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Issue #5 www.thezebramagazine.com

Winners Portfolios from 3rd Zebra Monochrome Awards

Š Patricia Dinu


TZIPAC is the publisher of the Zebra Magazine. As the magazine is mainly filled up with third parties content, TZIPAC is not liable for any editorial error, omission, mistake or typographical error. In the case of advertising material supplied, we as publishers, make no representation and provide no warranty as to the accuracy of descriptions or offers within. As publishers we accept no liability for any loss, which any person may incur while relying on the accuracy or description of any statement or photograph herein. The views expressed by all contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher. Copyright: All of the content published in the Zebra Magazine is subject to copyright held either by TZIPAC in the whole or in part by the contributing photographers, artists and contributors. None of the photo or content can be downloaded, stored, printed, manipulated, distributed or used in anyway without the writtent consent and permission from the copyright holder. The works published in this magazine or on the TZIPAC website/s are protected under domestic and international copyright laws and are not considered as public domain. TZIPAC and the Zebra Magazine assume no legal liabilities whatsoever for the works of the contributors.


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Zebra Monochrome Magazine is always on the look-out for outstanding artists from around the globe to show case, as well as sharing exciting news about the creative world with our members and readers. If you would like to submit your work, or recommend another person’s work to us, please feel free to send your submission to info@tzipac.com, and the editorial team will respond accordingly on the suitability of the recommended content for our Zebra Monochrome Magazine. The focus for our

content is mainly targetted towards photographic materials, including mobile, digital and conventional arts, as well as digital arts, such as digitial painting, manipulation etc. We look forward to seeing your submissions and we thank you in advance for contributing to the Zebra Monochrome Magazine and helping us bring inspiring and fascinating content to our members and readers.

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4th Zebra Awards Join us to celebrate the beauty of Black and White Photography Grand Prize $2000 $1 Entry Fee for Stage 1

Dealine: 31 December 2015 www.tzipac.com


Patricia Dinu Grand Winner For my photo ‘True Men Cry’ to be chosen by TZIPAC as the winner in the Wedding Category left me literally speechless. I am not one to be lost for words, but I was so honoured and proud, I couldn’t put my thoughts into words. People kept asking me how I felt, some wanted to blog about the success, but it actually took me a week to write about it myself.

every wedding day taking pictures of the Groom and his men, while my husband Jonny is shooting the bridal preparations. People always think, that the Bride is the nervously excited party. I don’t agree. On the morning of this wedding last summer in Beckwithshaw, Glenn wanted to get ready on his own and meet me and all the groomsmen at the Smith Arms for a calming pint. Seeing that the pub is right opposite the church in which Joanna and Glenn were going to marry it would have been rude not to.  As family and friends started turning up, tears were already flowing. Glenn composed himself with the help of his best man, his brother and we headed to the church to greet all the guests. 

My husband, Jonny and I rebranded our photography business last summer and everything fell into place, Avenue White was born. Our wedding was the turning point of our lives on so many levels. We wanted a photographer, who understood the importance of every moment and would capture the emotions of our day as they unfold. It’s the feeling we get from those photographs and reliving those memories, that stirred us in the way of photography and inspires our passion for the documentary style wedding and family photography ever since. Emotions from men move me. It did since I was a little girl, seen my dad cry only once and something has been awakened inside of me. The love that men can feel is unique. Every time I see it, it makes me want to stay in that moment. This is the reason why I am the one starting

As the groomsmen were standing outside the church emotions got high once again and as Glenn, his brother and their dad all started crying I was lost in the moment. What I didn’t know at this point was that this was going to be one of the most emotional weddings I had the honour to be part of. My love for what we do and what we believe in at Avenue White has just gotten stronger by achieving such a great compliment.

© Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Can you tell us about your background, how you discovered photography and where it has taken you up until now? I discovered the love for photography only 5 years ago. But from then on I live for photography – ‘Drawing with light’ is wonderful.

© Patricia Dinu


Your images are very landscape abstract style of images. Can you please tell us more about your work, your style, your vision? How did you come to discover your passion for these images? My vision as an artist is to be free to express myself - my Self is rooted deep in my heart and gives soul to everything. It allows my vision to be very individual and at the same time it does not limit me.

Where do you get your inspirations for your images and style? Inspiration? ... Beh... You can find inspiration anywhere But in general, I’m looking forward to have my own style .

Š Patricia Dinu


How do you identify the appropriate landscape for your images? The desert speaks to me. I love the desert, it’s light enlightens me. The US Southwest is much easier accessible than the Gobi and thus for simple logistical reason very attractive. Sure many of these fabulous places have been photographed before but that doesn’t matter to me because I believe in my personal interpretation of it. To do that I try to be one with the landscape, the only way to find out if it resonates with my soulscape. That’s when I take the picture .

© Patricia Dinu


Is there such thing as the perfect light for you? Light is everything in Photography, because photography means “drawing with light” Light is perfect for me when it meets the criteria of my personal style.

© Patricia Dinu


What do you look for during your post production to bring out the best in your images? In my postproduction, I’m looking to bring out what my heart and my eyes saw it in that place. The camera is a tool and cannot always record what I see with my heart and soul. Of course I try to compose my images as much as I can “in” the camera, with the right lens and all. The right moment of course is of essence, but the tool very often is not enough.

© Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Do you have to visualise a lot in your mind of the final images when confronted with a scene? How do you train yourself to see so far ahead? I don’t train myself. I only try to relive that moment, and give to the viewer some emotions of that place. Oh... Sometimes my images are identical with the scene, or even better. My infrared camera captures invisible light, therefore it is very important to “see” infrared when you are about to take an image. This is something one needs to learn by experience and you always have to be prepared, when it happens and when it does it is very crucial to “be one with what happens”. It’s a little bit like Zen. Later in the postproduction, I try to relive that moment, hoping that whoever will look at my images is able to feel what moved me.


It looks like there is a lot of traveling for you to capture these stunning images? Yes , I’m traveling a lot. But for all my travels I already have plans and projects in mind.

How do you protect your gear, especially from wind and dust? Are you worried about your gear on these trips? For the wind and dust ... I never change my lens in an open space ... I prefer to have 2 cameras with me with 2 different lenses.

What are some of your essential and favorite gear, especially for a long trip? Ahahaha. I photograph with Canon cameras and I love to use best of lens.


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


How do you identify the appropriate landscape for your images? The desert speaks to me. I love the desert, it’s light enlightens me. The US Southwest is much easier accessible than the Gobi and thus for simply logistical reason very attractive. Sure many of these fabulous places have been photographed before but that doesn’t matter to me because I believe in my personal interpretation of it. To do that I try to be one with the landscape, the only way to find out if it resonates with my soulscape. That’s when I take the picture .

© Patricia Dinu


Do you do other types of photography, such as portraits etc? I’m doing portraits, reportage too. But I think that as a photographer , one must have his speciality ... And mine is soulscapes photography.

How does differ?

landscape

photography

There is not a lot of difference. In all types of photography we use the moment , the light and vision, all these elements put together as one. Isn’t that soul?

© Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Can you share with us about your future projects and where photography will take you over the next few years? Right now, I’m working on three projects together with a very inspiring photographer, painter, singer, songwriter -Anselm Spring. He published nearly 80 books and maybe one of the most diverse, playful artists – at least that I know of. But right now this is my secret. I am still focused on my photographic first love, “The Desert Of Souls”, and the other ones I’ll keep for my secret … for a while.

© Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Š Patricia Dinu


Can you share some tips and advices with our readers on how to improve black and white photography? You have to know your medium whether color or black and white. We always must be able to choose the best light. This of course depends on the photographer himself. But as a general rule : we have 30 minutes at sunrise and 30 minutes at sunset. Be prepared !!!

Š Patricia Dinu


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Lars Andreas Dybvik 1st Place

Can you share the story behind your award winning image? I was photographing these starlings on the wire a grey rainy day in autumn. Suddenly one of them “fell down” and landed on the field just beneath. I was quick and got an exposure in the exact right moment. One second later the rest of them followed the first one. Two seconds later, all of them was on the ground feeding.

© Lars Andreas Dybvik


I love to create pictures that leave something unanswered, images that ask questions to the viewer. I don’t want to take pictures that one is able to describe over the telephone. I have been photographing and writing for 25 years plus, and published one book. I host workshops in creative photography. I have contributed in exhibitions in Europe and USA, and am represented by art gallery SG in Norway.

Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


The bottom line of al my photography, is a philosophical approach to nature. I love being outdoors, and feel the elements. And I often make up small fantasy stories to the scenes I am working with. Some time this can lead to quite different pictures than just the mere documentation of what I have in front of me. The whole process is quite interesting chain. I have some thoughts, and they influence how my pictures are taken. Then you see my images, and start processing what you see. You relate it to your experiences in life. Through the images my thoughts turn your thoughts.

Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Can you tell us about your background, how you discovered photography and where it has taken you up until now? I have been photographing all my adult life (and some more). Hiking and being outdoors are essential in my life, thus most of my photography is nature photography. I have the recent years gone from a traditional documentary style, to more abstract. I guess I was introduced to photography by my father all the way from childhood. I still remember when I was round 10-12 years old, and had been arranging some bright red oil capsules on a couple of small mirrors – and spent a 24 frame roll of film on that. When my father returned home from the photo store with the developed film, he said “I think it’s time you start to pay this your self son”..

© Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Your portfolio seems to display a certain affinity to abstract nature. Would this be a fair comment? Can you describe more about your work, your vision, your arts? That is 100% correct. I am a lot more fascinated of images that asks questions rather than give the answers. With that, I mean that the traditional nature photography mostly is a way to show where one has been or what you saw. I like to play with the viewer a bit, and have them ask questions of what they are seeing and experiencing when they look at my pictures. When I have exhibitions, I often get very polarized responses. People either like what they see very much, or specifically dislike it. I take that as a compliment. It implies that the viewer have been thinking. Not just looking at something beautiful, yet another spectacular landscape. I use many techniques to abstract my images. All have in common though, that they are based on the old fashion physics of photography. Multiple exposures, long exposures or just unexpected compositions.

Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Do you feel black and white photography suits this style of vision more than colour, and why? Not particularly. I do more colour than b&w. It all depends on the scene and the light. Can you share with us how you see these wonderful images from sceneries that may appear somewhat ordinary to others? This one is tricky. For me it’s down to intuition, and that is not possible to explain. I somehow are disposed to discover shapes and structures when looking at the world around me. I have tried to “turn that part of my brain off”, but no. It is just with me.

© Lars Andreas Dybvik


What would be a typical post production process for your black and white images? I use Lightroom as the main tool in all my editing. B&W images can sometimes go in to Photoshop as well, but it is rare nowadays. I often go further in contrast compared to colour images. Sometimes all graphic. In addition, an important feature I think is the possibility to control each colour channel to separate the tones as I wish. I often plan this when taking the picture, knowing that I can make an area of the image dark or light because it is in a separate colour than other subjects in the frame.

Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


For your style of photography, which is more important to you, getting it right in camera or post production, and why? I am a bit old fashion, so I like to create the base of my images in camera. I am not against post processing in any way. And I always use post processing as a natural extension from the camera in creating an image. It’s just that I don’t go around saying to myself: “don’t bother, fix this in post processing”. It is like cooking. You have to start with high quality ingredients. You can’t just add a lot of spice and hope to cover bad craftsmanship.

Where do you get your inspirations, to help you to practice, to better identify these wonderful images? I look at other art forms. A lot of photography of course, but also paintings, graphics, sculptures. And not the least; music. I try to be aware of not only getting input from others doing similar things than myself. Ideas come from ideas, so I have to expand my horizon to push myself further.

© Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


You also seem to love monochrome images, as well as black and white. Why is this? How does each tone contribute to the images? Again, it is all up to the light and the scene. And what I feel to convey in my image. I don’t prefer one over the other regarding b&w, monochrome or colour. I often tone my b&w images. And I often take monochrome images, convert them to b&w to clean up small areas with colours that don’t fit in. Then tone the bw image back to a tone coherent with the original tone of the scene.

Can you share some tips and advices with our readers on how to improve black and white photography? I think the most important is to acknowledge that a colour image that didn’t turn out as you wished, can’t be saved by going bw. You will create more good images if you practise the skill of visualizing in bw what you have in front of your camera. Sadly this is not done in a couple of weeks. It takes good old fashion practise.

© Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Š Lars Andreas Dybvik


Madiha Abdo 1st Place

My name is Madiha Abdo, and I am a London-based photographer. I have keenly been interested in photography since childhood, which have led to my studying and completing photography courses at both Lambeth College and University of West London. For me, photography is indeed a self-expression that allows me to document the interesting world around myself. I also use photography as a way of connecting with both the audience and my subject. Black and white photography is my favourite field, for I believe it allows me to capture the target in a most magical way that may produce images that are strong, pure and without any unnecessary distractions. I want people to experience what I feel during my process of image creation and to have fun while viewing them. When working on my black and white images I give particular attention to the sources of light, and contrast, so to be able to create very interesting images that could pull the eyes of the viewers. My works are mostly intended to realize some artistically bold and creative images with distinct characteristics. I would like to see myself as a visual artist, who is generally motivated to create photographs that capture certain interesting aspects of the world in which we live, so to share them with others. I often visualize first my targets before clicking the shutter, while giving greater regard, to lighting and composition. Indeed, the viewer can observe in many of my works figures captured when stepping into a shaft of light, surrounded by contrasting dark areas, thus obtaining interesting stronger figure-toground. When viewing many of my works one might note how the so-called theory of contraries, such as, for instance, light and dark, revealed and hidden, and so on, would seem characterizing them. This might seem to have made possible the creation some stark images that seem, at the same time, having profound mystery and subtlety, only felt by those equipped with high perceptive abilities.

Š Madiha Abdo


Can you share the story behind your award winning image in the 3rd Zebra Awards? In this architectural shot I have tried to capture from above the interior of a big hall, partly lit by natural light to produce contrasting geometric black and white sections that appeal to the viewer. Great natural lights and beautiful or interesting views unseen before can act to inspire me.

Š Madiha Abdo


Can you tell us about your background, how you discovered photography and where it has taken you up until now? I have been fascinated and interested in photography since childhood. My uncle used to take me to his dark room, to see from close the various steps he was taking in order to develop his images. This close contact with photography led me to the study of photography at both high school and university. Since then photography has become my passion and favoured occupation.

Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Why do you enjoy exploring this style of photography? How did you discover this style and your passion for it? I enjoy exploring this photography style, which allows me to create strong definition in the image, thus being able to come up with some unique and extraordinary artworks. While I was working on one of my architectural projects I was amazed by the extraordinary contrasts between the dark and the strongly lit areas. Since then I have been pursuing this course so to come up with more interesting images of the kind.

Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


How do you see these scenes, these images, these strong lines and shapes and silhouetters and shadows, when viewing the world through your eyes, the world in colour and full of textures and patterns? How do you find these simple and strong lines? Although the world might mostly be in colour and full of textures and patterns, nevertheless, the black and white is my favoured subject, which, in my view, allows me to place maximum emphasis on my subjects, such as the silhouettes, thus giving shape to subtly mysterious and powerful physical presence.

Š Madiha Abdo


Do you worry about the loss of information in the shadow? I do not necessarily worry about the loss of some information in the shadow, as I am able to capitalize on the shadow in order to obtain eye-catching images, even if, sometimes, some minor information might be lost.

Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


* Can you please share some of your favorite photography gear in your bag? As I am mostly a natural light shooter, I always like to travel very light, with only my Canon camera and its 70-300 lens. * Have you printed your images out on paper? What do you think would suit best for your images, and hep to bring out the strong lines and intense shadow? Yes, I have printed my images on metallic paper, which, in my view, heightened the clarity of the printed images, giving them an appealing surfaces texture that brought out their strong lines and intense shadow. Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Can you share some tips and advices with our readers on how to improve black and white photography? I would certainly like to share these tips with your readers. First of all, give due regard to lines, shadows and shapes. Secondly, pay attention to contrast, since increased contrast can make the subject more interesting. And, thirdly, make sure to get long exposure.

Š Madiha Abdo


Š Madiha Abdo


Yingting Shih 1st Place

Can you tell us about your background, how you discovered photography and where it has taken you up until now? I am a full-time assistant professor of Department of Visual Communication Design, China University of Technology, Taiwan and also an adjunct assistant professor of College of Communication, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. I teach photography and video production for more than ten years. Till now, I have won eight first prizes in different international photography competitions including The BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition, IPA(International Photography Awards), PX3(Prix de le Photographie Paris), ICA(International Color Awards) and so on.

Š Yingting Shih


Can you share the story behind your award winning image? My winning image was taken in a sporting park. I climbed up the tree and attempted to photograph the entire park. To me, the entire park was divided into parts and regarded as lines, circles, forms and so on. I waited for a bird flying through and pressed the shutter button.

Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


How would you characterise your work? Due to my insistence upon straight photography without manipulation, my work tries to reveal the unseen but naturally and already existed meaning of our world. I think my work is a creative revelation of our life world. In many of your images, you seem to quite enjoy exploring patterns and texture of the scene and landscape, what draw you to this? What do you hope to capture, to tell through your images? I think we can see everything from unlimited different perspectives. I love to see the scene and landscape from a very unusual way. Patterns and texture are among ways I often used. Š Yingting Shih


How do you see such patterns or texture in a landscape or a scene? In my experience, to see through the surface of a landscape or a scene is the most important key to reveal patterns or texture. The essence under the appearance is hard to find if one cannot avoid the attractive appearance of a landscape or a scene. Do you think your style of photography suits better with black and white photography? In my opinion, black and white photography is totally another way of revelation different from color photography. The difference between them is not the presence or absence of color but the active or passive role of color. Due to this, all of them are suitable ways of revelation. No one is better suitable than the other. Š Yingting Shih


What do you look for when you convert your images to black and white? In fact, almost everyone sees the world in color. But only photographers can convert it to black and white easily. As a photographer, I will convert my images to black and white only if I discover creative revelation in my black and white image. When you look at a scene, do you immediately see the shapes, lines, etc in the final version in black and white? How do you visualise the end product with what is infront of you? When I take my picture, I constitute the image in my head not in my camera. I deconstruct the original relationship between things and construct them in a creative way. I always can pre-visualize the final result before shooting. I just can see what things are set before I press the shutter button.

Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


What are some essential gears in your bag to help you with your creative work? I usually use Canon 7DII or 5DIII at the same time. After having two babies, it is really hard to carry my total gears. Now I use 7DII and only one zoom lens according to the situation. What would typically be your thought process when you see a scene? First, I will avoid the attractive appearance of a scene. Secondly, I research the scene and deconstruct the original relationship between parts. Finally, I construct parts into a new and complete scene.

Š Yingting Shih


Can you share some tips and advices with our readers on how to improve black and white photography? Just remember the old Chinese paradox that a white horse is not a horse (pai-ma fei ma). The difference between colored and colorless horses is not color but meaning.

Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Š Yingting Shih


Alec Johnson 2nd Place

Alec’s fine art photography is influenced primarily by the rugged landscape of Lake Superior and has spent many years documenting her many personalities. He generally likes shooting around water, so you will also find him on the coasts of Oregon or California. He began shooting black and white exclusively 3 years ago and has not looked back. Alec is a Singh Ray Filter’s featured photographer and has lead the way using their Gold N Blue color filter to develop tonally rich digital black and white images. In July 2015 he will begin a concept series addressing water pollution, bringing his landscape composition style together with his years of commercial portrait work to make a bigger statement about how we actually treat our natural water resources. Working closely with a print artist from Duluth, MN, Alec now offers traditional archival palladium prints of his photography. He also is a regular guest speaker with the Minneapolis/Saint Paul, MN area camera clubs and maintains a vibrant architectural photography practice. Lastly, Alec is a full-time professor of Entrepreneurship at the University of Saint Thomas and founder of three web platforms (higher education, research hospitals and photographers).

© Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Š Alec Johnson


Keith Parks 2nd Place

I have been taking and making pictures since the days when it made your fingers smell (aaahhh... fixer). At first I lamented the departure of film, but the digital medium certainly has its advantages. So while I do some computer processing of most of my images, I try and limit it to things that I could have done in the darkroom. It is important to me that the pictures are not overly synthetic. The series of paper images began quite by chance. While shooting some food pictures, I realized that the paper I was using as a backdrop was quite interesting on its own. And as I worked more and more with paper, I came to see it as the perfect subject: it is cheap, comes in an almost endless variety of colors and textures, and is quite willing to sit for hours under the lights for multiple shots while I cut, fold, fiddle with position, etc. In this series I continue to explore abstracts, still lifes, figurative images, conceptual pieces, and my own variations on historical art imagery. Ultimately I am most inspired by the phenomenon of nature that we call “light�, by its human offspring vision and perception, and by the amazing things that happen when the three come together. I also love a nice picture of a cute kitten now and then.

Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Š Keith Parks


Scott Gilbank 2nd Place

When I was notified that I was the Grand Winner for the 2012 Zebra Awards, I was completely over the moon, filled with honor and gratitude. This year to be announced as a finalist and runner up in a category is an equally gratifying moment. The world is a big place and every day there are more and more emerging photographers entering into the market place with a large array of talent and energy. The tools we use to capture images has changed so much in the past 10 years and in the next 10 years I am sure there will be even more on offer. One thing that technology cannot change ( at present ) is that unique personal ability or gift to visualize then capture

an image or scenario and turn that into a captivating photograph as the end product. I have found in my work sometimes simple is best, but to always use the tools that are available to enhance that simplicity. Quite often I have found that having an image produced in black and white is all the enhancement that is required. Allowing the strength of the tones ,lines and shapes to work together and produce an image with impact. Lately I have been fortunate enough to be able to use the strength of black and white for my commercial clients work.

Š Scott Gilbank


Š Scott Gilbank


Š Scott Gilbank


Š Scott Gilbank


Christian Knepper 3rd Place

I am an nature and travel photographer, 48 years old, born in Germany but living in Brazil since 1989. In the last two decades, I have traveled different parts of the country, documenting traditional communities, already known landscapes and places still isolated from São Luis, capital of Maranhão, on the border between the Northeast and Amazon. I collaborate with magazines such as National Geographic Brazil, Veja, and Marie Claire. Selling images for advertising production in Brazil and abroad, and provide photos for books such as “Natural do Maranhão”, “Brasil Caminhos e Destinos”, “Litoral do Brasil”, “Patrimônios da Humanidade do Brasil”, often revealing a country still unknown to most Brazilians. I have dedicated myself also to special projects in Mozambique and Cape Verde in Africa. In 2007 and 2009, I won the Leica photo competition in Brazil .

© Christian Knepper


Š Christian Knepper


Š Christian Knepper


Š Christian Knepper


Tee Lip Lim 3rd Place

Every journey into photography is a discovery and learning experience. I relish every opportunities to produce thoughtprovokting still and moving images that create a juxtaposition to highlight certain relationships. Although my style is ever evolving therein lies a story or dramatic element behind it and tend to be abstract or conceptual.

Š Tee Lip Lim


© Tee Lip Lim


© Tee Lip Lim


© Tee Lip Lim


Stuart Chape 3rd Place


4th Zebra Awards Join us to celebrate the beauty of Black and White Photography Grand Prize $2000 $1 Entry Fee for Stage 1

Dealine: 31 December 2015 www.tzipac.com


Zebra Monochrome Magazine Issue 5  

Celebrating stunning black and white photography from award winning artists at our recent 3rd Zebra Awards. For more beautiful black and whi...

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