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ANNUAL REPORT

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154,053

PATIENT VISITS

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THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

2016

BOARD Of VISITORS The CCHS Board of Visitors is made up of 44 volunteers, including alumni, donors, community physicians, business men and women, community activists and other friends of the College whose purpose is to help the College develop relationships and partnerships with communities in Alabama and organizations at the state and national levels. The Board meets biannually and advises the College on long-range planning, assists the College in securing financial resources and helps to develop opportunities for medical students and residents. Its next meeting is April 28 at the Gateway in Tuscaloosa. Mr. Eddie Sherwood, Chair Dr. Thomas Alford Dr. Susan Austin-Warner Dr. Daniel Avery, Jr. Dr. John Belyeu Dr. Jennifer Bolton Mrs. Kelly Bownes Mr. Brad Cork Mr. James Cowan, Jr. Mrs. Amelia de los Reyes Dr. Leisa DeVenny

NEW TO THE BOARD Dr. Michael DeVenny Dr. Frank Dozier The Honorable Mark Ezell Dr. Craig Fairburn Dr. Roland Ficken Dr. Samuel Gaskins Dr. Guillermo Godoy Mrs. Heike Harris Ms. Madeleine Hill Dr. William Hill, Jr. Dr. Robert Ireland, Jr. Dr. Beverly Jordan Mr. W.O. “Buddy” Kirk Mrs. Cindy Markushewski Dr. John Markushewski Dr. David Maxwell Mrs. Regina Maxwell Dr. Michael McBrearty Dr. Chris McGee Mrs. Voncile Pearce Mrs. Dorothy Pieroni Dr. Robert Pieroni Dr. Robert Posey Dr. James Robinson Dr. Richard Rutland Dr. Edgar Shotts Dr. Rodney Snead Dr. Vijaya Sundar Dr. Michael Taylor Mr. Mike Williams Dr. Mark Williams Dr. Mark Woods Dr. Fred Yerby

In 2016, the Board increased its membership by more than 35 percent, welcoming 16 new members Dr. Thomas Alford is medical director of Southern Blood Services in Birmingham and Tuscaloosa. Alford is from Albertville, Alabama. He received his bachelor’s degree from The University of Alabama, and then joined the US Army. He later earned his medical degree from the University of Alabama School of Medicine. Alford completed an internship in internal medicine at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Denver, Colorado, where he then completed a residency in anatomical and clinical pathology. Alford is chief of the pathology department at Brookwood Medical Center in Birmingham, and he was formerly assistant chief of pathology and chief of clinical pathology for the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center in Fort Gordon, Georgia. He also practiced in Birmingham for several years at Cunningham Pathology, LLC. Alford is a diplomat of the National Board of Medical Examiners and a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. He and his wife, Kelley Alford, have three children and five grandchildren. Dr. Daniel Avery, Jr., is director of Medical Student Admissions and associate director of the Tuscaloosa Longitudinal Community Curriculum for the College. He also serves as the medical laboratory director and medical review officer for University Medical Center, which the College operates. He is a professor of Community Medicine and Population Health and is medical director of the College’s Institute for Rural Health Research. He is also former chair of the College’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. COLLEGE OF COMMUNIT Y HEALTH SCIENCES

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in his memory to promote a broader understanding of international health care and of the health needs in underserved areas of the United States.

through the Lister Hill Society Fund, which is the College’s annual fund. Gulas received the award for her travel to Barahona, Dominican Republic.

Robert E. Pieroni, MD, and Family Endowed Scholarship Recipients: Maria Gulas (spring) and Danielle Fincher (fall) Amount: $1,000 each

RURAL HEALTH LEADERS PIPELINE SCHOLARSHIPS

Established by Dr. Robert and Mrs. Dorothy Pieroni in 2012, the scholarship supports medical students at the College interested in entering primary care. Dr. Pieroni was a faculty member at the College for many years and still remains active in his support. Reese Phifer, Jr., Memorial Foundation Endowed Scholarship Recipients: Dr. Elizabeth Junkin and Dr. Russell Guin Amount: $1,500 each

The primary aim of the Rural Health Leaders Pipeline is to prepare students from rural areas of Alabama to provide health care in rural areas, particularly as family medicine physicians.

Dr. and Mrs. Earl Brandon Gift Fund The members of the 21st class of Rural Medical Scholars were each awarded $1,204: Veronica Coleman, Rebecca England, Andrew Seth Griffin, Colby James, Jessica Luker, Dustin Cole Marshall, Brionna McMeans, Johnny Pate, Madison Peoples and Madilyn Tomaso.

The Reese Phifer Jr. Memorial Foundation Endowed Scholarship is awarded annually to promote the education of medical students at the College. The Reese Phifer, Jr., Memorial Foundation was established by Mr. and Mrs. Reese Phifer in 1967 in memory of their son J. Reese Phifer, Jr., a student at The University of Alabama who died in 1964. The foundation established the scholarship fund in 2014. Priority is given to current fourth-year medical students who intend to complete their residency at The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, which the College operates, and who have an interest in spending part of their residency training in Fayette, Alabama.

The Dr. and Mrs. Earl Brandon Gift Fund was established to support Rural Medical Scholars. Their son, Dr. John Brandon, is a family medicine physician in Gordo, Alabama, who taught CCHS medical students and residents for many years.

CCHS International Medical Experience Fund Recipient: Maria Gulas Amount: $1,700

Members of the 2016-2017 class of Rural Community Health Scholars were awarded $1,000 each ($500 per semester): Chelsey Clark (Reverend James Carstensen and Dr. Frances Koe contributed to this award), Raven Eldridge (Reverend James Carstensen, Butler County Farmers Federation and Dr. Beverly Jordan contributed to this award), Paris Long (Reverend James Carstensen and Dr. Beverly Jordan contributed to this award), Kendra Mims (Reverend

The International Medical Experience Fund exists to support international travel that facilitates the education of medical students at CCHS. It was established in 2011 by the College’s Board of Visitors 12

THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA

Rural Health Leaders Pipeline Scholarship The members of the 21st class of Rural Medical Scholars were each awarded $250: Veronica Coleman, Rebecca England, Andrew Seth Griffin, Colby James, Jessica Luker, Dustin Cole Marshall, Brionna McMeans, Johnny Pate, Madison Peoples and Madilyn Tomaso.


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

James Carstensen, Bibb County Farmers Federation and Ms. Angela Dee contributed to this award), Januar Page, Kristin Pressley, Jeremy Watson, Nandini Chandra ($500) (Wilcox County Alabama Farmers Federation contributed to this award).

skills, respect for staff and patients and a commitment to working as an effective member of a health care team. In 2016, the award was supported by the Theta Xi Endowed Scholarship fund.

MEDICAL STUDENT SENIOR CONVOCATION AWARDS

The College's Family Medicine Residency presents monetary awards to graduating residents.

The College and its departments also present monetary awards to medical students.

James H. Akers Memorial Award Recipient: Dr. Amber Beg Amount: $1,000 The James H. Akers Memorial Award is funded by the James H. Akers and Teresa Finney Memorial Endowed Scholarship fund. It is presented at convocation to a graduating medical student for dedication to the art and science of medicine. William R. Willard Award Recipient: Dr. Elizabeth Junkin Amount: $1,000 Established by the Bank of Moundville, this award is presented at convocation to a graduating student selected by CCHS faculty who has made outstanding contributions to the goals and missions of the College. The award is supported by the William R. Willard Awards Endowment fund. Interprofessional Excellence Award Recipient: Dr. Russell Guin Amount: $1,000 This award recognizes a graduating medical student selected by CCHS staff who has demonstrated excellence in communication

RESIDENCY GRADUATION AWARDS

360 Award Recipient: Dr. Katie Gates Amount: $1,000 This award is presented to a graduating resident selected by CCHS staff who demonstrates outstanding work as part of a multidisciplinary team. In 2016, this award was supported by the Theta Xi Endowed Scholarship fund. William R. Willard Family Medicine Award Recipient: Dr. Jacquelynn Luker Amount: $1,000 This award is presented to a first-year resident who demonstrates outstanding professional competence and personal characteristics. The award is supported by the William R. Willard Awards Endowment fund. William W. Winternitz Geriatric Award Recipient: Dr. Michael Gabriel Amount: $500 This award is presented to a graduating resident who demonstrates outstanding work in geriatric medicine. The award is supported by the William Winternitz Geriatric Gift Fund.

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STUDENT COLUMN

CARING FOR UNDERSERVED URBAN COMMUNITIES Scholarship affords medical student opportunity to experience health care in different urban settings

Danielle Fincher is a fourth-year medical student at the College, which operates the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus of the University of Alabama School of Medicine. She is the 2016 recipient of the Larry Mayes Endowed Scholarship, which is awarded to a student who elects a community medicine experience in a medically underserved setting in the US or abroad during his or her third or fourth year of medical school. 14

THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA

The Larry Mayes Endowed Scholarship at the College of Community Health Sciences funded my four-week elective at the Institute for Family Health in New York City. The Institute operates safety-net clinics throughout the city that provide primary care, mental health care, dental care and social work services targeted to the needs of urban underserved communities. This rotation specifically focused on women’s and reproductive health. The rotation was designed so that I traveled to and from three different clinics, located in Harlem, the Bronx and Manhattan. Each clinic served a different population: the Harlem clinic had a large Puerto Rican population, the Bronx clinic patients were mostly Dominican and African-American, while the Manhattan clinic, because of its proximity to many subway lines, served a very diverse population in race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, employment status and insurance coverage. In addition to seeing a wide variety of patients, I saw a wide variety of procedures, including IUD insertions and removals, Nexplanon insertion and removals, endometrial biopsies, pap smears and diaphragm fittings. My rotation also included the completion of a project related to reproductive health. I focused on the differences in health care access, particularly

access to reproductive health care among adolescents in Alabama versus New York state. My research focused on differences in laws, Medicaid coverage, patterns of contraceptive use and the construction and understanding of minors’ rights. During my month-long rotation, I also experienced what life was like in such a large city. I rented a small room in a two-bedroom, fifth-floor walk-up apartment in East Harlem. I became very familiar with the New York City subway system commuting to the three clinics located all over the city. I took advantage of any time off to tour New York City. I went to museums, saw an off-Broadway show, visited the 9/11 memorial, took a sailboat tour of the harbor, biked through Central Park, and even found a bar where Crimson Tide fans gather to watch football games. By the end of the month, I had visited four of the city’s five boroughs. Overall, my elective at the Institute was a strong complement to my clinical education at the College. My rotations at CCHS have given me a deeper understanding of the health care needs of rural underserved communities, and my rotation in New York City offered great exposure to the health care needs unique to an urban environment. After this rotation, I feel even more prepared to work and train in both urban and rural settings.


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

FOLLOWING THE ROADMAP Guided by a strategic plan and a strong foundation in primary care, the College is enhancing its efforts to improve the health of communities BY LESLIE ZGANJAR

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he College of Community Health Sciences is entering the fourth of a five-year strategic planning process that seeks to improve the health of Alabama communities through the College’s strong foundation in primary care and its ongoing work in educating family medicine physicians, providing direct patient care and engaging in related research and scholarship. The strategic plan, written in the 2012-13 academic year, provides a roadmap that is guiding significant progress in four key areas: build on the roots of The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, which CCHS operates; provide a community-oriented and innovative educational experience for medical students; transform University Medical Center, the College’s multispecialty clinical practice, to deliver exceptional, patient-centered care; and foster a passion for research and scholarship aligned with the College’s mission. The following are highlights of strategic planning work accomplished in 2016, and work planned for 2017. COLLEGE OF COMMUNIT Y HEALTH SCIENCES

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STRATEGY R { RESIDENCY } Enhance the quality of The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency through expanded community-based practice and experience, with continued emphasis on rural communities, to prepare primary care physicians who will be equipped to meet the challenges of an ever-changing health care environment.

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THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA

Since the strategic planning process began, the three-year Residency has grown to a 48-resident program (16 per year), making it the second largest family medicine residency in the US. Providing additional education and training opportunities for resident physicians was the focus of work in this strategic area in 2016. Two new fellowships—one in geriatrics and one in emergency medicine —were created and join the College’s existing fellowships in behavioral health, hospital medicine, obstetrics, sports medicine and rural psychiatry. The fellowships provide an additional year of training in these various specialties for family medicine physicians. An outpatient teaching series was added to the residency curriculum, as were electives in nephrology and prenatal/newborn care. Increased patient encounters were provided through the addition of a third night clinic at University Medical Center and an expanded resident presence at the Good Samaritan Clinic in Tuscaloosa, which provides free medical care to uninsured and underinsured adults in West Alabama.

This year, work is ongoing to provide additional practice opportunities in nearby Pickens and Fayette counties, and the College will continue to integrate resident clinical experiences in communities and with underserved health care providers. Since the strategic planning process began, the three-year Residency has grown to a 48-resident program (16 per year), making it the second largest family medicine residency in the US. Upward of a dozen practiceexperienced family medicine physician faculty have been hired at the College, improving residency staffing. Academics have continued to improve with a 100 percent board passage rate by residents. A new resident continuity clinic was successfully launched at University Medical Center-Northport, and 12 residents currently practice there. UMC on the UA campus and UMC-Northport make up the clinical practice of CCHS.


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

STRATEGY M { MEDICAL EDUCATION } Strengthen and focus medical student education at the College through adoption of innovative, community-oriented learning models, enhanced by primary care and population-focused learning opportunities.

Enriching the clinical years of education for the cohort of University of Alabama School of Medicine students who spend their third and fourth years at the Tuscaloosa regional campus was the focus of efforts in this strategic area in 2016. The Tuscaloosa Longitudinal Community Curriculum (TLC²) began its second pilot year with seven students, an increase from two students in the first pilot year. TLC² follows an innovative model of education that allows medical students to spend most of their third year of clinical education working with a community physician and following patients through diagnosis and treatment, covering specialty areas continuously and often simultaneously. An in-house model was added to the TLC² program, which allows for third-year clinical education to be done at the multispecialty UMC with multiple preceptors. In addition to developing and piloting a different third-year curriculum, work is underway to create a special track within the University of Alabama School of Medicine that will orient Tuscaloosa Regional Campus students toward primary care and community health, not only through TLC² in the third year, but through a new curriculum in the other years of medical school. The School of Medicine is currently awaiting approval

of the proposed track from the national Liaison Committee on Medical Education. Third- and fourth-year medical students in Tuscaloosa now have the opportunity to take co-enrollment courses with other UA health professions students. One of the courses, a culinary medicine elective, is part of a CCHS collaboration with the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans. The course teaches the fundamentals of cooking and how to share with patients the basics of preparing healthy and tasty meals. The College’s Pediatrics Clerkship added opportunities for medical students to participate in an ADHD clinic with UA psychology students, in pre-Kindergarten health screenings with nursing students from UA and Shelton State Community College, and in the College’s interprofessional Grand Rounds at DCH Regional Medical Center. Two new faculty-level positions were created and filled—a director of Learning and Program Evaluation and a director of Educational Technology and Continuing Education. The College hopes to soon create for medical students a patient simulation or standardized patient laboratory for interprofessional educational simulations.

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enlist the help of another who might best be able to help the student improve. “It’s a different way of thinking and that’s one of the benefits we didn’t foresee—how the students would help us see how we can work better as a team,” Taylor says. All students at the University of Alabama School of Medicine receive their first two years of medical education at the school’s main campus in Birmingham. Students then receive their third and fourth years of clinical education either at the Birmingham campus or at one of three branch campuses in Alabama. One of the College’s functions is to serve as the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus for the School of Medicine. Students who come to the College can elect to participate in the longitudinal integrated clerkship or the traditional medical education model, but that will soon change. Implementing the in-house model in 2016 was preparation for May 2018, when the entire incoming cohort of third-year medical students will be participating in TLC². A portion of the students will be paired with community preceptors, and the rest will receive their training at UMC and its second location in Northport. As a result, the School of Medicine applied to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education to introduce a new admissions track oriented toward primary care and rural health and targeted to the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus. Adding the track would work a half-day visit to Tuscaloosa into prospective students’ admissions and interviewing process. With the admissions track, the College can 28

THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA

select the students who are most interested in the longitudinal model and who are most likely to benefit from it, says Taylor. “We think this is a valuable educational experience, but we know it’s not for everybody,” she says. “You certainly don’t have to be interested in primary care to benefit from the curriculum, though. There’s a lot of value that, say, a surgeon, would get from a longitudinal curriculum.” In the in-house model, Kasanagottu follows a weekly cycle and is with a different preceptor each day, he says. “As with a traditional model, I’ll go in and see a patient on my own, talk to the patient, come up with a plan and present it to the physician. Then we go back in together to talk to the patient.” Kasanagottu says one advantage of working with preceptors over a long period of time is that he is given more responsibilities and develops a greater connection to the preceptors that he otherwise might not have had with a traditional model. Now, “If I’m seeing a preceptor for a half day per week for eight months, that’s more than 100 hours,” he says. “In a traditional model, in the end I might spend 30 hours with an attending.” The best part of the longitudinal model, he says, is making relationships with patients. “There’s a patient that comes in every month that I get to see,” he says. “Now we’re like old friends. You don’t really get that in a traditional model.”

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TLC STUDENTS AND WHERE THEY LEARNED These third-year medical students enrolled in the College's longitudinal curriculum have learned from preceptors across the state.

2015-2016 Chase Childers — Dr. Jennifer Burdette in Tuscaloosa Danielle Fincher — Dr. Catherine Skinner in Northport Maria Gulas — Dr. Caroline Day in Tuscaloosa Courtney Newsome — Dr. Scott Boyken in Pell City Jessica Powell — Dr. Julia Boothe in Reform Amanda Shaw — Dr. Scott Davidson in Columbiana Caitlin Tidwell — Dr. J.D. Shugrue in Calera

2016-2017 Nic Cobb — Dr. Josh Bell in Guntersville Jake Guin — Dr. Julia Boothe in Reform Koushik Kasanagottu — Multiple preceptors at University Medical Center and UMC-Northport, both of which the College operates Randy Nelson — Dr. Gerold Sibanda in Greensboro Marshall Pritchett — Dr. Anthony Nix in Sylacauga Rebecca Shuford — Dr. Catherine Skinner in Northport Garrett Taylor — Dr. Scott Boyken in Pell City Lissa Tyson — Dr. Beverly Jordan in Enterprise Ben Walters — Dr. Beth Western in Tuscaloosa


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

EMERGENCY MEDICINE FELLOWSHIP DEVELOPED Curriculum assembled and fellows signed for College's graduate medical education program with Rush Foundation Hospital in Meridian, Mississippi BY BRETT JAILLET

COLLEGE OF COMMUNIT Y HEALTH SCIENCES

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The College is providing its Emergency Medicine Fellowship in conjunction with Rush Foundation Hospital (left) in Meridian, Mississippi, which is where fellows will complete most of their training.

wo family medicine physicians will begin to receive additional training in emergency medicine through a yearlong fellowship at the College of Community Health Sciences. Dr. Michelle Pike, a third-year resident at the The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, which is operated by the College, will start training in July, and Dr. Owen Ulmer will start training in October. Plenty of preparation took place in 2016 to bring the new Emergency Medicine Fellowship to fruition. Curriculum development and recruitment were some of the biggest areas of preparation for the program, says Dr. Tamer Elsayed, assistant director of the College’s Family Medicine Residency. He and Dr. Richard Friend, director of the Residency, are co-directors of the fellowship, which is provided in conjunction with Rush Foundation Hospital in Meridian, Mississippi, where Dr. Walt Willis, emergency room director for the hospital, is site director of the fellowship. The program will include rotations through radiology, anesthesia, orthopedics and trauma, and advanced courses in obstetrics, airway 30

THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA

management and advanced life support. Developing the curriculum involved comparing what family medicine and emergency medicine physicians learn during residency, and filling in the gaps, says Elsayed. “We looked at what emergency residents do and their ACGME requirements and compared that to the family medicine residents, and we tried to see what the differences were,” he says. “We saw that family medicine physicians have more experience with pediatrics and OB/GYN than emergency medicine physicians. And we are going to provide more hours in the ER, more trauma and procedures education and teach about practice management in the ER.” Elsayed, Friend and Willis developed four basic components of the curriculum: clinical training, research, didactics and procedural. Didactics will take place at CCHS, and some rotations will be held at other sites, but the bulk of the program will be at Rush Foundation Hospital. Recruitment took place throughout the year, with the biggest emphasis at the American Academy of Family Physicians National Conference for Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students, held each year in July in Kansas City, Missouri. Candidate interviews were held in November and December. Funding for the program is provided by Rush Foundation Hospital, and more funding is being sought to grow the program over time, says Friend, who has a special interest in emergency medicine. Establishing the Emergency Medicine Fellowship has been one of his goals since he arrived at the College in 2013. “Fifty percent of all family physicians do some sort of urgent care or emergency medicine, and I think this will provide another venue for advanced education in areas where family medicine physicians might need some additional training,” Friend says. Elsayed also has a special interest in emergency medicine. In addition to his role at CCHS as assistant director of the Residency and assistant professor of Family Medicine, he works shifts in the


Emergency Medicine

Obstetrics

Rural Public Psychiatry

Hospital Medicine

Sports Medicine

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Dr. Edward and Mrs. Cindy Markushewski Dr. David and Mrs. Regina Maxwell Dr. Michael L. McBrearty Mr. Guy E. Moman, Jr. Dr. David O. Parrish Mrs. Voncile R. Pearce Dr. Robert and Mrs. Dorothy Pieroni Dr. Robert A. Posey Dr. Rodney Snead and Cheaha Area Regional Emergency Specialists, LLC Dr. James B. Robinson Dr. Richard O. Rutland, Jr. Dr. Karen E. Stone Dr. Michael A. and Mrs. Jovita M. Taylor Dr. Guillermo Godoy and Tuscaloosa Newborn Medicine PC Dr. and Mrs. William E. Walker Mr. Michael J. Williams Dr. Frederick L. Yerby

Sustaining — $250 - $499

Dr. Thomas A. Bartlett Dr. Julia and Mr. Aubrey E. Boothe, Jr. Dr. Ben G. Bostick Mrs. Hannah C. Brock Dr. Jerry A. Davis Dr. Sam D. Davis, Jr. Dr. Russell L. Ingram Dr. Robert B. Ireland, Jr. Dr. Patrick E. O’Reilly Dr. Lee Thomas and Mrs. Anne Sondergaard 34

THE UNIVERSIT Y OF ALABAMA

Dr. Shelley E. Waits Dr. Albert T. White, Jr.

Active — $100 - $249

Dr. L. Scott Atkins, Jr. Dr. William R. Bell III Dr. Alan M. Blum Dr. Thomas J. Burchett Dr. James L. Carroll Mr. Luke Cates The Honorable and Mrs. Joseph A. Colquitt Mr. and Mrs. J. Sydney Cook III Dr. G. Nelson Cooper, Jr. Dr. William A. Curry Mrs. Alice S. Davis Mr. Charleigh R. Davis Dr. Rod M. Duraski Mrs. Camille M. Elebash Dr. Ashley Evans Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Fanning Dr. Pamela H. Foster Dr. Gary M. Fowler Dr. H. Joseph Fritz, Jr. Mr. Charles E. Hilburn Mrs. Jean J. Hinton Dr. Kevin R. Katona Dr. R. Mark Kendrick, Sr. Mr. Bryan N. Kindred Dr. Terry A. Kurtts and Elberta Clinic, PC Mrs. Allison L. Leitner Dr. Nancy H. Lindberg Dr. Velimir A. Luketic Mrs. Jean P. Lumpkin

Dr. John A. and Mrs. Pamela M. Mantle and the Community Foundation of West Alabama Dr. Jeffrey W. Mathis Dr. Denise J. Nakos Dr. James G. Peters Mr. and Mrs. Victor P. Poole, Sr. Mrs. Phyllis H. Scutchfield Dr. John G. Simmons Mrs. Frances Snyder Dr. Alton B. Sturtevant, Jr., and the Alton B. Sturtevant Family Foundation Dr. John P. Summerford Dr. Heather M. Taylor Mrs. Elizabeth H. Thomson Dr. Alexandre Todorov Dr. Wilson L. Tucker Dr. Randall W. Weaver Dr. Michael A. Wells Dr. Jerre R. White Dr. Marcus Whitman, Jr. Drs. John and Patricia Wheat Wilson Family Foundation, Inc. Dr. Zynnia Zafra

Supporter — $50 - $99

Dr. G. Norman Carlson Mrs. Jan Chaisson Dr. Elizabeth W. Cleino Dr. Edwin Dennard Dr. I. Keith Fleisher Mr. George B. Gordon Mrs. Judith W. Hodges Dr. Joseph T. Johnson and Cullman Primary Care P.C.

Mrs. Shelley E. Jones Dr. James D. Leeper Dr. Louis H. McCormick Mr. James P. Merrell and Ross-Merrell Associates Mrs. Evelyn D. Mettee Dr. Katherine L. Norman Dr. Michael P. Robards Mrs. Carol Russell Mr. Robert H. Shaw, Jr. Mrs. Jane C. Simpson Mrs. Gail R. Windham Dr. Beverly C. Wingard Dr. David Zielinski

Other

Ms. Linda P. Jackson Mrs. Willia D. Sewell

GIVE Make your gift today to the Lister Hill Society, the College's annual fund, by visiting cchs.ua.edu/give or by sending checks payable to the Lister Hill Society to: The College of Community Health Sciences The University of Alabama Box 870326 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0326


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

GIVING PRIORITIES The College of Community Health Sciences is dedicated to improving and promoting the health of individuals and communities in Alabama and the region through leadership in medical education and primary care; the provision of high quality, accessible health care services; and scholarship. The College provides the last two years of clinical education for a cohort of medical students enrolled at the University of Alabama School of Medicine, and nearly 900 medical students have completed their clinical training in Tuscaloosa. Students who complete their training at CCHS are two times more likely than the national average to enter family medicine. With the Tuscaloosa Longitudinal Community Curriculum (TLC²), the College exposes students to community medicine with longitudinal connections to patients and providers and opportunities to

experience the broader professional roles of physicians. This education model, known as a longitudinally integrated clerkship, or LIC, allows medical students to live and train in a community for a period of months, be involved in the comprehensive care of patients over time and to have long-term relationships with patients' physicians. The College operates The University of Alabama Family Medicine Residency, the second largest family medicine residency in the US with 48 residents in training each year. One of seven Alabama family medicine physicians are graduates of the program. The College is also home to the Rural Health Leaders Pipeline, a series of nationally-recognized programs that recruit students from rural Alabama. The National Rural Health Association in 2013 named the Pipeline the Program of the Year.

GOALS TO SUPPORT: • •

• •

Innovative medical student education with a community focus. Activities and strategies that encourage primary care, especially in rural and underserved communities. Projects that support the communities and the health of the population. Projects that aid in the transformation of the practices of the College into a patient-centered and prevention-focused delivery system.

ALUMNI Are you a CCHS alum? Keep in touch with us by visiting cchs.ua.edu/alumni or by sending news and updates to : Leslie Zganjar The College of Community Health Sciences The University of Alabama Box 870326 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0326


CCHS Annual Report | 2016  

2016 Annual Report by The University of Alabama College of Community Health Sciences.

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