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LIAM ROBERTS ISTD 2012

STRATEGY & TYPE SPECIMEN

BRISTOL UWE


07

GRIDS 13

TYPE 21

EXPRESSIVE TYPE 31

COLOUR 39

IMAGERY 49

FURNITURE 53

OVERSIGHTS


This book is based around the Wimbledon Tennis Tournament 1985 Final, one of the greatest underdog stories to ever happen to modern Tennis and sports as a whole. The story is generally one over-shadowed by the great matches between John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg in the early 1980’s however this appears to be a more inspiring tale. Boris Becker, a seventeen year old unknown, unranked and unseeded player from Germany went on to win one of the most prestigious tennis tournaments in the world, outing several of the worlds greatest players. The newspaper shows both the road to the final and the final as a whole focusing mostly on Boris Becker himself. The reason I have chosen this story for the ‘It Happened On This Day’ brief is I believe it is a tale that everybody should know or have some idea of. With sport at the forefront of the Britain’s minds with the London 2012 Olympics due to start, and with Wimbledon Tennis Club being used twice in 2012, for the first time in its grand history. The newspaper aims to not only inform about the world of Tennis but to inspire, using the underlying message that you should never count yourself out. That there is a need to keep your head in the game, whatever game that may be, because you never know when some young buck is going to pip you to the post. This is a statement ever more relevant in the world of design. I started researching the project with a broad outlook, reading as many articles as possible to get a sense of the language I was going to be dealing with. I often had to translate large articles in German to understand how his homeland felt about him. Because of the match only being around 30 years ago, a lot of articles still remain on the subject. I gathered sources from all over the world trying to find as little bias as possible, though bias reports often came with more interesting language. This provided me with a great base for the story. To delve deeper I contacted Boris Becker himself to ask a few questions though he only replied with one statement on the matter, this later became the quote on the inside front page of the newspaper, “It was my own personal lunar landing.” After failing to speak to the man himself I decided that I would go to the Musuem at the All England Wimbledon Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, and gather as much information as possible from


the place itself. This trip proved to be invaluable as being around the court itself inspired almost all imagery, colour decisions as well as some of the typeface choices. The reason I chose a newspaper for my entry was because of its link to a single day in history. You hear stories of people keeping newspapers of special days in history so I decided it would be a perfect medium. In keeping with themes of Tennis I decided it would be fitting to use the grid of the tennis court. A second grid was used with a baseline increment focusing on the score structure in order to give the reader a sense of the game. The placement of text and imagery throughout the book is a rather scattered approach though always adhering to the grid. This scattered look was used to represent the shots played in the game of Tennis. There are several types of shot represented by the changing of colours throughout the book, this is especially apparent in the page furniture. Shots in Tennis can be hit short, long, right or left and this is represented with the placement of key images or text around the pages. All the colours that are used, I gathered from the site itself in order to give a real sense of Wimbledon. As almost all of the writing for the newspaper is taken from secondary sources, all references are named in the back of the book instead of page by page. The individual references are not placed throughout the text itself as I thought this detracted from the look of the newspaper. Several articles have been slightly reworded or restructured in order to sustain the sense of narrative. The images that appear throughout are taken from lots of different sources, though I tried to use as many as possible from my trip to Wimbedon, as they are of a better quality. The target market for the newspaper is anybody with an interest in sports and also anybody who likes an underdog story. Across the newspaper I thoroughly explain the different rules and regulations of the sport. This is for the benefit of the readers who have never come across Tennis before, but is also written in a way that will further inform readers who are already familiar with the story. In selecting relatively easy to read articles I believe this newspaper would be able to be read by a wide audience with a large age range.


SECTION 01/07

GRIDS

7


Court Grid Page Size, 289mm Ă— 380mm Spread Size, 578mm x 380mm 1. 15mm 2. 21.875mm x16 3. 16.187mm x16 4. 4mm 5. 4mm 1 2 3 4 5

8

Standard newspaper size for British tabloids. This grid is only used on the pages showing the court. As shown, the grid was built based on the Tennis court to perfect proportion taking into consideration the outside court.


Main Book Grid Page Size , 289mm Ă— 380mm Spread Size, 578mm x 380mm 1. 15mm 2. 16.187mm x16 3. 15pt

15pt Baseline Grid. 15, 30, 40, and 50 are numbers used heavily throughout the book representating the scoring. Using a 15pt Baseline allows all the Point Sizes to be used fluidly through the book.

1 2 3

9


Court Grid 2 1. 15mm 2. 21.875mm x16 3. 16.187mm x16

1 2 3 4 5

10

4. 4mm 5. 4mm


The Court Grid, as well as fitting the Tennis court perfectly vertically, also fits in the grid horizontally to the same proportions.

11


SECTION 02/07

TYPE

13


Quotes & Folio 1. DIN, Regular 28pt Leading 30pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 Fisrt Line Left Indent -5mm Left Indent 5mm 2. Latin Modern Mono Prop, Oblique 12pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100

BECKER STYLE 1

“He had a tremendous feel for the ball, but no technique,” ION TIRIAC

2

“He had a tremendous feel for the ball, but no technique.” recalls his youth coach at the young Breskvar training facility. “...Immobile, slow and stubborn he was.” This made him hard to coach, so he became a training partner for girls. But it was his stubbornness and his will to win, which made him refine his talent. During the early eighties, he won his first junior tournaments and became increasingly ambitious. His game developed into a fast, well placed serve and great volleying skills at the net. He could supplement his pure serve-and-volley game with brilliant athleticism at the net. His trademark was considered to be the diving volley, his use of which endeared him to his fans. His heavy forehand and return serve were also very significant factors in his game-play.

12 He occasionally deviated from his serve-andvolley style to try to out-hit, from the baseline. Most tennis players are normally at their best whilst returning from their own service baseline. Though he possessed powerful shots from both wings, commentators often criticized this strategy. He frequently had emotional outbursts on court. Whenever he considered himself to be playing badly, he often swore at himself and occasionally smashed his rackets. In contrast to John McEnroe, the young man rarely showed aggression toward his opponents or officials. Also in contrast to McEnroe, his level of play and focus tended to be diminished rather than enhanced following these outbursts. He described his style as “Boom Boom”. This later became his nickname.

14


Titles & Body Text 1. DIN, Regular 40pt Leading 45pt & DIN, Bold 40pt Leading 45pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18 2. Latin Modern Mono Prop 12pt Leading 15pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100

DIMENSIONS & SCORING Tennis is played on a rectangular flat surface; at Wimbledon the court is grass. It measures is 78 feet long and 36 feet wide. Its width is 27 feet for singles matches and 36 feet for doubles matches. The service line is situated 21 feet from the net. The net is stretched across the full width of the court, parallel with the baselines, dividing it into two equal ends. The net is 3 feet 6 inches high at the posts, and 3 feet high in the centre. Additional clear space around the court is needed in order for players to reach overrun balls. A tennis match is composed of points, games, and sets. A match is won when a player or a doubles team wins the majority of prescribed sets. Traditionally, matches are either a best of three sets or best of five sets format. The best of five set format is typically only played in the Men’s singles matches at Majors and Davis Cup matches.

20

A set consists of a number of games (typically six to twelve) which in turn consist of points, with a tiebreak played if the set is tied at six games per player. Tennis scoring rests on the premise that serving is advantageous over receiving. Because of this it is only possible to win a set or match by breaking the opponent’s service game at least once, before a tiebreak is required. Likewise, it is not possible to win a tiebreak without winning at least one point during an opponent’s turn at serve.

1

A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving, and is won by the first player (or players) to have won at least four points by two points or more over their opponent. In scoring an individual standard game of tennis, the server’s score is always called first and the receiver’s score second. Score calling is unique to the sport of tennis in that each point has a corresponding call that is synonymous with that point value. Tennis is also the only sport in which a player can score more points and lose the match. In tennis, scoring in tie situations also varies. If each player has won three points, the score is described as “deuce” rather than “40-all”. From this point on, whenever the score is tied, it is described as “deuce” regardless of how many points have been played.

2

In standard play, scoring beyond a “deuce” score, in which both players have scored three points each, requires that one player must win two consecutive points in order to win the game. This type of tennis scoring is known as “advantage scoring”. In this type of scoring, the player who wins the next point after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with advantage loses the next point, the score is again deuce, since the score is tied. If the player with the advantage wins the next point, that player has won the game, since the player now leads by two points. The server may simply use players’ names; in professional tournaments the umpire announces the score in this format (e.g., “advantage McEnroe”). The current point score is announced before each point by the umpire. For example if the server, or the umpire, announces the score as “30-love” it means that the server has won two points and the receiver none.

15


Contents & Scoring 1. Optima LT Std, Demi 40pt Leading 45pt C=0 M=0 Y=90 K=0 2. Optima LT Std, Demi 30pt Leading 75pt C=O M=0 Y=90 K=0

PREVIOUS SETS

000 000 1

2

16

SETS G

K.CURREN V B.BECKER

0 0

INTRODUCTION

6

BEC

KEVIN CURREN

8

CUR

BECKER BECKER

10

TOU

BECKER STYLE

12

THE

WIMBLEDON

16

SPO

SCORING

20

SHO

GRASS

24

MAT

SEEDINGS

28


New Athletic M54 1. New Athletic M54 72pt Leading 75pt Paper 2. New Athletic M54 30pt Paper

I

1 “ I' M G O IN G O N c O U R T T O f ig h t I t o w in

B O R IS B E C K E R 2

17


Captions 1. DIN, Regular 8pt Text Frame Options - Inset Spacing - Top 1.5mm C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100

KEVIN CURRUN

Though he never won a Grand Slam singles title, Curren did win 4 Grand Slam doubles titles. In 1981 he won the US Open mixed doubles, and in 1982 he won the Wimbledon mixed doubles. Also in 1982 both men’s doubles and mixed dbles at the US Open. During his career, Curren won 5 top level singles titles and 26 doubles titles. The highest he ranked during his career was World No.5 in singles and World No.3 in mixed doubles. His final singles title came in 1989 at Frankfurt, and his last doubles title was won in 1992 in Seoul. Curren retired from the professional tour in 1993 and Since retiring from the tour, Curren has served as Captain of South Africa’s Davis Cup team.

9 THIRD SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

1

18

FOURTH SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985


Typeface Rationales Latin Modern Mono Prop After visiting the Wimbledon Museum I found that they been use a typeface that looks incredibly like Courier New. Researching further and asking the Museum Curator. I found that the font used was Latin Modern Mono Prop. As this is used in the Museum on displays informing of the history of matches and the tournament, I thought this would be fitting to use as my body type. DIN I decided to use DIN as one of the main fonts in my ISTD entry as it is a strong Germanic font. I believe this a fitting typeface because Boris Becker is German and speaks with an authoritative tone. The typeface it is often used for other tennis player’s words, this is to represent an outsiders view on a German and also to represent that he isn’t so different from some of the all the time greatest tennis players of all time. New Athletic M54 This is a typeface specifically designed with sports use in mind. The reason I used it in my ISTD entry was I believe this typeface emulates the court markings with its angular look. Optima Originally using DIN for the scoring and contents, I realised that it wasn’t the typeface used on the scoring system itself. I then made some phone calls to Wimbledon, The LTA and the manufacturer of the score-boards, and discovered that the typeface used on the Wimbledon score-boards and all other UK based Tennis events is Optima.

19


SECTION 03/07

EXPRESSIVE TYPE

21


Expressive Type 1 1. New Athletic 300 pt Leading 90pt Paper Background C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18

1

22

BOOM BOOM


Expressive Type 2 1. DIN, Bold 150pt Leading 150pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18 2. Line 4pt Paper

I LOVE TO WIN

1

2

01/04 BORIS BECKER

23


Expressive Type 3 1. DIN, Bold 600pt Paper 2. DIN, Bold 40pt Leading 45pt Paper

HER I WANT TO BE A

14

24


RO BORIS BECKER

25


Expressive Type 4 1. New Athletic 140pt Leading 150pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 k=15 2. New Athletic 140pt Leading 150pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 k=45

1

2

3

4 26

5

26

OTHER PLACES AND& MEMORIES FADE


3. 2. New Athletic 140pt Leading 150pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 k=70 4. 2. New Athletic 140pt Leading 150pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 k=85 5. 2. New Athletic 140pt Leading 150pt C=0 M=0 Y=0 k=95

WIMBLEDON ONLY GETS BRIGHTER

27

BORIS BECKER

27


Expressive Type 5 1. New Athletic M54 72pt Leading 75pt Paper 2. Lines 3pt C=45 M=0 Y=100 K=0 3. Lines 1pt C=45 M=0 Y=100 K=0

1

2

3

BJORN BORG

28


Expressive Type Rationales Expressive Type 1 The overlapping Boom Boom is a representation of how the commentators would shout this nickname. Boom Boom was said with no space between the two words, here I have displayed it phonetically, “Booboom”. His nickname is in reference to his hard-hitting style. Expressive Type 2 This shows one of four pages that are similar in style. The quote is fragmented due to the nature of how he said statement, taking a breath in between each stage. The lines breaking through the type are representative of the lines of the court as you can see as he spoke the words he was recalling previous games. Expressive Type 3 The large size and contrast in the size of the type is to represent the size of the young player’s aspirations to become one of the best tennis players of all time. Expressive Type 4 The colour of the type fades in order to highlight the words of the quote getting darker and lighter, like the text suggests. Expressive Type 5 Using Illustrator CS5 I made the type appear as if it was embedded in the grass itself. The reason I believe this is fitting is because the quote is about the grass. This a quote is showcased proudly on the Wimbledon website.

29


SECTION 04/07

COLOUR

31


Colour 1 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0

32

This colour is used throughout the newspaper because it is one of the two colours used by Wimbledon in logos and everything associated with the club.


Colour 2 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18

This colour is used throughout the newspaper because it is one of the two colours used by Wimbledon in logos and everything associated with the club.

33


Colour 3 C=42 M=0 Y=100 K=0

34

This colour is used throughout the newspaper to represent the colour of the grass at the Wimbledon club.


Colour 4 C=0 M=0 Y=90 K=0

This is the yellow used in the score board of the tournament. Though it doesn’t appear so much any more at the tournament it used to feature during every game.

35


Colour 5 C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100

36

Black of this depth is the representative of the newspaper printing process, keeping it in conjunction with traditional styles. It isn’t a deep black to allow from the 4-colour plate process anymore than 240 ink coverage would appear smudged.


Colour 6 Paper

Paper is also used in order to represent traditional newspaper style. White space is also used heavily because of the clubs all white colour scheme set for the players.

37


SECTION 05/07

IMAGERY

39


Image Effect 1 Bitmap, Halftone Screen 75 Pixels/Inch Frequency 10 - Angle 180 Degrees Gradient Map, C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18 - Paper

V 40


Image Effect 2 1. C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 Box Over Grayscale Image Multiply Effect 1. C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18 Box Over Grayscale Image Multiply Effect

The main show courts, Centre Court and No.1 Court are normally only used for two weeks a year, during the Championships, but play can extend into a third week in exceptional circumstances. The remaining seventeen courts are regularly used for other events hosted by the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.

LEFT LUGGAGE E

The principal court, Centre Court, was opened in 1922 when the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club moved from Worple Road, to the current, Church Road. The Church Road venue was larger and was needed to meet the ever growing public demand.

TOILETS TOILETS OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS FIRST AID

Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam event played on grass courts. At one time all the Majors, except the French Open, were played on grass. The US Open abandoned grass for a synthetic clay surface in 1975. The Australian Open abandoned grass for Rebound Ace, a different type of hard surface, in 1988.

INFORMATION DRINKING FOUNTAIN THE AUTOMOBILE TELEPHONE ASSOCIATION

20

TO VIEWIN WIMBLEDON DESIGNATED WHEELCHAIR 17 COMMON

0

2 RECOMMENDED ROUTES FOR WH S

O

TICKET HOLDERS’ ENTRANCES

M E R

BROAD

SE

CENTR NON-TICKET HOLDERS’ ENTRANCE

T

RO

PRIVATE AND CONTRACTORS’ ENT

AY

AD

AD

NE

W

E POINTS ACCESS ST

16

W

UNRESERVED SEATING

PR CE

15

TH MI BU

THE WIMBLEDON SHOP REFRESHMENTS

CO CO

14

CAR PARK

USED TENNIS BALL KIOSK

3

ME EN

PROGRAMME OFFICE YARDS LOST PROPERTY TAXIS (SOUTH)

50

13

COVERED COURTS

C

TOILETS

18

TOILETS OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS

COVERED COURTS

12

FIRST AID

SOM

CEMTRE COURT // LIAM ROBERTS

INFORMATION

LEFT LUGGAGE D

CAR PARK

1

TELEPHONE

1

BUSES FOR PARK & RIDE

DESIGNATED WHEELCHAIR VIEWING – AORANGI TERRACE RECOMMENDED ROUTES FOR WHEELCHAIR USERS

MA

TICKET HOLDERS’ ENTRANCES

PRIVATE AND CONTRACTORS’ ENTRANCES ACCESS POINTS UNRESERVED SEATING THE WIMBLEDON SHOP REFRESHMENTS

2

USED TENNIS BALL KIOSK

YARDS

50

RR

YA

T

RO

AD

BUSES FOR WIMBLEDON

NON-TICKET HOLDERS’ ENTRANCE VIA THE TURNSTILES

COURT NO.1 // LIAM ROBERTS

ERS

DRINKING FOUNTAIN

100

41


Image Effect 3 Image, Mode, Bitmap, Halftone Screen 200 Pixels/Inch Frequency 15 Angle 180 Degrees

HER I WANT TO BE A

14

42


RO BORIS BECKER

43


Image Effect 4 Gradient Map C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=0 - C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100

The second set ran more balanced than the first. Early on in the set Becker kicked the ball like a football, which created cheerful laughter from the audience. With no fear, again and again, Boris danced at the baseline; it wasn’t until late in the set he began to fall short. He brought his own service games through safely, nevertheless, Curren turned around his 4-2 lead and finally won this set with 7-6. The game had now reached a turning point. Boris seemed to have lost his cool. He began to quarrel, complain and gesticulate wildly. The 27 year old Curren then took his opportunity and got the upper hand. With the score at 3-3 for the first time Becker lost his serve, Curren was ecstatic, after 2 hours and 4 minutes for the first time in the final, he had the lead. Everyone expected a turnaround in this match, “The experienced Curren forces the young men to their knees.” The Wimbledon commentator shouted, “But not Becker”. Boris fought for every ball and dived and danced over the sandy soil of Wimbledon. Again, it went into the tiebreak. Becker decided it quickly with a 7-3 win. For the first time in the match he unleashed the Becker fist and his mother Elvira smiled in the stands.

FOURTH SET // KEVIN CURREN // TENNIS WAREHOUSE

42

SET 2 CURREN 7-6

FIRST SET // BORIS BECKER SERVING // TELEGRAPH

44


FURST SET // BORIS BECKER // BBC

SECOND SET // BORIS BECKER // BBC

THIRD SET // BORIS BECKER // TENNIS WAREHOUSE

43

SET 3 BECKER 7-6 FOURTH SET // BORIS BECKER // TELEGRAPH

45


Image Effect 5 Image Strectched 16x Original Size

I

“ I' M G O IN G O N c O U R T T O f ig h t t o w in I

39

B O R IS B E C K E R

46


Image Effect Rationales Image Effect 1 This image effect was used in order to try and take the reader back to the eighties with its grainy and line like structure, similar to television at the time. Image Effect 2 This effect is used all around the Wimbledon complex and is how they choose to represent themselves in their branding. Image Effect 3 This effect was also influenced by eighties television and by the games featuring tennis that were beginning to be released. Image Effect 4 Black and White imagery is used to give the reader a sense of the story’s place in the past. This is a technique commonly used in film. Also the image placement represents the rarity of balls hitting the same location and different types of shots that can be played. Image Effect 5 Inspired by the game ‘Wimbledon’ for the Sega Master System which is a game featuring the two competitors. I use this effect to once again give the sense that it was very much at the heart of the eighties and popular culture.

47


SECTION 06/07

FURNITURE

49


Page Furniture For Columns 1. 1 Column 1pt Line C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18 2. 2 Columns 1pt Line C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18

1

2

50

The Page furniture is scattered throughout the pages helping to lead the eye and suggest the grid. They are used in several colours, lengths and direction to indicate the varying styles of shot that the ball can be hit during a match.


Page Furniture For Rows & Folio 1. 1 Row 1pt Line C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18 2. 2 Rows 1pt Line C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=100 C=100 M=20 Y=4 K=0 C=70 M=100 Y=0 K=18

1

2

51


SECTION 07/07

OVERSIGHTS

53


Oversight 1 Paragraph Scructure

Word sticking out towards the end of this paragraph which makes the paragraph structure look ugly.

Curren as a boy, quickly rose among the ranks as a junior at Montclair Lawn Tennis Club in Durban, South Africa. At college he played tennis for the University of Texas and won the NCAA singles title in 1979. He turned professional later that year, and won his first top level singles title in the 1981 season at Johannesburg. In 1985, Kevin Curren reached the final at Wimbledon with the help of his coach Tony Roche. After defeating future champion Stefan Edberg in the fourth round in straight sets, 7-6, 6-3, 7-6, he comprehensively eliminated World No.1 John McEnroe in the quarter finals 6-2, 6-2, 6-4 and World No.3 Jimmy Connors in the semifinals 6–2, 6–2, 6–1. Curren was the first player to beat both the legends in the same Grand Slam event. McEnroe later commented that he had difficulty in dealing with Curren’s highly individualistic and very fast serving. It was hard to read and tended to produce low balls that would skip on the grass courts.

THIRD SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

When he reached the final against Becker the match was very heated and intense. Becker sent several hostile glares to Curren before and after each point. On one of the final changeovers, Becker even bumped Curren’s shoulder as they passed one another. After his defeat, Curren was noted as saying that he thought the game would see an increase in the number of successful young players, and predicted they would have more intense, but shorter, careers.

8

FOURTH SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

FIRST SET // KEVIN KURREN // EUROSPORT TV,1985

54


Oversight 2 Widow

DIMENSIONS & SCORING Tennis is played on a rectangular flat surface; at Wimbledon the court is grass. It measures is 78 feet long and 36 feet wide. Its width is 27 feet for singles matches and 36 feet for doubles matches. The service line is situated 21 feet from the net. The net is stretched across the full width of the court, parallel with the baselines, dividing it into two equal ends. The net is 3 feet 6 inches high at the posts, and 3 feet high in the centre. Additional clear space around the court is needed in order for players to reach overrun balls. A tennis match is composed of points, games, and sets. A match is won when a player or a doubles team wins the majority of prescribed sets. Traditionally, matches are either a best of three sets or best of five sets format. The best of five set format is typically only played in the Men’s singles matches at Majors and Davis Cup matches.

20

A set consists of a number of games (typically six to twelve) which in turn consist of points, with a tiebreak played if the set is tied at six games per player. Tennis scoring rests on the premise that serving is advantageous over receiving. Because of this it is only possible to win a set or match by breaking the opponent’s service game at least once, before a tiebreak is required. Likewise, it is not possible to win a tiebreak without winning at least one point during an opponent’s turn at serve.

A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving, and is won by the first player (or players) to have won at least four points by two points or more over their opponent. In scoring an individual standard game of tennis, the server’s score is always called first and the receiver’s score second. Score calling is unique to the sport of tennis in that each point has a corresponding call that is synonymous with that point value. Tennis is also the only sport in which a player can score more points and lose the match. In tennis, scoring in tie situations also varies. If each player has won three points, the score is described as “deuce” rather than “40-all”. From this point on, whenever the score is tied, it is described as “deuce” regardless of how many points have been played. In standard play, scoring beyond a “deuce” score, in which both players have scored three points each, requires that one player must win two consecutive points in order to win the game. This type of tennis scoring is known as “advantage scoring”. In this type of scoring, the player who wins the next point after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with advantage loses the next point, the score is again deuce, since the score is tied. If the player with the advantage wins the next point, that player has won the game, since the player now leads by two points. The server may simply use players’ names; in professional tournaments the umpire announces the score in this format (e.g., “advantage McEnroe”). The current point score is announced before each point by the umpire. For example if the server, or the umpire, announces the score as “30-love” it means that the server has won two points and the receiver none.

55


Oversight 3 Unexpected Space

Text & Information:

Imagery Sources:

The Hindu Times

Die Zeit

Deutsche Welle

Sports Illustrated

80’s-Tennis.com

BBC Archive

Wimbledon.com

Sports Journal

BorisBecker.com

Telegraph Online

The Wimbledon Meseum

Liam Roberts

Sporthelden.de

Tennis Warehouse

Sports Illustrated

Sporting-Heroes.com

The LTA

Wimbledon.com

Wikipedia

Eurosport TV

The New York Times Liam Roberts Hannah Tribe

56

Designed by:

Copy Edited:

Liam Roberts

Hannah Tribe Alexandra Nicholson


Changes After correcting the Oversights I have highlighted other changes I would make. Having the time, I would have not used a block colour that would show through onto the front page. Also the paper is slightly thinner to what I would have liked and planned for in the printing process. Unbeknown to me the test print in which I received had been printed differently by the same company and therefore the results were different. Dispite these small issues I am extremely happy with the end product that I have created and I would like to thank ISTD for letting me partake on a great brief.

57


LIAM ROBERTS



1985 Wimbledon Final: On This Day type specimen