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This chapter presents, in brief, a series of approaches to development which can serve as inspiration for communities struggling with boom and bust cycles. They can help to give content to strategies under construction, by showing what happened in other places, and what different theories have to say. Some approaches are more influential in other parts of the world, some are more embraced by theorists, but all have some presence and credence in theory and practice. As discussed in Part IV, communities working on their own development strategy can look to the experiences and approaches adopted elsewhere, successes and failures, to inspire and guide their own strategic efforts. We provide a selection of the most prominent development approaches that can help frame your strategy, or else serve as a jumping off point for the process of path and context mapping and strategy development. As with any governance issue, context is everything, so communities need to consider how each strategy might work within their own set of actors, institutions, and power relations at work in their communities.

1. Planning and design One potential approach to take when developing your community strategy, is that of land use/spatial planning and design. In essence, a planningbased approach to community development sees the organization of space as the best way to promote a certain track of development. Spatial planning is the coordination of policies and practices affecting the organization of space, and making planning central to a development strategy means that general development issues are translated into questions regarding a different or better organization of space. From a slightly different angle, we can say that spatial planning, in this approach, becomes the most important site of policy integration; plans become the policy tools which can integrate many other policies. Planning is expected to spark development, and development ideas are expected to be translated first of all into spatial plans. In this perspective, spatial plans look as the natural context to implement environmental, social, economic‌ Policy. “Designâ€? in this view is not simply a matter of aesthetics, but rather a matter of organizing space, of solving problems and creating qualities. It focuses on interventions in space, to improve its structure, to allow for more combinations of activities, to increase overall spatial quality. Design thinking and perspectives can be part of the ongoing process of the organization of space. Planning can be design (but not all design is planning). Design thinking accompanies governance, rather than

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Boom and Bust: a guide

Profile for University of Alberta Extension

Boom & Bust: A Guide, Managing Ups and Downs in Communities  

Boom and Bust: A Guide is the result of a collective effort at the University of Alberta to better understand the dramatic ups and downs whi...

Boom & Bust: A Guide, Managing Ups and Downs in Communities  

Boom and Bust: A Guide is the result of a collective effort at the University of Alberta to better understand the dramatic ups and downs whi...

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