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analysis of narratives, assets, expertise, and location, indicate that there is indeed a possibility either to attract high tech businesses, consultants, or academic organizations, or to foster entrepreneurship in knowledgeintensive sectors, why not take this approach? • Singapore was more or less considered a “busted place”, with declining manufacturing as early as the 1960s. Yet they had the location, resources, population, and an authoritarian and enlightened regime to see very early the benefits of a reinvention based on innovation and the “knowledge economy”. As an early mover, they had an additional advantage over later competitors. The case of Singapore is an often quoted example of transition management, a more ambitious and steering-intensive version of innovation-driven strategy. • Transition management aims to identify gaps in existing knowledge and assets, and identify existing potential for scientific and economic gain. It tries to spot where economic potential is hindered by a few lacking pieces of the knowledge puzzle, and where existing expertise could lead to new products, requiring some assistance. New institutions can foster the traffic in two directions, between knowledge and products, recognizing gaps and potential in industry and knowledge, and using the resources and institutions of governments to intensify the relationship between the two fields. Transition management aims to link and magnify innovations in a systematic way, enabling transitions of economy and society. Loet Leydesdorff’s triple helix model is very influential in these circles, an understanding of innovation and prosperity emerging out of an intensified and structured interplay between companies, government, and academic or knowledge-producing organizations. • Fort McMurray, Alberta and the oil sands nearby were at first the object of strategic development attempts by a network of mostly governmental actors across Canada. Since the 1970s, private actors became more and more dominant. Yet, one recurring theme is the belief in private- public cooperation in knowledge production for resource extraction. The University of Alberta has played a crucial role in Alberta’s energy sector since the 1920s, and is still fostering innovation for the regional economy. Profitable exploitation of the oil sands is the direct result of coordinated technical innovation and financial and institutional support. However, as controversy increased over oil sands exploitation, the University of Alberta became more entangled in the production of competing knowledges, serving several actors and purposes: new

Part V: Development approaches for inspiration and guidance

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Profile for University of Alberta Extension

Boom & Bust: A Guide, Managing Ups and Downs in Communities  

Boom and Bust: A Guide is the result of a collective effort at the University of Alberta to better understand the dramatic ups and downs whi...

Boom & Bust: A Guide, Managing Ups and Downs in Communities  

Boom and Bust: A Guide is the result of a collective effort at the University of Alberta to better understand the dramatic ups and downs whi...

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