to the Vice Chancellor of Student Services. If a student is injured on campus, and Injury Report must be completed and submitted to the Vice Chancellor for Student Services. ADA Student Referral Process The Vice Chancellor for Student Services serves as the ADA Compliance Officer. The process of student referral under the Americans with Disabilities Act is as follows: • The student is referred to ADA Counselor in Student Support Services. • The ADA Counselor interviews the student, collects forms requesting reasonable accommodations, and requests a release of medical documentation. • The student’s medical documentation is presented to the ADA Counselor. • The ADA Counselor, in consultation with the ADA Compliance Officer, makes a final determination upon review of the evidence. • Notice is given to the student and appropriate instructors as to the final determination of accommodations to be provided. Admissions Appeals Committee The purpose of the Admissions Appeals Committee is to hear appeals related to College admission or enrollment after academic suspension. The following are members of the committee: Vice Chancellor for Student Services, Registrar, Non- Admissions Staff Member, Appointed Faculty Member. Counseling and Guidance The College provides to students the services of trained guidance counselors. The purpose of the counselor is to provide assistance in both academic and personal development during the student’s tenure at the institution. The College does not provide mental health counseling, but refers students to community agencies for mental health counseling. Career Center The UAHT Career Center provides services, resources and educational opportunities that support students and alumni in their career planning and job search efforts. The Career Center offers a comprehensive program that helps students to understand the relationship between academic experiences, internship opportunities, career choices, and to assist in the transition from college to professional life. Resources available through the Center include workshops on resume preparation, interview skills, and job searches. The Career Center follows the campus calendar is closed when the College is closed. 55


Career Pathways Initiative The Arkansas Career Pathways Initiative is a comprehensive project designed to improve the earning and postsecondary education attainment of Arkansans that are or have been in poverty. The initiative provides funding for two-year colleges to develop career pathways programs that assist custodial parents to earn a marketable educational credential for immediate entry into a high demand occupation. The initiative emphasizes such program components as job readiness skills, basic academic skills preparation/remediation, and postsecondary credentials tied to high demand occupations. Intensive student services are provided for students in the program. The initiative fosters strong connections among two-year colleges, students, community organizations, state agencies, and employers. Student Advising System Each student will be assigned an advisor during registration. The advisor will be a faculty member in the area most closely related to the student’s proposed major field of study. The advisor will assist the student in choosing the appropriate courses prior to registration each semester. The faculty advisor will also direct the student to information relating to financial aid, testing, etc. Student Advising System Each student will be assigned an advisor during registration. The advisor will be a faculty member in the area most closely related to the student’s proposed major field of study. The advisor will assist the student in choosing the appropriate courses prior to registration each semester. The faculty advisor will also direct the student to information relating to financial aid, testing, etc. Testing Center Office phone: 870-722-8247 Office location: SC105 Fax: 870-722-8161 Email: leighann.quillin@uacch.edu Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am-4:30pm ACCUPLACER \The UAHT Hope Testing Center offers Accuplacer testing on a regular basis. Compass testing at our Texarkana location is done by appointment only. Testing appointments may be made at https://www.registerblast.com/ uacch/Exam. Testing appointments are strongly encouraged to ensure prompt computer access upon arrival to the Testing Center. Students must have a valid photo ID or their UAHT student ID prior to testing. ACCUPLACER Test Fee Schedule *UAHT Student ACCUPLACER Testing Fee: First attempt: FREE Accuplacer Retake Fee: $5.00 **Non-UAHT Student Testing Fee: $5.00 per sub-test ***After Hour Testing Fee: $25.00 * UAHT Student is defined as one who has a current admission application on file with the UAHT Registrar’s Office. **Non-UAHT Student is defined as one who does not have an application for admission on file in the Registrar’s Office or is not willing to complete one prior to testing, and/or indicates they are not planning to attend UAHT. ***Students, either UAHT or non-UAHT, requiring test-proctor services at days/hours outside of normal, scheduled Testing Center hours. All fees are payable in the Testing Center in advance of receiving service. 56


Proctored Exams The UAHT Hope Testing Center can provide proctor exams for students who have approved accommodations through UAHT Student Support Services Counselor, are taking online courses, or for students who are identified as an Independent Study. UAHT Hope Testing Center is a pre-approved test site for most institutions in Arkansas and several out-of-state institutions. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the UAHT Hope Testing Center to make arrangements for a specific date and time to be tested. Prior to taking an exam, the student is required to present a photo I.D. to the Proctor. The student is also required to come prepared with the necessary supplies to take the exam. Personal items such as cell phones must be stored in a locker at the Hope Campus or in an assigned storage bin at the Texarkana Campus. ONLINE COURSE MIDTERM and/or FINALS Students taking online courses that require proctored testing (midterm and/or final exams) need to register at https://www.registerblast.com/uacch/Exam. Online Student Responsibility… 1. It is the student’s responsibility to know if a Midterm and/or Final is required and needs to be proctored in the Testing Center. 2. Students must bring valid non-expired photo ID. Acceptable IDs include driver’s license, state ID card, passport, school ID, or military ID. 3. The following items are not allowed in the testing room and/or lab: cell phones, purses, backpacks, food, drink, and electronic devices. All prohibited items will be locked in a locker before testing can begin. 4. It is the student’s responsibility, not the UAHT Testing Center to ensure that Midterm and/or Final exams are open at the date and time registered to test. 5. It is the student’s responsibility to bring any login information necessary to take the exam. For example, Blackboard login and password. GED® The General Educational Development (G.E.D) Test is a high school equivalency test that is developed by the American Council on Education, Washington, D.C. The tests of General Education Development provide adults who did not complete high school with an opportunity to earn a high school equivalency diploma. By taking and passing a series of four subjects Reasoning Through Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematical Reasoning, adults demonstrate they have acquired a level of learning that is comparable to that of high school graduates. All Arkansas requirements must be met prior to testing. The GED is administered on a monthly basis at the UAHT Hope Testing Center. NOCTI The Student Occupational Competency Achievement Test (SOCAT) is administered by the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI). UACCH uses NOCTI assessments as a tool to facilitate the construction of curricula and establish academic standards. Since NOCTI assessments are created by occupational experts in the specific fields, they provide national standards on which to base program improvement. Scoring reports from NOCTI provide feedback of great benefit to both UAHT and students. Faculty and administrators are able to determine strengths and weaknesses within the program of instruction by using the scoring reports. Data analysis includes scoring in subparts of the assessment; individual scores positioned within school, state and national statistics; mean scores; and standard deviations. The SOCAT (NOCTI) is administered to students in five technical areas the end of their program of study: Industrial Electricity, Industrial Maintenance, Heating and Air Conditioning, Diesel Technology, and Welding. Please contact the UAHT Testing Center for appointments, requests, or questions. Students can find more information at: .http://noctitesting.org. ATI-TEAS The General Educational Development (G.E.D) Test is a high school equivalency test that is developed by the American Council on Education, Washington, D.C. The tests of General Education Development provide adults who did not complete high school with an opportunity to earn a high school equivalency diploma. By taking and passing a series of four subjects Reasoning Through Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematical Reasoning, adults demonstrate they have acquired a level of learning that is comparable to that of high school graduates. All Arkansas requirements must be met prior to testing. The GED is administered on a monthly basis at the UAHT Hope Testing Center. 57


NLN-NACE All applicants must complete the NACE-1 exam prior to determining eligibility to the ARNEC program. Students may test one time only per application period. Test fees are the responsibility of the applicant at the time of registering for the NACE-1 Test. Test fees are non-refundable. ARNEC applicants may register for the NACE –1 exam at : www.nlnonlinetesting.org. Tutoring Center TRiO Student Support Services is a federal program that provides opportunities to students who need assistance with college level classes. The tutoring center has been designated as the location students may meet with their tutor, or it may be used if they need a quiet place to study. There are also other resources available such as books, paper, index cards and graphing paper. The center provides individual, group and supplemental instruction tutoring sessions by appointment. The services provided are designed to aid student retention and enable participants to successfully complete their educational goals. The tutoring center is located in Room 143 of the Administration Complex (AC). Tutors are available Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. Student Rights Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana intends to comply fully with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. A student attending UAHT has the right to inspect and review all of his/her records that meet the definition of educational records. Student rights concerning access to educational records are defined in Public Law 98-380 as amended by Public Law 93-568 (also known as the Buckley Amendment and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974). The following information, which is considered to be directory information, will be subject to public disclosure unless the student informs the Registrar in writing before the eleventh class day of each regular term and the fifth class day of summer terms that he/she does not want any or all of these types of information designated as directory information: student’s name; address; email address, photograph, telephone number; date and place of birth; major field of study; classification by year; number of hours in which enrolled and number completed; participation in officially recognized activities and organizations; dates of attendance including matriculation and withdrawal dates; degrees, scholarships, honors and awards received, including type and date granted; and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended. Students have the right to request the amendment of his/her educational records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his/her privacy or other rights. A student may consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in his/her education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. Students may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning an alleged failure by UAHT to comply with the requirements of FERPA. To obtain a copy of the University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana’s FERPA policy, contact the Registrar’s Office.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Rights and Responsibilities as a Student Student Conduct The College expects students to conduct themselves as responsible members of the College community. Students are expected to assume responsibility for their actions, to respect the rights of others, to conform to the ordinary rules of good conduct, to protect private and public property, and to make effective use of their time in pursuing an education. Students are required to observe local, state, and federal laws and abide by College policies and regulations as 58


established in respective College publications. The College reserves the right to approve the time, place, and manner of individual and group activities held on the campus. The Vice Chancellor for Student Services will process all matters pertaining to student misconduct. Misconduct will lead to disciplinary action taken against the student. This action may include dismissal from the College. Misconduct includes but is not limited to the following: 1. Misuse of identification cards, furnishing false information to the College, or misuse of College funds; 2. Obstruction or disruption of any College activity, whether academic, social, or administrative; 3. Threats, physical harm, or verbal abuse of any person on College property or at College-sponsored functions; 4. Theft of or damage to any property belonging to the College, its personnel, its students, or its guests; 5. Unauthorized entry into, or use of, any College facility; 6. Violations of rules governing College facilities; 7. Disorderly conduct or lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct or expression on College property or at Collegesponsored functions; 8. Use, possession, sale, or distribution of illegal narcotics, drugs, or stimulants; 9. Drunkenness, use, possession, sale or distribution of alcoholic beverages on College property, whether leased or owned, and on the specified premises of College-sponsored off-campus functions; 10. Gambling on College property; 11. Use of tobacco in all forms in classrooms, labs, campus buildings, grounds, and at all class-related activities; 12. Smoking or the use of any tobacco products or e-cigarettes on any college property; 13. Food and beverages in classrooms, labs, and carpeted areas; 14. Unauthorized possession or use of explosives or firearms on campus, or use or attempted use of any item as a weapon. 15. Failure to comply with the directions of College officials acting in the performance of their duties; 16. Parking and traffic violations; 17. Any academic dishonesty including, but not limited to, cheating on tests, cheating on assigned coursework, and plagiarism; 18. Attending classes when not enrolled; 19. Attending class with and/or creating distractions in the classroom with small children or babies; and 20. Leaving children unattended in or on campus property. 21. Failure to ensure the proper accepted conduct of guests. (A guest is defined as any person who is present at the invitation of a student or any person who is received by a student, or any invited or uninvited nonstudent who is accompanied by a student.) 22. Participation in hazing or a hazing activity as an individual or as a member of a group. 23. Bringing an animal on the College premises, except for service animals, without appropriate approval. 24. Violation of local, state, or federal law which adversely affects the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suitability as a member of the College community, or when it appears that the presence of the student on campus would interfere with the normal educational functions or would endanger the student or threaten to endanger a member of the College community or College property. Reporting Violations Students, faculty, and staff should report an alleged incident of misconduct to the Vice Chancellor for Student Services. Discipline Procedures Students, faculty, and staff should report an alleged incident of misconduct to the Campus Police or the Vice Chancellor for Student Services. The disciplinary procedures of UAHT, as all activities on a College campus, are designed to be a part of the educational process and normally cover a wide spectrum of disciplinary measures ranging from counseling to dismissal. The Vice Chancellor for Student Services is charged with the responsibility of initiating student disciplinary procedures and meeting with the student. In the process of meeting and counseling with the student, 59


which may sometimes comprise two or more interview appointments, a determination of responsibility will be made. The Vice Chancellor will determine whether the evidence (including the information provided in any reports, the parties’ written statements, if any, the evidence presented at the meeting, and the testimony of the parties and witnesses) establishes that it is more likely than not that the student committed a violation of UAHT Policy. In other words, the standard of proof will be the preponderance of the evidence. All charges and possible disciplinary actions shall be presented to the accused student in written form sent or delivered to the address listed in the registrar’s records. This shall constitute full and adequate notice. However, the College reserves the right to use other reasonable means to notify students. This includes, but is not limited to, the use of the College e-mail system. The failure of a student to provide an address change or forwarding address, or the refusal or inability to accept the mailed notice, shall not constitute good cause for failure to comply with the notification. The student will be informed by written notice of the finding of responsibility and sanction, if any. If no written notice of appeal is received within the time specified, the finding and sanction shall be final. Student’s may appeal the Vice Chancellor’s finding and/or sanction using the STUDENT COMPLAINT/APPEALS/ GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES outlined in the College Catalog The disciplinary actions the College may take include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. Expulsion: separation of the student from the College; the student is not eligible for readmission to the College. 2. Dismissal: separation of the student from the College for an indefinite period of time. 3. Suspension: separation of the student from the College for a definite period of time. 4. Disciplinary probation: official warning that the student’s conduct is 1) in violation of the rules, regulations, and policies stated in UAHT publications, official correspondence, or announcements; or 2) in violation of Arkansas or federal criminal statutes. Disciplinary probation will be imposed for varying periods of time when a student enrolls following a period of disciplinary suspension, dismissal, or expulsion. Disciplinary probation can be imposed for varying periods of time and can include the following: 4a. ineligibility to hold office in College organizations 4b. ineligibility to represent the College in any official function 4c. ineligibility to continue to receive a College-sponsored scholarship, grant, and/or work 4d. placing an informational notice in the student’s permanent file 4e. continued enrollment depends upon the maintenance of satisfactory conduct throughout the period of probation 5. Letter of enrollment block: a letter stating that the student may not reenter the College without prior approval through the Vice Chancellor for Student Services if enrollment has been blocked for a previous disciplinary problem. 6. Letter of reprimand: a written admonition of a student for actions unbecoming to the College community. 7. Work hours: hours that a student may be required to work in a specified area of service to the College. 8. Restrictions: the withdrawal of specified privileges for a definite period of time. 9. Restitution: a payment for financial injury in cases involving theft, personal injury, destruction of property, or deception. The assessed costs to be paid may be in addition to other disciplinary sanctions. 10. Monetary fines: a fine assessed by the College which is placed on the sanctioned student’s account. 11. Educational sanctions: All consequences of the student judicial process are intended to be educational. In this context, however, the term “educational sanctions” specifically describes those tasks, assignments, or experiences that a student is obligated to complete as a result of the staff’s decision. Educational sanctions may be imposed in combination with or as a condition of any other disciplinary sanction. Educational sanctions may, for example, require the student to prepare letters of apology, to research an issue related to the offense, to attend a workshop, lecture or meeting, or to attend counseling. 60


Interim Suspension In certain circumstances, the Vice Chancellor for Student Services may impose a College suspension prior to the discipline meeting. The interim suspension shall become immediately effective without prior notice. Interim suspension may be imposed only: • to ensure the safety and wellbeing of members of the College community or preservation of College property • to ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being • or if student poses a definite threat of disruption of or interference with the normal operations of the College During the interim suspension, students shall be denied access to the campus (including classes) and/or all other College activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, as the Vice Chancellor for Student Services may determine to be appropriate. Response to Drug and Alcohol Abuse and Drug-Free Campus Policy College regulations specify that the use, possession, or sale of illegal drugs and alcohol is in violation of College policy. Students who are found guilty of violating College policy regarding illegal drugs will be subject to dismissal. Students having drug or alcohol abuse problems or who know or care about someone who is abusing drugs and alcohol will find a variety of sources on campus where assistance is available. Student Services has this information available. UAHT Policy for Discrimination, Harassment, Retaliation and Sexual Misconduct POLICY STATEMENT The University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana is committed to providing an environment that emphasizes the dignity and worth of every member of its community and that is free from harassment and discrimination based upon race, color, religion, national origin, service in the uniformed services (as defined in state and federal law), veteran status, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, pregnancy, physical or mental disability or genetic information. Such an environment is necessary to a healthy learning, working and living atmosphere. Accordingly, all acts of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and sexual misconduct as defined by this Policy are prohibited. JURISDICTION Title IX protects the College community from sexual discrimination, harassment and misconduct in a school’s education programs and activities. Title IX protects the UAHT community in connection with all academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic and other College programs, whether those programs take place on UAHT property, in UAHT transportation, at a class or training program sponsored by UAHT at another location or elsewhere. This Policy shall not be construed or applied to restrict academic freedom at UAHT, nor shall it be construed to restrict constitutionally protected expression. Consistent with state and federal law, reasonable accommodation will be provided to persons with disabilities. All Complaints or any concerns about conduct that may violate this Policy should be submitted to the Title IX Coordinator: Brian Berry, Executive Vice Chancellor for Student Services & Administration Student Center room 229 P.O. Box 140, Hope, AR 71802-0140 870-722-8227 A complaint may also be submitted to the Title IX Deputy Coordinator: Kathryn Hopkins, Human Resource Officer Administrative Complex room 125 P.O. Box 140, Hope, AR 71802-0140 870-722-8164 FILING REPORT WITH LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT 61


In some instances, sexual misconduct may constitute both a violation of UAHT policy and criminal activity. The UAHT grievance process is not a substitute for instituting legal action. UAHT encourages individuals to report alleged sexual misconduct promptly to campus officials AND to law enforcement authorities, where appropriate. Individuals may file a report directly with local law enforcement agencies by dialing 911. Individuals may also contact any of the following for assistance in filing a report with local law enforcement: Hope Police Department 312 S. Washington Ste. Hope, AR 71801 870-777-3434

Texarkana Police Department 100 N. Stateline Ave. Texarkana, AR 75504 903-798-3130

PRESERVING EVIDENCE It is important that evidence of sexual assault be preserved, because it may be needed for prosecuting the criminal case. Victims and others should not alter the scene of the attack. The victim should not change clothes, bathe or shower, drink or eat anything, or brush her/his teeth before reporting the assault. Any items worn by the victim during the assault, but are not currently being worn, and any materials encountered during the assault (i.e., bed sheets, blankets, etc.) should be placed in a paper bag and brought along with the victim to a local hospital emergency department that has kits to collect and preserve evidence of rape and sexual assault. STUDENT AND VISITOR RESPONSIBILITY TO REPORT Students and visitors to UAHT are strongly encouraged to report allegations of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator and/or deputy coordinator. A report should be made as soon as possible after the incident in order to facilitate an effective response. The longer a report is delayed, the more difficult it will be for UAHT to investigate. Reports may be made by the person experiencing the misconduct or by a third party, such as a witness or someone who is told of the misconduct. MANDATORY EMPLOYEE REPORTING In order to enable UAHT to respond effectively and to proactively stop instances of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and sexual misconduct at UAHT, all employees must, within 24 hours of receiving information regarding a potential violation of this Policy, report information to the Title IX Coordinator and/or deputy coordinator. Only employees who are statutorily prohibited from reporting such information (e.g., licensed health-care professionals) are exempt from these reporting requirements. This Policy is not intended to restrict curriculum or prohibit or abridge the use of particular textbooks or curricular materials. OFF-CAMPUS CONDUCT Conduct that occurs off campus can be the subject of a Complaint or report and will be evaluated to determine whether it violates this Policy. Allegations of off-campus sexual misconduct are of particular concern and should be brought to the UAHT’s attention. CONFIDENTIALITY Subject to the other provisions of this Policy and the requirements of law, every possible effort will be made to ensure that all information received as part of the UAHT’s Complaint/Grievance Procedure is treated discreetly. All parties to the Complaint are required to maintain the confidentiality of all information received during this process. However, it is not possible to guarantee that all Complaints will remain confidential because of UAHT’s obligation to investigate allegations of misconduct. All requests to maintain confidentiality shall be directed to the Title IX Coordinator who has the authority to make such determinations. Except as compelled by law or in the interest of fairness, just resolution or health and safety considerations, disclosure of information contained in Complaints, their substance, procedures and the results of investigations will be limited to the immediate parties, witnesses and other appropriate officials. Limited disclosure may also be necessary to conduct a full and impartial investigation. AVAILABILITY OF COUNSELING AND ADVOCACY Counseling and other mental health services for victims of sexual assault are available in the community. A 62


current list of these services is available on the UAHT website. Domestic Violence Prevention, Inc. sexual assault services may assist with making referrals for individual counseling and support groups and in identifying non- counseling campus and community resources that may be of additional help and serve as a victim advocate upon request. EDUCATION AND AWARENESS PROGRAMS UAHT’s Title IX Coordinator, in conjunction with other campus offices, is responsible for planning and coordinating campus education and awareness programs about all forms of sexual assault, including rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, and other sex offenses. Programs are presented regularly throughout the academic year in student orientation, academic classes, employee training and professional development, and in other settings that are likely to reach people throughout the campus community. Campuswide education and awareness activities are also conducted during Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Month. POLICY EXPECTATIONS WITH RESPECT TO CONSENSUAL RELATIONSHIPS There are inherent risks in any romantic or sexual relationship between individuals in unequal positions (such as teacher and student, or supervisor and employee). These relationships may be less consensual than perceived by the individual whose position confers power. The relationship also may be viewed in different ways by each of the parties, particularly in retrospect. Furthermore, circumstances may change, and conduct that was previously welcome may become unwelcome. Even when both parties have consented at the outset to a romantic or sexual involvement, this past consent may not remove grounds for a later charge of a violation of Policy. UAHT does not wish to interfere with private choices regarding personal relationships when those relationships do not interfere with the goals and policies of UAHT. However, for the personal protection of members of this community, relationships in which power differentials are inherent (faculty-student, staff-student, administratorstudent or employee) are prohibited except in extraordinary circumstances. Consensual romantic or sexual relationships in which one party maintains a direct supervisory or evaluative role over the other party are unethical. Therefore, persons with direct supervisory or evaluative responsibilities who are involved in such relationships must bring those relationships to the timely attention of their supervisors. This will likely result in the necessity to remove the employee from the supervisory or evaluative responsibilities, or will shift the student or employee out of being supervised or evaluated by someone with whom he or she has established a consensual relationship. Failure to self-report such relationships to a supervisor as required can result in disciplinary action for an employee, up to and including termination. COMPLAINT/GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE These procedures are intended to apply to all grievances involving discrimination, harassment, retaliation and sexual misconduct as described in this Policy, including but not limited to those brought by a student against an employee and/or fellow student, employee against fellow employee and/or student, and third party against employee and/or student. All other grievances by students, employees or third parties shall be addressed through other grievance procedures as indicated below and detailed in the UAHT College Catalog: • Grade Appeal Procedure • Student Grievance/Complaint Procedure • Financial Aid Satisfactory Appeal Progress Appeal Procedure • Student Conduct Policy UAHT benefits from formal and informal procedures that encourage prompt resolution of Complaints and concerns raised by members of the UAHT community. INFORMAL COMPLAINT PROCESS UAHT does not require a Complainant to utilize the Informal Complaint Process if doing so is impracticable or 63


unsafe, or if the Complainant believes that the conduct cannot be effectively addressed through informal means. For example, the Informal Complaint Process should not be used to address allegations of sexual assault. However, in other circumstances where it is practical and safe to do so, every reasonable effort should be made to constructively resolve issues with students, faculty, staff and administrators before pursuing the Formal Complaint Process. Under the Informal Complaint Process, a Complainant may elect to resolve his/ her Complaint by discussing it with the offending party. If the offending party is an employee and satisfactory resolution cannot be reached after discussion, the Complainant may also contact the individual’s direct supervisor to resolve the Complaint. If these efforts are unsuccessful, the Formal Complaint Process may be initiated. FORMAL COMPLAINT PROCESS Upon receiving a report of alleged or possible violation of this Policy, the Title IX Coordinator and/or deputy will evaluate the information received and determine what further actions should be taken. The Title IX Coordinator will follow the procedures described in this Policy. The Title IX Coordinator and/or deputy will take steps, either directly with the complainant or through a reporting employee, to provide information about the UAHT’s Complaint/Grievance Procedure, as well as available health and advocacy resources and options for criminal reporting. INVESTIGATION The Title IX Coordinator will be responsible for overseeing the prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution of Complaints filed with UAHT. The Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will investigate all Complaints of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and sexual misconduct and determine any accommodations or other remedial short-term actions necessary in light of the individual circumstances presented. The Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee will apprise the Vice Chancellor for the appropriate division or department of the Complaint. The Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee, who will have been properly trained, will: • identify the correct policies allegedly violated; • conduct an immediate initial investigation to determine if there is reasonable cause to charge the Respondent(s); • meet with the Complainant to finalize the Complaint; • prepare the notice of charges on the basis of initial investigation; • develop a strategic investigation plan which may include a witness list, an evidence list, an intended timeframe, and an order of interviews for all witnesses, including the Respondent; • conduct a thorough, reliable and impartial investigation during which witnesses may or may not be given notice prior to the interview; • complete the investigation promptly, and without unreasonable deviation from the intended timeline; • make a written finding on the case, based on a preponderance of the evidence, which indicates that it is more likely than not that a Policy violation has or has not occurred, and identifies appropriate remedies and/or sanctions, if any; and • prepare a complete report on the investigation and findings. As noted above, an investigation of the Complaint will be conducted by the Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee unless it is clear from the face of the Complaint or the Title IX Coordinator’s initial meetings with the parties that no reasonable grounds exist for believing that the conduct at issue violates this Policy. In the event that the Complaint was made by someone other than the alleged victim, the Title IX Coordinator will consider the following factors in determining whether it is reasonable to investigate the Complaint: • the source and nature of the information, • the seriousness of the alleged incident, • the specificity of the information, • the objectivity and credibility of the source of the information, • whether the alleged victims can be identified, and 64


• whether those individuals wish to pursue the matter. In the event that the Title IX Coordinator determines that an investigation of the Complaint should not be conducted, he/she will determine and document (in consultation, as necessary, with the alleged victim, the Respondent and any other UAHT administrators) the appropriate resolution of the Complaint and inform the parties of the same. With all Complaints, if the Title IX Coordinator determines that an investigation should be conducted, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly investigate the matter. The existence of concurrent criminal investigations or proceedings shall not delay the investigation of any Complaint filed under this Policy. If another individual is designated to investigate the matter, the Title IX Coordinator will share the investigator’s name and contact information with the alleged victim and the Respondent and will forward the Complaint to the investigator. Within three (3) days of such appointment, the investigator, the alleged victim or the Respondent may identify to the Title IX Coordinator in writing any real or perceived conflicts of interest posed by assigning such investigator to the matter. The Title IX Coordinator will carefully consider such statements and will assign a different individual as investigator if it is determined that a material conflict of interest exists. Upon receipt of the Complaint, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly begin the investigation, which shall include but is not limited to the following: • conducting interviews with the Complainant, the alleged victim (if not the Complainant), the Respondent, and third-party witnesses (including expert witnesses, where applicable) and summarizing such interviews in written form; • isiting, inspecting, and taking photographs at relevant sites; and • where applicable, collecting and preserving relevant evidence (in cases of corresponding criminal reports, this step may be coordinated with law enforcement agencies). Throughout the investigation, the Title IX Coordinator will remain neutral. The Title IX Coordinator should obtain, where applicable and where possible, the written consent of any third-party witnesses to the disclosure, as contemplated by this Policy, of any personally identifiable information contained in the Complaint, the Investigative Report, and for any other documents the disclosure of which is contemplated by this Policy in order to further the resolution of the Complaints. Initial Meeting with Complainant and/or Alleged Victim. As soon as is practicable, the Title IX Coordinator will contact the Complainant and the alleged victim (if not the Complainant) to schedule an initial meeting to, as applicable: • provide a copy of this Policy; • provide a copy of the Discrimination, Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Complaint Form (a copy of which is attached as Exhibit • A) on which the Complainant may, if he or she agrees to disclose the information, provide details regarding the allegation, including the name of the accused individual and the date, location and general nature of the alleged violation of Policy (the Complaint Form may be completed by Complainant or dictated to the Title IX Coordinator, who will confirm the accuracy of his or her documentation with the Complainant); • explain avenues for resolution; • explain the steps involved in an investigation under this Policy; • discuss confidentiality standards and concerns; • determine whether the Complainant or the alleged victim (if not the Complainant) wish to pursue a resolution through UAHT or no resolution of any kind; • refer to law enforcement, counseling, medical, academic or other resources, as appropriate; and • discuss, as appropriate, possible interim measures that can be provided during the pendency of the investigative and resolution processes. Interim Measures. Unless circumstances dictate otherwise, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly issue a “No 65


Contact” order to all parties upon notice of any sexual assault Complaint. In all cases, UAHT may implement any necessary interim measures, deemed appropriate and reasonably available, regardless of whether a Complaint has been filed (with either campus administrators or law enforcement agencies) or whether an investigation has commenced (by either campus administrators or law enforcement agencies). Interim measures may include, but are not limited to: • issuing no-contact orders; • providing an escort to ensure that an individual can move safely between classes, work, and/or activities; • changing work arrangements or location; • rescheduling class work, assignments, and examinations; • arranging for the Complainant to take an incomplete in a class; • reassigning class section; • permitting a temporary withdrawal from UAHT; • providing alternative course completion options; • providing counseling services; and • providing academic support services. Following the initial meeting with the Complainant and the alleged victim (if not the Complainant), the Title IX Coordinator will, if applicable, promptly determine the interim measures to be provided to the alleged victim. Such determination will be promptly communicated to the alleged victim, and no later than the point at which it is communicated to the Respondent. Initial Meeting with Respondent. If the Complainant or alleged victim (if not the Complainant) wishes to pursue resolution through UAHT or if UAHT otherwise deems that a further investigation is warranted, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the Title IX Coordinator’s initial meeting with the Complainant (and, if applicable, the alleged victim), the Title IX Coordinator will schedule an initial meeting with the Respondent. During the initial meeting with the Respondent, the Investigator will, as applicable: • provide sufficient written information, consistent with privacy laws and any request for confidentiality, to allow Respondent to address the allegation (e.g., the name of the Complainant/alleged victim, the date, location, nature of the alleged violation of Policy, etc.); • provide a copy of this Policy; • explain UAHT’s procedures for resolution of the Complaint; • explain the steps involved in an investigation under this Policy; • discuss confidentiality standards and concerns; • discuss non-retaliation requirements; • inform of any interim measures already determined and being provided to the Complainant and/or the alleged victim that would directly affect the Respondent (e.g., changing his or her class schedule, etc.); • refer to law enforcement, counseling, medical, academic or other resources, as appropriate; and • discuss, as appropriate, possible interim measures that can be provided to the Respondent during the pendency of the investigative and resolution processes. Interim Measures. Unless circumstances dictate otherwise, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly issue a “No Contact” order to all parties upon notice of any sexual assault Complaint. In all cases, UAHT may implement any necessary interim measures, deemed appropriate and reasonably available, regardless of whether a Complaint has been filed (with either campus administrators or law enforcement agencies) or whether an investigation has commenced (by either campus administrators or law enforcement agencies). Interim measures may include, but are not limited to: • issuing no-contact orders; • providing an escort to ensure that an individual can move safely between classes, work, and/or activities; • changing work arrangements or location; • rescheduling class work, assignments, and examinations; • arranging for the Complainant to take an incomplete in a class; • reassigning class section; • permitting a temporary withdrawal from UAHT; • providing alternative course completion options; • providing counseling services; and 66


• providing academic support services. Following the initial meeting with the Complainant and the alleged victim (if not the Complainant), the Title IX Coordinator will, if applicable, promptly determine the interim measures to be provided to the alleged victim. Such determination will be promptly communicated to the alleged victim, and no later than the point at which it is communicated to the Respondent. Initial Meeting with Respondent. If the Complainant or alleged victim (if not the Complainant) wishes to pursue resolution through UAHT or if UAHT otherwise deems that a further investigation is warranted, as soon as is reasonably practicable after the Title IX Coordinator’s initial meeting with the Complainant (and, if applicable, the alleged victim), the Title IX Coordinator will schedule an initial meeting with the Respondent. During the initial meeting with the Respondent, the Investigator will, as applicable: • provide sufficient written information, consistent with privacy laws and any request for confidentiality, to allow Respondent to address the allegation (e.g., the name of the Complainant/alleged victim, the date, location, nature of the alleged violation of Policy, etc.); • provide a copy of this Policy; • explain UAHT’s procedures for resolution of the Complaint; • explain the steps involved in an investigation under this Policy; • discuss confidentiality standards and concerns; • discuss non-retaliation requirements; • inform of any interim measures already determined and being provided to the Complainant and/or the alleged victim that would directly affect the Respondent (e.g., changing his or her class schedule, etc.); • refer to law enforcement, counseling, medical, academic or other resources, as appropriate; and • discuss, as appropriate, possible interim measures that can be provided to the Respondent during the pendency of the investigative and resolution processes. Investigative Report. The Title IX Coordinator shall complete a written investigative report (“Investigative Report”) that shall include the following items: • The name and sex of the alleged victim and, if different, the name and sex of the person reporting the allegation (It should also include any other relevant protected class characteristics if the Complaint involves a violation of this Policy based on a protected status other than gender); • a statement of the allegation, a description of the incident(s), and the date(s) and time(s) (if known) of the alleged incident(s); • the date that the Complaint or other report was made; • the date the Complainant and alleged victim (if not the Complainant) were interviewed; • the date the Respondent was interviewed; • the names and sex of all persons alleged to have committed the alleged violation of this Policy (It should also include any other relevant protected status characteristics if the Complaint involves a violation of this Policy based on a protected status other than gender); • the names and sex of all known witnesses to the alleged incident(s); • the dates that any relevant documentary evidence (including cell phone and other records as appropriate) was obtained; • any written statements of the Complainant (or victim, if different from the Complainant), the Respondent and any witnesses; • summaries of all interviews conducted, photographs, and descriptions of relevant evidence, summaries of relevant electronic records, and a detailed report of the events in question; • a written finding on the case, based on a preponderance of the evidence which indicates whether or not it is more likely than not that a Policy violation has occurred; • the policy or policies violated and, in consultation, as necessary, with the Complainant, alleged victim (if different than the Complainant), Respondent, and other UAHT officials, any remedial and/or disciplinary action deemed appropriate under the circumstances; • the response of UAHT personnel and, if applicable, University-level officials, including any interim measures and permanent steps taken with respect to the Complainant, alleged victim (if different than the Complainant) 67


and the Respondent; and • a narrative of all action taken to prevent recurrence of any harassing incident(s), including any written documentation. If the Title IX Coordinator is unable to obtain the consent of third-party witnesses, he or she will redact the Investigative Report to the extent necessary to avoid inappropriate disclosure of such witness’s personally identifiable information, while ensuring that such redaction does not prevent resolution of the Complaint. If the Title IX Coordinator determines and documents, based on the investigation, that reasonable grounds exist to believe that the conduct at issue constitutes a violation of this Policy, the Title IX Coordinator will determine the appropriate remedy and/or sanction to be imposed and will include the appropriate remedy and/or sanction in the Investigative Report. Imposition of the appropriate remedy and/or sanction will be imposed only after all appeals have been exhausted. In determining the appropriate remedy and/or sanction, UAHT will act to end the discrimination, harassment, retaliation or sexual misconduct, prevent its recurrence and remedy its effects on the victim and/or UAHT community. Sanctions will depend upon the nature and gravity of the misconduct, any record of prior discipline for a violation of this Policy, or both. Sanctions may include, without limitation, withholding a promotion or pay increase, reassigning employment, terminating employment, temporary suspension without pay, compensation adjustments, expulsion or suspension from UAHT, disciplinary probation, mandated counseling and/or educational sanctions as deemed appropriate. The Title IX Coordinator shall complete and distribute the Investigative Report, concurrently, to the alleged victim and Respondent within thirty (30) calendar days following receipt of a Complaint. All parties to whom the Investigative Report is distributed pursuant to this Policy should maintain it in confidence. The Investigative Report may only be disclosed as contemplated by this Policy. If the Title IX Coordinator finds no reasonable grounds to believe that the conduct at issue constitutes a violation of this Policy, then the Title IX Coordinator will determine and document the appropriate resolution of the Complaint in the Investigative Report and will promptly notify the parties of that determination. APPEAL INVOLVING FACULTY/STAFF All appeals where the Respondent is a UAHT faculty or staff member shall be made to the Chancellor or his/ her designee. Both the alleged victim and the Respondent may appeal any or all of the Title IX Coordinator’s decision in writing to the Chancellor or his/her designee within ten (10) days of receipt of the Investigative Report. The appealing party must also provide a copy of the appeal to the Title IX Coordinator within the same time period. The appeal should include a brief statement describing any or all parts of the Investigative Report that is being appealed and the reason for appeal. Acceptable means of notification include email, facsimile, hand delivered notification or postal delivery. The Title IX Coordinator will promptly inform the other party of the appeal. Within thirty (30) days of receipt of the appeal, the Chancellor or his/her designee will make a final determination as to whether the Complaint should be closed, whether a violation of Policy has occurred, and/ or whether any additional or different remedial action or sanctions are warranted. The Chancellor or his/her designee will concurrently notify the alleged victim and the Respondent of his/her decision. All non-tenured faculty and staff members of UAHT are at-will employees who may be terminated at any time, with or without cause. With regard to such faculty and staff, nothing in this Policy shall create an expectation of continued employment with UAHT or be construed to prevent or delay UAHT from taking any disciplinary action deemed appropriate (including suspension and immediate termination of employment) for any violation of state law, federal law or UAHT policy. When the Respondent is a faculty member with tenure and the sanction imposed or upheld by the Chancellor or his/her designee is dismissal of the Respondent’s employment, the matter shall proceed pursuant to Board Policy 405.1. APPEAL INVOLVING A STUDENT 68


In those instances where the Respondent is a UAHT student, the alleged victim and/or the Respondent may appeal any or all of the Title IX Coordinator’s decision to a Hearing Panel by providing a written appeal to the Chancellor or his/her designee with a copy also being provided to the Title IX Coordinator. The appeal must be submitted within ten (10) days of receipt of the Investigative Report and must include a brief statement describing any or all parts of the Investigative Report being appealed and the reason for appeal. Acceptable means of notification include email, facsimile, hand delivered notification or postal delivery. Within three (3) days of receiving the appeal, the Chancellor or his/her designee will appoint the members of the Hearing Panel, to include at least three faculty and/or staff members. The Chancellor or his/her designee will select one member of the Hearing Panel to act as the Chair. The Title IX Coordinator will provide a copy of the Complaint and the Investigative Report to each member of the Hearing Panel and, if only a portion of the Title IX Coordinator’s findings and determinations are appealed, the Title IX Coordinator will specify which part(s) of the alleged misconduct will be the subject of the hearing. Promptly after the appointment of the members of the Hearing Panel, the Title IX Coordinator will provide concurrent written notice to the alleged victim and the Respondent, setting forth the names of the individuals selected to serve on and chair the Hearing Panel. If only a portion of the findings and determination are appealed, the Title IX Coordinator will also specify in the notice which part(s) of the alleged misconduct will be the subject of the hearing. The parties may challenge the participation of any member of the Hearing Panel by submitting a written objection to the Chancellor or his/her designee within three (3) days of receipt of the notice of the composition of the Hearing Panel. Any objection must state the specific reason(s) for the objection. The Chancellor or his/her designee will evaluate the objection and determine whether to alter the composition of the Hearing Panel. Failure to submit a timely and proper objection will constitute a waiver of any right of objection to the composition of the Hearing Panel. Any changes in the composition of the Hearing Panel will be provided in writing to both parties prior to the date of the hearing. Submission of Written Materials. Within five (5) days of receipt of the notice of the initial composition of the Hearing Panel, the alleged victim and the Respondent may provide the Chair of the Hearing Panel with a list of witnesses, if any, that they propose that the Hearing Panel call and a brief description of each proposed witness’s connection to and/or knowledge of the issues in dispute, any supporting documents or other evidence, and a written statement of position. Notice of the Hearings. Not less than five (5) days but not more than ten (10) days after delivery of notice of the initial composition of the Hearing Panel to the parties, the Hearing Panel will provide a separate notice to the alleged victim, Respondent and any witnesses or other third parties whose testimony the Hearing Panel deems relevant, requesting such individuals to appear before the Hearing Panel. The notice should set forth the date, time, and location for the individual’s requested presence. The Hearing Panel shall provide the names of the witnesses or other third parties that the Hearing Panel plans to call in its notices to the alleged victim and the Respondent. The hearing shall be conducted within twenty (20) days but no sooner than ten (10) days of the receipt of the appeal. Failure to Appear. If any party fails to appear before the Hearing Panel if requested to do so, and such party was provided proper notice of the hearing as set forth above, then absent extenuating circumstances, the Hearing Panel will proceed to determine the resolution of the Complaint. Support Persons. Both the alleged victim and the Respondent may be accompanied by one support person to assist them during the hearing process. This support person can be anyone, including an attorney, but the support person may not take part in the hearing. Unless the student has received a suspension of ten (10) or more days or expulsion, the support person may not address the Hearing Panel, present evidence, make objections or statements, ask questions of any party or witness or otherwise participate in the hearing, beyond privately communicating with the party that he/she is supporting. If the student has received a suspension of ten (10) or more days or expulsion, the support person may fully participate during the disciplinary appeal proceeding. 69


The Chair must be notified five (5) business days in advance of the hearing if a party will be accompanied by a support person. The Chair may disallow the attendance of any support person if he/she is also a witness or if, in the discretion of the Chair, such person’s presence would be disruptive or obstructive to the hearing or otherwise warrant removal. All support persons must agree to keep any and all information presented in the hearing confidential in order to attend. Absent accommodation for disability, the parties may not be accompanied by any other individual during the hearing process except as set forth in this Policy. UAHT officials may seek advice from the University’s Office of General Counsel on questions of law and procedure at any time during the process. Evidentiary Matters. The alleged victim and the Respondent will have an equal opportunity to present evidence during their hearing. Formal rules of evidence will not be observed during the hearings. Prior Sexual Conduct. Evidence of the prior sexual conduct of the alleged victim and the Respondent with others will not be permitted at the hearings, with the following exceptions: • evidence is permitted to show that the alleged victim has in the past been formally disciplined by UAHT for falsely filing Complaints alleging a violation of this Policy; • evidence is permitted to show that the Respondent has in the past been either convicted in a criminal proceeding or formally disciplined by UAHT for conduct which would violate this Policy, if deemed relevant; and • evidence regarding the past sexual activity of the Respondent (regardless of whether the Respondent was formally charged with a violation of the Policy with respect to such conduct) may be permitted to show that the Respondent has engaged in a pattern of behavior similar to the alleged violations of policy at issue before the Hearing Panel, provided that (1) the Respondent has not been found “not responsible” by UAHT in a proceeding related to such conduct and (2) the Chair has made written findings both that the evidence is reliable and trustworthy and that the conduct is sufficiently and substantially similar to the conduct at issue before the Hearing Panel to suggest a pattern of behavior. Hearing Procedure. The Hearing Panel will conduct a hearing during which it will interview and question the Complainant, the alleged victim, the Respondent, and any witnesses or other third parties whose testimony the Hearing Panel deems relevant. The parties will not be allowed to personally question or cross-examine each other during the hearing, but will be allowed to question witnesses. The Chair will resolve all questions concerning procedure or the admission of evidence or testimony, including the relevancy and reliability of the evidence and testimony. All participants at the hearing are expected to provide truthful testimony. The Complainant and/or alleged victim have the option not to be in the same room with the alleged Respondent during the hearing. Any party may choose not to testify or appear before the Hearing Panel; however, his/ her exercise of that option will not preclude the Hearing Panel from making a determination regarding the Complaint filed against the Respondent. Decision of the Hearing Panel. Following the conclusion of the hearing, the Hearing Panel will confer and by majority vote determine whether the evidence (including the information provided in and by the Investigative Report, the parties’ written statements, if any, the evidence presented at the hearings, and the testimony of the parties and witnesses) establishes that it is more likely than not that the Respondent committed a violation of this Policy. In other words, the standard of proof will be the preponderance of the evidence. If the Hearing Panel determines that more likely than not the Respondent committed a violation of this Policy, the Hearing Panel will recommend sanctions and give consideration to whether a given sanction will (a) bring an end to the violation in question, (b) reasonably prevent a recurrence of a similar violation, and (c) remedy the effects of the violation. The Hearing Panel will forward its recommendations regarding sanctions to the Chancellor or his designee, who will make the final determination regarding all sanctions. Sanctions for a finding of responsibility will depend upon the nature and gravity of the misconduct, any record of prior discipline for a violation of this Policy, or both. Sanctions may include, without limitation, expulsion or suspension from UAHT, disciplinary probation, expulsion from campus housing, mandated counseling, and/or educational sanctions deemed appropriate by the Hearing Panel. 70


Ordinarily, sanctions will not be imposed until the resolution of any timely appeal under this Policy. However, if it is deemed necessary to protect the welfare of the victim or the UAHT community, the Hearing Panel may recommend and the Chancellor or his/her designee may determine that any sanctions be imposed immediately and continue in effect until such time as the appeal process is exhausted. At such time that the appeal process is exhausted, the Title IX Coordinator will determine the final accommodations to be provided to the victim, if any, and the Title IX Coordinator will communicate such decision to the victim and the Respondent to the extent that it affects him/her. The Title IX Coordinator will also take steps to prevent any harassment of or retaliation against the Complainant, the victim (if not the Complainant), or third parties, such as informing them about how to report subsequent problems, following up with them to ensure that there are no subsequent problems, providing training for the campus community, and providing counseling for the Respondent. The Title IX Coordinator will also take steps to prevent the harassment of or retaliation against the Respondent. Furthermore, the Title IX Coordinator will take prompt corrective action if the Complainant or the victim (if not the Complainant) experiences retaliation or is subjected to further violation of this Policy or if the original sanctions imposed on the Respondent are ineffective to protect the safety and well-being of the Complainant, the victim (if not the Complainant), or other members of the UAHT community. The Title IX Coordinator will also take reasonable steps to eliminate any hostile environment that has been created, such as conducting trainings and disseminating informational materials. In taking the above-outlined steps, the Title IX Coordinator will make every reasonable effort to minimize the burden on the Complainant and/or alleged victim. Final Outcome Letter. Within ten (10) calendar days following the conclusion of the hearings, the Hearing Panel will issue a written decision letter (the “Final Outcome Letter”) concurrently to the Respondent and the alleged victim. The Final Outcome Letter will set forth (1) the name of the Respondent, (2) the violation(s) of this Policy for which the Respondent was found responsible, if any, (3) the recommended sanctions imposed on the Respondent, if any, and it may set forth names of other individuals, such as a victim or witness, provided that such other individuals provide their written consent to such inclusion. In order to comply with FERPA, the letter will not include information considered part of a party’s “education record” (as that term is defined by FERPA) that is not otherwise exempt from disclosure under the Act, or other information about sanctions that do not relate to the victim. Confidentiality and Disclosure. In order to comply with FERPA and Title IX and to provide an orderly process for the presentation and consideration of relevant information without undue intimidation or pressure, the hearing process is not open to the general public. Accordingly, documents prepared in anticipation of the hearings (including the Complaint, the Investigative Report, the notices of hearing, and the pre•hearing submissions referenced above) and documents, testimony, or other information introduced at the hearings may not be disclosed outside of the hearing proceedings, except as may be required or authorized by law. TIME PERIODS UAHT will make every reasonable effort to ensure that the investigation and resolution of a Complaint occurs in as timely and efficient a manner as possible. UAHT’s investigation and resolution of a Complaint (including an appeal, if applicable) will generally be completed within 60 calendar days of the receipt of the Complaint, absent extenuating circumstances. Hearings, if at all, will take place after the conclusion of the investigation. If hearings have taken place, both the Complainant and the Respondent generally will receive a Final Outcome Letter within ten (10) calendar days of the conclusion of the hearing. Any party may request an extension of any deadline by providing the Title IX Coordinator or his or her respective deputies with a written request for an extension that includes reference to the duration of the proposed extension and the basis for the request. For purposes of calculating all time periods set forth in this Complaint and Grievance Policy, a business day 71


is defined to mean normal operating hours, Monday through Friday, excluding recognized national and state holidays and UAHT closings. Timelines may be modified in cases where information is not clear, judged to be incomplete, relevant parties are not available for interview, and/or other related circumstances as may arise. The Title IX Coordinator may also modify any deadlines contained in this Policy as necessary and for good cause. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY At any time prior to the issuance of the Investigative Report or the date of his/her designated hearing, the Respondent may elect to acknowledge his/her actions and take responsibility for the alleged policy violation. In such situation, the Title IX Coordinator will propose sanction(s). If either party objects to the proposed sanction(s), they may appeal the sanction pursuant to this Policy. NO RETALIATION Retaliation against any person who files a Complaint, participates in an investigation, or opposes a discriminatory employment or educational practice or policy is prohibited. A person who believes retaliation has occurred should notify the Title IX Compliance Officer as soon as possible. FALSE REPORTS Willfully making a false report of sexual harassment is a violation of UAHT policy and is a serious offense. Any person who willfully makes or participates in making a false or frivolous report of discrimination, harassment, retaliation or sexual misconduct will be subject to disciplinary action. False reporting may also violate state criminal statutes and civil defamation laws. OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS COMPLAINT Although Complainants are encouraged to resolve their grievances related to discrimination by utilizing this Complaint/Grievance Procedure, they have the right to file a complaint directly with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR). Information regarding applicable timelines and procedures is available from OCR. You may call 1-800-421-3481 to obtain further information about filing a complaint with OCR. EFFECTIVE DATE UAHT reserves the right to make changes and amendments to this Policy as needed, with appropriate notice to the community. However, the Policy in force at the time that a Complaint is filed will be the Policy used throughout the investigation, hearing and any appeals that are heard. DOCUMENTATION UAHT will retain documentation (including but not limited to the written Complaint, notifications, the Investigative Report, any written findings of fact, petitions for appeal, hearing transcripts or recordings (if any), and any written communication between the parties), for at least three (3) years. Documentation pertaining to terminations, expulsions or educational sanctions may be retained indefinitely. DEFINITION OF TERMS Complainant: Any party who makes a Complaint against a student, employee, staff member or campus visitor. Consent: is a clear, knowing and voluntary decision to engage in sexual activity. Because consent is voluntary, it is given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. It is given with positive cooperation in the act or expression of intent to engage in the act pursuant to an exercise of free will. Consent is active, not passive. Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions consist of an affirmative, unambiguous, conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity. 72


Consent is revocable, meaning consent can be withdrawn at any time. Thus, consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter. Once consent has been revoked, sexual activity must stop immediately. Consent can be limited, meaning consent to any one form of sexual activity cannot automatically imply consent to any other forms of sexual activity. Further, previous relationships or prior consent cannot imply consent to future sexual acts. Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, such as when a person is physically or mentally unable to make informed, rational judgments, or lacks the ability to understand the “who, what, when, where and how” related to the sexual activity. States of incapacitation include, but are not limited to, unconsciousness and sleep. Where alcohol or drugs are involved, incapacitation is determined by how the alcohol or other drugs have impacted a person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and/or ability to make fully informed judgments. Use of alcohol or other drugs will never function as a defense to a violation of this Policy. In sum: • Silence does not equal consent. • Lack of verbal resistance does not constitute consent. • Lack of physical resistance does not constitute consent. • There is no consent when there is force, coercion, intimidation, threats or duress. • Consent may be withdrawn at any time, and sexual activity must cease when consent is withdrawn unless or until additional consent is given. • Consent to one form of sexual activity does not indicate consent to another form of sexual activity. • A prior sexual relationship does not indicate current or future consent. • Minors cannot give consent. • Physically or mentally incapacitated persons cannot give consent. • Consent may be determined by whether the accused knew, or a reasonable person should have known, that the alleged victim was incapacitated. Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the alleged victim. It includes any unwelcome physical violence such as hitting, pulling, shoving, kicking, biting or throwing things; and sexual assault, sexual exploitation and sexual harassment. Discrimination (general definition): Conduct that is based upon an individual’s race, color, religion, national origin, service in the uniformed services (as defined in state and federal law), veteran status, sex, age, pregnancy, physical or mental disability or genetic information that excludes an individual from participation, denies the individual the benefits of, treats the individual differently or otherwise adversely affects a term or condition of an individual’s employment, education, living environment or participation in a College program or activity. This includes failing to provide reasonable accommodation, consistent with state and federal law, to persons with disabilities. Discriminatory Harassment: Detrimental action based on an individual’s race, color, religion, national origin, service in the uniformed services (as defined in state and federal law), veteran status, sex, age, pregnancy, physical or mental disability or genetic information. Harassing conduct may take various forms, including, name- calling, graphic or written statements (including the use of cell phones or the Internet), or other conduct that may be physically threatening, harmful, or humiliating. Harassment does not have to include intent to harm, be directed at a specific target or involve repeated incidents. Gender-based harassment includes sexual harassment. Domestic Violence: Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury, or assault between family or household members; or any sexual conduct between family or household members, whether minors or adults, that constitutes a crime under the laws of this state. Family or household members means spouses, former spouses, parents and children, persons related by blood within 73


the fourth degree of consanguinity, any children residing in the household, persons who presently or in the past have resided or cohabited together, persons who have or have had a child in common, and persons who are presently or in the past have been in a dating relationship together. See also, Arkansas Code Annotated § 9-15-103—”Domestic Abuse”). Hostile Environment: A hostile environment exists when there is harassing conduct based on race, color, religion, national origin, service in the uniformed services (as defined in state and federal law), veteran status, sex, age, pregnancy, physical or mental disability or genetic information that is sufficiently serious (i.e., severe, pervasive, or persistent) and objectively offensive to deny or limit a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from UAHT’s programs, services, opportunities or activities; or when such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s employment. Harassment that creates a hostile environment (“hostile environment harassment”) violates this Policy. Non-Consensual Sexual Contact: Non-consensual sexual contact is any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object by a male or female upon a male or a female that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual Contact includes intentional contact with the breasts, buttock, groin, or genitals, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another touch you or themselves with or on any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, though not involving contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice. Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse: Non-consensual sexual intercourse is any sexual intercourse however slight, by a male or female upon a male or a female that is without consent and/or by force. Intercourse includes vaginal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger; anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue, or finger; and oral copulation (mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact), no matter how slight the penetration or contact. Respondent: The person(s) against whom a Complaint has been made. Retaliation: Action taken by an accused individual or by a third party against any person because that person has opposed any practices forbidden under this Policy or because that person has filed a Complaint, testified, assisted or participated in any manner in an investigation or proceeding under this Policy. This includes action taken against a bystander who intervened to stop or attempt to stop discrimination, harassment or sexual misconduct. Retaliation includes intimidating, threatening, coercing or in any way discriminating against an individual because of the individual’s Complaint or participation. Action is generally deemed retaliatory if it would deter a reasonable person in the same circumstances from opposing practices prohibited by this Policy. Sexual Assault: An actual or attempted sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent. Sexual assault includes, but is not limited to involvement in any sexual contact when the victim is unable to consent; intentional and unwelcome touching of, or coercing, forcing, or attempting to coerce or force another to touch a person’s intimate parts (defined as genital area, groin, inner thigh, buttocks, or breast); and sexual intercourse without consent, including acts commonly referred to as “rape.” Sexual Exploitation: Occurs when a person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of other sexual misconduct offenses. Examples of behavior that could rise to the level of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to: • invading sexual privacy; • prostituting another person; • non-consensual video or audio-taping of sexual activity; • going beyond the boundaries of consent (e.g., allowing others to watch consensual sex without that party’s knowledge or consent); • engaging in voyeurism; • non-consensual distribution of photos, other images, or information of an individual’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness, with the intent to or having the effect of embarrassing an individual who is the 74


subject of such images or information; • knowingly transmitting an STI, such as HIV, to another without disclosing your STI status; • exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances or inducing another to expose his or her genitals; or • possessing, distributing, viewing or forcing others to view illegal pornography. Sexually-based stalking and/or bullying may also be forms of sexual exploitation. Sexual Harassment: Sexual Harassment is unwelcome, gender-based spoken, written or symbolic action or physical conduct that is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that it has the effect of unreasonably interfering with, limiting or denying someone the ability to participate in or benefit from the College’s educational programs. The unwelcome behavior may be based on power differentials, the creation of a hostile environment or retaliation. For the purpose of this Policy, sexual harassment includes stalking or repeatedly following, harassing, threatening, or intimidating another by telephone, mail, electronic communication, social media, or any other action, device or method that purposely or knowingly causes substantial emotional distress or reasonable fear of bodily injury or death. Sexual harassment also includes quid pro quo sexual harassment which exists when there are unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature and submission to or rejection of such conduct results in adverse educational or employment action. Not all workplace or educational conduct that may be described as “harassment” affects the terms, conditions or privileges of employment or education. For example, a mere utterance of an ethnic, gender-based or racial epithet which creates offensive feelings in an employee or student would not normally affect the terms and conditions of their employment or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the College’s educational programs or activities. Sexual Misconduct: includes sexual assault, inducing incapacitation for sexual purposes, sexual exploitation and dating and domestic violence. Status: A full-time employee of the College will be considered an “employee” for the purposes of this Policy, regardless of whether he/she is also enrolled as a student. Any student who is a part-time employee will be considered a “student” for the purposes of this Policy unless the incident under consideration occurred in connection with his/her employment. Smoking Policy Smoking is prohibited by students, faculty, staff and visitors at all times on the UAHT campus and all other state-supported institutions of higher education in Arkansas. UAHT policy further prohibits the use of all tobacco products and e-cigarettes. As outlined by ACT 734, the Clean Air on Campus Act of 2009, and UAHT policy, the term “campus” is all inclusive, meaning all college property, both real and personal, owned or operated by UAHT, including all buildings, grounds and automobiles. Public Assembly and Freedom of Expression Areas At institutions of higher education providing a forum for the exchange of ideas, even difficult and unpopular ideas, is a key mission. The college hopes that debates will be conducted with respect and civility and will strive to provoke thought rather than anger. Because the mission of UA Hope-Texarkana is education, the campuses are not a public forum open for assembly and expression of free speech in the same manner as public streets, sidewalks, and parks. The college remains firmly committed to affording each member of the community the opportunity to engage in peaceful and orderly protests and demonstrations in areas designated as free expression areas. However, these activities must not disrupt the operation of the college. In order to achieve this objective, while at the same time insuring that the institution fulfills its educational mission, the College has the responsibility to regulate the time, place, and manner of expression. Through such regulation, order within the college community can be preserved, college property can be protected, and a secure environment for individuals to exercise freedom of 75


expression can be provided. In support of free speech and the exchange of ideas, the area in front of the Rapert Library on the Hope campus and the fountain in front of the Campus Center at the Texarkana campus are designated as free expression areas for limited public forums such as speeches and demonstrations. These areas are available on a first-come, firstserved basis to individuals or organizations for free speech purposes without registration or reservation from 7:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. No amplification equipment may be used and no structure(s) may be erected. All other areas of campus must be reserved following the established facilities use policy. Non- commercial pamphlets, handbills, circulars, newspapers, magazines and other written materials may be distributed on a person-to-person basis in the designated free expression areas and the area around the fountain in front of the Student Center on the Hope campus. The distribution of commercial materials and publications is covered by the Campus Solicitation Policy and is prohibited. The college maintains a position of neutrality as to the content of any speech, demonstration, or written material on the campus under this policy Housing The College provides no housing facilities. Parking/Traffic Regulations Students may park in any of the unrestricted parking spaces. Restricted parking spaces are designated. The streets and parking areas are a part of the Arkansas Highway System. All students, faculty, and staff must display current parking stickers on vehicles parked on campus. Students may obtain parking stickers in the Enrollment management office or the Registrarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office at the Hope campus and in the Texarkana Campus Center Lobby at the Texarkana campus; staff and faculty may obtain parking stickers in the Human Resources Office. Parking and traffic violations are subject to fines or other corrective measures. Tools Many of the Technical and Industrial courses require students to bring a basic set of hand tools to class in order to complete the laboratory components of the course objectives. Students should contact the program instructor to obtain a required tool list for their chosen area of study. Students should refer to the course syllabus for information concerning when they must have the required tools.

76


Campus Security Students are encouraged to promptly report crimes or suspicious activities to Campus Security. Should the campus security officer not be available, students should contact the Vice Chancellor for Student Services or the campus operator. Assistance will be given in contacting the local law enforcement authorities should that be necessary. The College prepares an Annual Security Report in compliance with the Jeanne Cleary Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The full text of this report can be located on the UAHT website at http://www.uacch.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Annual-Security-Report-2016-UAHT.pdf. This report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, the Administrative Cabinet and the Vice Chancellor for Student Services. Each entity provides updated information concerning criminal offenses, the campus Crisis Plan, incident reports, and educational efforts and programs to comply with the Act. Campus crime, arrest, and referral statistics include those reported to designated campus officials and local law enforcement agencies are included in the report. Each year, an email notification which provides the website to access this report is sent to all enrolled students, faculty and staff. Copies of the report may also be obtained in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Services and the library. Students and members of the College community are urged to follow these recommendations: To report a non-emergency, contact Campus Security at (870) 722-8570 In an emergency, call 911 (8-911 from a campus phone) • Report all crimes to College officials. • Alert campus security about suspicious-looking people or activities • Always let family/friends know where you’re going and when you expect to arrive/return • Steer clear of shrubbery, trees or structures that people could hide behind • When walking alone, walk confidently and be aware of your surroundings • If you think you’re being followed, find other people immediately • Have keys ready before you get to the car so you don’t have to search for them • Keep vehicles locked and don’t leave valuables in plain sight • If you have someone that is prohibited, by law, from coming in contact with you, give that information to campus security Health Professions Students Criminal Background Check Certain clinical facilities require criminal background checks prior to entry into the clinical rotations. In addition, certain programs require background checks for licensure. Certain criminal convictions may prevent the student from completing the program of study or applying for licensure. Students with any criminal conviction must consult with the director of the program they are majoring in prior to admission. The cost of background checks will be borne by the student. Student Complaint/Appeals/Grievance Procedures In accordance with its mission, the College promotes and maintains a supportive learning environment within which students can optimize their personal, academic, and professional development. All actions under these procedures are based on the values most consistent with the College’s mission and by the principles of mutual respect and procedural fairness for and by all students, faculty, staff, and administrators who may be involved. All grievances directed to College personnel by students are considered important and will be addressed by the respective employee and/or department. Only formal, written student complaints submitted on an Official Student Complaint Form and filed with the appropriate Vice Chancellor are considered official complaints. Copies of the Official Student Complaint Form are available on the College website and in the offices of the Vice Chancellors of Academics and Student Services. Any student who has a grievance shall make a reasonable, 77


good faith effort to resolve the matter following the informal process for student grievances before initiating an official complaint. Information about student complaints is formally logged into the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Complaint Log and shared with the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accrediting agency, the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association. Individual identities of students are shielded without the express permission of the complainants that they may be shared. The purpose of officially logging complaints and sharing that information with the accrediting agency is to establish that the College processes complaints in a consistent and timely manner that demonstrates fairness and attention to student concerns. In all instances, student grievances, appeals, and complaints follow a four-step process. Issues are addressed as quickly as possible at the level as close to the source of the decision-making as possible. Students must complete each step of the resolution process in its entirety before continuing to the next step. Grade Appeals Appeals dealing with grades are addressed to the Vice Chancellor for Academics. Appeals against the Vice Chancellor are addressed to and conducted by the Chancellor. Grade appeals must follow the course of action outlined under the Student Grievance/Appeals/Complaint Procedures. A student may file a written formal appeal of a final grade in a course only, including its calculation or other action resulting in a particular grade or removal from the course. The instructional methods of the instructor and his or her ability to teach are not subject to the appeals process. Students wishing to file a grade appeal must submit a written request and the specific remedies sought to the Vice Chancellor of Academics within 30 days after the grievance. The Vice Chancellor of Academics has 10 days to identify an ad hoc appeals committee and to notify the student and the selected committee members of the time and place for a hearing. The ad hoc appeals committee consists of four faculty members chosen by lot and one faculty member of the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice. Although grade appeals are not considered a formal student complaint, to ensure due process, the appeals committee will operate in the same manner and under the same procedures as a formal complaint committee. The College follows an appeals process in certain other academic and non-academic instances. In an effort to ensure due process, in all instances the appeals procedures include provisions for formally resolving issues. Neither grievances nor appeals are considered student complaints; however, the appropriate Vice Chancellor has the discretion to enter a grievance or an appeal and its outcome in the Student Complaint Log. Student Grievance/Appeals/Complaint Procedures The purpose of the Student Grievance/Appeals/Complaint Procedure is to assure students that their grievances will be considered under due process, rapidly, and in a non-threatening atmosphere. College policy is to address all grievances informally (steps 1 through 3) before embarking on a formal student complaint (step 4). 1. Students must first consult with the instructor of the course or the person(s) or office responsible for the issue in a good faith effort to resolve the problem. Contact should be made as soon as possible, noting that the formal student complaint procedure must be initiated within 30 days. 2. If the problem cannot be resolved, the student should contact the academic dean or the responsible supervisor. The dean or supervisor shall arrange a meeting with the person(s) responsible and the student in an effort to resolve the problem. 3. If the grievance is still not resolved the student, academic dean, or responsible supervisor should schedule a meeting of the student and the appropriate Vice Chancellor. If the informal discussion does not lead to a good faith effort to resolve the grievance, the Vice Chancellor apprises the student of the formal student complaint procedure. The Vice Chancellor has the discretion to document the informal grievance process and its resolution, including the reason why the informal grievance procedure failed. 4. Students filing a formal complaint must submit a written request and the specific remedies sought to the appropriate Vice Chancellor within 30 day after the grievance. Students must submit written complaints on an Official Student Complaint Form, available on the UAHT website or in the offices of the Vice Chancellors. Upon receipt of the written document, the appropriate Vice Chancellor has 10 days to 78


identify an ad hoc Student Complaint Committee and to notify the student and the selected committee members as to the time and place of the formal resolution. The Student Complaint Committee consists of four faculty or professional staff members chosen by lot and one student selected by the appropriate Vice Chancellor. In the case of a grade appeal, the committee consists of four faculty members chosen by lot and one faculty member of the student’s choice. The Vice Chancellor serves as the non-voting moderator of the formal resolution. Formal resolutions are closed to the public. Formal resolutions are conducted in the following orderly and expeditious manner without undue interference or interruptions: 4a. Attendance at the hearing is restricted to the moderator, selected committee members, the student, a student advisor/support person if the student chooses, and the instructor or person responsible for the original decision and/or the supervisor(s) for the area. The support person can be anyone, including an attorney, but the support person may not take part in the hearing. Unless the student has received a suspension of ten (10) or more days or expulsion, the support person may not address the Hearing Panel, present evidence, make objections or statements, ask questions of any party or witness or otherwise participate in the hearing, beyond privately communicating with the party that he/she is supporting. If the student has received a suspension of ten (10) or more days or expulsion, the support person may fully participate during the disciplinary appeal proceeding. 4b. The moderator reads the written complaint prepared by the student. 4c. Up to 15 minutes is allowed for a presentation of the student’s position. The complaint committee, in reaching a decision, considers written statements that supplement and support the student’s position. 4d. Up to 15 minutes is allowed for a presentation by the person(s) against whom the complaint was filed. The complaint committee, in reaching a decision, considers written statements that supplement and support the opposing position. 4e. Complaint committee members may ask questions of the participants. The complaint committee and moderator go into executive session to consider the decision. Unless the complaint committee has questions or a point needs clarification, there will be no further input from the parties to the complaint. 4f. After discussing the case, the moderator will poll the complaint committee members, count the written ballots, and announce the vote count. Decisions are by majority vote. All discussions and vote counts are to be kept confidential. 4g. The moderator assists the complaint committee in preparing a written finding in the case. The committee will convene again in regular session, and the moderator will announce the decision. No additional comments will be allowed. The decision of the complaint committee is final, and conclusion of the complaint resolution finalizes the process. 4h. The moderator enters information regarding the student complaint into the Student Complaint Log. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS ON-LINE CONSORTIUM STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEAL Questions related to grading or other matters of an academic nature should be presented to the student’s instructor. If the question or issue is not satisfactorily resolved at this level, the questions should be referred using the clearly defined process established by the University of Arkansas On-line Consortium. Steps 1

Procedure Student initiates contact with the instructor about the issue. If there is no resolution, the student completes the Student Academic Appeal Form. This form must include a written explanation of the appeal and all relevant information regarding the situation in question as well as the proposed solution(s). Once the student e-mails the form to the instructor, the instructor records the action taken and returns the form to the student with a signature. Once the student has the form with the faculty member’s electronic signature, the student proceeds to Step 2.

Time Frame The student e-mails a completed appeal form to the instructor within 10 working days of the official posting of the final course grade. The student should contact the Distance Education Coordinator at their home campus to notify them that an appeal form has been sent. (See On-line Calendar for official grade posting dates.) The instructor will return the appeal form to the student. In the event that the instructor does not respond within five (5) working days, student should proceed to step two.

79


2

3

4

Student submits the Student Academic Appeal form indicating the “action taken” by the faculty member to the Distance Learning Coordinator of his or her home campus. The Distance Learning Coordinator will Chair and convene the Appeals Committee and will provide a written recommendation from the committee to the Chief Academic Officer (CAO) of the student’s home campus. The CAO will review the recommendation and evidence presented by the Distance Learning Coordinator Chair and will make final decision in whether a hearing is warranted. The CAO will provide a copy to the registrar to be kept in the student’s permanent file. If the CAO determines that no hearing is warranted, the student receives an e-mail letter explaining the decision.

5

6

The student must complete Step 2 within 5 working days of receiving the instructor’s signed form. Form may be scanned and emailed or sent via facsimile. The Distance Learning Coordinator must complete Step 3 within 5 working days of Step 2.

The CAO will contact the student within 5 working days of the Step 3 decision about whether to schedule an appeals hearing.

If the CAO determines that the request warrants a hearing, the CAO will notify the student and instructor of the date, time, and location of the hearing. If a hearing is warranted, the Student The Committee Chair (CAO) will inform Academic Appeals Committee will the student and faculty member of the convene, examine evidence about the decision of the Committee at the close of appeal, listen to the appeal issues, discuss the hearing. the issue, and establish a solution. The Academic Appeals Committee will make its recommendation about the appeal Once the decision has been made, the to the CAO. The CAO from the college of Chief Academic Officer will inform the student’s residency will make the final the student and faculty member of the decision about the appeal informed by the decision of the Committee. Appeals Committee findings. Findings concerning a Student Academic Appeal are considered final.

The chair of the Student Academics Appeal Committee will always be the Distance Learning Coordinator from the home campus of the student making the appeal. Other members will consist of one person from each Consortium college appointed by the CAO of that college and the distance learning coordinator from the home campus. Both the faculty member and the student may be accompanied by one person who is not a member of the press. These persons will not be allowed to address the committee. The student will have 15 minutes to present his or her case at the formal appeal hearing and the faculty member will have 15 minutes to present his or her position. After the presentations, the committee may question either the student or faculty member. In all cases the grievant has the burden of proof with respect to the allegations in the complaint and in the request for a hearing. The Committee will provide a written decision of the final solution to the complaint to the Chief Academic Officer who will examine the evidence and make a final decision based on the Committee findings. Once that 80


decision is made, the Chief Academic Officer will inform the student and faculty of the decision outcome and provide a copy to the registrar to be kept in the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permanent file. Because of the time needed to resolve a possible grievance, the Distance Learning Coordinator will retain appropriate course records for at least one semester following the semester just ended. Clubs/Organizations The College supports activities outside the classroom that enrich, supplement, and provide a testing ground for classroom learning. These activities offer opportunities for social growth and for the development of values, appreciations, and insights. The faculty seeks to provide an environment in which students may become selfdisciplined, self-reliant, and socially sensitive individuals. Students and faculty have the opportunity to become members of several clubs and organizations. They may participate in any College activity for which they are eligible. All student organizations have faculty sponsors and are responsible to the Vice Chancellor for Student Services. Rules for starting new clubs/organizations are available in the Student Relations Office. Secret societies are not allowed to be recognized as clubs/ organizations. The following organizations are currently active at UAHT: Arkansas Licensed Practical Nursing Association (ALPNA) The purpose of the Arkansas Licensed Practical Nursing Association shall be to promote the LPN as an important member of the Health Team, concerned with the Health Standards for all people. Members must be enrolled in the LPN program. Campus Crusades for Christ (CRU) Campus Crusade for Christ is an interdenominational movement for students, with advisors from the staff and faculty and leadership made up of growing Christian students. CRU has a ministry presence in 191 countries. Campus Crusades for Christâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ministry goal is to reach the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 60 million university students through Christcentered fellowship, activities and retreats. www.campuscrusadesforchrist.org Fine Arts Club The Fine Arts Club was formed for the purpose of giving students an outlet for creative expression in the fine arts. The mission of the club is to foster an appreciation of the fine arts not only at the college, but also in the community, specifically in the areas of theatre, art, creative writing, and music. Membership is open to all currently enrolled students. Funeral Services Club The purpose of this organization is to build camaraderie among funeral service students, bring attention to the funeral service program within the community by assisting in various community activities, broaden the educational horizons and opportunities provided to the students of the funeral service program, and to represent and assist in the expansion of the funeral service program at UAHT by conducting ourselves in a professional manner at all times and by providing information and program assistance in the local community, throughout the state and beyond. You must be a UAHT student and must be enrolled in the UAHT Funeral Service Program.

81


Information Technology Club The purpose of this organization is to foster camaraderie among students in the Information Technology sciences, promote education and opportunities for the Information Technology students and to promote awareness and means by which members of the community at large may recycle and dispose of electronic waste. Membership is open to anyone who has an active interest in the activities and is in agreement with the policies of the organization. Multicultural Club The purpose of the Multicultural Club is to bring about a better relationship among the students, faculty, and all ethnic groups, along with the enhancement of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-image. Also, the purpose is to have a positive effect on the general atmosphere of the College campus, as well as introduce beneficial projects to the College and community as a whole. Membership is open to all currently enrolled students. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is to recognize and encourage scholarship among two-year college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunities for the development of leadership and service, an intellectual climate for the exchange of ideas and ideals, lively fellowship of scholars, and stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence. To become members of Phi Theta Kappa, students must have attained at least 12 credit hours and a cumulative GPA of 3.50. Shooting Sports Club The purpose of the Shooting Sports Club is to provide a venue for participation in shooting sports to any/all students at the University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana. Members are provided opportunities to acquire skills that can be employed in recreational/leisure and/or competitive shooting activities Student Government Association (SGA) The Student Government Association is composed of elected representatives of the student body and deals with matters concerning the student body as a whole. SGA is a deliberative planning group which works in close liaison with administrative officials of the College, interpreting official policies to the students and student concern to the administration. T&I Club The T&I Club goal is to expand the participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s occupational goals and awareness by tying together the industrial community and the college. The club is open to all students past and present, and members of the industrial community. TRiO Student Success Club In 1998 the TRiO Student Success Club was organized with a purpose designed to encourage and promote group unity, develop leadership skills, and provide academic, cultural and social support and services that will benefit the participants from the first day of enrollment to graduation. The club provides a friendly atmosphere, academic, cultural, and social workshops, cultural trips, fundraising activities and community service opportunities. Participants in the club serve as a resource to assist the TRiO Team in planning events and activities.

82


ACADEMIC PROGRAMS General Education Statement The University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana’s general education curriculum is one through which students obtain the depth and breadth of knowledge and the skills and attitudes required for living and working in the diverse and technological society of the 21st century. The general education curriculum is the primary way students demonstrate their ability to think, reason, compute, communicate, understand, and pursue a life of learning and adaptation. The general education curriculum is required in all Associate degree and Technical Certificate programs. The faculty and staff agree, through a body of courses and educational experiences, to enrich students’ lives and serve as an example of life-long learning. In addition, their educational experience should expose students to the importance of academic integrity, the value of a positive attitude and common courtesy, and the necessity of professionalism. Such qualities are the foundations upon which individuals build lives of independence, significance, and value. With the General Education Statement in mind, the faculty and staff of UA HOPE- TEXARKANA adopt the following statements as evidence of common knowledge and intellectual concepts that every educated person should have. These include the ability to: 1. Through the application of analytical skills, use information literacy to complete specific general education tasks and projects, including the ability to: determine the extent of information needed, access information effectively and efficiently, evaluate information and its sources, and use information in an ethical and legal manner. 2. Exhibit critical thinking skills in clear communication of thoughts, views, issues, and ideas, demonstrated through speaking and/or writing. 3. Comprehend academic content delivered via various modes, demonstrated through listening and/or reading. 4. Make reasoned conclusions including the use of mathematics and scientific concepts and principles. 5. Use basic computer skills and technology to acquire and process knowledge. 6. Exhibit a broad knowledge and understanding of human culture through history, government, the humanities and the fine arts. Academic Skills Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Since general education requirements are in place for technical certificates, students seeking these certificates will be placed in English and math courses according to their placement scores and degree requirements. Students cannot be placed in a course higher than their placement scores indicate without having completed the previous course with a grade of “C or higher. Any student who is inadvertently placed in a course higher than their placement scores indicate will be placed back into the lower level course at the first opportunity. State Minimum Core Required for Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, and Baccalaureate Degrees Arkansas Act 98 of 1989 provides that the State Board of Higher Education “shall establish in consultation with the colleges and universities a minimum core of courses which shall apply toward the general education core curriculum requirements for Baccalaureate degree at state-supported institutions.” The University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana has selected the following minimum core of 35 semester hours: English composition – 6; speech communication – 3; social science – 6; fine arts/humanities – 6; lab science-8; math -3; U.S. history/ government-3 Course Requirements Credit Hours

83


Course Requirements Credit Hours English 6 ACTS Index # ENGL 1103 Composition I ENGL 1013 ENGL 1203 Composition II ENGL 1023 Communication SPCH Mathematics MATH or MATH

3 1313

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1003 3

1053

College Algebra

MATH 1103

1153

Quantitative Literacy

MATH 1113

Lab Science Natural Science Select 1 course and Lab (4) BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL

1204 1244 1254 2214 2224 2234

Biology General Botany Zoology Human Anatomy & Physiology I Human Anatomy & Physiology II Microbiology

BIOL 1014 BIOL 1034

Physical Science Select 1 course and Lab (4) CHEM CHEM PHSC PHYS

1114 1124 1024 2054

Chemistry Chemistry II Physical Science University Physics (UAF STEM)

CHEM 1414 CHEM 1224 PHSC 1004 PHYC 2034

Fine Arts/Humanities Select 2 courses ARTS DRAM ENGL ENGL MUSI PHIL

8

BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414 BIOL 2004

6 2003 2003 2023 2123 2103 2003

Art Appreciation Introduction to Theate World Literature I World Literature II Music Appreciation Philosophy

ARTA 1003 DRAM 1003 ENGL 2113 ENGL 2123 MUSC 1003 PHIL 1103 3

U.S. History/Government Select 1 course HIST HIST PLSC

2013 2023 2103

U.S. History I U.S. History II American Government 84

HIST 2113 HIST 2123 PLSC 2003


Social Sciences Select 2 courses CRJU GEOG HIST HIST PSYC PSYC PSYC

6 1203 2203 1113 1123 2303 2313 2413

Introduction to Criminal Justice Introduction to Geography World Civilizations I World Civilizations II General Psychology Developmental Psychology Sociology

CRJU 1023 GEOG 1103 HIST 1113 HIST 1123 PSYC 1103 PSYC 2103 SOCI 1013

Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu). Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009 The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees have been approved by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education as meeting the transfer criteria set forth in ACT 182 of 2009, commonly known as the Roger Phillips Transfer Act. ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to admit a transfer student to junior status in a baccalaureate degree program if that student has completed the approved Associate of Arts or Associate of Science transfer curriculum. Further, an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education receiving a transfer student shall not require additional lower division credits for the transfer student if the additional course is considered a general education lower division course. Finally, ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to accept all hours completed and credits earned for a designated transfer degree upon a student’s transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at the four- year public institution of higher education. Courses with a grade of “D” are not guaranteed to transfer. Institutional policies regarding the transfer of courses with a grade of “D” may vary. Degree and Certificate Options Explained DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE OPTIONS Degree and Certificate options are general descriptions of educational programs available to students. Each describes the basic elements required but individual degree and certificate options vary in time and length depending upon the specific option pursued. Academic skills courses may be required based upon placement testing and cannot be used to fulfill degree requirements. Associate of Arts (AA) 60 credit hours The AA degree allows students to complete collegiate level work that is transferable toward a baccalaureate degree. The degree must include the 35-hour state minimum general education core. Typically, the field of study is not specified in the degree title. Under the Arkansas Course Transfer System, students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and equitable treatment for admission and degree requirements to all public colleges and universities in the state of Arkansas. 85


Associate of Science (AS) 60 – 62 credit hours The AS allows students to complete a program of collegiate level work with an occupational objective of which the majority of occupational courses and all general education courses are transferable toward a baccalaureate degree. The degree must include the 35-hour state minimum general education core. Typically, the general field of study is specified in the degree title. Associate of Applied Science (AAS) 60-66 credit hours The AAS degree allows students to complete a program of collegiate level work which is primarily designed for direct employment. Courses should not be assumed to be transferable to other institutions. The program includes a mixture of general education courses and support courses from other related technical disciplines. Associate of General Studies The Associate of General Studies degree is a 60 -64 credit hour curriculum composed of 15 core general education credit hours and 45 to 49 hours of collegiate level transfer and/or occupational course work as approved by an academic dean. Technical Certificate (TC) 24-27 credit hours The TC provides technical training in specific skills and is designed to prepare students for immediate employment. It is usually one year or less in duration. Certificate of Proficiency (CP) 7-18 credit hours The CP is a program of study that may be stand-alone or part of a technical certificate or associate degree curriculum. Generally, it requires a demonstrated mastery of skills and knowledge. Certificate of General Studies 31-38 credit hours The CGS recognizes specified general education core courses successfully completed by students. List of Degrees and Certificates Associate of Arts Degree (AA) • General Education ♦♦Transfer for all majors ♦♦Criminal Justice Focus ♦♦Human Services Focus ♦♦Social Work Associate of Science Degree (AS) • Business • Education Associate of Applied Science (AAS) • Business Administration • Business Administration – Accounting Focus • Crime Scene Investigation • Early Childhood Education • Funeral Service Education • General Technology • Information Technology • Law Enforcement Administration • Medical Office Management • Nursing – LPN/LPTN/LVN to RN Transition

86


• Paramedic • Power Plant Technology • Supply Chain Management Associate of General Studies • General Studies Technical Certificates • Accounting • Business Technology • Commercial and Residential Equipment Maintenance and Repair (CARE) • Crime Scene Investigation • Diesel Technology • Funeral Directing • Health Professions • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning • Industrial Electricity • Industrial Maintenance Technology – Machine Shop or Multi-Craft • Information Technology • Law Enforcement Administration • Medical Office Management • Paramedic • Power Plant Operations • Power Plant Technology • Practical Nursing • Supply Chain Management • Welding technology Certificates of Proficiency • Building Maintenance • CDA – Child Development Associate • CNA – Certified Nursing Assistant • Crime Scene Investigation • Diesel Technology ♦♦Engine Systems ♦♦Electrical Systems ♦♦Chassis Systems ♦♦Brakes/Power Train Systems • EMT – Emergency Medical Technician • Funeral Service • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning • Industrial Maintenance Technology ♦♦Electrical ♦♦Machining ♦♦Mechanical • Information Technology • Law Enforcement Administration • Major Appliances • Medical Office Management • Power Plant Technology • Supply Chain Management • Surgical Scrub Nurse • Welding Technology ♦♦Basic Welding ♦♦Construction Welding 87


Recommended Courses of Study and Degree Requirements Recommended courses of study given as examples on the following pages are merely guides; if followed in the proper sequence, the student should complete the program of study in the suggested time frame. If the student is required to take academic skills courses, or in some cases begins the program of study in the spring semester, the student may not complete the course of study in the suggested time frame. Every effort will be made in the counseling sessions to approve an appropriate schedule designed to meet the needs of each individual student. Student Responsibility While the College makes every effort to make changes only as revisions to the degree plans, the College reserves the right to make changes to curriculum contained herein as circumstances may require. The latest versions of all degree plans are available online at www.uacch.edu.

88


Programs of Study

ACCOUNTING Accounting Technical Certificate in Accounting The Certificate of Proficiency in General Business is a component of the Technical Certificate in Accounting and the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration (Accounting Focus). This option take twelve credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry-level office positions. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL Total

1013

Composition I

ENGL 1013

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003

12

Certificate of Proficiency in General Business This program provides the necessary job-entry skills to acquire positions in clerical accounting, general bookkeeping, and general accounting. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL ACCT

1013 2113

Composition I Principles of Accounting II

ENGL 1013 ACCT 2013

ACCT

2203

Payroll Accounting

BUSS

2103

Human Resource Mgt.

BUSS

1213

Business Communication

BUSS

2303

Personal Finance

CISS

1353

Electronic Spreadsheet

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003

Total

15

TOTAL

27

Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration (Accounting Focus) This program provides students with the general education, business, and technical skills necessary to succeed in the workplace. The program prepares graduates to assume positions in management and upgrades the skills and knowledge of those currently employed. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. 89


Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

3

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

3

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

3

ENGL ACCT

1013 2113

Composition I Principles of Accounting II

3 3

ACCT

2203

Payroll Accounting

3

BUSS

2103

Human Resource Mgt.

3

BUSS

1213

Business Communication

3

BUSS

2303

Personal Finance

3

CISS

1353

Electronic Spreadsheet

3

BUSS

2353

Introduction to Management

3

BUSS

2203

Business Law

3

CISS

1253

Word Processing

3

ECON

2103

Microeconomics

3

ENGL

2253

Credit Hours

3

(ENGL1023 Composition II, ACTS Index # ENGL1023, substitute requires dean’s approval) MATH

1063

AAS Math Business

3

(MATH1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH1103, or MATH1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH1113, substitute requires dean’s approval) PSYC 2303 General Psychology (or) SOCI

2413

Sociology

3

SPCH

1313

Principles of Speech

3

Elective (see chart below)

3

Elective (see chart below)

3

AAS Bus Admin (with Accounting Focus)

Total Hours

60

*Six credit hours chosen from the following approved electives: BUSS

1253

Records Management

BUSS

2903

Internship (with advisor recommendation)

CISS

1203

Ethics in Technology

CISS

1503

Introductory Web Design

CISS ECON

2223 2003

Database Management Macroeconomics

ECON 2103

(Other electives may be substituted, but ONLY with advisor approval) TOTAL

60

90


BUSINESS Business

Certificate of Proficiency in General Business The Certificate of Proficiency in General Business is a component of the Technical Certificate in Accounting and the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration (Accounting Focus). This option take twelve credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry-level office positions. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL Total

1013

Composition I

ENGL 1013

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003

12

Technical Certificate in Business Technology This program provides the necessary job-entry skills to acquire positions as clerk typists in private and public business offices. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL CISS

1013 1703

Composition I Desktop Operating System

ENGL 1013

BUSS

1213

Business Communications

BUS 2013

CISS

1203

Ethics in Technology

CISS

1253

Word Processing

CISS

1353

Electronic Spreadsheet

CISS

2223

Database Managment

TOTAL

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003

30

Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration This program provides students with the general education, business, and technical skills necessary to succeed in the workplace. The program prepares graduates to assume positions in management and upgrades the skills and knowledge of those currently employed. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment.

91


Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL CISS

1013 1703

Composition I Desktop Operating System

ENGL 1013

BUSS

1213

Business Communications

BUS 2013

CISS

1203

Ethics in Technology

CISS

1253

Word Processing

CISS

1353

Electronic Spreadsheet

CISS

2223

Database Management

BUSS

2353

Introduction Management

BUSS

2103

Human Resource Management

MATH

1063

AAS Math Business

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003

(MATH 1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH 1103, or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH 1113, substitute requires dean’s approval) PSYC 2303 General Psychology (OR) PSYC 1103 SOCI

2413

Sociology

SOCI 1013

*3-credit hour elective from approved list below. BUSS

2303

Personal Finance

BUSS

2203

Business Law

ENGL

2253

Technical Writing

BLAW 2003

(ENGL 1023 Composition II, ACTS Index # ENGL 1023, substitute requires dean’s approval) SPCH

1313

Principles of Speech

*3-credit hour elective from approved list below. Six hours chosen from the following approved electives: BUSS

1363

Introduction to Marketing

BUSS

2223

Entrepreneurial Leadership

ACCT

2203

Payroll Accounting

BUSS

2903

Internship (with advisor recommendation)

CISS ECON

1503 2003

Introductory Web Design Macroeconomics

ECON 2103

ECON

2103

Microeconomics

ECON 2203

(Other electives may be substituted, but ONLY with advisor approval.) TOTAL

60

92


Associate of Science in Business This sequence of courses is designed to fulfill the requirements of the first two years of study for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree at most four-year colleges. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009 The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees have been approved by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education as meeting the transfer criteria set forth in ACT 182 of 2009, commonly known as the Roger Phillips Transfer Act. ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to admit a transfer student to junior status in a baccalaureate degree program if that student has completed the approved Associate of Arts or Associate of Science transfer curriculum. Further, an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education receiving a transfer student shall not require additional lower division credits for the transfer student if the additional course is considered a general education lower division course. Finally, ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to accept all hours completed and credits earned for a designated transfer degree upon a student’s transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at the four- year public institution of higher education. Courses with a grade of “D” are not guaranteed to transfer. Institutional policies regarding the transfer of courses with a grade of “D” may vary. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

Communications SPCH

3 1313

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1003

Computer Science CISS English

3 1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003 6 3

Fine Arts/Humanities ARTS

2003

Art Appreciation (or)

ARTA 1003

DRAM

2003

Introduction to Theatre (or)

DRAM 1003

MUSI

2103

Music Appreciation

MUSC 1003

Literature

3

ENGL

2023

World Literature I (or)

ENGL 2213

ENGL

2123

World Literature II

ENGL 2223

Mathematics

3

MATH

1053

College Algebra (or)

MATH 1103

MATH

1153

Quantitative Literacy

MATH 1113

Natural Science BIOL

4 1204

Biology

BIOL 1014

Physical Science PHSC

Credit Hours

4 1024

Physical Science 93

PHSC 1004


6*

Social Science (*3 hours must be Sociology) HIST

1003

World Civilizations I (or)

HIST 1113

HIST

1013

World Civilizations II

HIST 1123

SOCI

2413

Sociology

SOCI 1013

U.S. History/Government

3

HIST

2013

U.S. History I (or)

HIST 2113

HIST

2023

U.S. History II (or)

HIST 2123

PLSC

2103

American Government

PLSD 2003

Business Core

24

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

ACCT 2003

ACCT

2113

Principles of Accounting II

ACCT 2013

BUSS

2203

Business Law

BLAW 2003

ECON

2003

Macroeconomics

ECON 2103

ECON

2103

Microeconomics

ECON 2103

BUSS

2313

Business Statistics

BUSS

2323

Business Calculus

XXXX

XXX3 Directed Elective (chosen in consultation with advisor)

TOTAL

62

94


COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE REPAIR Commercial and Residential Equipment Maintenance Repair

Certificate of Proficiency in Major Appliances The Certificate of Proficiency in Major Appliances is an employment ready certificate or can be applied as a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in General Technology. This option takes fifteen credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level facilities maintenance helper or major appliance repair helper positions. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

Total Credit Hours

Credit Hours 10

CARE

1233

Troubleshooting and Repair

CARE

1113

Kitchen Products

CARE

1123

Laundry Products

Certificate of Proficiency in Building Maintenance The Certificate of Proficiency in Building Maintenance is an employment ready certificate. This option takes fifteen credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level facilities maintenance helper or major appliance repair helper positions. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

Total Credit Hours

Credit Hours 10

ELEC

1104

Basic Electricity

CARE

1243

Basic Carpentry and Painting

CARE

1253

Basic Plumbing

Technical Certificate in Commercial & Residential Equipment Maint. Repair The Technical Certificate in Commercial and Residential Equipment Maintenance and Repair is an employment ready certificate or can be applied as a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in General Technology. This option takes thirty credit hours of study and qualifies students for immediate employment as facilities maintenance technicians or major appliance repair technicians. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

CARE

1113

Kitchen Products

CARE

1123

Laundry Products

CARE

1243

Basic Carpentry and Painting

CARE ELEC GTAS HVAC HVAC HVAC INMT TOTAL

1253 1104 1112 1002 1204 1503 1404

Basic Plumbing Basic Electricity General Tool and Safety Tubing and Piping Principles of Refrigeration Motors and Controls Mechanical Devices

Credit Hours

31 95


CRIMINAL JUSTICE Criminal Justice

Associate of Arts Transfer Degree Plan (Criminal Justice focus) This sequence of courses has been designed for students who wish to earn an associate’s degree and then transfer into a bachelor’s program majoring in criminal justice. The degree meets the transfer criteria set forth in ACT 182 of 2009, commonly known as the Roger Phillips Transfer Act. ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to admit a transfer student to junior status in a baccalaureate degree program if that student has completed the approved Associate of Arts transfer curriculum. Further, an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education receiving a transfer student shall not require additional lower-division credits for the transfer student if the additional course is considered a general education lower-division course. However, a transfer student must complete all lowerdivision prerequisite courses and discipline- specific courses required for the student’s baccalaureate degree. Finally, ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to accept all hours completed and credits earned for a designated transfer degree upon a student’s transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at the four-year public institution of higher education. Courses with a grade of “D” are not guaranteed to transfer. Institutional policies regarding the transfer of courses with a grade of “D” may vary. Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy (ALETA) certifications will substitute for the following courses in the AA and AAS Criminal Justice programs: CRJU CRJU CRJU

1203 1323 1403

Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal Investigations Arkansas Criminal Law

Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

Credit Hours

STATE MINIMUM GENERAL EDUCATION SCORE (35 credit hours) English ENGL

6 1103

ENGL 1203 Communication SPCH 1313 Mathematics MATH 1053 or MATH 1153 Lab Science Narual Science Select 1 course and Lab (4) BIOL 1204

Composition I

ENGL 1013

Composition II

ENGL 1023

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1003

College Algebra

MATH 1103

Quantitative Literacy

MATH 1113 8

Biology

1014 96


BIOL 1244 General Botany BIOL 1034 BIOL 1254 Zoology BIOL 1054 BIOL 2214 Human A&P I BIOL 2404 BIOL 2224 Human A&P II BIOL 2414 BIOL 2234 Microbiology BIOL 2004 Physical Science Select 1 course and Lab (4) CHEM 1114 Chemistry I CHEM 1414 CHEM 1124 Chemistry II CHEM 1224 PHSC 1024 Physical Science PHSC 1004 PHYS University Physics I (UAF STEM) PHYC 2034 Fine Arts/Humanities 6 Select 2 course ARTS 2003 Art Appreciation ARTA 1003 DRAM 2003 Introduction to Theater DRAM 1003 ENGL 2023 World Literature I ENGL 2213 ENGL 2123 World Literature II ENGL 2223 MUSI 2103 Music Appreciation MUSC 1003 PHIL 2003 Philosophy PHIL 1103 U.S. History/Government 3 Select 1 course HIST 2013 U.S. History I HIST 2113 HIST 2023 U.S. History II HIST 2123 PLSC 2103 American Government PLSC 2003 Social Sciences 6 Select 2 courses - one must be CRJU 1203 CRJU 1203 Intro. to Criminal Justice CRJU 1023 GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geology GEOG 1103 HIST 1113 World Civilization I or HIST 1213 HIST 1123 World Civilization II HIST 1223 PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 1103 SOCI 2413 Sociology SOCI 1013 Approved Electives 6 Select 6 additional credit hours from the following (Advisor approval required) EDGE 1003 College Life Skills (if required) CRJU 1323 Criminal Investigation CRJU 1403 Arkansas Criminal Law CRJU 2043 Evidence DIRECTED ELECTIVES (16 credit hours) [Courses taken to satisfy State Minimum General Education Core and Institutional Requirements/Approved Electives cannot fulfill the Directed Electives requirement.} 97


Select 16 credit hours from the following courses: ARTS 1003 Drawing I ARTS 1013 Drawing II ARTS 1023 Painting ARTS 2003 Art Appreciation ARTS 2013 Introduction to Film BIOL 1204 Biology BIOL 1244 General Botany BIOL 1254 Zoology BIOL 2203 Nutrition BIOL 2214 Human Anatomy & Physiology I BIOL 2224 Human Anatomy & Physiology II BIOL 2234 Microbiology CHEM 1114 Chemistry I CHEM 1124 Chemistry II CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CRJU 1023 Introduction to Criminal Justice DRAM 2003 Introduction to Theatre Arts ECON 2003 Macroeconomics ECON 2103 Microeconomics ENGL 2023 World Literature I ENGL 2123 World Literature II ENGL 2203 American Literature I ENGL 2213 American Literature II ENGL 2253 Technical Writing GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography GEOL 1003 Physical Geology HIST 1023 Arkansas History HIST 1113 World Civilizations I HIST 1123 World Civilization II HIST 2013 U.S. History I HIST 2023 U.S. History II MATH 1043 Plane Trigonometry MATH 1053 College Algebra MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy MATH 2003 Elementary Statistics MATH 2015 Calculus I MATH 2025 Calculus II MATH 2015 Calculus I (UAF STEM) MATH 2025 Calculus II (UAF STEM) MUSC 2103 Music Appreciation 98

ARTA 1003 BIOL 1014 BIOL 1034 BIOL1054 BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414 BIOL 2004 CHEM 1414 CHEM 1224 CPSI 1003 CRJU 1023 DRAM 1003 ECON 2103 ECON 2203 ENGL 2013 ENGL 2223 ENGL 2213 ENGL 2023 GEOG 1103 GEOL 1114 HIST 1213 HIST 1223 HIST 2113 HIST 2123 MATH 1203 MATH 1103 MATH 1113 MATH 2103 MATH 2405 MATH 2505 MATH 2405 MATH 2505 MUSC 1003


PHIL PHIL PHSC PLSC PLSC PSYC PSYC SOCI SOCI SOCI SPAN SPAN TOTAL

2003 2203 1024 2103 2203 2203 2313 2013 2413 2503 1203 1303

Philosophy World Religions Physical Science American Government Comparative Government General Psychology Developmental Psychology Cultural Anthropology Sociology Marriage and Family Spanish I Spanish II

PHIL 1103 PHSC 1004 PLSC 2003 PSYC 1103 PSYC 2103 ANTH 2013 SOCI 1013 SPAN 1013 SPAN 1023 60

99


DIESEL TECHNOLOGY Diesel Technology

Certificate of Proficiency in Diesel Technology Certificates of Proficiency are designed for students who want to earn specific skills in the Diesel Technology field within a short time frame. Normally, Certificates of Proficiency may be earned within one semester, but some will require more than one semester depending upon course scheduling. Certificate of Proficiency in Diesel Technology - Brakes/Power Train Systems Course Requirements DIES

2025

Brakes & Hydraulics

DIES

2105

Clutches & Power Trains

DIES

2204

Air Conditioning

Credit Hours

14

TOTAL Certificate of Proficiency in Diesel Technology - Chassis Systems Course Requirements

Credit Hours

DIES

2215

Trouble Shooting & Inspection

DIES

2005

Suspension & Steering

DIES

1004

Basic Diesel 14

TOTAL Certificate of Proficiency in Diesel Technology - Electrical Systems Course Requirements

Credit Hours

DIES

1304

Fuel Systems

DIES

1404

Electrical Systems

DIES

1414

Diesel Electronics 12

TOTAL Certificate of Proficiency in Diesel Technology - Electrical Systems Course Requirements

Credit Hours

DIES

1104

Engine Systems

DIES

1204

Diesel Engines

DIES

1004

Basic Diesel 12

TOTAL

100


Technical Certificate in Diesel Technology The Diesel Technology Program provides the student with the necessary entry-level skills and theory to enter either the medium/heavy duty truck or construction equipment service/repair fields. The program is flexible to allow the student to enter at the beginning of any semester and complete a Technical Certificate in two (2) semesters. Students may receive a Basic Diesel Technical Certificate after successfully completing their first twenty four (24) credit hours of DIES designated classes and remedial classes if required based on placement testing results. If the student continues in the program and successfully completes an additional twenty four (24) credit hours in DIES designated classes; the student will be awarded a second certificate, the Advanced Diesel Technical Certificate. (See course requirements.) Possible Required Courses Based upon placement testing results, some students will be required to successfully complete ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications and/or MATH 0033 Math for Trades in order to develop college level reading, writing, and math skills. These courses do not fulfill degree requirements and they will not transfer to any 4 year institution. Diesel Technology Program courses are offered on an every other year basis to accommodate the number of courses that make up the program. The years that particular courses are offered are shown above the course listings. A student can enter the program at any semester and progress through the degree plan. Fall Semester

Credit Hours

DIES

1104

Engine Systems

DIES

1204

Diesel Engines

DIES

1004

Basic Diesel Shop 12

TOTAL Spring Semester

Credit Hours

DIES

1304

Fuel Systems

DIES

1404

Electrical Systems

DIES

1414

Diesel Electronics 12

TOTAL Fall Semester

Credit Hours

DIES

1004

Basic Diesel Shop

DIES

2215

Trouble Shooting & Inspection

DIES

2005

Suspension & Steering 14

TOTAL Spring Semester

Credit Hours

DIES

2025

Brakes & Hydraulics

DIES

2105

Clutches & Power Trains

DIES

2204

Air Conditioning 14

TOTAL

The Diesel Technology certificates of proficiency and technical certificates can be applied toward an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology. 101


Early Childhood (Day Care Professional) Early Childhood (Day Care Professional)

Certificate of Proficiency in Child Development Associate (CDA) Child Development Associate coursework is intended to prepare the student for the final CDA Council Assessment to qualify for a Child Development Credential. The credential is awarded by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition in Washington, D.C. The purpose of this course is to prepare the student with the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 120-hour coursework requirements for the CDA Assessment Application. Entrance requirements for CDA training are: 1. Age 18 years or older; 2. High school diploma or equivalent; 3. Successful completion of Child Care Orientation Training (CCOT EDCC 1001) before or during the semester; 4. Candidate should ideally have 480 hours of experience or be employed or volunteering at an approved childcare facility while in CDA training. (480 hours of experience are required of the individual before applying for assessment by the Council for Early childhood Professional Recognition). The CDA Certificate of Proficiency is awarded to those students who satisfactorily complete the CDA course requirements. The TC in Early Childhood Education prepares individuals beyond their CDA in the field of Early Childhood. The one-year Technical Certificate teaches students a better understanding of the social, emotional, intellectual and physical growth and development of young children. The program will also prepare students for continuation into the AAS Early Childhood Program. Course Requirements Credit Hours EDCC

1001

Child Care Orientation Training

EDCC

1003

Foundation of Early Childhood Education

EDCC

1013

Child Growth & Develpment

EDCC EDCC EDCC TOTAL

1023 1033 1011

Environments for Young Children Council Preparation and Practicum Pediatric CPR & First Aid 14

The Certificate of Proficiency in Early Childhood Education (Childcare) (CP ECE) is composed of one (1) credit hour of Child Care Orientation Training (CCOT), nine (9) hours of lecture, three (3) credit hours of Council Preparation & Practicum, and a course in American Heart Saver Association First Aid Training and Pediatric CPR. Technical Certificate in Early Childhood Education The Technical Certificate of Proficiency in Early Childhood Education (Childcare) is a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Early Childhood Education. This option takes thirty two credit hours of study and qualifies students for go beyond entry level in the field of child care. Course Requirements

Credit Hours

EDCC

1001

Child Care Orientation Training

EDCC

1003

Foundation of Early Childhood Education

EDCC

1013

Child Growth & Development 102


EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC TOTAL

1023 1033 1011 2403 2303 2013 1223 1213

Environments for Young Children Council Preparation and Practicum Pediatric CPR & First Aid Math & Science for Early Childhood Literacy & Lang. Arts for Early Childhood Child Behavior & Guidance Early Childhood Learning Environments Child Development 29

Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Education Course Requirements EDCC

1001

Child Care Orientation Training

EDCC

1003

Foundation of Early Childhood Education

EDCC

1013

Child Growth & Development

EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC EDCC ENGL ENGL MATH

1023 1033 1011 2403 2303 2013 1223 1213 1013 1023 1063

Environments for Young Children Council Preparation and Practicum Pediatric CPR & First Aid Math & Science for Early Childhood Literacy & Lang. Arts for Early Childhood Child Behavior & Guidance Early Childhood Learning Environments Child Development Composition I Composition II AAS Math Business MATH 1063 AAS Math Business (MATH1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH1103, or MATH1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH1113, substitute requires Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval)

PSYC PSYC SOCI SPCH BIOL PHSC CISS EDUC TOTAL

2303 2313 2413 1313 2203 1024 1013 2103

General Psychology Developmental Psychology Sociology Principles of Speech Biology (or) Physical Science Introduction to Computers (or) K-12 Educational Technology

Credit Hours

60

103


EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES Emergency Medical Services

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) This course is designed to prepare students for the basic EMT certification administered by the Arkansas Health Department. The course includes anatomy, dealing with trauma, splinting, use of spine boards, bandaging, emergency care of patients, and emphasis on emergency intervention at a basic level. Students are required to be Health Care Provider CPR certified through program completion. Must have one of the following: ACT Reading 15, ACCUPLACER 47, or COMPASS 63. Students seeking the AAS Paramedic but who are taking EMPT 1003 and EMPT 1004 courses must co-enroll in any pre-college courses required during the first 30 credit hours of course work. Students scoring less than a ACCUPLACER 47 must take the appropriate Reading course prior to enrollment in EMT 1003 and EMPT 1004. Students must be 18 years of age or older at time of program completion. Please consult with the program advisor if you are under the age of 23. If you have been convicted of a crime please see the program advisor to determine eligibility. Students must be able to lift, move and perform practical skills. Course Requirements

Credit Hours

EMPT

1003

Introduction to EMS

EMPT

1004

Emergency Medical Technician

MEDL

1001

HCP CPR (IF NEEDED)

TOTAL

7

Technical Certificate in Paramedic The Paramedic is an EMT whose advanced training enables him/her to provide more sophisticated care above the EMT life support level in the pre-hospital setting and in various other medical facility environments such as Emergency Department or Intensive Care Unit. Paramedics receive enhanced studies which enable them to carry out Advanced Life Support (ALS) procedures. This program is conducted through classroom, clinical, and on-line instruction. Students must have online access to complete this program. This can be done through the college. Students seeking admission into the Paramedic Program must meet the following requirements prior to program application: • Be 18 years or older. • Be certified as an Arkansas EMT (see instructor if test results are pending). • Have certification in American Heart Association HCP CPR. • Score minimally 19 on the ACT or 78 on the Accuplacer Reading exam (Comp I ready) or successfully complete the appropriate Reading placement course. • Score minimally 19 on the ACT or 83 on the Accuplacer Writing exam (comp I ready) or successfully complete the appropriate English placement course. • Score minimally 16 on the ACT or AR 57/EA 42 on the Accuplacer Math exam or successfully complete the appropriate math placement course. • Submit a completed UACCH Paramedic application by December 1. Applications are accepted from August 1 to December 1 of each year. Applications submitted after this deadline will be considered if space is available. • Submit all additional application paperwork by December 1. All application paperwork must be turned in by the deadline in order to be considered. The program director must have the following on file in order for the application to be complete: 104


♦♦Paramedic Program application ♦♦College placement scores (Compass scores) ♦♦College transcript or transcript from EMT-Basic program ♦♦Copy of EMT-Basic certification ♦♦Copy of AHA/BLS/CPR Card ♦♦Complete interview process ♦♦Complete a drug screening • If a Student is in the process of testing they will be allowed to enter the program, but must show proof of licensure by the census day of the first semester. If the student cannot show proof of licensure they will be removed from the program and will be eligible to re-apply for the next cohort. All applicants are notified by mail or telephone if he or she gained entrance into the program. If the number of applicants is greater than the number of positions, students will be required to take a comprehensive EMT Basic exam. Students will be ranked based on scores from this examination and completion of any course work leading toward the AAS Paramedic degree. Course Requirements

Credit Hours

EMPT 1003 and EMPT 1004 or Arkansas EMT Licensure* *Must have Arkansas EMT Certification or enroll and successfully complete EMPT 1003 and EMPT 1004 Emergency Medical Technician prior to Paramedic coursework. Spring EMSP EMSP EMSP EMSP TOTAL

1203 1215 1221 1233

Maymester EMSP EMSP TOTAL

1205 1202

Summer I EMSP TOTAL

1213

Summer II EMSP TOTAL

1216

EMS Environment Anatomy and Psychophysiology Field Internship I Pharmacology 12

Medical Emergencies I Clinical Rotation I 7

Medical Emergencies II 3

Traumatic Emergencies 6

105


Fall EMSP EMSP EMSP EMSP EMSP EMSP Total TOTAL

1214 1222 1223 1224 1201 1001

Special Considerations Paramedic Comprehensive Review Clinical Rotation II Field Internship II Advanced Cardiac Life Support Paramedic Remediation (if required) 14 42

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) The Associate Applied Science in Paramedic provides paramedic students an opportunity to further their education with course work leading to the AAS. Students majoring in A.A.S. Paramedic may complete the required course work prior to or after completion of the Paramedic Technical Certificate curriculum. The following courses are required in addition to the Paramedic Technical Certificate coursework. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

ACTS Index #

ENGL

1013

Composition I

ENGL 1013

ENGL

1023

Composition II (or)

ENGL 1023

ENGL

2253

Technical Writing

ENGL 2023

Principles of Speech General Psychology Introduction to Computers AAS Math health Professions (or) College Algebra

SPCH 1003 PSYC 1103 CPSI 1003

Quantitative Literacy Paramedic Remediation (if required)

MATH 1113

SPCH 1003 PSYC 2303 CISS 1013 MATH 1083 MATH 1053 OR MATH 1153 EMSP 1001 Total Paramedic Course Work Total TOTAL FOR DEGREE

Credit Hours

MATH 1103

18 42 60

106


FUNERAL SERVICES Funeral Services Funeral Services The Certificate of Proficiency at the University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana is designed to prepare the student for employment in funeral service. This academic program is designed to meet state or professional needs. It is not accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education. Students graduating from this program are not eligible to take the National Board Examination or any state board examination for which graduation from an ABFSE Accredited program is required. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

First Semester (Fall) FSED

2223

Business & Funeral Law

FSED

1001

Funeral Service Orientation & Ethics

FSED FSED FSED FSED Total

1002 1033 2103 1313

History of Funeral Service Funeral Directing Funeral Psychology/Sociology Funeral Merchandising & Management 15

*ARKANSAS COURSE TRANSFER SYSTEM (ACTS) The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu). Courses not having an ACTS number may also transfer. Please consult the receiving institution for complete transfer information. Technical Certificate in Funeral Directing The Funeral Director Technical Certificate at the University of Arkansas at Hope- Texarkana is designed to meet the prerequisites for licensure and employment in funeral service as a Funeral Director in the State of Texas. According to the policies and procedures that govern the administration of the Texas State Board Examination (TX SBE): Registration procedure for the TX SBE will be as follows: • All candidates sitting for the TX SBE will be required to complete the TX SBE application online at the Conference of Funeral Service Examining Boards website. • All candidates sitting for the TX State Board Examination, for the first time, must be certified as having graduated from a funeral directing program with a Certificate of Proficiency in Funeral Service recognized by the Texas Funeral Service Commission. The University of AR Community College at Hope is recognized by the Texas Funeral Service Commission and the International Conference of Funeral Service Examining Boards to provide eligibility for sitting Texas state board exams. The TX SBE Candidate Eligibility Certification Form must be completed for all candidates sitting for the TX SBE for the first time. No candidate will be allowed to sit for the TX SBE until this form is completed and placed on file with the Conference Office. The TX SBE Candidate Eligibility Form must be printed on school letterhead (UA HOPETEXARKANA provides this eligibility form on UA HOPE-TEXARKANA letterhead) 107


On-Line Technical Certificate in Funeral Directing Spring Block Session I (8 weeks) ENGL

1013

Composition I

3

FSED

1001

Funeral Service Oritentation & Ethics

1

FSED

1002

Funeral Service History

2

Spring Block Session II (8 weeks) BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business FSED 1033 Funeral Directing Total Summer Block (8 weeks) CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers FSED 2223 Business & Funeral Law Total Fall Block Session I (8 weeks) ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I FSED 2103 Funeral Psychology/Sociology Fall Block Session II (8 weeks) SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech FSED 1313 Funeral Merchandising & Management Total TOTAL

3 3 12 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 12 30

This academic program is designed to meet specific state or professional needs. It is not accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education. Students graduating from this program are not eligible to take the National Board Examination or any state board examination for which graduation from an ABFSE Accredited program is required.

On Campus Technical Certificate in Funeral Directing First Semester (Fall) 3 ENGL 1013 Composition 3 FSED 2223 Business & Funeral Law 1 FSED 1001 Funeral Service Orientation & Ethics 3 FSED 1033 Funeral Directing 2 FSED 1002 History of Funeral Service 15 FSED 2103 Funeral Psychology/Sociology Second Semester (Spring) 3 FSED 1313 Funeral Merchandising & Management 3 CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers 3 SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech 3 ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting 3 BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business Total 15 TOTAL 30 This academic program is designed to meet specific state or professional needs. It is not accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education. Students graduating from this program are not eligible to take the National Board Examination or any state board examination for which graduation from an ABFSE Accredited program is required. 108


Associate of Applied Science in Funeral Service Education The Funeral Service Education Program offers a two-year curriculum leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree. The degree program meets current curriculum standards as set forth by the American Board of Funeral Service Education. The objectives of the Funeral Service Education Program at UACCH are as follows: To enlarge the background and knowledge of students about the funeral service profession ♦♦To enlarge the background and knowledge of students about the funeral service profession ♦♦To educate students in every phase of funeral service and to help enable them to develop proficiency and skills necessary for funeral service defined as a profession practiced by men and women who are required to meet certain educational, societal, and governmental standards. ♦♦To educate students concerning the responsibilities of the funeral service profession to the community at large ♦♦To emphasize high standards of ethical conduct ♦♦To provide a curriculum at the post-secondary level of instruction ♦♦To encourage student and faculty research in the field of funeral service The Funeral Service Education Program has as its central aim recognition of the importance of funeral service personnel as: ♦♦Members of a human service profession ♦♦Members of the community in which they serve ♦♦Participants in the relationship between bereaved families and those engaged in the funeral service profession ♦♦Professionals knowledgeable of and compliant with federal, state, provincial/territorial, and local regulatory guidelines in the geographic area in where they practice ♦♦Professionals sensitive to the responsibility for public health, safety, and welfare in caring for human remains Recognizing the importance of the care of the bereaved, the College has designed a curriculum not only to educate the student in the care of the deceased, but also in the care of the living. Admission Requirements The following will be required for acceptance into the funeral service program: 1. UA HOPE-TEXARKANA application for admission 2. Funeral Service Program Application 3. Official copy of high school transcript or GED 4. Official copy of college transcript—if applicable 5. Official high school transcript, GED or college transcript MUST be mailed (to UA HOPE-TEXARKANA) directly from the institution from which the credits were received. Upon receipt of ALL of the above requirements, the student shall receive a letter of admission from the funeral service program director. A student will not be allowed to progress to any FSED funeral service “core” course until the first and second semester courses of the program are satisfactorily completed. The following are considered “core” courses:

109


Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

Fall Core Courses FSED

2223

Business & Funeral Law

FSED

1001

Funeral Service Orientation & Ethics

FSED FSED FSED FSED FSED FSED Spring Core Courses FSED FSED FSED FSED FSED FSED

1033 1002 1012 1103 1181 2103

Funeral Directing History of Funeral Service Restorative Art I Embalming I Clinical I Funeral Psychology/Sociology

1203 1191 1022 1313 2213 2203

Embalming II Clinical II Restorative Art II Funeral Merchandising & Management Microbiology/Pathology Comprehensive Review

FSED 1003 Funeral Service Chemistry and FSED 1013 Funeral Service Anatomy are not considered “core” courses and are taken during the first year. The core courses cannot be spread out over more than 2 semesters as listed in the curriculum outline. A student must enroll in all core courses or no core courses. A student will not be allowed to take core courses on a parttime schedule. Admission to the College does not guarantee enrollment into the Funeral Service Education courses. It is the responsibility of the applicant to make sure that the requirements, as stated above, are satisfied and documentation is received in both the registrar and the funeral service education offices. Other Information Transfer Requirements • Any course(s) with a prefix of FSED (or its equivalent) must have been taken within the past one (1) year to be accepted for transfer. • A grade of “C” or higher is required for transfer courses. • The course for transfer must be comparable to the course required for the funeral service program. (The name of the course can be different, but the course description must be similar to that of the course for transfer) • Courses that do not meet the above requirements must be retaken. • Transferees from another funeral service program must not be on academic probation or suspension at that institution. Program Requirements and Progression A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is expected at the end of each semester to remain in funeral service education courses. A grade of “C” or higher is required in any course with an FSED prefix or the course must be repeated. A student who receives a final grade of less than “C” in any Funeral Service core course during the program or who withdraws from a course cannot progress and will be suspended from the program. At the completion of the two semesters of clinical rotation, the student is required to prove technical competence in embalming via direct observation by the program director or qualified UA HOPE-TEXARKANA 110


faculty. There are specific requirements related to this clinical and are discussed in detail in Clinical I and Clinical II. Students who seek readmission to the Funeral Service program and are in good standing with the program may be granted admission into the next program if readmission is sought the following program year. Students may be granted credit for previous classes completed successfully. Students waiting more than one year to return will not be granted credit for classes taken and must compete with other students for readmission into that year’s program. The UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Funeral Service program follows ethical practices in all student matters to include advertisement, recruitment, admissions, student and program requirements.. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. The Associate of Applied Science in Funeral Service Education at the University of Arkansas Community College Hope is accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE) 992 Mantua Pike, Suite 108; Woodbury Heights, NJ 08097office (816) 233-3747 www.abfse.org PROGRAM INFORMATION Year 2016 2015 2014

Total Enrolled

# of New Students

# of Grads

Timely Grad*

47 53 42

8 16 8

6 10 5

6/6 8/10 3/5

Graduation rate 38% 100% 50%

Did not finish** 1 3 6

Overall

Employed in FS

100% 90% 60%

100% 70% 60%

*Timely graduation = complete program in 1½ times designated program length. **Left before completing the program; did not finish.

NATIONAL BOARD STATISTICS 3 year average 206-2014 2015-2013 2014-2012 Most Recent 2016 Arts 2016 Sciences

% Pass Arts 95% 90% 71% # Takers 7 7

% Pass Sciences 82% 77% 81% # Passed 6 7

So that the public and prospective students can easily access UAHT funeral service program statistics, National Board Examination pass rates, graduation rates (beginning in 2015), and employment rates (beginning in 2015) for this and other ABFSE- accredited programs are available at www.abfse.org. To request a printed copy of this program’s pass rates and scores, go to the Funeral Service program Director’s office at ST 120 (Science Technology Building), or by e-mail at karen.davis@uacch.edu or by telephone 870722-8206.

111


UAHT Coursework First Fall Semester

15

ENGL

1013

Composition

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

MATH 1063 BUSS 1203 BUSS 1013 First Spring Semester ACCT 2103 ENGL 2013 SPCH 1313 FSED 1003 Second Fall Semester FSED 2223 FSED 1001 FSED 1002 FSED 1103 FSED 1181 FSED 1012 FSED 2103 FSED 1033 Second Spring Semester FSED 1203 FSED 1191 FSED 1022 FSED 1313 FSED 2203 FSED 2213 TOTAL

AAS Math Business or College Algebra Introduction to Business Funeral Service Anatomy 12 Principles of Accounting Composition II Principles of Speech Funeral Service Chemistry 18 Business & Funeral Law Funeral Service Orientation and Ethics History of Funeral Service Embalming I Clinical I Restorative Art I Funeral Psychology/Sociology Funeral Directing 15 Embalming II Clinical II Restorative Art II Funeral Merchandising & Management Comprehensive Review Microbiology/Pathology 60

112


GENERAL EDUCATION with Transfer Options General Education with Transfer Options Associate of Arts The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees have been approved by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education as meeting the transfer criteria set forth in ACT 182 of 2009, commonly known as the Roger Phillips Transfer Act. ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to admit a transfer student to junior status in a baccalaureate degree program if that student has completed the approved Associate of Arts or Associate of Science transfer curriculum. Further, an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education receiving a transfer student shall not require additional lower division credits for the transfer student if the additional course is considered a general education lower division course. Finally, ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to accept all hours completed and credits earned for a designated transfer degree upon a student’s transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at the four- year public institution of higher education. Courses with a grade of “D” are not guaranteed to transfer. Institutional policies regarding the transfer of courses with a grade of “D” may vary. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

STATE MINIMUM GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (35 credit hours) English ENGL

6 1103

ENGL 1023 Communication SPCH 1313 Mathematics MATH 1053 or MATH 1153 Lab Science Natural Science Select 1 course and lab (4) BIOL 1204 BIOL 1244 BIOL 1254 BIOL 2214 BIOL 2224 BIOL 2234 Physical Science Select 1 course and Lab (4)

Composition I

ENGL 1013

Composition II

ENGL 1023 3

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1003

College Algebra Quantitative Literacy

MATH 1103 MATH 1113 8

Biology General Botany Zoology Human A&P I Human A&P II Microbiology

BIOL 1014 BIOL 1043 BIOL 1054 BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414 BIOL 2004 8 113


CHEM 1114 CHEM 1124 PHSC 1024 Fine Arts/Humanities Select 2 courses ARTS 2003 DRAM 2003 ENGL 2023 ENGL 2123 MUSI 2103 PHIL 2003 U.S. History/Government Select 1 course HIST 2013 HIST 2023 PLSC 2103 Social Sciences Select 2 courses CRJU 1203 GEOG 2203 HIST 1113 HIST 1123 PSYC 2303 SOCI 2413

Chemistry I Chemistry II Physical Science

CHEM 1414 CHEM 1224 PHSC 1004 6

Art Appreciation Introduction to Theater World Literature I World Literature II Music Appreciation Philosophy

ARTA 1003 DRAM 1003 ENGL 2213 ENGL 2223 MUSC 1003 PHIL 1103 3

U.S. History I U.S. History II American Government

HIST 2113 HIST 2123 PLSC 2003 6

Introduction to Criminal Justice Introduction to Geography World Civilizations I World Civilizations II General Psychology Sociology

CRJU 1023 GEOG 1103 HIST 1213 HIST 1223 PSYC 1103 SOCI 1013

DIRECTED ELECTIVES (16-17 credit hours) Courses taken to satisfy State Minimum General Education Core and Institutional Requirements/Approved Electives cannot fulfill the Directed Electives requirement. Select 16-17 credit hours from the following courses: ENGL

2023

World Literature I*

ARTS

1003

Drawing I

ARTS

1013

Drawing II

ARTs

1023

Painting

ARTS ARTS BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL CHEM

2003 2013 1244 1254 2203 2214 2224 2234 1114

Art Appreciation Introduction to Film General Botany Zoology Nutrition Human Anatomy & Physiology I Human Anatomy & Physiology II Microbiology Chemistry I 114

ENGL 2213

ARTA 1003 BIOL 2404 BIOL 1054 BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414 BIOL 2004 CHEM 1414


CHEM 1124 Chemistry II CHEM 1224 CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CPSI 1003 CRJU 1203 Introduction to Criminal Justice CRJU 1023 DRAM 2003 Introduction to Theatre Arts DRAM 1003 ECON 2003 Macroeconomics ECON 2103 ECON 2023 Microeconomics ECON 2203 ENGL 2003 Creative Writing ENGL 2013 ENGL 2023 World Literature I ENGL 2213 ENGL 2123 World Literature II ENGL 2223 ENGL 2203 American Literature I ENGL 2653 ENGL American Literature II ENGL 2253 Technical Writing ENGL 2023 GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography GEOG 1103 GEOL 1004 Physical Geology GEOL 1114 HIST 1023 Arkansas History HIST 1113 World Civilizations I HIST 1213 HIST 1123 World Civilizations II HIST 1223 HIST 2013 U.S. History I HIST 2113 HIST 2023 U.S. History II HIST 2123 MATH 1043 Plane Trigonometry MATH 1203 MATH 2003 Philosophy PHIL 1103 MATH 2015 Calculus I MATH 2405 MATH 2025 Calculus II MATH 2505 MUSC 2103 Music Appreciation MUSC 1003 PHIL 2003 Philosophy PHIL 1103 PHIL 2203 Comparative Government PHSC 1024 Physical Science PHSC 1004 PLSC 2103 American Government PLSC 2003 PLSC 2203 Comparative Government PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 1103 PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology PSYC 2103 SOCI 2003 Social Problems SOCI 1013 SOCI 2013 Cultural Anthropology ANTH 2013 SOCI 2413 Sociology SOCI 2503 Marriage and Family SPAN 1203 Spanish I SPAN 1013 SPAN 1303 Spanish II SPAN 1023 Approved Electives* Up to 10 credit hours Select up to 10 additional credit hours (Advisor approval required) TOTAL 60 *Required for any degree seeking student who is required to take an academic skills course; excluding Intermediate Algebra. 115


GENERAL TECHNOLOGY General Technology

Associate of Applied Science in General Technology This degree program allows a student to become proficient in a particular occupational area. To increase their knowledge and skills in that area or expand their knowledge and skills to other areas of interest through the selection of additional elective courses. And, to increase their communication and math/science reasoning through the completion of selected General Education courses. Each student enrolling in this degree program will be required to develop a degree plan. The degree plan will indicate the Technical Certificate that the student intends to attain. The student will then select enough elective courses from the approved list to combine with required general education classes to equal at least 60 credit hours. This degree plan requires approval by the Dean of the Technical and Industrial Professions Division. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education

Credit Hours 15*

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL

1013

Composition I

ENGL 1013

ENGL 1023 Compostion II or ENGL 2253 Technical Writing (* 3 hours must be a History or Government class) HIST XXX3 (or) PLSC XXX3 MATH 1073 AAS Math for Technical and Industrial

ENGL 1023 ENGL 2023

Major Technical Discipline In addition to the required general education courses the student will attain a Technical Certificate (a student may attain two Technical Certificates in Diesel Technology) in one of the following programs (from 30 to 33 credit hours): • Diesel Technology • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning • Industrial Electricity • Industrial Technology – Option in Machine Shop or Multi-Craft • Welding Technology

116


Approved Elective Courses Students must select courses from the following list of Electives to attain the minimum required to equal 60 credit hours total. Elective Courses

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

ACCT 2003

3

ACCT

2113

Principles of Accounting II

ACCT 2013

3

ACCT ARTS BIOL BUSS BUSS BUSS BUSS BUSS BUSS BUSS BUSS CHEM CHEM CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS CISS DIES DIES DIES DIES DIES DIES DIES DIES

2003 2003 2234 1203 1213 1253 2023 2103 2203 2303 2313 1004 1114 1001 1123 1203 1253 1353 1503 1703 1804 1814 1903 2013 2103 2223 2303 1004 1104 1204 1304 1404 1414 2005 2025

Payroll Accounting Art Appreciation Microbiology Introduction to Business Business Communications Records Management Business Organization & Management Human Resources Management Business Law Personal Finance Business Statistics Introduction to Chemistry Chemistry Computer Fundamentals Computer Software Applications Ethics in Technology Word Processing Electronics Spreadsheet Introductory Web Design Desktop Operating Systems Computer Maintenance I Computer Maintenance II Concepts of Operating Systems Advanced Web Design Application Programming Database Networking Essentials Basic Diesel Shop Engine Systems Diesel Electronics Fuel Systems Electronic Systems Diesel Electronics Suspension & Steering Brakes & Hydraulics 117

ARTA 1003 BIOL 2004 BUSI 1013 BUSI 2013

BLAW 2003

CHEM 1004 CHEM 1414

3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5


DIES DIES DIES ECON ECON EDGE ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC HIST HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC INMT INMT INMT INMT INMT MACH MACH MACH MACH MATH PHSC PLSC PSYC PWRM PWRO PWRO PWRT PWRT SOCI SPAN SPCH

2105 2204 2215 2003 2103 1003 1104 1204 1303 1403 1603 2314 1023 1002 1204 1503 1604 1703 1804 1904 1003 1104 1304 1404 2415 1215 1315 1403 1003 1043 1024 2013 2303 1313 1244 1253 1003 1023 2413 1203 1313

Clutches & Power Inspection Air Conditioning Trouble Shooting & Inspection Macroeconomics Microeconomics College Life Skills Basic Electricity Wiring I National Electric Code Industrial Motors & Controls Wiring II High Voltage Components & Systems Arkansas History Tubing & Piping Principles of Refrigeration Motors & Controls Schematics Air Properties Residential Systems AC Systems Blueprint Reading Hydraulics/Pneumatics Basic Programmable Controls Mechanical Devices & Systems Instrumentation and Controls Basic Lathe Basic Knee Mill Intro to CNC Processes Intro to Machining Processes Plane Trigonometry Physical Science American Government General Psychology Trouble Shooting & Repair Elect Gen Comp & Control Thermodynamics Fundamentals of Modern Power Plants Basic Steam Generation Sociology Spanish I Principles of Speech 118

ECON 2103 ECON 2203

MATH 1203 PHSC 1004 PLSC 2003 PSYC 1103

SOCI 1013 SPAN 1013 SPCH 1003

5 4 5 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3


TECH TECH WELD WELD WELD WELD WELD WELD WELD WELD WELD

280X 290X 1003 1104 1204 1302 1503 1502 1703 2001 2003

Special Topics in T&I 1-4 CH Internship 1-4 Hours Basic Welding Pipe & Structural Fitting Introduction to Arc Welding Metallurgy MIG Welding TIG Welding Spray Arc Welding Special Problems in Welding I Special Problems Welding II

119

1-4 1-4 3 4 4 2 3 2 3 1 3


HEALTH PROFESSIONS Health Professions

Technical Certificate Health Professions The Technical Certificate Health Professions is designed to create an entry-level employment opportunity in the areas of Nursing Assistant, Phlebotomy, Cardiac Monitor Tech, and Phlebotomy. It is created for students who are seeking a career in the health professions area. Students seeking this degree must be advised and placed in classes by a health professions advisor. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education

Credit Hours 12 hrs

ENGL

1013

Composition

ENGL 1013

PSYC MATH RNSG MATH CISS CORE MEDL MEDL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL EMPHASIS EMSEMPT EMPT Pre-Nursing BIOL CNAP

2303 1083 1033 1153 1003

General Psychology AAS Math Health Professions Math for Nursing OR Quantitative Literacy Introduction Computers

PSYC 1103

MATH 1113 CPSI 1003 10-12

1021 2214 2214 2224 1003 1013

HCP AHA CPR Intro to Health Care Systems (I) Human A&P I AND Human A&P II Essentials A&P I AND Essentials A&P II

BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414

6-9 1003 1004

Emergency Medical Responder Emergency Medical Technician (or)

2013 1001 1004 1101

Nutrition CNA I CNAP CNA II CNAP CNA III (or)

Medical Laboratory MEDL 1333 Phlebotomy BIOL 2234 Microbiology TOTAL *May be exempt if current AHA CPR certification verified

BIOL 2004 30

Any student convicted of a misdemeanor or felony or listed on the LTCF Employment Clearance Registry with a disqualification status due to abuse, neglect, misappropriation of resident property or a disqualifying criminal record must contact the Program Director prior to application to the program. Any student seeking admission into any nursing program is allowed only one (1) readmission. This one (1) time readmission counts admissions from other nursing programs (RN or LPN). See program director for more information. 120


HEATING, VENTILATION, & AIR CONDITIONING Health, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning

Certificate of Proficiency in Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning This certificate program will provide instruction and experience to prepare the student for a position as a technicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helper or apprentice in the HVAC industry. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ELEC

1104

Basic Electricity

HVAC

1002

Tubing & Piping

HVAC

1204

Principles of Refrigeration

HVAC TOTAL

1804

Residential Systems

Credit Hours

14

Technical Certificate in Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning This program provides knowledge of troubleshooting techniques, installation, and repair of HVAC components. Possible Required Courses Based upon placement testing results, some students will be required to successfully complete ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications and/or MATH 0033 Math for Trades in order to develop college level reading, writing, and math skills. These courses do not fulfill degree requirements and they will not transfer to any 4-year institution. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ELEC

1104

Basic Electricity

GTAS

1112

General Tool and Safety

HVAC

1002

Tubing & Piping

HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC TOTAL

1204 1804 1503 1604 1703 1904

Principles of Refrigeration Residential Systems Motors & Controls Schematics Air Properties AC Systems

Credit Hours

30

The HVAC certificate of proficiency and technical certificate can be applied toward an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology.

121


HUMAN SERVICES Human Services

Associate of Arts Transfer Degree Plan (Human Services focus) This sequence of courses has been designed for students who wish to earn an associate’s degree and then transfer into a bachelor’s program majoring in social work. The degree meets the transfer criteria set forth in ACT 182 of 2009, commonly known as the Roger Phillips Transfer Act. ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to admit a transfer student to junior status in a baccalaureate degree program if that student has completed the approved Associate of Arts transfer curriculum. Further, an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education receiving a transfer student shall not require additional lower-division credits for the transfer student if the additional course is considered a general education lower-division course. However, a transfer student must complete all lowerdivision prerequisite courses and discipline- specific courses required for the student’s baccalaureate degree. Finally, ACT 182 of 2009 requires an Arkansas four-year public institution of higher education to accept all hours completed and credits earned for a designated transfer degree upon a student’s transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at the four-year public institution of higher education. Courses with a grade of “D” are not guaranteed to transfer. Institutional policies regarding the transfer of courses with a grade of “D” may vary. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

STATE MINIMUM GENERAL EDUCATION CORE

35

English

6

ENGL

1103

Composition I

ENGL 1013

ENGL

1203

Composition II

ENGL 1023

Communication SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech Mathematics MATH 1053 College Algebra OR MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy Lab Science Natural Science-Select 1 course and Lab (4) BIOL 1204 Biology BIOL 1244 General Botany BIOL 1254 Zoology BIOL 2214 Human A&P I BIOL 2224 Human A&P II BIOL 2234 Microbiology Physical Science - Select 1 course and Lab (4) CHEM 1114 Chemistry I 122

3 SPCH 1003 MATH 1103 MATH 1113 8 BIOL 1014 BIOL 1034 BIOL 1054 BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414 BIOL 2004 CHEM 1414


CHEM 1124 Chemistry II PHSC 1024 Physical Science Fine Arts/Humanities Select 2 courses ARTS 2003 Art Appreciation DRAM 2003 Introduction to Theatre ENGL 2023 World Literature I ENGL 2123 World Literature II MUSI 2103 Music Appreciation PHIL 2003 Philosophy U.S. History/Government HIST 2013 U.S. History I HIST 2023 U.S. History II PLSC 2103 American Govenrment Social Sciences Select 2 courses - one must be SOCI 2413 SOCI 2413 Sociology CRJU 1203 Introduction to Criminal Justice GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography HIST 1113 World Civilizations I HIST 1123 World Civilizations II PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology

CHEM 1224 PHSC 1004 6 ARTA 1003 DRAM 1003 ENGL 2213 ENGL 2223 MUSC 1003 PHIL 1103 3 HIST 2113 HIST 2123 PLSC 2003 6 SOCI 1013 CRJU 1023 GEOG 1103 HIST 1213 HIST 1223 PSYC 1103 PSYC 2103

DIRECTED ELECTIVES (16-17 credit hours) [Courses taken to satisfy State Minimum General Education Core and Institutional Requirements/Approved Electives cannot fulfill the Directed Electives requirement.] Select 16-17 credit hours from the following courses: ECON 2003 Macroeconomics ECON 2103 ECON

2103

Microeconomics

ECON 2203

PSYC

2303

General Psychology

PSCH 1103

SOCI

2003

Social Problems

SOCI 2013

SOCI SOCI SPAN SPAN

2013 2503 1203 1303

Cultural Anthropology Marriage and Family Spanish I Spanish II

ANTH 2013 SPAN 1013 SPAN 1023

Approved Electives (6-7) Select 6-7 additional credit hours (Advisor approval required) TOTAL

123

60


INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY Industrial Electricity

Certificate of Proficiency in Industrial Maintenance Technology - Electrical These certificates provide instruction and experience to prepare the student for a position as a helper or apprentice in the Industrial Technology field. Certificate of Proficiency in Industrial Maintenance Technology - Electrical ELEC

1104

Basic Electricity

ELEC

1204

Wiring I

ELEc

1403

Industrial Motors & Controls

ELEC TOTAL

1303

National Electric Code 14

Technical Certificate in Industrial Electricity This program presents a knowledge of electrical wiring, trouble-shooting, and repair of electrical components. Possible Required Courses Based upon placement testing results, some students will be required to successfully complete ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications and/or MATH 0033 Math for Trades in order to develop college level reading, writing, and math skills. These courses do not fulfill degree requirements and they will not transfer to any 4-year institution. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ELEC

1104

Basic Electricity

ELEC

1204

Wiring I

ELEC

1303

National Electric Code

ELEC INMT GTAS ELEC INMT INMT TOTAL

1403 1404 1112 1603 1104 1304

Industrial Motor & Controls Mechanical Devices & Systems General Tools & Safety Wiring II Hydraulics/Pneumatics Basic Programmable Controls

Credit Hours

31

The Industrial Electricity certificates of proficiency and technical certificates can be applied toward an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology.

124


INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE Industrial Maintenance

Certificate of Proficiency Industrial Maintenance Technology These certificates provide instruction and experience to prepare the student for a position as a helper or apprentice in the Industrial Technology field. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

Certificate of Proficiency in Industrial Maintenance Technology - Machining INMT

1003

Blueprint Readin

MACH

1003

Intro to Machining Processes

MACH 1215 Basic Lathe Operations WELD 1003 Basic Welding TOTAL Certificate of Proficiency in Industrial Maintenance Technology - Mechanical GTAS 1112 General Tool and Safety ELEC 1104 Basic Electricity INMT 1003 Blueprint Reading INMT 1404 Mechanical Devices TOTAL

14

13

Technical Certificate in Industrial Maintenance Technology This program is designed to prepare students for maintenance jobs in industrial and production facilities. Students may choose either Machine Shop or Multi-Craft as an option with approval of their advisor. Possible Required Courses Based upon placement testing results, some students will be required to successfully complete ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications and/or MATH 0033 Math for Trades in order to develop college level reading, writing, and math skills. These courses do not fulfill degree requirements and they will not transfer to any 4-year institution. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

Option in Machining GTAS

1113

General Tool and Safety

MACH

1003

Introduction to Machining Processes

INMT MACH WELD MACH INMT MACH WELD TOTAL

1003 1215 1003 1403 1404 1315 1302

Blueprint Reading Basic Lathe Operations Basic Welding Intro to CNC Processes Mechanical Devices & Systems Basic Knee Mill Operations Metallurgy 30 125


Option in Multi-Craft Maintenance INMT 1003 Blueprint Reading ELEC 1104 Basic Electricity ELEC 1403 Industrial Motors & Controls MACH 1003 Intro to Machining Processes WELD 1003 Basic Welding GTAS 1112 General Tool and Safety INMT 1104 Hydraulics & Pneumatics INMT 1304 Programmable Controls INMT 1404 Mechanical Devices TOTAL

30

The Industrial Maintenance certificates of proficiency and technical certificates can be applied toward an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology.

126


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Information Technology

Certificate of Proficiency in Information Technology The Certificate of Proficiency in Information Technology is a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Information Technology. This option takes sixteen credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level computer technicians. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers*

CISS

1203

Ethics in Technology

CISS CISS CISS TOTAL

1503 1703 1804

Introduction to Web Design Desktop Operating System Computer Maintenance I

Credit Hours

CPSI 1003

16

Certificate of Proficiency in Information Technology The Certificate of Proficiency in Information Technology is a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Information Technology. This option takes sixteen credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level computer technicians. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Fall Semester

Credit Hours 16

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers*

CISS

1203

Ethics in Technology

CISS

1503

Introduction to Web Design

CISS

1703

Desktop Operating Systems

CISS

1804

Computer Maintenance I

Spring Semester

CPSI 1003

19

CISS

1353

Spreadsheet Applications

CISS

1814

Computer Maintenance II

CISS

2013

Advanced Web Design

CISS

2223

Database Management

CISS

2303

Networking Essentials

ENGL

0053

Advanced Writing (or higher)

TOTAL

35

*Keyboarding is a prerequisite if you have NO prior keyboarding experience.

127


Associate of Applied Science in Information Technology The Associate of Applied Science degree is a four-semester program composed of 60 college credit hours designed for students who plan to seek employment in the information technology field upon graduation. The program prepares students to enter jobs, be productive with a minimum of on-the-job training, and advance to a position of increased responsibility with additional experience. Possible employment opportunities are computer operator, data processor, technical/software support specialists, and help desk technician. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Fall Semester CISS

Credit Hours 16

1013

Introduction to Computers*

CPSI 1003

CISS 1503 Introduction to Web Design CISS 1804 Computer Maintenance I ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1013 MATH 1053 College Algebra MATH 1103 Spring Semester CISS 1814 Computer Maintenance II CISS 2013 Advanced Web Design CISS 2303 Networking Essentials ENGL 2253 Technical Writing ENGL 2023 (ENGL 1023 Composition II, ACTS Index # ENGL 1023, substitute requires deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval) PSYC 2303 General Psychology (or) PSYC 1103 SOCI 2413 Sociology SOCI 1013 Fall Semester CISS 1203 Ethics in Technology CISS 1353 Spreadsheet Application CISS 1703 Desktop Operating Systems CISS 2203 Fundamentals of UNIX SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech SPCH 1003 Spring Semester CISS 1903 Concepts of Operating Systems CISS 2223 Database Management CISS 2103 Application Programming Approved 4-credit hour elective chosen from the following list: CISS 2404 Internship ELEC 1104 Basic Electricity ELEC 1204 Wiring I TOTAL

128

16

15

13

60


MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGEMENT Medical Office Management

Certificate of Proficiency in General Business The Certificate of Proficiency in General Business is a component of the Technical Certificate in Accounting and the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Administration (Accounting Focus). This option take twelve credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry-level office positions. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS ENGL TOTAL

1013 1013

Introduction to Computers Composition I

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003 CPSI 1003 ENGL 1013 12

Technical Certificate in Medical Office Management The Technical Certificate in Medical Office Management is a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Office Management. This option takes thirty credit hours of study and qualifies students for immediate employment in businesses which involve Medical Office Management. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business

CISS ENGL BUSS BUSS BUSS CISS MEDL MEDL TOTAL

1013 1013 2213 1213 2003 1353 2003 2003

Introduction to Computers Composition I Medical Office Billing Business Communications Medical Transcription Electronic Spreadsheet Legal Concepts of Health Care Medical Terminology

Credit Hours

ACCT 2003 CPSI 1003 ENGL 1013

30

*Keyboarding is a prerequisite if you have NO prior keyboarding experience. Technical Certificate in Medical Office Management The Medical Office Management AAS degree program includes a broad exposure to the functional areas of business and the technical courses required to develop those skills necessary for competence as a Medical Office Manager. The program is composed of 60 credit hours and includes instruction in legal concepts, health care systems and medical insurance billing. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ACCT

2103

Principles of Accounting I

BUSS

1203

Introduction to Business 129

ACCT 2003

Credit Hours


CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CPSI 1003 ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1013 BUSS 2213 Medical Office Billing BUSS 1213 Business Communications BUSS 2003 Medical Transcription CISS 1353 Electronic Spreadsheet MEDL 2003 Legal Concepts of Health Care MEDL 2003 Medical Terminology BUSS 2103 Human Resource Management CISS 1253 Word Processing MATH 1063 AAS Math Business (MATH 1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH 1103, or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH 1113, substitute requires dean’s approval) PSYC 2303 General Psychology (OR) PSYC 1103 SOCI 2413 Sociology SOCI 1013 ACCT 2203 Payroll Accounting BUSS 2303 Personal Finance ENGL 2253 Technical Wiring ENGL 2013 (ENGL 1023 Composition II, ACTS Index # ENGL 1023, substitute requires dean’s approval) SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech SPCH 1003 ELECTIVE *3-credit hour approved elective chosen from the list below. Six hours chosen from the following approved electives: BIOL 1003 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 1013 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology II BUSS 1253 Records Management BUSS 2903 Internship (with advisor recommendation) CISS 1203 Ethics in Technology CISS 2223 Database Management (Other electives may be substituted, but ONLY with advisor approval.) TOTAL 60

130


NURSING Nursing

Certificate of Proficiency in Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) The Certified Nursing Assistant Program provides courses of instruction and experience that will prepare individuals to be a qualified member of a health care team. This program is taught following the Arkansas Long Term Care Facility Nursing Assistant Training Curriculum. Admission to the CNA courses will be determined based on a tiered acceptance: Tier 1: Students who have successfully completed ENGL 1013 Composition I. Tier 2: Students who have a score of 83 Reading on COMPASS, 83-120 Reading on ACCUPLACER or 19 Reading on ACT. Students who have taken ENGL 0033 Reading or ENGL 0063 Literacy and ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing (Comp I ready by scores or coursework). Tier 3: Students who score between 65-83 Reading on COMPASS, 47-82 READING on COMPASS or 15- 19 Reading on ACT may be accepted with the following: 1. Letter of Recommendation. 2. Seats available after admission of Tier 1 and 2 students. Any student accepted into the CNA courses must turn 18 years within 1 year of completion of the CNA courses in order to meet Office of Long Term Care testing policy. Students must complete the CNA Program Application and obtain a current Arkansas Health Card or Tuberculin Screening. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

CNAP

1001

Nursing Assistant I

CNAP

1004

Nursing Assistant II

CNPAP MEDL MEDL TOTAL

1101 1021 1001

Nursing Assistant III Heartsaver CPR/FirstAid* (or) HCP CPR/FirstAid*

Credit Hours

7

Students with criminal convictions, misdemeanors, crimes listed in Long Term Care Employment Clearance Registry, recently engaged in drug-related behavior, or in the last two years been in chemical or alcohol dependency program must contact the Program Director prior to application to the program. Due to clinical placement requirements, the student criminal record may be reason for rejection or withdrawal of admission. *CPR is not required for certification but is required for the Certificate of Proficiency. Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing - Hope The Practical Nursing Program provides an educational curriculum leading to a technical certificate. The Arkansas State Board of Nursing approves the program of study. Upon graduation from the program, students are eligible to take the licensure exam for Practical Nurses. The goal of the Practical Nursing Program is to provide entry-level knowledge, skills, and employment skills for the graduate nurse. Specific entrance requirements, progression, attendance, criminal background checks, drug screening, and grading policies apply to the Practical Nursing Certificate Program. Due to clinical placement requirements, the student criminal record may be reason for rejection or withdrawal of admission. Contact the Program Director for further information. Readmission: Students seeking readmission or transfer are allowed only one (1) readmission. This one (1) readmission counts admissions from any and all nursing programs (RN or LPN). Students may have up to two (2) nursing program admissions total. Readmission is contingent upon available space. All requests for readmission are reviewed by the nursing faculty. Readmitted students must complete all nursing course work from the beginning of the program. Students with recorded disciplinary actions will not be considered for readmission. 131


Note: There is a special application and deadline for this program. Practical Nursing Program applications are available March 1 through May 1. Deadline for application into the program is May 1. Courses taken in Spring of application year will be considered in the application process. Entrance into the program is based on space availability, time of prerequisite completion, total entrance score, and criminal background clearance. All applicants must complete background checks and a cognitive ability test (CAT) before May 1st of the application year. The CAT will be at the expense of the applicant. Applicant will receive a total entrance score using the 4 pre-requisite courses GPA x10 plus the CAT score. Students taking Human A&P I and II can potentially increase total GPA points for this application due to extra credit hours in those courses. Applicants will be ranked and selected based on their total entrance scores. Specific entrance policies are available in the program brochure. A current American Heart Association CPR certification and current health card (TB Skin Test) is required prior to clinical experience. NURS courses do not follow the typical college schedule. In order to provide a variety of learning experiences, students are scheduled clinical rotations at health care agencies throughout the surrounding area. Clinical hours include day, evening, night, and weekend rotations. The following prerequisite courses are required before acceptance into the Practical Nursing Certificate Program: Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Prerequisite Courses

Credit Hours 12-14

BIOL

1003

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology I

BIOL (or) BIOL BIOL (and) BIOL MATH MATH RNSG MATH

1013

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology II

2214 2224

Human A&P I Human A&P II

2203 1083 1053 1033 1153

Nutrition AAS Math Health Professions (or) College Algebra (or) Math for Nursing (or) Quantitative Literacy

BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414

Students whose score is less than 78 Reading ACCUPLACER, 83 Reading COMPASS or less than 19 Reading on ACT must have successful completion of ENGL 0063 Literacy and ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing (Comp I ready by scores or coursework). Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

HOPE CAMPUS Summer II NURS NURS Total Fall Smester NURS NURS NURS

1103 1101

Nursing Concepts I Medication Calculations 4

1105 1012 1004

Nursing Concepts II Gerontological Nursing Clinical Practicum I 132


NURS NURS NURS NURS Total Spring Semester NURS NURS NURS NURS Total

1021 1022 2021 1002

Venous Access Therapy Maternal/Infant Nursing Mental Health Nursing Pharmacology I 17

2008 2002 2012 2019

Nursing of Adults Pharmacology II Pediatric Nursing Clinical Practicum II 21

Note: BIOL 2214, BIOL 2224, and BIOL 2203 are accepted for credit by the UAMS Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. BIOL 1003 BIOL 1013, and MATH 1083 are non-transferable credits. Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing - Texarkana The Practical Nursing Program provides an educational curriculum leading to a technical certificate. The Arkansas State Board of Nursing approves the program of study. Upon graduation from the program, students are eligible to take the licensure exam for Practical Nurses. The goal of the Practical Nursing Program is to provide entry-level knowledge, skills, and employment skills for the graduate nurse. Specific entrance requirements, progression, attendance, criminal background checks, drug screening, and grading policies apply to the Practical Nursing Certificate Program. Due to clinical placement requirements, the student criminal record may be reason for rejection or withdrawal of admission. Contact the Program Director for further information. Note: There is a special application and deadline for this program. Practical Nursing Program applications are available September 1 through November 1. Deadline for application into the program is November 1. Courses taken in Fall of application year will be considered in the application process. Entrance into the program is based on space availability, time of prerequisite completion, total entrance score, and criminal background clearance. All applicants must complete background checks and a cognitive ability test (CAT) before December 1st of the application year. The CAT will be at the expense of the applicant. Applicant will receive a total entrance score using the 4 pre-requisite courses GPA x10 plus the CAT score. Applicants will be ranked and selected based on their total entrance scores. Specific entrance policies are available in the program brochure. A current American Heart Association CPR certification and current health card (TB Skin Test) is required prior to clinical experience. NURS courses do not follow the typical college schedule. In order to provide a variety of learning experiences, students are scheduled clinical rotations at health care agencies throughout the surrounding area. Clinical hours include day, evening, night, and weekend rotations. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Prerequisite Courses

Credit Hours 12-14

BIOL

1003

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology I

BIOL (or)

1013

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology II 133


BIOL BIOL (and) BIOL MATH MATH RNSG MATH

2214 2224

Human A&P I Human A&P II

2203 1083 1053 1033 1153

Nutrition AAS Math Health Professions (or) College Algebra (or) Math for Nursing (or) Quantitative Literacy

BIOL 2404 BIOL 2414

7

Students whose score is less than 78 Reading ACCUPLACER, 83 Reading COMPASS or less than 19 Reading on ACT must have successful completion of ENGL 0063 Literacy and ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing (Comp I ready by scores or coursework). Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Spring Semester

Credit Hours 12-14

NURS

1103

Nursing Concepts

NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS Total Maymester NURS NURS Total Summer I NURS Total Summer II NURS NURS Total Fall Semester NURS NURS NURS Total TOTAL

1001 1105 1012 1002 1005

Medication Calculations Nursing Concepts II Gerontological Nursing Pharmacology I Eveing Practicum I 18

1021 1115

Venous Access & Therapy Evening Practicum II 5

1022

Maternal/Infant Nursing 2

2021 2012

Mental health Nursing Pediatric Nursing 3

2008 2002 2005

Nursing of Adults Pharmacology II Evening Practicum III 15 55-57

Note: BIOL 2214, BIOL 2224, and BIOL 2203 are accepted for credit by the ARNEC and UAMS Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs. BIOL 1003 BIOL 1013, and MATH 1083 are non-transferable credits. 134


*ARKANSAS COURSE TRANSFER SYSTEM (ACTS) The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu). Courses not having an ACTS number may also transfer. Please consult the receiving institution for complete transfer information. Associate of General Studies with a focus in Practical Nursing The Associate of General Studies degree is a 60 -64 credit hour curriculum composed of 15 core general education credit hours and 45 to 49 hours of collegiate level transfer and/or occupational course work as approved by an academic dean. The Associates of General Studies will specifically allow students completing the technical certificate in Practical Nursing an opportunity to further their education with course work that is purposely designed to improve work place skills and to facilitate entry into other professional degree programs. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education ENGL

Credit Hours 15

1013

ENGL 1023 MATH 1083 CISS 1013 3 hours social sicence elective

Composition I

ENGL 1013

Composition II AAS Math Professions (or higher) Introductive to Computers

ENGL 1023 CPSI 1003

Major Technical Discipline Courses must be completed in the following discipline *Practical Nursing Partnership Programs: The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program from the UAMS College of Nursing is offered on the UA HOPE campus. Associate of Applied Science in Nursing LPN/LPTN/LVN to RN Transition Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing Arkansas Rural Nursing Education Consortium LPN/LPTN/LVN to RN Transition Note: There is a special application and deadline for this program. All students admitted to the Arkansas Rural Nursing Education Consortium LPN/LVN to RN program must read the Arkansas Nurse Practice Act, ACA §17-87-312, (provided in course syllabi each semester) and submit a signed statement indicating that they understand that graduating from a nursing program in Arkansas does not assure the Arkansas State Board of Nursing’s approval to take the licensure examination. This program is a 12-month program that combines classroom instruction with clinical experiences. This program is designed to meet the needs of working LPNs/LPTNs/LVNs. Eight LPN programs have joined together to form a consortium, the Arkansas Rural Nursing Education Consortium (ARNEC). The following institutions are members of the ARNEC program: Arkansas State University (ASU-N) – Newport, Black River Technical College (BRTC) – Pocahontas, Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas (CCCUA) – DeQueen, Ozarka College (OC) – Melbourne, South Arkansas Community College (SACC) – El Dorado, and the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton (UACCM), University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana, Rich Mountain Community College (RMCC)-Mena. ARNEC offers a new and innovative approach via a nontraditional delivery format of nursing theory by interactive video. Nursing lectures are scheduled two evenings a week from 3:30 –8:30 and clinical time approximately every other weekend. This program meets the requirements of the Arkansas State Board of Nursing. 135


Graduates of the program receive an Associate of Applied Science Degree and are eligible to take the NCLEXRN (the Registered Nurse licensing examination). Due to the strenuous nature of the curriculum, faculty will admit students based on the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to perform the tasks and responsibilities of a Registered Nurse and to complete the clinical and course objectives. These abilities are re-evaluated during and after each course. For complete information, admission process, and program application go to http://www.arnec.org/ Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

General Education BIOL

2214

Human Antatomy and Physiology I

BIOL 2224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 2234 Microbiology ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1023 Composition II RNSG 1033 Math for Nurses BIOL 2303 Nutrition PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 2313 Development Psychology CSCI 1013 Introduction to Computers Total General Education Requirements

BIOL 2404

4

BIOL 2414 BIOL 2004 ENGL 1013 ENGL 1023

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33

PSYC 1103 PSYC 2103 CPSI 1003

Upon admission into the program, students will enroll in the following courses. Nursing Course Requirements Spring Semester (16 weeks) RNSG 2119 Nursing Process I RNSG 2123 Nursing Practicum I Total Credit for Spring Semester Summer Semesters (8 weeks) RNSG 2216 Nursing Process II RNSG 2223 Nursing Practicum II Total Credit Hours for Spring Semester Summer Semester (8 weeks) RNSG 2216 Nursing Process II RNSG 2223 Nursing Practicum II Total Credit Hours for Summer Semester Fall Semester (16 weeks) RNSG 2318 Nursing Process III RNSG 2311 NCLEX-RN Preparation RNSG 2323 Hours for Fall Semester Total Nursing Course Requirement Hours Total Completion Hours for AAS in Nursing 136

9 3 12 6 3 12 6 3 9 8 1 12 33 66


POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGY Power Plant Technology

Certificate of Proficiency in Power Plant Technology The Certificate of Proficiency in Power Plant Technology is an employment ready certificate or can be applied as a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Power Plant. This option takes thirteen credit hours of study and gives students the basic knowledge of the power industry. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

ELEC

1104

Basic Electricity

PWRT

1003

Fund of Modern Power Plant

PWRT PWRT TOTAL

1013 1023

Basic Steam Generation Power Plant

Credit Hours

13

Technical Certificate in Power Plant Technology The Technical Certificate in Power Plant Technology is an employment ready certificate or can be applied as a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Power Plant. This option takes thirty-two credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level positions in the power industry. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

Fall Semester GTAS

1112

General Tool and Safety

PWRT ELEC INMT WELD Total Spring Semester PWRT PWRT INMT ELEC PWRT Total TOTAL

1003 1104 1404 1003

Fund of Modern Power Plants Basic Electricity Mechanical Devices and Systems Basic Welding 16

1013 1023 1104 1403 1313

Basic Steam Generation Power Plant Components and Systems Hydraulics/Pneumatics Industrial Motors & Controls Troubleshooting and Repair 16 32

Certificate of Proficiency in Power Plant Technology The Technical Certificate in Power Plant Operations is an employment ready certificate or can be applied as a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Power Plant. This option takes thirty-five credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level operations positions within the power industry.

137


Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

Fall Semester GTAS

1112

General Tool and Safety

PWRT PWRT PWRT PWRO ELEC Total Spring Semester PWRO PWRO PWRO PWRO PWRO Total TOTAL

1003 1013 1023 1213 1104

Fund of Modern Power Plants Basic Steam Generation Power Plant Components and Systems Intro to Power Plant Operations Basic Electricity 18

1223 1233 1244 1253 1264

Concepts of Process Control Concepts and Practices of Coal Handling Electricity Generation Components & Controls Thermodynamics Heat Rate Improvement 17 35

Associate of Applied Science in Power Plant Technology This program is designed for entry-level employment in the operation of facilities where steam and/or electricity is generated; such as modern fossil fuel power plants, food processing plants, paper mills, tire and rubber product manufacturers, water treatment facilities, or other. Graduates will master the theories and responsibilities of plant operations and the mechanical and chemical technologies needed for working in related industrial operations. All participants in the program must successfully complete the courses listed in the first year of study, referred to as the “Core”. Upon completion of the core, students must select a major emphasis from one of the four options. They are: Power Plant Operation, Electrical & Instrument Tech, Welding, or Machinist. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. First Year Courses – Required of all students in the program. After completion of the first year core courses each student must select one of four focus specialties for their major emphasis. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

PWRT

1003

Fund of Modern Power Plants

ENGL

1013

Composition I

ELEC MATH HIST PLSC PWRT

1104 1073 XXX3 2103 1013

Basic Electricity AAS Math for Technical and Industrial History (or) American Government Basic Steam Generation

ENGL 1013

138

PLSC 2003

Credit Hours


PWRT 1023 Power Plant Components and Systems ENGL 2253 Technical Writing ENGL 2023 INMT 1104 Hydraulics/Pneumatics INMT 1404 Mechanical Device & Systems TOTAL Second year Courses - Focus on Power Plant Operation ELEC 1403 Industrial Motors & Controls PWRO 1213 Intro to Power Plant Operations PWRO 1223 Concepts of Process Control PWRO 1233 Concepts and Practices of Coal Handling PWRO 1244 Electricity Generation Components & Controls PWRO 1253 Thermodynamics PWRO 1264 Heat Rate Improvement PWRO 1273 Boiler Operations & Water Chemistry CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CPSI 1003 TOTAL TOTAL FOR DEGREE Second Year Courses - Focus Machinist MACH 1003 Introduction to Machining Processes MACH 1403 Intro to CNC Processes PWRM 1313 Troubleshooting and Repair CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CPSI 1003 MACH 1215 Basic Lathe Operations WELD 1302 Metallurgy WELD 1204 Intro to Arc Welding MACH 1315 Basic Knee Mill TOTAL TOTAL FOR DEGREE

139

33

29 62

28 61


SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Certificate Proficiency in Supply Chain Management Power PlantofTechnology Certificate of Proficiency in Supply Chain Management The Certificate of Proficiency in Supply Chain Management is a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Supply Chain Management. This option takes fifteen credit hours of study and qualifies students for entry level stocking, shipping, and receiving positions. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ECON

2103

Microeconomics

ECON 2203

Credit Hours

MATH 1063 AAS math Business (MATH 1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH 1103, or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH 1113, substitute requires dean’s approval) SCMT 1013 Intro to Supply Chain management SCMT 1023 Logistics TOTAL 15 Technical Certificate in Supply Chain Management The Technical Certificate in Supply Chain Management is a component of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Supply Chain Management. This option takes thirty credit hours of study and qualifies students for immediate employment as department manager and customer service positions related to transportation, logistics and inventory. Note: Students are required to take Powered Industrial Truck (Forklift) COED 0600 for this certification. This is a six contact hour non-credit class. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

Credit Hours

Fall Semester CISS

2103

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ECON 2103 Microeconomics ECON 2203 MATH 1063 AAS Math Business (MATH 1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH 1103, or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH 1113, substitute requires dean’s approval) SCMT 1013 Intro to Supply Chain management ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I ACCT 2003 ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1013 SCMT 1113 Inventory SCMT 1123 Transportation TOTAL 30

140


Associate of Applied Science in Supply Chain Management The Associate of Applied Science degree is a four-semester program composed of 60 college credit hours designed for students who plan to seek employment in the area of supply chain management upon graduation. The program prepares students to enter jobs, be productive with a minimum of on-the-job training, and advance to a position of increased responsibility with additional experience. Possible employment opportunities are transportation/logistics/inventory management or management trainee positions. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ECON

2103

Microeconomics

ECON 2203

Credit Hours

MATH 1063 AAS Math Business (MATH 1053 College Algebra, ACTS Index # MATH 1103, or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy, ACTS Index # MATH 1113, substitute requires deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval) SCMT 1013 Intro to Supply Chain management ACCT 1023 Logistics CISS 1353 Electronic Spreadsheet ENGL 1013 Composition I ENGL 1013 SCMT 1113 Inventory SCMT 1123 Transportation BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business BUSS 1013 BUSS 1213 Business Communications BUSI 2013 BUSS 1253 Records Management ENGL 2253 Technical Writing ENGL 2023 (ENGL 1023 Composition II, ACTS Index # ENGL 1023, substitute requires deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval) PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 1103 (or) SOCI 2413 Sociology SOCI 1013 BUSS 2023 Business Organization and Management BUSS 2103 Human Resource Management BUSS 2203 Business Law BLAW 2003 CISS 2223 Database Management ECON 2003 Macroeconomics ECON 2103 TOTAL 60

141


WELDING Welding

Certificate of Proficiency in Welding Technology Certificate of Proficiency in Basic Welding This course of study is designed for those students wishing to develop basic welding skills in a relatively short time frame. Course Requirements Acts Index # Credit Hours WELD

1003

Basic Welding

GTAS

1112

General Tool and Safety

WELD 1503 MIG Welding WELD 1502 TIG Welding TOTAL Certificate of Proficiency in Construction Welding

10

This course of study is designed for those students wishing to develop welding skills required for employment in the construction trades. Course Requirements Acts Index # Credit Hours WELD

1204

Introduction to Arc Welding

WELD

1104

Pipe and Structural Welding

WELD WELD TOTAL

1503 1502

MIG Welding TIG Welding 13

Technical Certificate in Welding Technology The Welding Technology Certificate Program allows students to develop skills to meet certain certification test standards for both structural and high pressure vessel welding. Students will also be prepared to assume positions that require an understanding of fabrication and layout. Possible Required Courses Based upon placement testing results, some students will be required to successfully complete ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications and/or MATH 0033 Math for Trades in order to develop college level reading, writing, and math skills. These courses do not fulfill degree requirements and they will not transfer to any 4-year institution. Course Requirements Acts Index # Credit Hours INMT

1003

Blueprint Reading

WEDL

1104

Pipe and Structural Welding

WELD WELD GTAS WELD WELD WELD WELD TOTAL

1204 1703 1113 1302 1306 1503 1502

Introduction to Arc Welding Spray Arc Welding General tool and Safety Metallurgy Position Welding MIG Welding TIG Welding 142

29


PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS

Partnership Program The University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana serves as a host institution for higher education degrees from the University of Arkansas - Fayetteville and Little Rock These degrees include: • Bachelor of Science in Education in Human Resource Development (online) • Master of Education in Adult Education (online) • Master of Education in Vocational Education (online) • Educational Specialist in Educational Administration (online) The above U of A programs are offered online. Admission to these programs requires formal admission to U of A. For more information about these programs, call 479- 575-3767 or visit www.uark.edu/hrd.

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FOR MEDICAL SCIENCES (UAMS) The University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana, in conjunction with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, offers prerequisite courses that may be transferred into specific health care majors. Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (BSN) The following courses are offered by UA HOPE-TEXARKANA and are required prerequisites for acceptance into the UAMS College of Nursing Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing Program, which is offered on the UA HOPE campus. Course Requirements Acts Index # Credit Hours Biophysical Science BIOL

2214

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

4

BIOL

2224

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

4

BIOL 2234 Microbiology CHEM 1014 Chemistry Social Sciences PSYC 2303 General Psychology PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology SOCI 2413 Sociology Three credit hours selected from the following: HIST 1113 World Civilizations I HIST 1123 Composition PHIL 2003 Philosophy Additional Courses BIOL 2203 Nutrition MATH 1053 College Algebra MATH 2003 Elementary Statistics SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech Elective Credits TOTAL HOURS

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 8-9 60-61

Courses must be transferable with a non-nursing prefix. Previous coursework may count as electives. All general education prerequisite course grades must be a “C” or higher. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or greater is required for admission. 143


Students are encouraged to contact the UAMS College of Nursing at UA HOPE- TEXARKANA during their freshman year for complete program requirements. For information, please call (870) 722-8133 or access the College of Nursing’s Web site at http://nursing.uams.edu All entering students are required to receive Health Care Provider or Professional Rescuers CPR Certification prior to entering the program. All general education prerequisites are to be completed prior to the summer entry date each year. All application materials and official transcripts must be received by the College of Nursing Admissions and Registrar’s Office by February 1 of the year the student plans to enter the program.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE INSTITUTE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Crime Scene Investigation Certificate of Proficiency in Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) Students enrolled in this program of study would obtain up to fifteen (15) degree hours by completing basic law enforcement training at an ACLEST accredited academy and attending advanced courses presented by the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education Courses ENGL

1013

Credit Hours 3

Composition I

ENGL 1013

Criminal Justice Institute

15

Criminal Scene Technician Certificate Program Law Enforcement Certificate TOTAL

18

Technical Certificate in Crime Scene Investigation Students enrolled in this program of study would obtain twenty-seven (27) to thirty (30) degree hours by completing basic law enforcement training at an ACLEST accredited academy and attending advanced courses presented by the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education Courses CISS

1013

Credit Hours 9

Introduction to Computers*

CPSI 1003

ENGL 1013 Composition I (or) ENGL 1013 ENGL 2253 Technical Writing ENGL 2023 MATH 1053 College Algebra MATH 1103 or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy MATH 1113 Criminal Justice Institute Crime Scene Investigation Certificate of Proficiency Special Topics Computer Applications* TOTAL *May be substituted with “Computer Applications” offered by the Criminal Justice Institute. 144

27-30

18


Associate of Applied Science in Crime Scene Investigation Students enrolled in this program of study would obtain thirty-five (35) to thirty-eight (38) hours by completing basic law enforcement training at an ACLEST accredited academy and attending advanced law enforcement courses presented by the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas. Catalog description for proposed course: Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy (ALETA) certifications will substitute for the following courses in the AA and AAS Criminal Justice programs: Course Requirements

Acts Index #

CRJU

1203

Introduction to Criminal Justice

CRJU

1313

Criminal Procedures

CRJU

1323

Criminal Investigations

CRJU

1403

Arkansas Criminal Law

Credit Hours

CRJU 1023

AAS students, in addition to the four courses listed above, are credited the remaining 12 hours depending on additional certification hours students may have. Certification hours totaling 180 clock hours or more receive credit for the additional 12 hours of major discipline courses. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education Courses

Credit Hours 9

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

CPSI 1003

ENGL

1013

Composition I

ENGL 1013

MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy Additional General Education BIOL 1204 Biology BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business CRJU 1203 Introduction to Criminal Justice ENGL 1023 Composition II (or) GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography HIST 1113 World Civilization I (or) HIST 1123 World Civilizations II PLSC 2103 American Government PSYC 2303 General Psychology SOCI 2413 Sociology SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech Criminal Justice Institue* Advanced Crime Scene Technician Certificate 145

MATH 1103 MATH 1113 18 BIOL 1014 BUS 1013 CRJU 1023 ENGL 1023 GEOG 1103 HIST 1213 HIST 1223 PLSC 2003 PSYC 1103 SOCI 1013 SPCH 1003 35-38


Crime Scene Investigation Certificate of Proficiency Crime Scene Investigation Technical Certificate Advanced Crime Scene Special Topics TOTAL

62-65

*In 1997, the 81st Arkansas General Assembly, through Act 1035 and codified in Arkansas Code Annotated 12-9-501 et seq 12-9-507, made the Criminal Justice Institute a separate educational division of the University of Arkansas System, and directed the Criminal Justice Institute to: provide management forensic, and computer education; provide technical assistance; conduct practical research and evaluation; and act as an information clearinghouse for Arkansas law enforcement officers. Criminal Justice Institute University of Arkansas System 26 Corporate Hill Drive Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-570-8000 Toll-free: 800-635-6310 Law Enforcement Administration Certificate of Proficiency in Law Enforcement Administration Students enrolled in this program of study would obtain up to fifteen (15) degree hours by completing basic law enforcement training at an ACLEST accredited academy and attending advanced courses presented by the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education Courses ENGL

2253

Credit Hours 3

Technical Writing

Criminal Justice Institute

15

Criminal Scene Technician Certificate Program Law Enforcement Certificate Law Enforcement Certification TOTAL

18

Technical Certificate in Law Enforcement Administration Students enrolled in this program of study would obtain twenty-one (21) degree hours by completing basic law enforcement training at an ACLEST accredited academy and attending advanced courses presented by the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas. Course Requirements Acts Index # Credit Hours General Education Courses

15

ENGL

2253

Technical Writing

CISS

1013

Introduction to Computers

ENGL

2253

Technical Writing

MATH

0043

Introductory Algebra

SPCH

1313

Principles of Speech

Criminal Justice Institute Law Enforcement Administration Certificate of Proficiency Advanced Law Enforcement Special Topics TOTAL 146

21

36


Associate of Applied Science in Law Enforcement Administration Students enrolled in this program of study would obtain up to thirty-six (36) degree hours by completing basic law enforcement training at an ACLEST accredited academy and attending advanced courses presented by the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas. Note: Students not meeting the ACT or ACCUPLACER requirements in math and English must enroll in the appropriate sequential academic skills math, reading, and/or English course(s) during their first semester in college and each subsequent semester until the requirements are successfully completed. Any degree seeking student enrolled under the Student Success Plan must also take EDGE 1003 College Life Skills the first semester of enrollment. Course Requirements

Acts Index #

General Education Courses

Credit Hours 12

ENGL

1013

Composition I (or)

ENGL

1023

Composition II (or)

ENGL

2253

Technical Writing

MATH

1053

College Algebra (or)

MATH

1063

AAS Math Business

Addition General Education Courses

18

BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers CRJU 1203 Introduction to Criminal Justice GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography HIST 1113 World Civilization I (or) HIST 1123 World Civilization II PLSC 2103 American Government PSYC 2303 General Psychology SOCI 2413 Sociology SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech Criminal Justice Institute* 36 Law Enforcement Administration Certificate of Proficiency Law Enforcement Administration Technical Certificate School of Law Enforcement Supervision Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement Integrity in Law Enforcement TOTAL 63-66 *In 1997, the 81st Arkansas General Assembly, through Act 1035 and codified in Arkansas Code Annotated 12-9-501 et seq 12-9-507, made the Criminal Justice Institute a separate educational division of the University of Arkansas System, and directed the Criminal Justice Institute to: provide management forensic, and computer education; provide technical assistance; conduct practical research and evaluation; and act as an information clearinghouse for Arkansas law enforcement officers. Criminal Justice Institute University of Arkansas System 26 Corporate Hill Drive Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-570-8000 Toll-free: 800-635-6310 147


UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK Associate of Science Degree in Middle School Education The Associate of Science in Middle School Education degree is designed for students preparing to transfer to UALR to obtain a bachelor’s degree in Middle School education and teacher certification. This program has two tracks in which to choose from: Language Arts / Social Sciences or Math / Science. This degree was developed in conjunction with the College of Education and Health Professions at the University of Arkansas – Little Rock and is intended to transfer to the UALR Bachelor of Science in Middle School Education. Students can choose which track they wish to take. English/Communications

UALR

ENGL

1013

Composition I

RHET 1300

ENGL

1023

Composition II

RHET 1213

SPCH

1313

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1300

TOTAL

Credit Hours

9

Mathematics MATH TOTAL Life/Physical Sciences BIOL CHEM TOTAL Fine Arts/Humanities MUSI DRAM ARTS ENGL ENGL PHIL TOTAL Social Sciences HIST HIST HIST HIST PLSC PSYC TOTAL Physical Education

1053

College Algebra (or higher math course)

MATH 1302 3

1204 (1203, 1201) 1114 (1113, 1111)

Biology/Lab

BIOL 1400

Chemistry I/Lab

CHEM 1402

(or other Biology course with lab approved for the core) (or other CHEM, GEOL, PHYS course with lab approved for the core)

8 2103 2003 2003 2023 2123 2003

Music Appreciation (or) Intro to Theater Arts (or) Art Appreciation World Literature I World Literature II (or) Philosophy

MUHL 2305 THEA 2305 ARHA 2305 ENGL 2337 CORE Humanities 9

1113 1123 2013 2023 2103 2303

World Civilization I World Civilization II US History (or) US History II American Government General Psychology

HIST 1311 HIST 1312 HIST 2311 HIST 2312 POLS 1310 PSYC 2300 15

148


PHED TOTAL Recommended Electives HIST ECON ECON GEOG

1213

Personal and Community Health

HSCI 1370 3

1023 2003 2013 2203

Arkansas History Macroeconomics (or) Microeconomics Geography Additional 4-6 hours general electives

Elective ECON 2323 ECON 2322 Elective

TOTAL

13-15 UAHT AS Education (Middle School MS to BSE Middle School UALR Degree Plan)

English/Communications

UALR

ENGL

1013

Composition I

RHET 1300

ENGL

1023

Composition II

RHET 1213

SPCH

1313

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1300

TOTAL

Credit Hours

9

Mathematics MATH TOTAL Life/Physical Sciences BIOL CHEM TOTAL Fine Arts/Humanities MUSI DRAM ARTS ENGL ENGL TOTAL Social Sciences HIST HIST HIST HIST PLSC PSYC

1053

College Algebra (or higher math course)

MATH 1302 3

1204 (1203, 1201) 1114 (1113, 1111)

Biology/Lab

BIOL 1400

Chemistry I/Lab

CHEM 1402

(or other Biology course with lab approved for the core) (or other CHEM, GEOL, PHYS course with lab approved for the core)

8 2103 2003 2003 2023 2123

Music Appreciation (or) Intro to Theater Arts (or) Art Appreciation World Literature I World Literature II (or)

MUHL 2305 THEA 2305 ARHA 2305 ENGL 2337 CORE 6

1113 1123 2013 2023 2103 2303

World Civilization I World Civilization II US History (or) US History II American Government General Psychology 149

HIST 1311 HIST 1312 HIST 2311 HIST 2312 POLS 1310 PSYC 2300


SOCI SOCI TOTAL Education Electives GEOL

2413 2013

Sociology Cultural Anthropology

1004

Physical Geology w/Lab

PHSC MATH MATH HIST

1024 2015 2003 1023

Physical Science Lab Calculus I Statistics Arkansas History Additional 6 hours STEM electives

SOCI 2300 ANTH 2316 9

TOTAL

ERSC 1302, 1102 Core Science MATH 1451 STAT 2350 Elective

2015

25

150


Associate of Science Degree in elementary Education The Associate of Science in Elementary Education degree is designed for students preparing to transfer to UALR to obtain a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and teacher certification. This program incorporates foundation coursework in teacher education, field-based experience, and content coursework specific to elementary education. This degree was developed in conjunction with the College of Education and Health Professions at the University of Arkansas – Little Rock and is intended to transfer to the UALR Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education – Elementary Education K-6. English/Communications

UALR

ENGL

1013

Composition I

RHET 1300

ENGL

1023

Composition II

RHET 1213

SPCH

1313

Principles of Speech

SPCH 1300

TOTAL

Credit Hours

9

Mathematics MATH TOTAL Life/Physical Sciences BIOL CHEM GEOL PHSC TOTAL Fine Arts/Humanities MUSI DRAM ARTS ENGL ENGL EDU EDU TOTAL Social Sciences HIST HIST HIST HIST PLSC PSYC EDU TOTAL

1053

College Algebra (or higher math course)

MATH 1302 3

1204 (1203, 1201) 1114 (1113, 1111) 1004 1024

Biology/Lab

BIOL 1400

Chemistry I/Lab

CHEM 1402

(or other Biology course with lab approved for the core) (or other CHEM, GEOL, PHYS course with lab approved for the core)

Physical Geology (or) Physical Science/Lab 8

2103 2003 2003 2023 2123 1002 1012

Music Appreciation (or) Intro to Theater Arts (or) Art Appreciation World Literature I World Literature II (or) Art for Elementary Teachers Elementary Classroom Music

MUHL 2305 THEA 2305 ARHA 2305 ENGL 2337 CORE

10 1113 1123 2013 2023 2103 2303 2012

World Civilization I World Civilization II US History (or) US History II American Government General Psychology Teaching Diversity

HIST 1311 HIST 1312 HIST 2311 HIST 2312 POLS 1310 PSYC 2300 15

151


Physical Education EDUC TOTAL Directed Electives EDUC MATH TOTAL

2033

Teaching Physical Education 3

2003 2013

Introduction to Education w/ Field Experience Math for Teachers I 12

152


SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY - MAGNOLIA The University of Arkansas at Hope serves as a host institution for higher education degrees from Southern Arkansas University-Magnolia. These Degrees include: ♦♦Bachelor of Science in Education K-6 Early Childhood Education For more information about this program contact: Director of Continuing Education P.O. Box 9240 Magnolia, AR 71754-9240 Phone: 870-235-4006 Fax: 870-235-5110

153


INDUSTRY TRAINING AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

Industry Training and Continuing Education Continuing education and community education classes are offered throughout the year at the College. These classes are organized to serve the comprehensive educational needs of the community. Recognizing that the educational needs of any individual are not only academic and career oriented, but also cultural and vocational. The staff designs and provides non-credit and credit courses, workshops, seminars, and activities which offer opportunities for employment and enrichment needs. Contract training is provided to area employers and designed to meet their specific performance needs. Short term training includes, but is not limited to: Industrial Operations and Maintenance Training OSHA 10 NCCER Core Computer Software Supervision HCP CPR CPR, First Aid and AED for individuals and companies See www.uacch.edu to view the latest community education schedule, or call (870)- 722-8102. For additional information on continuing or customized training, call (870)-722-8162. Refund Policy Continuing education and community education course cancellations by the College will provide 100% refund. After the course has begun, no refunds will be made.

154


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Course Descriptions “I” indicates fall semester; “II” indicates spring semester; “S” indicates summer terms. Courses may be offered in semesters not listed if there is a demand. Numbers in parentheses follow each course description. The first number identifies the required number of lecture hours per week for a regular semester. The second number identifies the required number of lab hours per week for a regular semester. The third number identifies the amount of student semester credit hours (SSCH) awarded for the course. For example, a listing of “HIST 1113 World Civilizations I (3,0,3)” would mean that it meets in class for three hours per week for a regular semester (15 weeks), has no lab, and is awarded three SSCH. Courses with descriptions followed by “offered on demand” generally will be offered each semester there is sufficient interest to merit it. The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) course index number is indicated at the end of the course description for applicable courses. Courses not having an ACTS number may also transfer. Please consult the receiving institution for complete transfer information. Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu). Note: The College reserves the right to cancel a class under the following conditions: fewer than ten (10) students enroll; a qualified instructor is not available; necessary facilities, equipment, or materials are not available; or a reasons that would otherwise make the teaching and learning in the class inefficient or ineffective.

155


ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I (I, II) A study of fundamental accounting theory and procedures for sole proprietorship with emphasis on the accounting equation, the double-entry accounting system, financial statements, end-of-period adjusting and closing procedures, and internal control. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ACCT 2003 ACCT 2113 Principles of Accounting II (I,II) A continuation of Principles of Accounting I with emphasis on accounting for manufacturing corporations, differentiating between cost flow systems, analyzing and recording cost transactions, preparing cost reports, analyzing accounting information and understanding the budgeting process. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ACCT 2013 ACCT 2203 Payroll Accounting (II) Introduces students to the major tasks of payroll accounting. Examines employment practices; federal, state, and local government laws and regulations; internal controls; and various payroll accounting forms and records. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I. (3,0,3) ARTS 1003 Drawing I (I): An introductory course in drawing techniques and media. (3,0,3) ARTS 1013 Drawing II (I): A continuation of the study of drawing with more advanced projects and media experiences, including on-site drawing and drawing in a series. Prerequisite: ARTS 1003. (3,0,3) ARTS 1023 Painting (II): An introductory course in painting techniques and media. (3,0,3) ARTS 2003 Art Appreciation (I,II,S): An introductory survey of the visual arts. Exploration of purposes and processes in the visual arts including evaluation of selected works, the rule of art in various cultures, and the history of art. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ARTA 1003 ARTS 2013 Introduction to Film: This course will introduce students to the filmmaking art. Students will analyze films’ meanings and messages by analysis of symbolic representation using critical thinking. Students will put the films into context with the cultural, societal, and political influences of the day and evaluate how the films attempted to shape these factors in society. The students will also study the historical context of the films and their aesthetic qualities. (3,0,3) ARTS 280X Special Topics in Arts: Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. ARTS 290X Internship: This course is designed to allow a student to gain knowledge, skill, and experience while working in a position that is reflective of their educational goal(s). The student will work varying number of hours at the intern site depending upon the number of credit hours desired. This course requires the diligence of the student, oversight by the faculty advisor or divisional dean, and a high level of interaction by the intern site’s foreman or supervisor. (0,9,3) or (0,12,4) BIOL 1003 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology I (I,II) Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a study of the structure of the human body and functions with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, reproductive, and endocrine systems. This course is a non-lab human anatomy and physiology course which meets the requirements for many allied health professions. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English), ACT 19 (Reading); or ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing) (3,0,3) BIOL 1013 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology II (I,II) Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of BIOL 1003 with emphasis on the circulatory, digestive, urinary, nervous, and respiratory systems. This course is a non- lab human anatomy and physiology course which meets the requirements for many allied health professions. Prerequisite: “C” or above in BIOL 1003. (3,0,3) 156


BIOL 1201 Biology Lab (I) A morphological, physiological, and taxonomic survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with emphasis on basic biological concepts. (0,3,1) BIOL 1203 Biology (Lecture Only) (I) A morphological, physiological, and taxonomic survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with emphasis on basic biological concepts. (3,0,3) BIOL 1204 Biology (I,II) A morphological, physiological, and taxonomic survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with emphasis on basic biological concepts. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: BIOL 1014 BIOL 1244 General Botany Botany is a study of the plant kingdom, including the structure, physiology and phylogeny of plants. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: BIOL 1034 BIOL 1254 Zoology Zoology is a survey of the major taxa of the animal kingdom using a phylogenetic and systemic approach. Major physiological systems will be covered for each phylum with emphasis on their evolution, structure and function. Laboratory is designed to compliment the lecture component of the course and includes dissection. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: BIOL 1054 BIOL 2203 Nutrition (I,II) A study of the fundamental principles of human nutrition and diet that emphasizes normal nutrition as a basis for making diet adaptations in the treatment of disease. (3,0,3) BIOL 2211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cellular processes, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and endocrine systems. Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English) ACT 19 (Reading); or ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing) (0,3,1) BIOL 2213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lecture (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cellular processes, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English); ACT 19 (Reading); or ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing) BIOL 2214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cellular processes, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and endocrine systems. Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English); ACT 19 (Reading); or ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/ Writing) ACTS Index Number: BIOL 2404 *Note Anatomy I and Anatomy II should be taken at the same institution to be transferable. BIOL 2221 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the circulatory system and blood, lymphatic system, digestive system and nutrition, urinary system and excretion, nervous system and special senses, respiratory, and reproductive systems. Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. Prerequisite: BIOL 2214, or permission of instructor. (0,3,1) BIOL 2223 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lecture (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the circulatory system and blood, lymphatic system, digestive system and nutrition, urinary system and excretion, nervous system and special senses, respiratory, and reproductive systems. Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. Prerequisite: BIOL 2214, or permission of instructor. (3,0,3) BIOL 2224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the circulatory system and blood, lymphatic system, digestive system and nutrition, urinary system and excretion, nervous system and special senses, respiratory, and reproductive systems. Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. . Prerequisite: BIOL 2214, or permission of instructor. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: BIOL 24 157


*Note Anatomy I and Anatomy II should be taken at the same institution to be transferable. BIOL 2234 Microbiology (I,II,S) A study of the general characteristics of microorganisms with emphasis on the role of microorganisms in areas related to human health and disease. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English,), ACT 19 (Reading); or ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing) ACTS Index Number: BIOL 2004 BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business (I,II) Surveys business activities of individual, national, and international scope. A comparison of economic systems with emphasis on the free enterprise system including forms of ownership, organization and management, labor relations, production, marketing, finance, and legal and regulatory influences. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: BUSI 1013 BUSS 1213 Business Communications (II) A study of the principles of effective business letter writing and effective oral communications related to todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business environment. Prerequisite: Passing CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers with a C or better. Prerequisite or Co requisite: ENGL 1013 Composition I. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: BUSI 2013 BUSS 1253 Records Management Provides studies in records management, filing, supplies, and equipment. Emphasis will be placed on alphabetic, geographic, numeric, chronological subject sorting, filing, and retrieving. (3,0,3) BUSS 1363 Introduction to Marketing (I, II) This course is a study of the tenets and principles of the organizational function known as marketing, including the historical perspective as well as the application of the processes, strategies and techniques. It offers instruction to those students who wish to further develop their marketing skills and to those who wish to pursue a career in marketing and / management. Prerequisite: BUSS 1203. (3,0,3) BUSS 2003 Medical Transcription (I, II) This course provides training in the transcribing of mailable documents from recordings using a microcomputer. Prerequisite: Passing CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers with a C or better. Prerequisite or Co requisite: ENGL 1013 Composition I. (3,0,3) BUSS 2103 Human Resource Management (I) This course is a study of the principles, methods, and procedures related to the effective utilization of human resources in organizations. (3,0,3) BUSS 2203 Business Law (I,II) This course provides studies in some of the basic characteristics of the American system of free enterprise and legal obligations and rights of the individual. Topics include contracts, personal property, commercial property, agency and employment, business organization, and real property. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: BLAW BUSS 2213 Medical Office Billing (I, II) In this course students follow the flow of information as patients are scheduled and seen in a medical office, through procedure posting, billing and collections. Concepts discussed are followed by immediate application using a generic practice management software, which helps users prepare to work with other similar commercial software being used in medical offices today. Standard procedure and diagnostic coding are referenced and discussed as they relate to the billing process. (3,0,3) BUSS 2303 Personal Finance (I,II) This course is a study of the basic principles of personal management of banking services, consumer credit, insurance, real estate, savings and investments, pensions and annuity plans, and estate planning. (3,0,3) BUSS 2223 Entrepreneurial Leadership This course offers instruction to help students further develop their entrepreneurial and leadership skills. Students will learn the basics of Business Plan writing and be required to accurately present their plan in a professional manner. Students will also learn of a variety of different leadership styles and traits associated with business in the 21st century. BUSS 2313 Business Statistics (I) This course provides an introduction of statistical methods used in studying business and economic data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, 158


estimation, sampling concepts and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy. (3,0,3) BUSS 2323 Business Calculus (II) This course provides an introduction to the concepts of differentiation and integration. Emphasis will be placed on applications of calculus in business, economics, and accounting. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy. (3,0,3) BUSS 2353 Introduction to Management (I ) This course offers instruction to help students further develop their understanding of the role of a manager. It builds upon the prerequisite BUSS1203 – Introduction to Business. Furthermore, it provides a focus upon the process of management, the strategies and techniques employed in the 21st century and a reference those who wish a career in management. BUSS 2703 Independent Study Research and independent investigation in areas of business under the supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites: Sophomore - second semester standing and permission of advisor and instructor. Offered upon demand. (3,0,3) BUSS 280X Special Topics in Business Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE- TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. BUSS 2903 Internship A cooperative program between the student, the College, and business and industry to begin to develop the skills necessary to be successful in the job environment. Students attend class to discuss job interviews and resume writing, interpersonal skills, soft skills and professional etiquette prior to placement. Students are placed by advisors; the intern site will provide on-the-job training as an extension of the classroom. Internship is designed to permit students the experience of an actual job in their chosen fields of study. Prerequisite: Final semester of enrollment in the AAS: Business Administration degree, approval by advisor, and 3.0 GPA. (2,2,3) CARD 1001 Introduction to Dysrhythmia (I) An introduction to the dysrhythmias found in cardiology and their treatments. This course is fast paced, and it is recommended that students have some background in cardiac dysfunction. The design of this course is to meet the needs of individuals attempting Advanced Cardiac Life Support for the first time and to meet the needs of individuals wanting to pursue or update skills in electrocardiography. ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing) (1,0,1) CARE 1113 Kitchen Products (I) This course will provide an overview of kitchen products as they relate to residential and commercial applications. Course topics will include principles of operation, installation of, and components associated with each product. (2,3,3) CARE 1123 Laundry Products (I) This course will provide an overview of kitchen and Laundry products as they relate to residential and commercial applications. This will include an understanding of the relation of the components and controls associated with each product. Students will focus primarily on troubleshooting and repairing all kitchen and laundry products at the component level. (1,5,3) CARE 1233 Troubleshooting and Repair (II) This course will provide an overview of kitchen and Laundry products as they relate to residential and commercial applications. This will include an understanding of the relation of the components and controls associated with each product. Students will focus primarily on troubleshooting and repairing all kitchen and laundry products at the component level. (1,5,3) CARE 1243 Basic Carpentry and Painting (I) This course is an introduction to the basic principles, tools, and methods associated with the basic carpentry and painting knowledge and skills required in the maintenance and repair of commercial and residential facilities. (1,5,3) CARE 1253 Basic Plumbing (I) This course is an introduction to the basic principles, tools, and methods associated with the basic plumbing knowledge and skills required in the maintenance and repair of commercial and residential facilities. (1,5,3) 159


CHEM 1004 Introduction to Chemistry Introduction to Chemistry is a survey of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and biological chemistry. Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and theory, periodic law, bonding, stoichiometry calculations, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidationreduction reactions, radioactivity, organic nomenclature and reactions, and biological chemistry and reactions. ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing), ACCUPLACER EA 77-120 (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: CHEM 1004 CHEM 1111 Chemistry I Lab (Lab only to accompany CHEM 1113 for the lecture portion) (I). An algebra-based chemistry course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry. Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity.. Prerequisites: “C” or above in MATH 1033 OR ACT Math 19 or above OR ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing), ACCUPLACER EA 77-120, CHEM 1113 Chemistry Lecture (Lecture to accompany CHEM 1111 for the lab portion) (I). An algebra-based chemistry course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry. Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity.. Prerequisites: ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing), ACCUPLACER EA 77-120 (3, 0, 3) CHEM 1114 Chemistry I (I, II). An algebra-based chemistry course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry. Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity.. Prerequisites: “C” or above in MATH 1033 OR ACT Math 19 or above OR ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/ Writing), ACCUPLACER EA 77-120 (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: CHEM1414 CHEM 1124 Chemistry II (II) General Chemistry II is an introduction to intermolecular forces, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, solubility equilibrium and properties of solutions, titration equilibrium, chemical kinetics, acid-base theory and oxidation-reduction. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: CHEM1424 CHEM 1414 General Chemistry I is a survey of general chemistry with emphasis on inorganic chemistry. Among the topics to be covered are organic chemistry, measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: CHEM1414 CISS 0003 Computer Applications This course provides the knowledge and skills required to apply microcomputers in a variety of disciplines. Students will gain hands- on experience in the use of several software packages, including word-processing, spreadsheets, database management, and presentations. Does not count toward a degree. Offered upon demand. (3,0,3) CISS 0033 Keyboarding/Basic Computer Skills (I) This course provides beginning training in the touch operation of the alphabetic and numeric keyboards. Basic computer skills are introduced to provide job skills necessary in many careers with limited computer use. This course is also designed to improve keyboarding and computer skills necessary prior to enrollment in Introduction to Computers. Does not count toward a business degree or certificate. (3,0,3) CISS 1001 Computer Fundamentals (I,II) This course is designed to introduce students to computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, keyboarding, and applications applied to specific trades. (0,3,1) CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers (I,II,S) A survey of the computer industry with application software 160


lab exercises, including but not limited to history, uses, types, hardware, software, teleprocessing, and networking of computers. Lab exercises introduce the fundamentals of the three most common microcomputer applications: word processing, electronic spreadsheets, and databases. It is recommended that the student be able to type 25 words per minute. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: CPSI 1003 CISS 1123 Computer Software Applications (I, II) This course provides instruction in the use of word processing, spreadsheet, and database application software for microcomputers. Students will become more familiar with computer operations, operating systems and ways of solving everyday problems with software programs. (3,0,3) CISS 1203 Ethics in Technology (I) Introduces technicians to social, legal, and ethical issues in computing and technology. Students will be introduced to privacy issues, information issues of trust in computers, computer crime, issues on the impact and control of computers, and issues of professional responsibility and ethics. (3,0,3) CISS 1253 Word Processing (II) This course covers the theory and logic involved in all aspects of word processing and is designed to teach students how to enter, edit, format, store, and retrieve documents. Students learn to develop proficiency-level skills in word processing. Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in CISS 1013. (3,0,3) CISS 1353 Electronic Spreadsheet (I,II) This course covers the theory and logic involved in all aspects of electronic spreadsheets and is designed to teach studentshow to perform calculations and produce graphs and reports in electronic spreadsheets. Students also learn to analyze information in electronic spreadsheets, and students will learn to develop proficiency-level skills in electronic spreadsheets. Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in CISS 1013. (3,0,3) CISS 1503 Introductory Web Design (I) Provides students with real-world experience in designing and implementing web pages. (3, 0, 3) CISS 1703 Desktop Operating Systems (I) Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to address the implementation and desktop support needs of customers who plan to deploy and support Microsoft Windows operating systems. (3, 0, 3) CISS 1804 Computer Maintenance I (I) Designed to prepare students for entry into the workforce as a computer technician. Students are provided intensive hands-on experience in the theory, operation, troubleshooting and remedial and preventative maintenance of microcomputers as used in the workplace today. This is the first in a series of courses designed to prepare students for diagnosing and repairing modern microcomputers as commonly used in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for acquiring the A+ certification credential. (3, 3, 4) CISS 1814 Computer Maintenance II (II) A continuation of CISS 1804 – Computer Maintenance I. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CISS 1804 (3, 3, 4) CISS 1903 Concepts of Operating Systems (II) Introduction to computer and network operating systems. Emphasis on practical application, with discussion and practice on command prompt based systems, graphical user interface systems, and embedded systems. (3,0,3) CISS 2013 Advanced Web Design (II) A continuation of CISS 1503 – Introductory Web Design. Presents students with an in-depth coverage of HTML, implements design using image editing software, and explains the connection between a detailed design plan that considers audience expectations, sound design principles and various technical considerations that create successful web sites. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CISS 1503 Introductory Web Design (3, 0, 3) CISS 2103 Application Programming (II) Provides the students with an understanding of the design and implementation of high level programming languages and a survey of programming language paradigms. 161


(3,0,3) CISS 2203 Fundamentals of UNIX (I) Designed to give students a fundamental understanding of the Linux operating system. It covers the essentials of installing, configuring, maintaining, administering, and troubleshooting the Linux Operating System. Some topics include Lanning, Installing and Running a Linux System, using Graphical Systems with Linux, The Shell and Text Files, the role of the System Administrator and basic administration tasks of managing system resources. (3, 0, 3) CISS 2223 Database (I,II) This course covers the theory and logic involved in all aspects of database. Students learn the principles of database and its applications. This course is designed to teach students how to build a database, enter data, query for information, and produce reports. Students also learn the principles of database and its application and will learn to develop proficiency-level skills in database. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in CISS 1013. (3,0,3) CISS 2303 Networking Essentials (I) Provides the students with a fundamental understanding of networking computers. Some of the topics covered will include network design, networking media, network hardware, network communications, protocols, network administration and network troubleshooting. This course is designed to help students pass the Network+ certification exam offered by CompTia. (3, 0, 3) CISS 2404 Internship (Offered on Demand) Provides students with the opportunity to learn by working and to gain valuable real-world experience. Internship assignments are created with businesses in either a virtual or an actual mode and require eight hours of work per week to fulfill the course requirements. Reporting and supervision requirements developed up beforehand with the student, the intern advisor, and the employer. CNAP 1001 Nursing Assistant I (offered on demand) Nursing Assistant I covers the basic fundamental concepts essential to the foundation of the nursing assistants education and training. This course includes basic instruction in communication, infection, safety, and an introduction to resident care. This course utilizes both theory instruction and skills demonstration in the classroom and lab. Prerequisites: ACCUPLACER 47-78 Reading and ACT >15-19 Reading. (1,0,1) CNAP 1004 Nursing Assistant II (offered on demand) Nursing Assistant II is a continuation of CNAP 1001. This course covers additional concepts and skills necessary to the nursing assistant curriculum. This course incorporates the addition of clinical practice into the already established theory instruction and skills demonstration given in the classroom and lab. Prerequisites: ACCUPLACER 47-78 Reading and ACT >15-19 Reading.(2,2,4) CNAP 1101 Nursing Assistant III (Barbara Broyles Alzheimer’s and Dementia Training Program) (offered on demand) Nursing Assistant III covers the specialized skills and understanding necessary when caring for residents with Alzheimer’s and Dementia. This course covers such topics as respect, communication, behavioral issues, nutrition, activities, and burnout. Prerequisites: ACCUPLACER 47-78 Reading and ACT >15-19 Reading. (1,0,1) CRJU 1203 Introduction to Criminal Justice (I, II) Introduction to Criminal Justice introduces the history, development and philosophy of the three major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the courts and the corrections system. Included is an overview of the United States Criminal Justice system and detailed analysis of the interaction between substantive and procedural law. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: CRJU 1023 CRJU 1323 Criminal Investigation (every other I) A study of the fundamentals of criminal investigation, theory, and history from crime scene to courtroom with an emphasis on techniques appropriate to specific crime scenes. (3,0,3) CRJU 1403 Arkansas Criminal Law (every other II) A study of the criminal statutory provisions in the State of Arkansas. The course includes the interpretation of the Statutory criminal law as set forth by the Arkansas 162


Supreme Court and U.S. Supreme Court. (3,0,3) CRJU 2043 Evidence (every other I) A comprehensive study of the rules of evidence. Includes criminal proceedings (trials and hearings), admissibility of evidence, exclusion of illegally seized evidence, burden of proof, hearsay evidence, opinion and expert testimony, admissions, and confessions. (3,0,3) CRJU 2113 Law Enforcement Ethics (every other II) A self-paced examination of the various ethical issues encountered by professionals within the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on law enforcement. Includes the basic philosophies of moral and ethical development and emphasizes police conduct, authority, discretion, and responsibilities. (3,0,3) DIES 1004 Basic Diesel Shop (I Odd and Even Years) A lecture-demonstration course in shop safety and management. The course emphasizes how to use and read service manuals, order parts, perform jobs in the shop, have good rapport with customers, and search for a job. (2,6,4) DIES 1104 Engine Systems (I Odd Years) A course designed to help the student become acquainted with the principles of operation and the components and their functions of internal combustion two-cycle and four-cycle engines. Gasoline, diesel, and LP gas engines are compared. (2,6,4) DIES 1204 Diesel Engines (I Odd Years) An introductory course covering shop tools, special service tools, precision-measuring instruments, shop equipment, and the fundamentals of diesel engine disassembly and assembly. (2,6,4) DIES 1304 Fuel Systems (II Even Years) This course provides an introduction to fuel systems used on medium and heavy-duty diesel engines. Students learn to recognize and identify various components of diesel fuel systems and understand the purpose each component serves. Common problems encountered in servicing diesel fuel systems are also covered. (2,6,4) DIES 1404 Electrical Systems (II Even Years) A study of the technical fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. This course is designed to give the student a background in and a working knowledge of the principles and functions of charging and starting circuits and electronic controls relating to diesel equipment electrical systems. (2,6,4) DIES 1414 Diesel Electronics (II Even Years) This course covers vehicular computers, instrument gauges, instrument panels, power windows, power door locks, power seats, diesel ignition systems, warning devices, and passive restraint systems. (2,6,4) DIES 2005 Suspension and Steering (I Even Years) This course focuses on frame construction, suspension systems, wheel and tires, basic alignment angles, and alignment procedures of heavy-duty vehicles and steering systems. Common problems and corrections of alignment angles and repair and diagnosis of these systems are also covered. (3,6,5) DIES 2025 Brakes and Hydraulics (II Odd Years) A study of braking systems, design, purposes, and control devices. This course provides instruction in system components and operation and servicing of hydraulic, power-assist, and air brake units. (3,6,5) DIES 2105 Clutches and Power Trains (II Odd Years) A course designed to help the student understand different types of clutch applications and operations along with the understanding of transmission and drive assemblies.(3,6,5) DIES 2204 Air Conditioning (II Odd Years) A basic course in automotive air conditioning. Lecture and demonstrations cover such topics as troubleshooting, identifying and replacing components, charging, and servicing the air conditioning system. (2,6,4) DIES 2215 Troubleshooting &Inspection (I Even Years) The student will learn to listen to and verify operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complaints, and review past maintenance documents to determine needed repairs, and proper 163


procedures for inspecting and repairing the cab and body, tires and wheels, engine compartments, electrical and electronic systems, and chassis and undercarriage. (3,6,5) DRAM 2003 Introduction to Theatre Arts : This course is a study of live theatre and how it is produced, how it has developed historically and culturally, and how it is evaluated and analyzed. This is primarily a survey and theory class but it also includes some practical hands on experience in the various theatre crafts as well as theatre going experiences. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: DRAM 1003 DRAM 2013 Theatre Practicum : Students participate in a live production in which they gain experience in acting as well as work with technical aspects of a production. (3,0,3) ECON 2003 Macroeconomics (I,II) A study of macroeconomics analysis including aggregate employment, income, fiscal and monetary policy growth, and business cycles. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ECON 2103 ECON 2103 Microeconomics (I, II) A study of microeconomics analysis including market structures, supply and demand, production costs, price and output, and international economics. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ECON 2203 EDCC 1001 Child Care Orientation Training (I,II) This course is designed to provide ten hours of basic orientation training in Early Childhood Education. (1,0,1) EDCC 1003 Foundations of Early Childhood Education (I,II) This course is a study of the principles of child development and learning, and their implication to the teacher in early childhood education programs. The emphasis of this course is on safety, health, and the learning environment. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical roles of families in their child’s development. The student will become familiar with the theories that early childhood education is based upon and learn how to develop an effective program designed uniquely for children birth to age eight. The student will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. The course content is based upon guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1013, 1023, 1101, MEDL 1011(3,0,3) EDCC 1013 Child Growth and Development (I,II) This course is a study of the principles of child development and learning, and their implications to the teacher in early childhood programs. The emphasis of this course is on the physical, cognitive, communication, creative, self, social and the guidance aspects of early childhood programs. This course focuses on children birth to age eight and covers all aspects of a child’s physical and cognitive growth and socio-emotional development. The student will be introduced to ways to observe and evaluate children’s development and recognize possible delays in development. The course content is based upon guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. Corequisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1023, 1101, MEDL 1011 (3,0,3) EDCC 1023 Environments For Young Children (I,II) This course is a study of early childhood education as a profession. The emphasis of this course includes strategies to establish family relationships, managing an effective program, and maintaining a commitment to professionalism. This course is designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge base on how to design a program for children developing both typically and atypically. The course provides the opportunity to plan environments that are physically and emotionally secure. The student will plan and implement activities that are age, stage, and culturally appropriate for children birth to age eight. The course content is based upon guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1101, MEDL 1011. (3,0,3) EDCC 1033 Council Preparation and Practicum (I,II) Child Care Practicum is necessary for all CDA students. This course includes directions in completing CDA packet for assessment and preparing the resource file. (1,0,1) Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1023, MEDL 1011 (1,0,1) Child Care Program Administration (Offered on Demand) This course is designed to help the student become a successful administrator of a quality early childhood education program. The course provides information on how 164


to operate both proprietary and non-profit programs. The course helps the student to identify and develop strategies for dealing with management situations, providing quality care as well as training in leadership and organizational skills. Prerequisite: ACCUPLACER 47-77 Reading, 44-82 English/Writing (2,2,3) EDCC 1101 Council Preparation Practicum (I,II) Child Care Practicum is necessary for all CDA students. This course includes directions in completing CDA packet for assessment and preparing the resource file. (1,0,1) Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1023, MEDL 1011 (1,0,1) EDCC 1203 Child Care Program Administration (Offered on Demand) This course is designed to help the student become a successful administrator of a quality early childhood education program. The course provides information on how to operate both proprietary and non-profit programs. The course helps the student to identify and develop strategies for dealing with management situations, providing quality care as well as training in leadership and organizational skills. Prerequisite: ACCUPLACER 47-77 Reading, 44-82 English/ Writing (3,0,3) EDCC 1213 Child Development (I,II) A course designed to make the student aware of the developmental stages of children. Prerequisite: ACCUPLACER 47-77 Reading, 44-82 English/Writing (3,0,3) EDCC 1223 Early Childhood Learning Environments (II, Odd Years Only) This course is a study of the elements of a quality early childhood environment. Prerequisite: ACCUPLACER 47-77 Reading, 44-82 English/Writing (3,0,3) EDCC 2003 History and Foundations of Childcare Education (Offered on Demand) A course designed to cover the basics of early childhood and the principles found in early childhood education. Prerequisite: scores of 20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3) EDCC 2013 Child Behavior and Guidance (I, Even Years Only) A course designed to make the child care provider aware of behaviors and actions that are found in the child care environment. The course will also cover the principles of guidance of child behaviors. Prerequisite: scores of 20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3) EDCC 2023 Advanced Clinical Practicum (I,II) This course is available to meet the needs of students requiring an advisor, on-the-job observation, and review of coursework before applying for the Early Childhood Studies Review given by the Council for Early Childhood Recognition. Additional $25.00 clinical practicum fee is required. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1023, 1101, MEDL 1011 (0,9,3) EDCC 2303 Literacy and Language Arts in Early Childhood (II, Even Years Only) This course is designed to make the early childhood educator aware of the acquisition of language and how to provide children birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs with language rich environments by incorporating the four areas of language: speaking, listening, writing and reading. (3,0,3) EDCC 2403 Math and Science for Early Childhood (I, Odd Years Only) Students will become familiar with a variety of ways to introduce children Birth through pre- kindergarten, including children with special needs to ideas and concepts related to math and science. Students will create activities; plan and practice developmentally appropriate experiences that would meet recognized standards (NAEYC, NCTM, etc.) for these areas. (3,0,3) EDGE 1003 College Life Skills (I,II, S): A unique student success course that emphasizes school-to-work skills while at the same time giving strong coverage of academic skills such as note taking, test taking, and time management. This course focuses on practical strategies to help students, both traditional and non-traditional, progress from college to career and enhance self image, through the discussion of topics such as working in groups, making presentations, conducting meetings, listening, and setting goals. (3,0,3) 165


EDUC 1002 Art for Elementary Teachers An investigation of elementary-level art education focusing on materials and methods for teaching art history, art criticism, and studio production to children. Attention is given to the relationship of the cisual arts to general education, developmental growth of children in art, curriculum planning, and current issues in art education. (2,0,2) EDUC 1012 Elementary Classroom Music Elementary Classroom Music is intended for elementary education majors. The course is designed to provide experiences that will enable students to develop the necessary skills and knowledge to teach musical concepts and integrate music learning with other core subjects. The goals and objectives of this course are aligned with the Arkansas Standards for Beginning Teachers and are directed towards the goal of becoming an exemplary elementary teacher. (2,0,2) EDUC 2003 Introduction to Education with Field Experience (I,II) An introduction to teaching focusing on the history of philosophy of education. Requires a minimum of 30 hours of observation in Arkansas public schools Students are scheduled to observe at least 5 hours each in elementary, middle school, and secondary settings. (3,2,3) EDUC 2012 Teaching Diversity Teaching Diversity is designed to provide an introduction to the historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of multicultural education. The course will focus on how personal, social, political, cultural, and educational factors affect the success or failure of students in classrooms. The course will include study on how human diversity integrates personal and organizational perspectives, research, and theories in developing classroom teachers. (3,0,3) EDUC 2033 Teaching Physical Education This course is designed to help students understand the need for an effective K-6 physical education program. It will provide the prospective PK-6 school classroom teacher, as well as the PK-6 physical education specialist, with a knowledge base in the principles of physical fitness, elementary physical education curriculum planning and appropriate selection of physical activities for children. The students will be working with hands-on projects integrating the discipline of physical education and other curriculum subjects found in grades PK-6. Proper nutrition for the elementary student will also be discussed. (3,0,3) EDUC 2103 k-12 Education Technology (I) This course will address uses of technology to enhance classroom instruction for current and future teachers, K-12. On completion of course, students will be able to use computers and application software, integrate computers and educational technology, access information on the World Wide Web, prepare E-portfolios, and develop PowerPoint presentations for classroom instruction (same as CISS 1013) It is recommended that the student be able to type 25 words per minute. (3,2,3) ELEC 1104 Basic Electricity (I, II) A study of the generation, transmission, theory and use of electricity. Included in this course will be electrical and shop safety, use of power tools, hand tools, and wiring devices used in the electrical trade. (3,3,4) ELEC 1204 Wiring I (I) A study of basic wiring techniques and skills as applied to general house wiring and industrial wiring. A practical application in the laboratory is provided. (2,6,4) ELEC 1303 National Electric Code (I) A study of the license requirements and electrical codes as they apply to industrial and construction trades. (3,0,3) ELEC 1403 Industrial Motors & Controls (I) The study of electric motor and control systems as applied to the industrial trades. Included are maintenance, installation, wiring diagrams, and trouble-shooting. (2,4,3) ELEC 1603 Wiring II (II) A continued study of commercial and industrial wiring and the study of schematics as applied to the electrical trade. Prerequisite: ELEC 1204, ELEC 1403 (1,8,3)

166


ELEC 2314 High Voltage Components and Systems (II) This course is designed to introduce the student to the high voltage components and systems found in modern industrial power plants. Emphasis is on high voltage switches, controls, transformers, and systems found in a modern industrial power plant. Prerequisite/Co requisites: ELEC 1104, ELEC 1204, ELEC 1403 (4,0,4) EMPT 1003 Introduction to EMS (I, II) This course is designed to assist the student in acquiring skills and knowledge needed to be prepared for the EMT Program. This program provides the basic lifesaving knowledge and training required to start a career in EMS. The student will learn how to think and act in an emergency situation and how to cope with the rigors and stress presented by these situations. Prerequisite ACT Reading 15, ACCUPLACER 47 (3,1,3) EMPT 1004 Emergency Medical Technician (I, II) This course is designed to assist the student in acquiring skills and knowledge needed to challenge the Arkansas State certification and the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technician examination and become a National Registry Emergency Medical Technician. This program provides the basic lifesaving knowledge and training required to start a career as an EMT-B. The student will learn how to think and act in an emergency situation and how to cope with the rigors and stress presented by these situations. (3,3,4) EMSP 1001 Paramedic Remediation This course is designed to allow the students that have fulfilled the didactic and lab requirements but were unable to successfully challenge the exit exams to complete the course. The intent is to aid the student in preparing for the National Registry Exam. This course will use online test for review and standardized exams will be administered that will allow the student to recognize areas of strength and/or weakness. This course also allows for students to complete any clinical/internship time or skills that they were not able to complete in the regularly schedule program with the protection of malpractice insurance. (1,0,1) EMSP 1202 Clinical Rotation I This course is a supervised rotation through the clinical settings. Rotations will include surgery/recovery, lab/IV, respiratory, and emergency room. This rotation provides students with the opportunity to use advanced level skills in the clinical setting. 140 contact hours. (0,2,2) EMSP 1203 EMS Environment This course reviews the Emergency Medical System with emphasis placed on professionalism, responsibility, community involvement and ethical/legal aspects. An overview of body systems will be introduced along with physical assessment. 55 contact hours. (3,1,3) EMSP 1205 Medical Emergencies I This course covers the care of patients with both respiratory and cardiac conditions. It includes normal anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, assessment, and management of cardiopulmonary conditions. Specialized interventions such as advanced airway and rhythm interpretation with treatment are emphasized. 89 contact hours. (4,2,5) EMSP 1213 Medical Emergencies II This course covers the care of patients with medical emergencies. It will include diabetic emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, exposure to environmental extremes, alcoholism, poisoning, acute abdomen, genitourinary problems, infectious disease, obstetric/gynecological emergencies, behavioral emergencies, and medical emergencies of the geriatric patient. 53 contact hours. (3,0,3) EMSP 1214 Special Considerations This course covers the care of clients with specialized needs including recognition, management, anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology of pediatric patients. It will also cover disaster situations, triage, stress management, hazmat, and emergency rescue extrication. 67 contact hours. (4,0,4) EMSP 1215 Anatomy and Pathophysiology This course provides an overview of Anatomy and Physiology with emphasis placed in the Pathophysiology of specific systems where emergency medicine is focused. (5,0,5)

167


EMSP 1216 Traumatic Emergencies This course covers the assessment, management and treatment of traumatic injuries including soft tissue, central nervous system, and musculoskeletal structures. Other injuries involving human systems are also covered. 105 contact hours. (5,1,6) EMSP 1221 Field Experience This course introduces the student to the internship section of the EMS system. During this phase the student will function as a team member and be evaluated as such. 50 contact hours. (0,1,1) EMSP 1222 Paramedic Comprehensive Review This course is designed to assist the student in preparing for the National Registry exam. Through instructor led reviews and case studies that revisit key medical and trauma situations the Paramedic may be faced with in the pre-hospital setting. A standardized exam will be administered that will allow the student to identify areas of strength and/or weakness. (2,1,2) EMSP 1223 Clinical Rotation II This course is a supervised rotation through the clinical settings. As a continuation of Clinical Rotation I, the student will rotate through areas including emergency department, surgery, ICU, OB, Pediatrics, and behavior/psychiatric areas. 160 contact hours. (0,3,3) EMSP 1224 Field Internship II This course is a continuation of Field Internship I. This course will allow the student to utilize advanced life support interventions. 250 contact hours. (0,4,4) EMSP 1233 Pharmacology This course covers clinical pharmacology, classification and indications of medications. Precautions, dosages, methods of administration, dosage calculation, and metric conversions are also included. (3,1,3) EMST 1201 Advanced Cardiac Life Support This course is a program of medical intervention used to treat victims of respiratory and or cardiac emergencies and strokes, including invasive techniques such as tracheal intubation and drug administration. Pre-requisite: current Health Care Provider CPR card and license as an EMT, CRTT, RRT, LPN or RN. 30 contact hours. (1,1,1) ENGL 0033 Literacy (I, II, S) This course offers instruction to help students increase vocabulary and comprehension skills as well as develop writing skills, beginning at the paragraph level and progressing to the 5-paragraph essay format. Grammar is addressed within the context of writing. Students scoring 11 or less on the ACT English test or 43 or below on the ACCUPLACER English/Writing test must enroll in this course. Students scoring 18 or less on the ACT Reading test or 47-77 ACCUPLACER Reading test may enroll in this course to satisfy the requirement for reading remediation. Students must earn a grade of 70% or better to be successful in the course. This course does not count toward an Associate’s Degree. ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing (I,II,S) This course is a lecture course with an intensive study of the process of writing five paragraph, three point essays. Grammar is addressed within the context of writing. Students scoring 12-18 on the ACT English test or 44-82 ACCUPLACER English/writing test (or have passed ENGL 0033) must enroll in this course. A grade of 70% or better is required to pass to ENGL 1013. This course does not count toward an Associate’s Degree. (3,0,3) ENGL 0063 Reading This course offers instruction to help students increase vocabulary, comprehension skills, and reading rate. Students scoring 18 or less on the ACT Reading test or 47-77 ACCUPLACER Reading test must enroll in this course. A grade of 70% or better is required to pass ENGL 0063. This course does not count toward an Associate’s Degree. (3, 0, 3) ENGL 0073 ALP Writing (I, II) This course is a workshop that functions in alignment with and support of the paired ENGL 1013 course. ENGL 0073 emphasizes appropriate grammar, punctuation, usage, and mechanics; fundamentals of sentence, paragraph, and essay structure; and reading, study, and composition strategies. Students scoring 16-18 on the ACT Reading and ACT English test or 76-82 ACCUPLACER Writing and 7077 ACCUPLACER Reading may enroll in this course. Students must have successfully completed reading remediation or have appropriate reading placement scores to enroll in ALP Writing. This course does not count toward an associate’s degree. 168


ENGL 1013 Composition I (I,II,S) Practice in writing clear and effective prose based on accepted conventions of grammar, usage, diction, and logic, and a study of the techniques of using the library in preparation of documented papers. Emphasis on the interrelationship between reading and writing skills and practice in writing standard essay patterns. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 0053 and ENGL 0033; or ACT 19 (Reading and English) or ACCUPLACER 78 (Reading), 83 (English/Writing), (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 1013 ENGL 1023 Composition II (I,II,S): A continuation of ENGL 1013 with greater maturity in writing and skill in reading expected; reading of literature to include study of basic literary terms and techniques; reading of non-fiction such as editorials and critical essays; writing of critical papers; writing of a major research paper. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1013. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 1023 ENGL 2003 Creative Writing: Creative Writing is a combination lecture/workshop course designed to teach the basics of creating poetry, short fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction. Prerequisite ENGL 1013. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2013 ENGL 2023 World Literature I (I,II,S): World Literature I is a survey course of literary classics in the global tradition. The course offers selections from masterpieces beginning with The Epic of Gilgamesh and Greek and Roman writers followed by selections from the Middle Ages. The course continues with poetry and drama from the Renaissance. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1023. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2113 ENGL 2123 World Literature II (I,II,S): World Literature II is a survey course of literary classics in the global tradition. The course offers selections from masterpieces beginning with Neoclassicism and continuing to the Modern Period. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1023. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2123 ENGL 2203 American Literature I (I): A survey covering significant writers and works from the colonial period through the Civil War, including such authors as Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2653 ENGL2213 American Literature II (II): A survey covering significant writers and works from the Civil War to the present. Attention will be focused on major authors including Clemens, James, Chopin, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and O’Conner. Works by lesser known writers will also be read and discussed. ACTS Index Number: ENGL2663 ENGL 2253 Technical Writing (I,II): This course is designed to help students learn the foundations and conventions of technical writing in its various forms and contexts. Research and writing will be the main part of the curriculum with focus on how to produce written communication that informs, persuades and records information. Study will include professional writing which demonstrates clarity of style and an understanding of the purposes for which these reports, letters, articles and other forms are used in settings such as American law, medicine and business. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1013. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2023 ENGL 2673 British Literature I (I): A survey covering selected works of British literature from its beginnings through the Renaissance. ACTS Index Number: ENGL2673 ENGL 2683 British Literature II (II): A survey covering selected works of British literature from postRenaissance to the present. ACTS Index Number: ENGL2683 FSED 1001 Funeral Service Orientation and Ethics (I) This is a study of funeral service ethics to include telephone techniques, first call, vital statistics and professional relationships and funeral service forms including Veteran’s and Social Security benefits. (1,0,1) 169


FSED 1002 History of Funeral Service (I) This course is a study of the history of funeral service as well as the progression of associations and education within funeral service. (2,0,2) FSED 1003 Funeral Service Chemistry (II) Funeral Service Chemistry is a course designed specifically to meet the requirements for students in the funeral service program. This is a survey course that includes inorganic, organic and biochemistry components. Other topics that are included are specific to funeral services, including specific safety issues. Prerequisites: MATH0093 recommended (3,0,3) FSED 1012 Restorative Art I (I) This course teaches a student the basic fundamentals of restorative art. It includes such areas as bones of the head and their respective landmarks, facial markings, muscles, and tissue thickness. Facial proportions, profile shapes, and head shapes are also discussed. This course emphasizes the use of proper terminology as well as terms of position and direction. This course also involves a study of the methods of attachment and support for the ear and nose, as well as problem cases with the mouth and eyes. (2,1,2) FSED 1022 Restorative Art II (II) This course covers restorative art waxes, color theory, and the importance of color in the funeral service profession. The study of cosmetics and their application for viewing in the funeral setting is also discussed. This course also includes a special laboratory in anatomical wax modeling, and also emphasizes the use of proper terminology. (2,1,2) FSED 1013 Funeral Service Anatomy (I) This course involves the study of the human body with particular emphasis on those systems providing the foundation for embalming, pathology, public health and restorative art. Funeral Service Anatomy is designed to meet the requirements of the funeral service program. This is a onesemester, non-lab course that does not meet the science requirements for any degree other than funeral service. (3, 0, 3) FSED 1033 Funeral Directing (I) This course is a study of the total funeral service environment including the duties, responsibilities, skills, and ethical obligations and procedures used by licenses funeral directors. A practicum is included for the student to assist in the day-to-day activities of a licensed funeral director. Each student will be required to turn in funeral activity forms. (3,0,3) FSED 1103 Embalming I (I) A basic course in embalming including the physical and chemical changes which occur in the body, both prior to and after death. Also covered in this course are the signs and tests for death along with embalming terminology, an in-depth look at the preparation room, including instruments, their proper names and uses, and calculations of solution strengths. A study is also devoted to anatomical and linear guides as they are related from an embalming standpoint. (3,0,3) FSED 1181 Clinical I (I) This course will provide clinical experiences in Funeral Directing and Embalming by a UAHT supervised preceptor at an off-campus clinical site. (1,0,1) FSED 1191 Clinical II (II) This course will provide clinical experiences in Funeral Directing and Embalming by a UAHT supervised preceptor at an off-campus clinical site. (1,0,1) FSED 1203 Embalming II (II) This course involves an in-depth study on the principles and techniques of embalming. Includes a study of the embalming chemicals used to treat deceased bodies, methods of injection and drainage, and the proper embalming procedures for handling special cases. (3,0,3) FSED 1313 Funeral Service Merchandising and Management (II) This is a course that is designed to introduce the funeral service student to the basics of merchandising as they apply to the funeral profession and the basic principles of funeral service management. This course will cover construction and features of caskets, outer burial containers, and other funeral related products. It will also examine methods of purchasing, pricing, display, and sale of funeral merchandise as well as funeral services. This course stresses general management technique and theory and specific areas of funeral service management guidelines for those areas. (3, 0, 3) 170


FSED 2103 Funeral Psychology/ Sociology (I) A study of the normal symptoms of grief in adults and children and the funeral director’s role in grief counseling in conjunction with the psychological and sociological aspect of human emotions, religious customs, and cultures as they pertain to the funeral, death, and final disposition. (3,0,3) FSED 2203 Comprehensive Review (II) A general review of the entire curriculum for graduating sophomores, culminating with an exam designed to prepare students for the National Board and various state board examinations. To be taken in student’s final semester. (3,0,3) FSED 2213 Microbiology/ Pathology (II) This course is a study of basic microbiology pathology principles as applied to mortuary science. It includes the basic need for an understanding of the causes of diseases and those diseases which have some effect upon the embalmer. (3,0,3) FSED 2223 Business and Funeral Law (I) This is a lecture course in the study of the basic principles of business law and legal and ethical aspects as related to funeral service. Especially stressed are the bodies of law and the judicial system found in the United State of America including contracts, sales, bailments (including carriers), commercial paper, agency, employment, and business organization. It is designed to introduce the student to sources of law, the legal status of the dead human body, the duty of burial, the right to control funeral arrangements and final disposition, liability for funeral expenses, torts involving the dead human body and the funeral director, wills, estates and probate proceedings, cemeteries and issues related thereto, state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to funeral service, and the legal aspects of being a licensed funeral director/ mortician. This course will familiarize the student with the Federal Trade Commission and the Trade Regulation Rule on Funeral Industry Practice. (3,0,3) GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography (I,II) A description of the present pattern of mankind in relation to certain physical and cultural elements of the total environment. (3,0,3)ACTS Index Number: GEOG 1103 GEOL 1004 Physical Geology Physical Geology is the study of the internal and external processes that are active in and on the earth. Topics include, but are not limited to, magnetism, minerals, rocks, landforms, plate tectonics, and geological processes. Lab is required. (3,3,4) ACTS Index Number: GEOL 1114 GTAS 1112 General Tool and Safety (I,II) This course is an introduction to the basic principles, types, intended purposes, and the safe usage of hand tools and power tools, OSHA laws and regulations, and the principles of good customer service. (1,3,2) HIST 1023 Arkansas History (I,II) A history of Arkansas’ social, political and economic development from the first Europeans to the present. (3,0,3) HIST 1113 World Civilizations I (I,II,S) A survey of ancient and medieval history, with emphasis on Asian, African and European cultures.. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: HIST 1223 HIST 1123 World Civilizations II (I,II,S) A survey of global history, from the early modern period until present day. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: HIST 1213 HIST 2013 U.S. History I (I,II,S) A general survey of the history of the United States from the beginning of North American colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: HIST 2113 HIST 2023 U.S. History II (I,II,S) A general survey of the history of the United States from the end of the American Reconstruction to the present. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: HIST 2123 HUMN 280X Special Topics in Humanities: Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. 171


HUMN 290X Internship: This course is designed to allow a student to gain knowledge, skill, and experience while working in a position that is reflective of their educational goal(s). The student will work varying number of hours at the intern site depending upon the number of credit hours desired. This course requires the diligence of the student, oversight by the faculty advisor or divisional dean, and a high level of interaction by the intern siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foreman or supervisor. (0,9,3) or (0,12,4) HVAC 1002 Tubing and Piping (I) A study of the process of identifying tubing and piping with practical applications in sizing and fitting to different configurations using mechanical fittings. (1,2,2) HVAC 1204 Principles of Refrigeration (I) A comprehensive study of mechanical refrigeration systems emphasizing proper service techniques through analysis of the problem. Testing procedures, parts removal, and installation are covered in depth. (2,7,4) HVAC 1503 Motors and Controls (II) A study of the theory and operation of electric motors and their controls. Principles of sizing, trouble-shooting, and repairing will be covered. (2,4,3) HVAC 1604 Schematics (II) A study of the schematic wiring diagrams found in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry. Interpretation, reading, drawing, and troubleshooting techniques utilizing schematic wiring diagrams are included. (3,3,4) HVAC 1703 Air Properties (II) A study of air properties and the instrumentation to meet the needs of a residential or commercial structure and the factors involved in the calculation of heating and cooling loads. (2,4,3) HVAC 1804 Residential Systems (I) A study of the major components and control devices and their applications. The student will troubleshoot and repair existing systems. (2,7,4) HVAC 1904 Air Conditioning Systems (II) A study of A/C systems and the practical applications and installation of combustion heat, electrical heat, cooling system, and heat pumps. Included is the study of air properties and instrumentation to meet the needs of a residential structure and the factors involved in the calculations of heating and cooling loads. (2,7,4) INMT 1104 Hydraulics/ Pneumatics (II) A study of physical laws, design, selection, and trouble-shooting of hydraulic and pneumatic equipment. (4,2,4) INMT 1003 Blueprint Reading (I) This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of reading and interpreting basic drawings. (3,0,3) INMT 1304 Basic Programmable Controllers (II) A study of programmable controllers (PCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s); the PC is a microprocessor-based, programmable device that replaces on/off control devices such as relays and switches in discrete control systems. Prerequisites: ELEC 1104, ELEC 1403. (3,3,4) INMT 1404 Mechanical Devices & Systems (II) This course provides the study and applications related to the maintenance and repair of equipment and machines found in a wide range of industrial operations. (3,3,4) INMT 2415 Instrumentation and Controls (on demand) This course is designed to advance the students knowledge and skill in installing, maintaining, troubleshooting, repairing, and replacing the instruments and data systems encountered in a modern industrial power plant. Prerequisite/Co requisite: , ELEC 1204, ELEC 1403 (5,0,5) MACH 1003 Introduction to Machining Processes (I) This course allows the student to develop the basic knowledge and skill in the care and operation of basic metalworking machine tools, precision measuring instruments and shop safety. (2,3, MACH 1215 Basic Lathe Operations (I) This course allows the student to develop the basic knowledge and skill in the use and operation of a metalworking lathe. Tapers, knurling, threading, and form turning operations are taught as well as accuracy and speed. Pre-requisite/Co-requisite MACH 1003 and INMT 1003(3,8,5) 172


MACH 1315 Basic Knee Mill Operations (II) This course allows the student to develop the basic knowledge and skill in the use and operation of the milling machine and the indexing, turntable, and broaching head attachments. It also covers straight, form, tapering and boring attachments. Pre-requisite/Co-requisite MACH 1003 and INMT 1003 (2,9,5) MACH 1403 Introduction to CNC Processes (II) This course allows the student to develop an understanding of Computer Numerical Control (CNC); what it is, how it came about, and how it is used in industry today. Students will be introduced to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) and the production of codes used to control 3D printers and CNC Lathes and Mills (CAM). Pre-requisite/Co-requisite MACH 1003 and INMT 1003 (2,3,3) MATH 0043 Introductory Algebra (I, II, S) A developmental math course which focuses on basic mathematical concepts and the beginning concepts of algebra. A study of whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, order of operations, writing and solving linear equations, percents, US and Metric conversions, number line graphing, and coordinate plane graphing. Students’ must earn a minimum grade of “C” in order to enroll in an advanced course. Does NOT count toward a degree. Students will participate in lab one hour per week. Prerequisite: Math ACT 15-16; Accuplacer AR 31-120, EA 0-62. (3,1,3) MATH 0093 Intermediate Algebra (I, II, S) A developmental math course designed for students who are not sufficiently proficient in algebraic skills to take MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy. A study of real numbers, order of operations, linear equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities, coordinate plane graphing, functions, exponent rules, scientific notation, factoring, rational expressions, and radicals. Students must earn a minimum grade of “C” in order to enroll in an advanced course. Does NOT count toward a degree. Prerequisite: Math ACT 17-18; Accuplacer EA 63-76; or pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3) MATH 1043 Plane Trigonometry (II) A study of right and oblique triangles; angular magnitude, velocity and acceleration, variation of trigonometric functions, and formulate relating to the functions and identities. Prerequisite: MATH 1053 College Algebra with a C or better (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: MATH 1203 MATH 1053 College Algebra (I,II,S) A study in algebraic processes in inequalities and equations of quadratic and higher degree, progressions, determinants, matrices, and binomial theorem. Prerequisite: Math ACT 19 or higher; Accuplacer EA 77-120; or pass MATH0093 with a “C” or better). (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: MATH 1103 MATH 1063 AAS Math Business (I, II) A math course designed to deliver degree specific mathematical concepts to students seeking an Associate of Applied Science in Funeral Services Education, Business Administration, Medical Office Management, Early Childhood Education, TC in Accounting, and TC in Business Technology. Business applications include, but are not limited to: calculation of markup/markdown rates, payroll deductions; property, income, and unemployment taxes; insurance premiums; and interest and finance charges on consumer loans. Prerequisite: Math ACT 16; Accuplacer EA 37-120; or pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or better; or pass MATH 0063 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3) MATH 1073 AAS Math T&I (I) A math course designed to deliver degree specific mathematical concepts to students seeking an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology. Technical applications include, but are not limited to: Interpretation of charts and graphs, using formulas to solve for RPM, acceleration, electrical circuit values, apparent and true power, and efficiency. Prerequisite: Math ACT 16; Accuplacer EA 37-120; or pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or better; or pass MATH0063 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3) MATH 1083 AAS Math Health Professions (I, II) A math course designed to deliver degree specific mathematical concepts to students seeking an Associate of Applied Science in Respiratory Care or Paramedic, an Associate of General Studies with a Practical Nursing focus, or a Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing or Health Professions. Health professions applications include, but are not limited to: measurement and conversion between household, metric and apothecary measurements, interpretation of basic statistics and graphs, and dosage calculations. Prerequisite: Math ACT 16; Accuplacer EA 37-120; or pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or 173


better; pass MATH 0063 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3) MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy (II). A mathematics course in which students will solve problems using mathematical reasoning involving logic, proportions, algebra, and relations. Instruction will focus on process, conceptual understanding, communication and problem solving found in the following strands: (a) Personal, state, and national finance, (b) Statistics, (c) Probability, and (d) Functions and Mathematical modeling including contextual linear models and exponential growth and decay models. Prerequisites: Math ACT 19; or Accuplacer EA 77-120; or pass MATH0093 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: MATH 1113 MATH 1175 Pre-Calculus Provides the necessary background for students planning to take Calculus I or Compact Calculus. Topics include: problem solving; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; parametric equations; and as time permits, linear systems. (5,0,5) ACTS Index Number: MATH 1305 MATH 2003 Elementary Statistics (I,II) An introductory course in statistical methods. Collection and display of data, mean, standard deviation and variance, probability including the normal, binomial, and chi-square distributions. Also sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing including nonparametric tests, regression, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH 1053. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: MATH 2103 MATH 2013 Math for Teachers I (I) This coure is for prospective P-8 education majors. Topics include a study of sets, numerations systems, the structure of arithmetic, number theory, and, beginning concepts of rational numbers, all with an emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH1053 College Algebra or MATH1153 Quantitative Literacy. (3,0,3) MATH 2015 Calculus I The first of a course sequence covering calculus. Topics in the calculus sequence will include analytical geometry, functions, limits, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, parametric equations, polar coordinate, transcendental functions, particle derivatives, multiple integrals, sequences and series, the generalized mean value theorem, and improper integrals. (5,0,5) ACTS Index Number: MATH 2405 MATH 2023 Math for Teachers II (II) This course is a continuation of MATH 2013. Topics include a study of probability, geometry, measurment, and data analysis, all learned within a problem solving framework. Prerequisite: A “C” or above in MATH 1053 or MATH 1153, and a “C” or above in MATH 2013. (3,0,3) MATH 2025 Calculus II The second course sequence covering calculus. The topics in the calculus sequence will include analytical geometry, functions, limits derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, parametric equations, polar coordinate, transcendental functions, particle derivatives, multiple integrals, sequences and series, the generalized mean value theorem, and improper integrals. (5,0,5) ACTS Index Number: MATH 2505 MATH 280X Special Topics in Math Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE- TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. MEDL 1001 HCP CPR & First Aid Instruction is given in Healthcare Provider CPR Adult/Child and First Aid. Students receive certification through the American Heart Association. There will be a fee of $10.00 assessed for CPR and First Aid Certification card. 16 contact hours. (1,0,1) MEDL 1003 Introduction to Health Care Systems (I) Examines the administration and structure of health care delivery in the United States. The course also provides information regarding the health care system development and discusses organizational patterns, facilities, health care personnel, and the economic, political, and environmental influences that affect the health care system. (3,0,3)

174


MEDL 1021 Adult CPR & First Aid Instruction is given in Adult Heartsaver CPR and Adult First Aid for lay rescuers, particularly those who are expected to respond to emergencies in the workplace. Students receive certification through the American Heart Association. There will be a fee of $10.00 assessed for CPR and First Aid Certification card. 12 contact hours. (1,0,1) MEDL 1011 Pediatric HCP CPR & First Aid This course is designed to teach the skills of CPR, relief of choking for infants and children, the prevention of injuries and cardiac arrest, and basic pediatric first aid to all lay rescuers, particularly those who are expected to respond to emergencies in the workplace. Students receive certification through the American heart Association. There will be a fee of $5 for each certification card. (1,0,1) MEDL 1333 Phlebotomy Theory with Practicum Phlebotomy Theory and Practicum covers the basic fundamental concepts essential to the foundation of the phlebotomy technician education and training. This course includes basic instruction in quality assurance, patient confidence, infection control, safety, anatomy, an introduction to skillful drawing of blood specimens, and specimen processing techniques. This course utilizes both theory instruction and skills demonstration in the classroom and lab. (2,3,3) MEDL 2003 Legal Concepts of Health Care (I) Provides an overview of the principles of law as applied to health care. The course gives consideration to the importance of medical records as legal documents, to the legal aspects of health care organizations, to the release of information, and to consents and authorizations. (3,0,3) MEDL 2033 Red Cross CPR and First Aid (II) This is a course in basic American Red Cross First Aid and American Red Cross Community CPR. (2,1,3) MEDL 2103 (OFAD 1313) Medical Terminology (I,II) The student is introduced to terminology that is specific to the health care industry. The student becomes familiar with terms used in nursing, respiratory care, and other health care professions. (3,0,3) MEDL 280X Special Topics in Medical Professions Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. Applied Music (I,II): Applied Music courses (private instruction) receive elective credit only on the A.A. degree programs. All Applied Music courses are one 60-minute lesson per week. Successive courses in any discipline are sequential, but each emphasizes fundamental technique, music literature, musical style, and interpretation. A non-refundable applied music fee (does not apply to ensembles) of $100 per credit hour is charged in addition to the normal registration fees. Voice – Voice I--MUSI 1211 Voice II--MUSI 1221 Piano--Piano I—MUSI 1231 Piano II—MUSI 1241 Guitar—Guitar I—MUSI 1251 Guitar II—MUSI 1261 Ensembles: UA HOPE-TEXARKANA offers several opportunities for students to participate in performing ensembles. The ensembles are for one hour of elective credit only. In addition to rehearsals, members of an ensemble are expected to participate in a limited number of public performances for various campus and community events. MUSI 1111, 1121, 1131, 1141: UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Choir A student and community based choir for any interested singer. Rehearsal time will be determined when course is offered. (1,0,1) MUSI 2103 Music Appreciation (I, II, S): Music Appreciation is a survey course designed to encourage a higher degree of understanding and enjoyment of classical music. Students will experience music through a variety of activities including listening, discussion, analysis, and live performance. This course follows the historical development of music with emphasis on 17th, 18th, and 19th century styles and composers. (3,0,3 ACTS Index Number: MUSC1003 175


NURS 1001 Medication Calculations (S) This course instructs the student regarding an understanding of basic mathematics, measurement equivalencies, and their application to dosage calculation using dimensional analysis. This course will be required of all Practical Nursing students scoring at or below 80% on the course pretest. (1,0,1) NURS 1002 Pharmacology I (I) This course is a study of medication, calculation, and administration. Topics of study include usual dosages, expected actions, side effect, and contraindications. Students must pass a calculations examination to progress further into the program. (2,0,2) NURS 1004 Clinical Practicum (I) This course provides supervised clinical experience of students in a healthcare setting. Students perform fundamental skills and demonstrate knowledge in the care of Geriatric client. (0,11,4) NURS 1005 Evening Practicum I (II) Evening Practicum I is a hands on course that provides supervised clinical experience of students in a healthcare setting. Students perform fundamental skills and demonstrate knowledge in the care of geriatric clients. (0,20,5) NURS 1012 Gerontological Nursing (I) Gerontological Nursing is a study of the special needs of the geriatric client. It includes management skill in long term care and delegation as it pertains to the practical nurse. (2,0,2) NURS 1021 Venous Access and Therapy Venous Access and Therapy covers the basic fundamental concepts essential to accessing the venous system for obtaining blood or administering intravenous fluids and medications. This course includes basic instruction in quality assurance, patient confidence, infection control, safety, anatomy, an introduction to skillful drawing of blood specimens, and specimen processing techniques. This course utilizes both theory instruction and skills demonstration in the classroom and lab. Concepts and theory associated with the understanding and development of these skills are presented, with emphasis on use of nursing process. Laboratory practice of skill and technique is incorporated throughout the course. Corequisite: NURS 1105 Nursing Concepts II. (1,1,1) NURS 1022 Maternal/Infant Nursing (I) This course is a study of nursing care during the prenatal, labor, delivery, postnatal, and neonatal periods. Normal and abnormal conditions are discussed. (2,0,2) NURS 1103 Nursing Concepts I (S) Nursing Concepts I is a course that introduces the theory and skill required of the entry-level practical nurse. Concepts and theory associated with the understanding and development of these skills are presented, with emphasis on use of nursing process. Laboratory practice of skill and technique is incorporated throughout the course. (3,1,3) NURS 1105 Nursing Concepts II (I) Nursing Concepts II is a course that builds on NURS 1103, completing the theory and skill required of the entry-level practical nurse. Concepts and theory associated with the understanding and development of these skills are presented, with emphasis on use of nursing process. Laboratory practice of skill and technique is incorporated throughout the course. (5,1,5) NURS 1115 Evening Practicum II (S) is a course that provides supervised, preceptor observational experiences I a variety of health care settings. Students rotate through medical surgical, obstetrics, pediatric and mental health areas. Theory content is taught concurrently or prior to the students specific clinical experience. (0, 16, 5) NURS 2002 Pharmacology II (II) This course integrates commonly used medications with specific medical surgical diseases and disorders. (2,0,2) NURS 2005 Evening Practicum III (I) Evening Practicum II is a course that provides supervised, preceptor and observational experiences in a variety of health care settings. Students rotate through medical surgical, operating room, recovery room, intensive care, emergency care, clinical, etc. to receive various medical surgical experiences. Theory content is taught concurrently or prior to the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; specific clinical experience. (0, 16, 5) 176


NURS 2008 Nursing of Adults (II) This course is a study of the common medical surgical disorders of the adult. It includes signs and symptoms, treatment, nursing care, and outcomes. (8,0,8) NURS 2012 Pediatric Nursing (II) This course is a study of the basic principles of growth and development, hospitalization, and care and treatment of common childhood illnesses. (2,0,2) NURS 2019 Clinical Practicum II This course provides supervised, preceptor, and observational experiences in a variety of clinical settings. Students rotate through medical surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and mental health areas. Theory content is taught concurrently or prior to the students’ specific clinical experience. (0, 34, 9) NURS 2021 Mental Health Nursing (I) Mental Health is a lecture course required to assist the practical nursing student develop a basic understanding of mental health and mental illness. It introduces the basic concepts of mental health and the most common conditions of mental illness including nursing care and treatment. Alcoholism and drug abuse is also introduced. (1,0,1) NURS 28XX Special Topics X This is a course developed for students who have previous professional experience and/or theory content and through program and/or standardized testing demonstrate a standard of knowledge acceptable to meet selected course objectives. This course modifies designated practical nursing courses in order to fulfill the needed knowledge base for such students with previous experience and/or theory content. This course is used to replace NURS coursework during a specified semester. PHED XXX1 Activity (I,II) Instruction and practice in sports and activities which contribute to present and future recreational needs, organic development, and fitness of the student. Instruction is in the roles, strategies, social behavior, and techniques of individual and dual team sports and physical fitness activities. All activity courses involve two one-hour laboratories weekly. (0,2,1) PHED 1071 Yoga I (on demand) Instruction and practice in yoga which contributes to present and future recreational and fitness needs of the student. (0, 2, 1) PHED 1081 CrossFit I (on demand) CrossFit I is a basic CrossFit course that defines CrossFit, provides the correct CrossFit moves and gives students basic nutrition information. Students will be required to participate in Benchmark tests throughout the semester. (0, 2, 1) PHED 1171 Yoga II (on demand) Yoga II is designed to further develop students’ knowledge of yoga terms, practices and breathing techniques to improve their level of fitness. It will further the development of each students’ flexibility, endurance, and overall wellness, with specific emphasis on knowledge of/ability to demonstrate to others proper technique and form. (0, 2, 1) PHED 1031 Physical Fitness I (I, II) Physical fitness I is a strength training and cardiovascular training class. It is designed for students to gain knowledge of rep-out, pyramid, and circuit training programs. (0,2,1) PHED 1041 Physical Fitness II (I, II) Physical fitness II is a strength training class. It is designed to teach students the different exercises that target each muscle group. They will be required to learn exercises and the muscle groups. (0,2,1) PHED 1061 Cardio Walking This course is designed for the beginning or intermediate walker. It will deal with improving fitness by increasing general physical strength, agility, muscular performance, endurance, and cardiovascular fitness. The bulk of the course will consist of active participation and class lectures. (0,2,1) PHED 1213 Personal and Community Health (I,II) A consideration of the various conditions and factors affecting individual and community health. Designed to assist students in formulating their philosophies, attitudes, and understanding of behaviors necessary to establish healthful living practices. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: HEAL 1003 177


PHIL 2003 (PHIL 1301) Introduction to Philosophy (I,II): This is a survey course of some of the major thinkers in philosophy beginning with the Asian sages and the Pre-Socratics followed by Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Selections from the Middle Ages include Thomas Aquinas. The course concludes with Descartes, Hume, Mills and Marx. The course will incorporate moral philosophy and modern ethics throughout with major attention to human values, the nature of reality and knowledge, and critical thinking. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: PHIL 1103 PHIL 2203 World Religions : A survey course offering students increased cultural awareness and global understanding. Beginning with definitions and common features of religions, the course introduces the student to Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (3,0,3) PHSC 1024 Physical Science (ACTS PHSC1004) The course will provide a survey of physics and chemistry with laboratory exercise to complement each of the individual topics as they are studies (3,3,4) PLSC 2103 American Government (I,II,S) American Government is an introduction to the history, development and philosophy of American government and politics, including an overview of the three branches of the United States government and a study of the American Constitution. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: PLSC 2003 PLSC 2203 Comparative Government Comparative Government is a study of several of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s governments as compared to the United States government, including historical background, key institutions and political attitudes. (3,0,3) PSYC 2303 General Psychology (I,II,S) Introduction of fundamental concepts and basic content of psychology. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: PSYC 1103 PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology (I,II,S) A comprehensive survey of human growth, maturation, and development over the whole life span. Prerequisite: PSYC 2303. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: PSYC 2103 PSYC 2323 Abnormal Psychology (I,II) This course is designed as an introductory level course in abnormal psychology, examining the current and historical theoretical paradigms that have influenced our understanding of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 2303. (3,0,3) PWRM 1313 Troubleshooting and Repair This is the first in a series of two courses designed to introduce the student to the methods and techniques of maintaining a modern industrial power plant. The intent of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to install new parts or systems, maintain existing equipment and systems troubleshoot various malfunctions throughout the plant, and repair or replace the various parts or systems as needed. PRE-REQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: INMT 1404 and INMT 1104 (3,0,3) PWRO 1213 Introduction to Power Plant Operations (I) This is the first course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the operators responsibilities in the operation of the plant. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, and PWRT 1023 (3,0,3) PWRO 1223 Concepts of Process Control (I) This is the third course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the basic components and systems used to control the steam/water cycle of plant operations. PRE- REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, and PWRO 1223 (3,0,3) PWRO 1233 Concepts and Practices of Coal Handling (I) This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts, practices, and processes involved in receiving, storing, and preparing coal for use in a modern day coal fired electrical power generation facilities. Emphasis is placed on operator responsibilities and safety.. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, and PWRO 1213 (3,0,3) 178


PWRO 1244 Electricity Generation Components and Controls (I) This is the fourth course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the components and systems required for the consistent, efficient, and safe generation of electrical power. PRE-REQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223 and PWRO 1233 (4,0,4) PWRO 1253 Thermodynamics (II) This is the fifth course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the science of thermodynamics and efficiency as it relates to modern steam boilers. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223, PWRO 1233, and PWRO 1244 (3,0,3) PWRO 1264 Heat Rate Improvement (II) This is the sixth course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the concept of heat rate as it pertains to boiler operation, the components involved in producing, controlling, and conveying the heat energy needed to generate steam, and the methods employed to increase and maintain the efficiency of that process. PRE- REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223, PWRO 1233, PWRO 1244, and PWRO 1253 (4,0,4) PWRO 1273 Boiler Operations and Water Chemistry (II) This is the seventh course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the National and State codes associated with boiler operation, the theory and application of water chemistry required to maintain effective boiler operations, the various methods of water purification associated with power plants, and the handling and treatment of waste water produced by the generation of power. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223, PWRO 1233, PWRO 1244, PWRO 1253, and PWRO 1264 (3,0,3) PWRT 1003 Fundamentals of Modern Power Plants (I) This course is designed to introduce the student to the major systems, components and theories of operation of modern day electrical power generation technology and facilities. Emphasis is placed on steam/water cycle. (3,0,3) PWRT 1013 Basic Steam Generation (II) This is the second in the introductory series of courses that provide the student with a broad overview of the components and systems of a modern power plant and how they operate. The purpose of this course is to expand the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basic foundation of knowledge concerning basic steam generation and associated equipment. Prerequisite: PWRT 1003 (3,0,3) PWRT 1023 Power Plant Components and Systems (II) This course is designed to introduce the student to the major systems, components, and theories of operation of modern day electrical power generation technology and facilities. Emphasis is placed on instrumentation, piping, and valving. (3,0,3) Pre-requisites/Co-requisites: PWRT 1003 and PWRT 1013 (3,0,3) RNSG1033 Math for Nurses (I) Math for Nurses is a didactic course offering instruction in dosage calculation using ratio-proportion as well as other dosage calculation formulas related to medication. This nursing course is designed to prepare nursing majors to be accurate and safe when calculating and preparing medication dosages. Topics include: interpretation of drug labels, syringe types, metric and apothecary conversions, roman numerals, reconstitution of medications, IV flow rate, interpretation of physician orders and transcribing to Medication Administration Records, dispensing, and proper documentation of medications as well as the Six Rights of Med Administration and military time. Prerequisite: LPN license or ACT 17-18 MATH; ACCUPLACER EA 63 MATH; or passing MATH0043 with a C or higher. (3, 0, 3) 179


RNSG 2119: Nursing Process I (II) This course provides the foundational theory for LPNs/LPTNs to transition to the responsibilities and roles of RNs. The student is introduced to ARNEC’s goals, philosophy, and learning objectives. These objectives will build on the concepts of holism, human need, nursing process, communications, safety, and wellness-illness across the life span. The student’s fundamental knowledge base will evolve by introducing knowledge, assessment and clinical skills, behaviors, and critical thinking skills that are required to function in the role as a Registered Nurse. This course also explores the legal, ethical, and social issues related to the Registered Nursing role. Basic pharmacology and fundamental nursing theory, skills, and medical math will be reviewed to prepare students for subsequent semesters. This course also provides lecture content for the age group involving the newborn through adolescence (pediatrics). The student will be provided a longitudinal view of the child as an individual on a continuum of developmental changes and as a member of a family unit. There will be discussion of social, cultural, and religious influences on child development and health promotion. Students will receive instruction on pediatric assessment, including interviewing skills, physical and behavioral observations, developmental levels, and preventive health care guidelines. Instruction will also include care of the child with cognitive and sensory impairment, chronic illness, serious body system diseases, and pain. Care of the hospitalized child, including pediatric clinical procedures, and home care guidelines are incorporated into the content. Prerequisite: Admission to the ARNEC program. Co-requisite: RNSG 2123. (9, 0, 9) RNSG 2123: Nursing Practicum I (II) This clinical lab course enables the student to practice the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are acquired in RNSG 2119. Students will have opportunity to learn new clinical skills along with sharpening previously learned skills. Practicum hours will include general clinical skills, medication administration, pediatric client care, and medical/surgical client care. Students are introduced to the role of the Registered Nurse by applying new skills in the assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation of their clients. Curriculum concepts and comprehension are carried out per clinical application. Prerequisite: Admission to the ARNEC program. Co-requisites: RNSG 2119. (0 , 9, 3) RNSG 2216: Nursing Process II (S) This first part of this course utilizes an integrated approach to further emphasize the skills, knowledge, and behaviors needed to care for clients in the areas of the child-bearing family, newborn, and women’s health. Topics will include normal and high-risk client care in the areas of the prenatal period, labor and delivery, postpartum, and the newborn period. The emerging field of genetics, major genetic diseases, and the role nurses play is also incorporated. Lecture content also includes human reproduction, reproductive health, family planning, female cancers, and general women’s health care. The second part of this course provides principles and concepts of mental health, psychopathology, and treatment modalities related to the nursing care of clients and their families. The focus of this course is on the psychosocial impact of wellness-illness problems of the adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations and the management and adaptation process. The course objectives will incorporate holism, human needs, growth and development, communications, safety, and wellness-illness across the life span for clients in these areas. Prerequisite: RNSG 2119, RNSG 2123. Co-requisite: RNSG 2223. (6, 0, 6) RNSG 2223: Nursing Practicum II (S) This clinical experience allows the student to synthesize new knowledge, apply previous knowledge, and gain experience in care of the child-bearing family, newborn, and women’s health. Students also use their skills in assessing and caring for children and adults with genetic abnormalities. This course also provides students with the opportunity to provide nursing care to adolescent, adult, and geriatric clients with mental illness. Students will observe and participate in treatment modalities for common mental illnesses, including therapeutic communication and safety planning. Students will engage in the clinical application of concepts covered in RNSG 2216, demonstrating progressive mastery and independence in Registered Nursing practice. Prerequisite: RNSG 2119, RNSG 2123. Co-requisite: RNSG 2216. (0, 9, 3)

180


RNSG 2318: Nursing Process III (I) This course builds upon the previous instruction and incorporates higher level nursing care, critical thinking, and clinical decision making. Management and leadership are strongly incorporated throughout this course. The student will learn to function in higher level situations by utilizing the nursing process as a framework for caring for clients with complex healthcare needs related to all body systems. The student will learn basic care methodology for clients in emergency (including bioterrorism preparedness), critical care, surgical care, and acute care and long-term care settings. Advanced pharmacological concepts are also integrated into this course. Concepts of holism, human needs, growth and development, communications, safety, and wellness-illness across the life span are incorporated. Prerequisites: RNSG 2216, RNSG 2223. Corequisite: RNSG 2311, RNSG 2323. (8, 0, 8) RNSG 2323: Nursing Practicum III (I) This clinical experience continues to build upon previous instruction and allows the student to deliver higher level nursing care, perform higher level clinical decision making, and demonstrate management and leadership skills. Team leading and care of critically-ill clients are major components of this course. Students will engage in the clinical application of concepts covered in RNSG 2318, demonstrating independence and mastery of the role of an entry level Registered Nurse. Prerequisites: RNSG 2216, RNSG 2223. Co-requisite: RNSG 2318, RNSG 2311. (0, 9, 3) RNSG 2311: NCLEX-RN Preparation (I) This online course offers the student a comprehensive review of nursing content to help prepare them for success on the NCLEX-RN. Students will receive test-taking strategies, review theory content, and practice NCLEX-style questions. The focus of this course is to review the student on what is needed to prepare for the NCLEX-RN and to begin their role as an entry-level Registered Nurse. This course also requires that the student passes the final comprehensive exit exam. To pass the exit exam, the student must score at or above the National (North American) average. To pass this course, the student must complete the online course (50% of the grade) and pass the exit exam (other 50% of the grade). See the Graduation Policy for more details. Prerequisites: RNSG 2216, RNSG 2223. Co-requisite: RNSG 2318, RNSG 232. (1, 0, 1 SCIE 280X Special Topics in Science Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. SCMT 1013 Intro to Supply Chain Management (I) This course is an overview of supply chain management and its role in the success of a firm. This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Course topics will include supply, operations, distribution, and integration.(3,0,3) SCMT 1023 Logistics (I) Management of logistics functions in the firm including physical distribution activities such as transportation, storage facility location, inventory control, materials handling, warehousing, and organization. (3,0,3) SCMT 1113 Inventory (II) This course explores the industrial purchasing cycle for materials acquisition and management. Students will study inventory control concepts, models for dependent and independent demand inventory control concepts, models for dependent and independent demand inventory systems, materials requirements planning systems, distribution requirements, planning techniques, and classical reorder point inventory models. Recent developments in supplier qualifications, appraisals, source selection, buying practices, value analysis, policies, and international purchasing will also be discussed. (3,0,3) SCMT 1123 Transportation (II) This course is an introduction to physical distributions interaction with transportation. The course examines forms of transportation and factors that influence transportation decisions to include regulation and public policy. (3,0,3) SOCI 2003 Social Problems (II) An analysis of selected social problems and other effects on the individual and society Prerequisite: SOCI 2413 (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: SOCI 2013 181


SOCI 2013 Cultural Anthropology (Online Course; Offered on Demand) Introduces the concept of culture and cultural processes. Examines perceptions of race, gender, and ethnicity. Compares human adaptation across cultures and through time in terms of subsistence methods, social and political organization, economics, stratification, marriage and family structure, religion, kinship, and language. Online course. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: ANTH 2013 SOCI 2413 Sociology (I,II,S) A study of the cultural basis of human life and social origins with concepts requisite to an understanding of the process of social institutions and the nature of social changes. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: SOCI 1013 SOCI 2503 Marriage and Family (I) A study of marriage, family, and kinship both cross-culturally and within the American society. Also, examined are socialization, sexuality, sex roles, types of marriages, love relationships, marital conflict, and other. (3,0,3) SPAN 0003 Conversational Spanish I : Emphasis will be on learning skills that are adaptable to everyday conversation. Offered upon demand. Non-transferable. (3,0,3) SPAN 0013 Conversational Spanish II : A continuation of SPAN 0003. Offered upon demand. Nontransferable. (3,0,3) SPAN 1203 Spanish I (I): This course is the first part of a two-semester college-level beginning Spanish course. The course begins with the study of simple grammar and vocabulary. Attention is placed on reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. The course also introduces students to aspects of the history, literature, art, religion, and geography of Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all academic skills coursework in English. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013(3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: SPAN 1013 SPAN 1303 Spanish II (II): Spanish II is the second part of a two-semester, college level beginning Spanish course. Attention is placed on reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. As a general education course, Spanish II also introduces students to aspects of the history, literature, art, religion, and popular culture of Spain and Latin America. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: SPAN 1023 SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech (I,II,S): Introduction to oral communications, covering theories and practical application emphasizing proficiency in speech organization, delivery, and critical thinking/listening applications. (3,0,3) ACTS Index Number: SPCH 1003 SOWK1303 Introduction to Social Work (II) Introduction to Social Work focuses on major concepts and principles of professional social work, including: the development of social welfare; the history of social work; the knowledge, skills, and value base of social work practice applications. The course also looks at the basis of knowledge from which the theories of social justice and diversity spring and lays a foundation for social workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; professional entry into both public and private arenas. SURG 1303 Introduction to Surgical Nursing - This course reviews fundamental nursing knowledge and skills in the surgical area. Patient care standards and legal ethical issues are reviewed. An understanding of the surgical team and their roles are also taught. SURG 1404 Fundamentals of Surgical Nursing - The course covers topics such as safe surgical environment, surgical asepsis and sterile technique, utilization and care of surgical instrumentation and equipment, intraoperative patient care, surgical site management. SURG 1503 Surgical Nursing Procedures - This course provides hands on practice and integration of theoretical concepts into a controlled setting. Essential principles and techniques are practiced which include surgical asepsis, surgical techniques, surgcial instrumentation and equipment, prepping and draping the patient, and surgical site management. 182


SURG 1605 Surgical Nursing Clinical - Under the supervision of a preceptor, the student provides direct patient care in the surgical setting. Students are exposed to a variety of surgical experiences progressing room obeservational scrub to second scrub to first scrub. TECH 280X Special Topics in Technical and Industrial Professions Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer. TECH 290X Internship This course is designed to allow a student to gain knowledge, skill, and experience while working in a position that is reflective of their educational goal(s). The student will work varying number of hours at the intern site depending upon the number of credit hours desired. This course requires the diligence of the student, oversight by the faculty advisor or divisional dean, and a high level of interaction by the intern site’s foreman or supervisor. (0,9,3) or (0,12,4) WELD 1001 Welding & Electrical Safety This is a short-term course that provides instruction in basic welding safety and electrical safety precautions as related to industry. Does not count toward a degree. Offered upon demand. (1,0,1) WELD 1003 Basic Welding (I) Students will be introduced to basic safety and welding procedures, including striking an arc, running a bead, gas safety, and simple gas welding and cutting procedures, identifying and using correct welding rods, simple brazing, and basic material properties and principles. (2,4,3) WELD 1104 Pipe And Structural Fitting (I, II) The study of fitting structural steel as well as pipe. This course includes oxy-acetylene welding. (3,3,4) WELD 1204 Introduction to Arc Welding (I, II) The theory and application of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) will include the setting of equipment, selecting of electrodes, and running of beads. Practical application is provided through shop experience. (2,7,4) WELD 1302 Metallurgy (II) A study of the properties and classifications of various metals. (1,2,2) WELD 1306 Position Welding (II) A continuation of the study of oxy-acetylene and SMAW in cutting and welding metals in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Emphasis is on SMAW. (3,9,6) WELD 1502 TIG Welding (I) A study of the theory and practice of gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, in which the arc is established through a non-consumable electrode housed in the handle and employing helium or argon as a shielding gas. The filler metal is applied by hand by the operator. This type of welding is sometimes known as heliarc welding. (1,3,2) WELD 1503 MIG Welding (I) A study of the theory and practice of gas metal arc welding, GMAW, in which the arc is established through a consumable electrode fed through the handle and employing a shielding gas. This type of welding is sometimes known as wire welding. (2,3,3) WELD 1703 Spray Arc Welding (I) The theory and application of spray arc welding will include the setting of equipment, selecting of electrodes, and running of beads. This course is designed to teach specific welding skills as required by local industry. (2,4,3) WELD 2001 Special Problems in Welding I Specific occupational applications for continuing study in subjects related to, but beyond the scope of other welding courses. Each application is designed according to the individual student’s need. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (0,3,1) WELD 2003 Special Problems in Welding II Specific occupational applications for continuing study in subjects related to, but beyond the scope of other welding courses. Each application is designed according to the individual student’s need. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (0,9,3) 183


GOVERNANCE, STAFF, AND FACULTY U of A Board of Trustees Ben Hyneman ........................................................................................................................Chairman Mark Waldtrip. ......................................................................................................................Vice Chairman Morril Harriman ....................................................................................................................Secretary Kelly Eichler..........................................................................................................................Assistant Secretary David H. Pryor John Goodson Stpehen Broughton M.D. C.C. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cliffâ&#x20AC;? Gibson III Sheffield Nelson Tommy Boyer U of A President Dr. Donald R. Bobbitt UA Hope-Texarkana Board of Visitors Mr. Freddie Smith .................................................................................................................Chairman Honorable Dennis Ramsey. ...................................................................................................Vice Chairman Jerry Pruden ..........................................................................................................................Secretary Mr. Ned Ray Purtle Honorable Tony Yocom Ms. Lindy Franks Dr. Robert A. Carter, D.D.S. Mrs. Jamie Pafford-Gresham Honorable Prissy Hickerson College Officers Chris Thomason, J.D. (2008)...............................................................................................................Chancellor Juris Doctorate, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, B.A., University of Arkansas- Little Rock Dr. Belinda Aaron (2015)......................................................Vice Chancellor for Finance Ph.D, Louisiana State University; M.B.A., University of Phoenix; B.S., Texas A&M- Texarkana Brian Berry (2014) .....................................Executive Vice Chancellor for Student Services & Administration M.Ed., Loyola University of Chicago; B.S., Arkansas Tech University Laura Clark (1994) .......................................................Vice Chancellor for Academics M.N.Sc., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; B.S.N., Henderson State University; Registered Nurse Academic Deans Karen Davis (1997) ............. Dean of Science and Health Professions and Funeral Services Program Director M.Ed., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville; B.S., Trevacca Nazarene College; A.A., John A. Gupton College; Licensed Funeral Director; Licensed Embalmer Michael Cox (2012).......................................................................................Dean of Math and Social Sciences M.A., Arkansas Tech University, B.A., Arkansas Tech University Edward Lamb (2016).................................................................. Dean of Business, Technology, and Education M.S. Texas A&M University-Texarkana, TX., Chartered Financial Institute, UK. Jennifer Teresa (2014) ..................................................................Dean of Technical and Industrial Professions M.S.B.A & B.S., Texas A & M University-Texarkana; AAS Power Plant Technology, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope 184


Jan Whatley (2005)............................................................................................... Dean of Arts and Humanities M.A., Texas A & M University – Texarkana; B.A., Henderson State University; A.A., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Faculty Lori Arnette (2017)………………………………………………………………........................…….Nursing R.N.; A.D.N.; B.S.N Southern Arkansas University Chris Bachers (2012)………………………………………............……….English & Education Coordinator M.A. Texas A&M University-Texarkana, TX Scott Bittle (2014 ) ....................................................................................................... Industrial Maintenance A.A. University Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Lisa Butler (2014)................................................................................................................................. Science M.Ed., Southern Arkansas University; B.S., Quachita Baptist University Sandra Champion (1999)....................................................................................... Early Childhood Education M.A., University of Texas at Tyler; B.A., Lee College; A.A., Tomlinson College Jason Chism (2010) ...............................................................................................................................English M.L.A., B.A., Henderson State University Jeff Cook (2016)……………………………………………………………......................…….……Business M.B.A. & B.A. Southern Arkansas University-Magnolia, AR Melanie Dillard (2008) ............................................................................................................................ Math M.S.E., B.S.E. Southern Arkansas University. Dr. Ashli Dykes (2011) .........................................................................................................................English Ph.D., Louisiana State University, M.L.A.,B.A., Henderson State University Glenda Formby (2008) .....................................................................................................Basic Skills Literacy M.S. E., B.S.E., Henderson State University Tammy Goodwin, BSN RN (2015)…………………………….........................................…Practical Nursing B.S. University of Arkansas for Medical Science (UMAS); LPN University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Cyndi Graham (2010)........................................................................................Nursing M.S.N. Walden University, B.S.N., University of Arkansas, Medical School of Nursing, Little Rock, Registered Nurse Michael Holcomb (2016)…………………………………………............................................….Engineering B.S. Texarkana A&M University-Texarkana, TX Sherry King (2016)………………………………………………......................................…Practical Nursing A.A.S. & LPN University of Arkansas - Cossatot-DeQueen, AR Ken LeJuene (2016)………………………………………………..…............................…….Math & Science M.S. Texas A&M University-Texarkana, TX. John Hopkins (1997) ............................................................................................................................. Science M.S., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville; B.A., East Texas State University 185


Amanda Ritter-Maggio (2013) ...............................................................................................................English M.L.A, B.A., Henderson State University Clayton Martin (2016)……………………………………...............................……..Power Plant Technology B.A. Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia, AR Dr. Michael Maune (2016)…………………………………………………....................…………….English Ph.D, M.A. Pardue University-West Lafayette, IN Jannie Moten (2008)............................................................................................................................Business M.S., Texas A&M University Texarkana, B.B.A., Texas A&M University Texarkana Rachel Parson (2010) ......................................................................................................Business Technology M.S.O.M., University of Arkansas Fayetteville, B.A.A.S. Texas A&M University, Texarkana Leo Rateliff (2016)………………………………………………….......................................………..HVAC A.A. Technology University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Lisa Pennington (2008) ............................................................................................................................. Art M.L.A., Henderson State University, B.F.A., Henderson State University Nicole Rogers (2017)...........................................................................................................................Science M.A., Henderson State University; B.S., University of Arkansas Monticello; A.S., Independence C.C. Reginald Roy (2013) .........................................................................................................Diesel Technology Diploma, Red River Technical College Charlie Scoggins (1980) ................................................................................................................... Welding A.S., Arkansas State University; Diploma, Red River Vocational-Technical School; AWS Certification Larry Shaw (2008)...................................................................... Psychology/Sociology M.D., Interdenominational Theological Center, Atlanta, GA Bradley Sheppard (2017).......................................................................................................Funeral Services M.Ed., University of Arkansas Little Rock; B.A., Ouachita Baptist University; A.A.S., Arkansas State Staci Shupe (2005) ..............................................................................................................................History M.S., Texas A & M University – Texarkana; B.S., Lubbock Christian University; A.A., South Plains College Chelsea Slack (2016)……………………………………………........................…Speech/Communication M.A. University of Memphis, TN; M.A.T., & B.A. Southern Arkansas University Cemeka Smith (2016)……………………………………………………………….....................…...Math Ph.D. University of Arkansas Medical Sciences; B.S.B.A. University of Little Rock, AR. Karen Steed (2016) …………………………………………………........................……..Math & Science M.S.E. & B.S.E Henderson State, AR Loni Taylor (2014) ........................................................................................................................... Science D.V.M., University of Missouri; B.S., Southern Arkansas University Lynnlee Vance (2016) ………………………………………………..................................................Math M.E. Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia, AR; B.S. Howard Payne University, Brownwood, TX 186


Mark Wilcox (2014 or 2016?)………………………………………………..…................................EMS EMT-B University Of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana; EMT-P Texarkana College, TX; EMT instructor North Arkansas University, Harrison, TX. Robert Williams (2016) ……………………………………..........................................……ARNEC Clinical A.S. Excelsior College, Albany, NY Ginny Witcher (2012)...........................................................................................................................Nursing M.S.N., Texas A&M University; B.S.N., Texas A&M University Adult Education Terry Bradford (2015)……………………………………..……...........................…SNAP .Adult Education Masters University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, AR Connie Banks (2016)…………..…................................…………..Administrative Specialist Miller County Cheryl Bruce (2015) ……………………….................................………….………..Fiscal Support Analyst Billy Gardner……………………………………………..................................…….SNAP Adult Education M.S. Texas A&M University, Texarkana, TX Charles George (2015) ..………………………………...............................……..Adult Education Director M. E. University of Arkansas Little Rock, AR; B.A. Arkansas College-Lyon, AR Keianna Marshall 2015)…………………………………..............................……Administrative Specialist A.A. University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Kim May (2015)………………………………………………….......................…………Adult Education M.E. University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR; B.A. Henderson State, Arkadelphia, AR Ruby McKinley (2015) …………………...............................……Administrative Specialist-Miller County Minnie Randall (2015) ………………………. ……………....................................………Adult Education B.S.E. Southern Arkansas University; Adult Ed. Endorsement University of Arkansas Little Rock Gloria Ward (2015)……………………………………………..................................... . Wage Coordinator A.S. & B.S Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia, AR Pam Warren (2015) …………………………………………....................................……Wage Coordinator M.S. Texas A.& M. University; Masters of Education University of Arkansas Little Rock; B.S. Grambling State University, Grambling, LA Academic Staff Sequoiah Anderson (2015) .......................................................Administrative Assistant Industry Outreach A.A.S., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Donna Carter (2012)..................................................................... Administrative Specialist UA Texarkana Kaye Cheatham (2002).................................................Administrative Specialist to the Dean of Academics Ayers School Business Shreveport, LA Jolane Cook (1999).........................................................................................Site Director of UA Texarkana M.P.A., Texas A & M University; B.A., Hendrix College 187


Shelia Jackson (2005)...............................................................................Library Technical Assistant A.A.S., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, T.C., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, C.P., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Stephanie McCoskey (2015)………………..........................…Administration Specialist Health Professions LPN University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Marielle McFarland (2005) ....................................................................................................Library Director M.L.S., University of North Texas; B.A., Steven F. Austin University; A.A., Blinn College Tonya Pace (2015)……………………………….....................……..Administrative Specialist - Enrollment A.A. Business University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Tara Powell (1998) ...............................................................................................Library Technical Assistant A.A.S., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Chancellor’s Office Staff Marla Matthews (2007) ............................................................................................. Administrative Assistant Business/Secretarial Certificate, Red River Technical College Finance and Administration Staff Jerry Baker (2016)………………………………….............................……Telecommunications Technician Rich Mountain Community College Vickey Brooks (2009) ............................................................................................. Accounting Technician II Cindy Lance (1998)........................................................................................……………………..Controller M.B.A. University of Arkansas-Little Rock; B.B.A., Southern Arkansas University Ashley Davis (2001).....................................................................................................Network Administrator M.B.A., B.B.A., Texas A&M University Texarkana, A.A., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Charles Jordan (1996)............................................................................. Director of Information Technology A.A.S., University of Texas-Arlington Merle Luster (1999)........................................................................................ Computer Services Technician A.S., Texarkana College Bruce McRae (2014) ................................................................................................ Fiscal Support Analyst B.A., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville Terra Newsom (2014)..............................................................................................Administrative Specialist Paul Patton (1998) ...................................................................................... Telecommunications Technician CISCO Certificate of Proficiency, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Cindy Phillips (1996) ............................................................................................. Accounting Technician II A.A.S., Office Systems Technical Certificate, Accounting Technical Certificate, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Hempstead Hall Staff Josh Clark (2017)……………………….............................…………….Technical Director Hempstead Hall 188


Heather Easterling (2016)………….………..................................Administrative Specialist Hempstead Hall University Of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana John Gladden (2016)………………………….............................…….Assistant Director of Hempstead Hall B.A. University of Arkansas-Monticello, AR Dolly Henley (2008)..............................................................................................Director of Hempstead Hall A.A., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Anna Powell (2016)………………………….............................……Communication Education Coordinator B.A. University of Central Arkansas Human Resources Staff Kathryn Hopkins (2007)......................................................................................... Human Resources Officer B.S., Henderson State University Katy Wolf (1994) ......................................................................................................................Payroll Officer Institutional Advancement Staff Jill Bobo (2012)...............................................................Institutional Advancement and Foundation Director B.A., Ouachita Baptist University Casey Curtis (2003)..............................................................Communication & External Affairs Coordinator B.B.A., Southern Arkansas University Amanda Lance (2017).........................................................................Advertising & Publications Coordinator A.A., University of Arkansas Hope - Texarkana Institutional Effectiveness John Hollis (1995) ....................................................................................Dean of Institutional Effectiveness J.D., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville; M.A., B.A., Baylor University Danita Ormand (2013).......................................................................................Institutional Research Officer M.B.A, Texas A&M University Texarkana, B.S.B.A, Arkansas Tech University Physical Plant Staff Steven Bass (2010) .......................................................................................................Maintenance Assistant Bruce Stapp (1995).........................................................................................................Grounds Maintenance Terry Tubbs (2012) ………………………………………..…………………………Physical Plant Director AA, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, Texarkana College, Texarkana, TX Gene Ward (1998) ....................................................................................................... Building Maintenance Student Services Staff Judy Anderson (1994) ....................................................................Dean of Enrollment Management M.Ed., B.S.E., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville; A.A., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Presley Capps (2015).......................................................................................................Enrollment Specialist B.S., Southern Arkansas University Diana Davidson (2000)...................................................................................................................... Registrar M. Ed., B.S.E., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville; A.A., University of Arkansas Community College at Hope 189


Brandi Eller (2015)…………………………………….................…Administrative Specialist Financial Aid A.A. Business University of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Mike Fielding (2007)...................................................................................................... Public Safety Officer Maria Fields (2015)………………………………………………................................……….Career Coach M.L.A & B.A. Henderson State University Phyllis Hamilton (1997) .................................................................................................................. Counselor M.S., Southern Arkansas University; B.S., Philander Smith College Misty Hughes (2010) .............................................................................................Student Services Specialist M.E., Southern Arkansas University, B.A., University of Arkansas at Little Rock Brittany Holleman (2012)........................................................................................................... Career Coach B.B.A., Southern Arkansas University Bernice McDonald (2002) .......................................................................Enrollment Services Secretary A.A., A.A.S. Business Technology, Office Systems Technical Certificate, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Melissa Mullholland (2016)……………………..……….........................…….Director of Student Relations M.B.A. Texas A&M University Karen O’Dell (2001)........................................................................... Counselor, Career Pathways Initiative B.S.E., University of Arkansas - Fayetteville Steven Ogden (2009)......................... Educational Specialist/ADA Counselor Student Services Trio M.Ed., B.S. Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia Leigh Quillin (1994).......................................................................................................... Director of Testing M.S., Henderson State University; B.G.S., East Texas State University Demechia Rowe (2000) ..................................... Career Services & Student Activities Coordinator B.B.A., University of Arkansas at Little Rock; AA, Business Administration; AAS.; Office Systems Technical Certificate, Technical Certificate in Accounting, Certificate of General Studies, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, Masters of Science in College Student Personnel Arkansas Tech University, Masters Science degree Arkansas Tech University Sonya Thomas (2007)..................................................................................................Career Pathways Director M.S., College Student Personnel, B.S., Southern Arkansas University Kyla Walker (1993)............................................................................................................Financial Aid Officer Office Systems Technical Certificate, University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Linda Waller (2008) ....................................................Counselor/Student Advisor, Career Pathways Initiative M.S.E. Ouachita Baptist University, B.S.E., Henderson State University Mary Allen White (1997) ......................................................... Director of Student Support Services M.S.E., Texas A & M University-Texarkana; B.A., California State University at Los Angeles; A.A., Los Angeles City College Becky Wilson (2007)...............................................................................................Director of Financial Aid B.A., Gulf Coast College & Seminary 190


Edessa Walton (2016)……………………………………..………......................……Financial Aid Analyst M.S.E. Texas A.&M. Texarkana, TX; B.S.E. Henderson State; A.A. University Of Arkansas Hope-Texarkana Nicole Woods (2013) .......................................................................................................TRiO Coordinator M.Ed., B.B.A., Southern Arkansas University Emeriti Johnny Rapert................................................................................................................ Chancellor Emeritus University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, 1988-1999 J.W. Rowe .......................................................................................................................... Director Emeritus Red River Vocational-Technical School, 1965-1987

191


Campus Maps

192


193


GENERAL INDEX A Ability-to-Benefit (ATB) Policy............................................................................................................... Academic Calendar................................................................................................................................... Academic Clemency................................................................................................................................. Academic Honesty.................................................................................................................................... Academic Probation/Suspension.............................................................................................................. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS...................................................................................................................... Academic Skills........................................................................................................................................ Accidents or Illness................................................................................................................................... Accounting................................................................................................................................................ Accreditations........................................................................................................................................... ACCUPLACER........................................................................................................................................ ACCUPLACER Test Fee Schedule.......................................................................................................... ADA Student Referral Process.................................................................................................................. Adding Classes......................................................................................................................................... Admissions Policy.................................................................................................................................... ADMISSION INFORMATION................................................................................................................ Admissions Appeals Committee............................................................................................................... Admissions Appeals Process.................................................................................................................... Advanced Placement (AP)........................................................................................................................ Advisory Committees............................................................................................................................... Application for Re-Admission.................................................................................................................. Arkansas Course Transfer System............................................................................................................ Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS).............................................................................................. Arkansas Course Transfer Systems (ACTS)............................................................................................. Arkansas Department of Higher Education.............................................................................................. Arkansas Licensed Practical Nursing Association (ALPNA)................................................................... Articulation Agreements........................................................................................................................... Associate of Applied Science (AAS)........................................................................................................ Associate of General Studies.................................................................................................................... Associate of Science (AS)........................................................................................................................ ATI-TEAS................................................................................................................................................. Attendance................................................................................................................................................ Auditing a Course.....................................................................................................................................

51 9 35 22 38 83 28, 83 55 89 18 56 56 55 36 25 25 55 28 34 19 36 39 85 27 54 81 40 86 86 86 57 36 36

B Bookstore.................................................................................................................................................. 24 Bridge Scholarship.................................................................................................................................... 53 Business.................................................................................................................................................... 91 C Campus Crusades for Christ (CRU)......................................................................................................... Campus Maps........................................................................................................................................... Campus Security....................................................................................................................................... Career Center............................................................................................................................................ Career Pathways Initiative........................................................................................................................ Catalog Changes....................................................................................................................................... Catalog Privilege....................................................................................................................................... Certificate of General Studies................................................................................................................... Certificate of Proficiency (CP).................................................................................................................. Certificate of Proficiency in Supply Chain M........................................................................................... Chancellor’s Honor Roll........................................................................................................................... Chancellor’s Scholarship.......................................................................................................................... Chancellor’s Welcome.............................................................................................................................. 194

81 192 77 55 56 39 35 86 86 141 38 53 2


Classification of Students.......................................................................................................................... Clubs/Organizations.................................................................................................................................. College Catalog......................................................................................................................................... College Credit Opportunities for High School Students........................................................................... College Level Examination Program (CLEP).......................................................................................... Commercial and Residential Equipment Maintenance Repair................................................................. Computer Lab Access............................................................................................................................... Computer Service Policy.......................................................................................................................... Computer Services Resource Policy......................................................................................................... Computer Services’ Responsibility........................................................................................................... Conditional Admissions Policy................................................................................................................. Continuing Education and Community Education refunds...................................................................... Counseling and Guidance......................................................................................................................... Course Descriptions.................................................................................................................................. Course Length........................................................................................................................................... Course Loads............................................................................................................................................ Credit for Courses..................................................................................................................................... Credit Hour Requirement.......................................................................................................................... Criminal Justice........................................................................................................................................ CRIMINAL JUSTICE INSTITUTE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS.....................................

35 81 35 31 33 95 22 22 22 23 25 44 55 156 37 37 37 47 96 146

D Degree and Certificate Options Explained................................................................................................ Department of Veterans Affairs................................................................................................................. Diesel Technology..................................................................................................................................... Discipline Procedures...............................................................................................................................

85 54 100 59

E Early Childhood (Day Care Professional)................................................................................................ Emergency Medical Services.................................................................................................................... Equal Opportunity Statement.................................................................................................................... Ethical Use................................................................................................................................................

102 105 17 22

F Federal programs...................................................................................................................................... Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)............................................................ Federal Work Study (FWS)....................................................................................................................... Fee Schedule Per Semester....................................................................................................................... FINANCIAL AID..................................................................................................................................... Financial Aid Application Process (FAFSA)............................................................................................ Financial Aid Refund Policy..................................................................................................................... Financial Aid SAP Appeal........................................................................................................................ Financial Aid SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY..................................................... Financial Aid Probation, Suspension, and Reinstatement........................................................................ Financial Aid Warning.............................................................................................................................. Fine Arts Club........................................................................................................................................... Food Services............................................................................................................................................ Foundation Scholarships........................................................................................................................... Freshman Assessment and Placement Program at State Colleges and Universities in Arkansas............. Funeral Services........................................................................................................................................ Funeral Services Club...............................................................................................................................

52 52 52 41 47 47 50 49 47 49 48 81 24 54 28 108 81

G GED®....................................................................................................................................................... 57 195


GED Scholarship...................................................................................................................................... General Education Statement.................................................................................................................... General Education with Transfer Options................................................................................................. General Graduation Requirements............................................................................................................ General Technology.................................................................................................................................. Good Standing for Financial Aid a student must:..................................................................................... GOVERNANCE, STAFF, AND FACULTY............................................................................................. Grade Appeals........................................................................................................................................... Grades and Grade Points........................................................................................................................... Graduation Rates.......................................................................................................................................

54 83 114 40 117 48 180 78 38 40

H Health Professions.................................................................................................................................... Health Professions Courses/Programs Additional Fees............................................................................ Health Professions Students Criminal Background Check....................................................................... Health, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning................................................................................................... High School Student/Concurrent Enrollment Admissions Policy............................................................ High School Transcripts............................................................................................................................ History...................................................................................................................................................... Honors Scholarship................................................................................................................................... Human Services........................................................................................................................................

121 42 77 122 31 51 20 53 123

I Important Information - emergency contact list & severe weather policy............................................... Incomplete Grade Policy........................................................................................................................... Industrial Electricity.................................................................................................................................. Industrial Maintenance.............................................................................................................................. Industry Training and Continuing Education............................................................................................ Information Technology............................................................................................................................ Information Technology Club................................................................................................................... Institutional Advancement........................................................................................................................ Institutional Purposes................................................................................................................................ Institutional Student Success Plan Enrollment......................................................................................... International Student Admissions Policy..................................................................................................

11 38 125 126 155 128 82 23 20 26 31

L Lab Fees.................................................................................................................................................... 42 Library....................................................................................................................................................... 23 List of Degrees and Certificates................................................................................................................ 86 M Majors....................................................................................................................................................... Maximum Length of Time........................................................................................................................ Medical Office Management..................................................................................................................... Minimum Class Size and Cancellation of Classes.................................................................................... Mission Statement..................................................................................................................................... Multicultural Club.....................................................................................................................................

52 47 130 37 20 82

N Network Security...................................................................................................................................... NLN-NACE.............................................................................................................................................. NOCTI...................................................................................................................................................... Non-Credit................................................................................................................................................ Nursing...................................................................................................................................................... 196

23 58 57 27 132


O Online Calendar........................................................................................................................................ 10 ONLINE COURSE MIDTERM and/or FINALS..................................................................................... 57 Other Programs......................................................................................................................................... 54 P Partnership Programs................................................................................................................................ Pell Grant.................................................................................................................................................. Pell Grant Lifetime Eligibility.................................................................................................................. Phi Theta Kappa (PTK)............................................................................................................................ PLACEMENT CHART FOR MATH....................................................................................................... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES............................................................................................................ Power Plant Technology........................................................................................................................... Pre-College Level Courses....................................................................................................................... Priority Deadlines for Financial Aid......................................................................................................... Proctored Exams....................................................................................................................................... Programs of Study....................................................................................................................................

144 52 48 82 30 58 138 50 52 57 89

R Recommended Courses of Study and Degree Requirements................................................................... Refund of Registration Fees...................................................................................................................... Refund Policy............................................................................................................................................ Repeated Courses...................................................................................................................................... Repeating Courses.................................................................................................................................... Reporting Violations................................................................................................................................. Request for Course Overload.................................................................................................................... Residency Requirements........................................................................................................................... Response to Drug and Alcohol Abuse and Drug-Free Campus Policy..................................................... Rights and Responsibilities as a Student.................................................................................................. Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009.......................................................................................

88 44 44 50 37 59 37 41 61 58 85

S Scholarship Stacking Policy..................................................................................................................... 52 Shooting Sports Club................................................................................................................................ 82 Social Security Number............................................................................................................................ 39 Statement of TRiO Student Support Services........................................................................................... 55 State Minimum Core Required for Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, and Baccalaureate Degrees 83 Student Advising System.......................................................................................................................... 56 Student Complaint/Appeals/Grievance Procedures.................................................................................. 77 Student Conduct........................................................................................................................................ 58 Student Government Association (SGA).................................................................................................. 82 Student I.D. Cards..................................................................................................................................... 43 Student Records........................................................................................................................................ 39 Student Responsibility.............................................................................................................................. 3, 17, 88 Student Rights Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).................................... 58 STUDENT SERVICES............................................................................................................................. 55 Student Status: Dependent or Independent............................................................................................... 51 T Technical Certificate (TC)......................................................................................................................... Testing Center........................................................................................................................................... The Roger Phillips Transfer Policy-Act 182 of 2009............................................................................... T&I Club................................................................................................................................................... Transfer Students...................................................................................................................................... 197

86 56 40 82 27, 50


TRiO Student Success Club...................................................................................................................... TUITION AND FEES............................................................................................................................... TUITION WAVER POLICY.................................................................................................................... Tutoring Center.........................................................................................................................................

82 41 45 58

U UA Hope-Texarkana profile...................................................................................................................... UAHT Foundation.................................................................................................................................... UAHT Institutional Scholarships.............................................................................................................. UAHT Placement Chart............................................................................................................................ UAHT Policy for Discrimination, Harassment, Retaliation and Sexual Misconduct............................... Unconditional Admissions Policy............................................................................................................. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FOR MEDICAL SCIENCES (UAMS)............................................... UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS ON-LINE CONSORTIUM STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEAL.........

20 23 52 28 61 25 145 79

V Valedictorian/Salutatorian Scholarship..................................................................................................... Value Statements....................................................................................................................................... Vice Chancellorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List............................................................................................................................... Vision Statement.......................................................................................................................................

53 21 38 21

W Waivers..................................................................................................................................................... Welding..................................................................................................................................................... Who to see................................................................................................................................................. William D. Ford Direct Student Loan Program........................................................................................ Withdrawal from Courses.........................................................................................................................

198

54 143 12 52 36


199


200

UAHT College Catalog 17-19  

uacch.edu

UAHT College Catalog 17-19  

uacch.edu