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yler jordan blazer • 12351 daisywood dr •

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t yler jordan blazer t y l e r. blaz er@ gmail. com 865 . 7 7 6. 8666 Marco Polo describes a bridge, stone by stone.

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“But which is the stone that supports the bridge?” Kublai Kahn asks. “The bridge is not supported by one or another,” Marco answers, “but by the line of the arch that they form.” Kublai Kahn remains silent, reflecting. Then he adds: “Why do you speak to me of the stones? It is only the arch that matters to me.” Polo answers: “Without stones there is no arch.”

-From Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino

yler jordan blazer • 12351 daisywood dr • knoxville, tn • 37932 • tblazer@utk.edu • 865.776.8666

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rchitecture

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raphic design

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ravel

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rchitecture sixth and peabody p. 6 decker + p.14 halls medical

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wisła bulwary

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Ce n t e r for S u s t a i n a b l e E d u c a t i o n Na s h v il l e , T N ted shelton, fourth year | fall The Avenue of Sciences is a redevelopment of the 6th Avenue corridor in Nashville, Tennessee. One of the strongholds of the corridor is the plan for the Center for Sustainability Education. This multi-functional facility is located on a triangular plot between Lafayette Avenue, Peabody, and 6th Avenue. A few blocks to the north is where the new Music City Center anchors one end of the Avenue of Sciences while the Adventure Science Center terminates the opposing end of the axis just beyond the interstate fly over. The multifunctional programmatic needs provided for a challenging design proposition. The predominate request was to maintain most of the square footage as for public usage with minimal obstructions due to the demands of the private or semiprivate spaces. Most of the public spaces are located on the first and second floors with access to the more private and semi-private spaces limited to the third floor. Multi-public access points address the various programmatic needs where some parts of the facility are able to be sectioned off from the public.

si xth a n d p eabody

On top of the dynamic programmatic needs, the design needs to be conscientiously sustainable in order to self-promote the uses of the building. As an educational facility the building needs to act as a teaching tool to demonstrate some of the leading building practices and designs that promote sustainability, whether active or passive.


As a means of promoting alternative modes of transportation, minimal parking is provided. To offset the parking needs bike racks along with changing and showering facilities accessible by the public were integrated for bike commuters not only of the facility but for employees of the downtown area. A transit bus stop is also promoted within the design. These options seek to not only provide for the facility but also encourage interaction with the urban lifestyle of downtown Nashville.

An intensive array of photovoltaic panels, wind turbines engineered for more silent operation, and a ground-coupled geothermal heat pump system provide renewable energy not only for the new facility but also address much of the district energy needs for the surrounding blocks. This approach is practical for addressing the future needs of the area. Sustainable communities find the most success in providing for renewable district energy sources.

The Center for Sustainable Education provides for a sustainable lifestyle that connects with the urban fabric of the denser urban areas to the north. To address the urban aesthetics a variation of façade treatments were utilized along the 6th Avenue as well as Peabody boundaries. Multiple setbacks as well as construction techniques not only provide for visual interest in the façade but also indicate programmatic changes. Extensive solar shades line the façade on the south and west facades in order to mitigate solar heat gain during the warmer months while trombe walls take advantage of the lower sun angles during the cooler months to offset heating needs.

As an overall design stance, Nashville’s Center for Sustainability Education is a teaching tool for the community. By providing a point of interaction with the community and not acting as a stand-alone building the idea of promoting more sustainable practices is the greatest success of this facility. By promoting a sustainable lifestyle this facility encroaches on spurring future developments not only along the Avenue of Sciences Corridor but also establishes a precedent for future developments in the Nashville area.

shifts and pulls

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shifts and pulls

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daylighting

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Cast-in place concrete structure

STRUCTURAL AXON

1FT Stepped Foundation

Cast-in-place Concrete Bearing Wall

12" concrete slab flooring with rigid insulation to reflect radiant floor heating into Flex space above

Vegetated Butterfly Roof over Auditorium

Vegetated Butterfly Roof over Auditorium

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12" Built up concrete roof with white EPDM to support solar array

Vegetate Butterfly Roof

12" built-up concrete roof with white EPDM

0'

5'

10'

20'

40'

96"x72"x18" Rectangular Footing (Typ)

W 27x84 Transfer Beam

W 10x49 Typ. Column

Vegetated Green Roof Terrace

12" Concrete Slab Flooring with Zoned Radiant Floor Heating (Typ)

18K3 Series Bar Joist (Typ)

Vegetated Green Roof

Hot Rolled Steel Structure with Purlins

Standing Seam Metal Roofing


ma ry l a n d in s t it u t e c o l l e g e o f a r t de cke r l ib r a r y a d d i t io n matt hall, second year | spring

In an effort to broaden the image of Maryland Institute College of Art’s presence in Baltimore, MICA has recently completed two grand projects that not only demand attention in form but also strategically become beacons for this area of the city. In addition to these projects, there is a need to connect between these points. The Decker Library is heavily burdened with the art and architectural collections and is in desperate need of expanding. Some of the key points of need are a central point of campus, increased security, and a connection between the new student dormitory as well as the student center. Set in a cross-path between the new dormitory and student center, the library addition is an essential gathering spot for students.

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The program is lifted to maximize outdoor spaces and takes advantage of the sloping site. Pushes and pulls within the building allocate public and private spaces. The give and take of form maximizes the area of the envelope in order to provide for natural daylight as well as enable passive solar shading. A centralized light well provides for natural ventilation that crosses between floors and provides adequate light for reading deep within the program. The courtyard spaces on the exterior reflect give and takes not only in the x-plane and y-plane but also indicates this transformation within the z plane. These activate the landscape by providing planting beds as well as benched seating to facilitate student leisure.

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ha l l s m e d ic a l c e nt e r me dica l offi ce a nd l e a s e s p a c e scott kinzy, third year | fall

Addressing the needs to expand a doctor’s practice as well as provide a source of income, the hall’s medical center is a brief introduction into the economics along with design. Feasibility studies with an intermediary economics class demonstrated how design choices such as materials, square footage, and even site work all effect the overall cost per square foot of a design. Important to note is that the cost was not indicated as a design hindrance but rather a more practical approach to remind the designer that a design solution is more complex than just the aesthetics of the space. Even product choices are critical in knowing how they can effect the health, safety, and welfare of the occupants. Noting the current site conditions as backing into a sharply rising hill, my intent is to capture the landscape as an important focal point of the patient’s experience. The overall design favors a grouping of exam rooms as well as support spaces that reflect a patient-centered environment where the healing process begins not only by today’s current resources in medicine, but an overall support group of family, friends, and loved ones.

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The healing process is not a mere solitude process, but rather an intertwined network of a support system. Ideally, this support system has always been in practice within the medical field; perhaps with more of an emphasis on the patient’s experience during a doctor’ appointment, one can experience a safer environment where he can trust his doctor’s knowledge and accountability.

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Exam Room

Doctor Office

Doctor Office

Exam Room

Doctor Office

Doctor Office

Exam Room

Doctor Office

Doctor Office

Exam Room

Exam Room

Exam Room

Exam Room

Exam Room

Exam Room

Exam Room

Exam Room

Procedure Room

Procedure Room

Women's Patient Restroom

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Nurse/Doctor Notes Station

Exam Room

Men's Patient Restroom

Pharmacy Sample & Storage

Waiting Room

Mechanical Room & Storage Staff Restroom

Nurse's Station

Nurse's Office

Business Area

Business Office

X-Ray

Reception Desk

Break Room

Lab Restroom

Lab

Lab Waiting Area

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By removing the double-loaded corridor as a basic plan it allows for a more concentrated approach of having pod-like quarters for the patients rooms where the doctor is capable of monitoring his patients in a more efficient manner. A centralized nurses station also utilizes viewpoints to all the exam rooms in order to facilitate appointments in a timely manner. The exam rooms all have views to some aspect of nature: whether via ample clerestory windows or a bank of windows that frame the undeveloped hillside behind the site. By providing this patient-centered medical clinic while still providing adequately private spaces for the doctors as well, one can escape from the ordinary and connect with nature.

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brick piers anchor the northern facade standing seam metal roof caps shed roof that provides adequate daylight a counterimposed standing seam metal roof welcomes patients with a covered drop-off a 4� hollow core bearing wall conceals structural metal while providing the look of a brick parti wall

a change of materials from brick to metal differentiates the entry portal

alterations of the facade placement reveals changes within the program beyond

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w is ł a r iv e r b u l w a r y k r a ko w, p o l a nd bartek hominski, fourth year | spring

A vital part of my education was the experience to study abroad in Kraków, Poland in the Spring of 2010. The opportunities to travel as well as other organized trips was a life-changing part of my understanding of architecture as a more complete picture. Architecture is beyond the built environment but also reflects history and culture of an area. This understanding places value on how my projects should provide for a lasting impact on society. The site of concern is a swath of land across the Wisła River from the historic counterparts of Krakow: including Wawel Castle, Kazimierz, and the decadent Old Town of Kraków. Currently on the land is a New Brutalism structure once hosting the Four Star Hotel Forum. The structure now sits predominantly vacant since 2002 after the hotel was stripped of its rank due to structural limitations among other complications after being sold to another hotel chain.

wis ła bulwa ry

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Observations of the shifts in the urban grid of Kraków lend a distinct look at how Kraków has changed as an urban center in Poland throughout the past millennia. The original 10th Century Okul settlement served as the central point of settlement with the construction of Wawel Castle shortly following. Okul served as a place of residency for the servants to the King and his Court of Poland. The linkage between the 13th Century Old Town and Wawel Castle followed along prominent trade routes. The development of the town of Kazimierz in the 14th Century and the expansion of the city in the 19th Century became vital districts to Krakow’s urban fabric before the rise of a Social government in the 20th century, which quickly marred historical growth patterns. Mundane linear alignments of housing and medium-sized high-rise social blocks began to dominate the outskirts of Krakow before the fall of Communism in the early 1990s.

13 th C. | CITY CENTER

19th C. | CITY GROWTH

19th C. | CITY GROWTH

10 th C | OKUL SETTLEMENT

10 th C | OKUL SETTLEMENT

WAWEL CASTLE HILL

WAWEL CASTLE HILL

KEY VIEWPOINTS

14th C. | KAZIMIERZ

20th C. | SOCIAL HOUSING

KEY VIEWPOINTS

MAJOR ARTERIES

MAJOR ARTERIES

GREEN SPACE

CHANGING URBAN FABRIC

CHANGING URBAN FABRIC

14th C. | KAZIMIERZ

20th C. | SOCIAL HOUSING

SITE LOCATION AND HISTORY SITE LOCATION AND HISTORY

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Major arterial routes as well as key viewpoints of Wawel Castle and of the views down the Wisła River provided for vital influences within the design approach. The requirements were to address the need for residential as well as commercial space along the Bulwary, or boulevard. Taking note of the major grid orientations and viewpoints, the design notes the major shift of the urban fabric and captures a sense of creating a secondary place for the public to collect and gather after the Old Town of Kraków.

13 th C. | CITY CENTER

GREEN SPACE

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PLAN AT 1:500

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

PARKING

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

VIEW FROM PLAZA LOOKING WEST

VISTULA RIVER

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EACH SHIFT REPRESENTS NOT ON OF A CITY BUT OF THE IDEA OF A CAPABLE OF ADAPTING TO NEW I EVEN NEW TECHNOLOGIES.

THESE TO VANTAGE POINTS CREA FABRIC OF THE SITE. THESE SHIFTS IN THE FACADES BUT THROUGH T PARTICULAR PAVING ARTICULATIO

LOCATED ACROSS THE VISTULA R SITE PROMOTES SUFFICIENT PHYS ACCESS TO OTHER PARTS OF THE PROVE TO BE ESSENTIAL IN DESIG RESPECTS BOTH VIEWS OF THE CI MAINTAINING THE VIEW OF WAW ING THE VISUAL AXIS FROM THE N THE STREET TOWARDS THE PEDES SOON TO BE BUILT.

BY TAKING ADVANTAGE OF PRE-E URBAN LAYOUT EXEMPLIFIES AN VARYING URBAN FABRICS CURREN IMITY TO THE BULWARY SITE.

URBAN

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DIAGRAMMATIC SECTION OF PROGRAM

SHIFTS WITHIN BUILDING

VIEW FROM PLAZA LOOKING NORTH

Shifts within not only the plaza but also within the structure of the buildings along the plaza spaces articulate the focal points of Wawel Castle as well as the series of bridges down the Wisła River. Adequate space for sidewalk cafes as well as street vendors provide for more life within the plaza. Groundfloor retail as well as upper floor residential and office units create life within this once seemingly desolate area of Kraków while maintaining a large proportion of open space for recreation along the Wisła River.

SITE PLAN AT 1 : 2000


raphic design field in motion

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two-page double spread

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stationery system

p.38

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field in motion diane fox, fourth year | fall

This project involves multiple design constraints and challenges in order to cohesively tie between a prescribed use of rectangles and fonts. The first part of the project includes iterations of designing movement through the arrangement of a minimum of twenty rectangles where one must be of a gray tone. Critical in the process of design is showing motion, balance, tension, or other prescribed adjectives that enlighten the observer. The secondary part is a response that shows a translation or reproduction of the first composition through a process of research and experimentation with fonts that best captures the first part of the project. The final result is a graphic representation of both steps that demonstrates the challenges and discoveries of a composition of shapes and text. The outcome of the project demonstrates that the composition and stroke of text is just as crucial within the design process where one must be critical in observation.

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Santiago Calatrava

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oday it is clear that Milwaukee’s gamble has paid off in the form of a striking monument that is at once a strong personal statement and a sensitive essay in the making of place. While visitors may flock to the Milwaukee Art Museum addition to glimpse the bird-like brise-soleil, they are likely to come away realizing that the device is not an isolated gimmick, but simply the most visible part of an inspired, carefully conceived whole. What makes the building fly is Calatrava’s singular fusion of sculpture and structure. In its finished state, the addition conveys the impression of a powerful whole even though it is made up of three distinct elements: a low-slung gallery building that extends southward from Saarinen and Kahler wings; a 250-foot-long, cable-stayed pedestrian bridge that

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t wo-pa ge d o u b l e s p r e a d s diane fox, fourth year | fall

The challenge of the double page spread is to take an existing magazine article or journal entry of a building and to provide balance and composition of text and image that best reflects the architecture of the subject. The choice of font, colors, and images are critical in conveying an overall graphic presentation that reflects cohesiveness between both spreads. Important to note is the requirement to provide a minimum of one pull-out quotation as well as captions for a minimum of 5 images of the project.

1-Time-lapse view of brise-soleil from Kiley’s gardens.

2-The Schroeder Galleria runs the length of the Milwaukee Art Museum addition along the west side. 3-The glass ans steel skylight under the brise-soleil unveals a strikingly grand,sunlit reception hall. 4- One of the preliminary watercolor sketches in Calatrava’s design of the museum addition. 5-The museum’s brise-soleil appears like a nautical sculpture at the termination of Wisconsin Avenue. 6, 7, 8- The brise-soleil takes nearly four minutes to completely open.

2 links the museum to downtown Milwaukee; and the brise-soliel, which sits atop a steel-framed reception hall and consists of 72 paired steel fins. Driven by hydraulic motors, the fins ostensibly are there to control the temperature and light in the reception hall, but they also give the museum a landmark presence it never had underneath the war memorial. While reaction has been favorable, some critics have observed that, by separating the grand reception hall from the more modest gallery building, Calatrava has dodged the conflict between the container and the contained that must be resolved if a building is to rank as a great art museum. Indeed, Calatrava’s addition has very little art in it. Just 12,000 of it’s 142,000 square feet are devoted to gallery space, with the rest going to public spaces like the reception hall. But Calatrava’s task was less to resolve the ongoing battle between art and architecture than to

recast the entire museum’s inner workings and identity. He did the former by shifting the public spaces out of the original Kahler’s wing and allowing the space they occupied to become galleries, thus giving the museum 30 percent more art-display space. He did the latter by creating a grand civic space and a new image for both the museum and its city. Take, for example, his deft handling of the spectacular shoreline site. He keeps the gallery building low to preserve views of Lake Michigan from the city. Throughout, he abstracts nautical imagery (sails, planks, prows, masts, soaring birds) to link the museum to the lake. While the blazing whiteness of the building appears to set it apart from Milwaukee’s somber vernacular, the color actually makes the block-long structure seem smaller than it would have otherwise and further links the building to its lakefront site by echoing the color sails.

“This is not spectacle, but art, a stunning and skillful transformation of heavyweight steel into a kinetic sculpture that seems as light as a bird’s wings.”

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3 Calatrava is equally good at relating his addition to both the city and to Saarinen’s war memorial. The sculptural presence of the brise-soleil culminates the axis of Wisconsin Avenue. Meanwhile, the addition echoes Saarinen’s cross-shaped plan, while Calatrava’s building opens up a genuine dialogue with Saarinen’se; the earlier structure, heavy and gray; the newer one, light and white – one trying to float but still earthbound; the other truly soaring one static, the other dynamic. When the brise-soliel unfolds, it is an event, one that beckons museumgoers outside with their video cameras. As the fins move upward, the sunshade resembles the bottom of an hourglass. This is not spectacle, but art, a stunning and skillful transformation of heavywheight steel into a kinetic sculpture that seems as light as a bird’s wings. Calatrava has designed moving buildings before, like his sphere-shaped City of Science in Valencia, Spain,

which has a cantilevered glass and concrete canopy that drops down over the façade like an eyelid over an eye. Yet the Milwaukee addition represents his most extensive effort in an aesthetic where buildings move or seem to move. The Milwaukee museum desperately needed to make a powerful visual statement, and Calatrava gave it to one with modern machinery that can instantly transform the building’s appearance. As the rest of the exterior demonstrates, Calatraca is a master of this kinetic genre. His cable-stayed bridge in Milwaukee is a structural tour de force; it’s wafer-thin steel deck makes it seem to float. There are other memorable flourishes, like the gallery building, which culminates, on the addition’s south side, in a beautifully sculpted prow that recalls the extended fingers of a human. Calatrava speaks of his designs as a series of gestures, which seems

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appropriate because the building, like a sculpture, resembles a body moving through space. Yet befitting its role as architecture, the addition shapes space, as when the gallery building frames the stone forecourt to the west of the addition and, to it’s west, Kiley’s gardens. Their low-slung hedges aptly echo the horizontality of Calatrava’s building and the lakefront, but they have a presence of their own, with the hedges forming roomlike lawns. The final design strokes in the addition are the twin gallerias that flank the gallery and lead to the original buildings. Far from being mere passageways, the gallerias, which house changing displays of contemporary art, are destinations that are distinguished by the rhythmic, lyrical expression of their arching concrete ribs. The Milwaukee Art Museum addition superbly serves its complex program while creating an instant landmark. For Calatrava, it represents an

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enormously successful American debut – a powerful hint of what he may still accomplish by embedding structure into sculpture. - Blair Kamin

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skills

Many thanks,

Tyler Blazer

relevant coursework

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résumé University of Tennessee Pursuing a Bachelor of Architecture - 2006-2011 Oak Ridge National Lab Buildings Technology Center Guest Researcher, Intern Summer 2009 Hutchins Associate, P.C. Intern, Project Assistant Knoxville, TN Summer 2008 Studio 7 Architects Intern, Project Assistant Knoxville, TN Summer 2007 AIAS National AIAS Membership Committee Delegate Local Chapter Press Secretary, 2009 Grassroots Council of Presidents Delegate, 2009 Fall 2010 AIAS South Quad Planning Committee Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honors Society Dean’s List 2006-2009 Cum Laude 2006-2009 Spring 2010 UT Center for International Education Study Abroad Scholarship 2010 Scripps Networks Global Scholarship Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign AutoDesk Revit AutoCAD Energy Gauge Microsoft Office Proficiency in Mac and PC UTZero Construction Studio Presentation Design 1

t yler jordan blazer 12351 daisywood dr knoxville, tn 37932

My name is Tyler Blazer and I am a rising fifth year student at The University of Tennessee. I am interested in learning more about what your firm has to offer in the education coming months concerning any internship opportunities for the summer of 2010. Your correspondence with my uncle Jon Shull is what fueled more interest in researching your firm. I am looking to work full time after my semester studying abroad at the Cracow experience University of Technology until mid August. I find it interesting to see that your firm is highly involved within the administration of a building well beyond the construction phase. I admire the approach that your firm takes to ensure not only a successful commissioning of a building but also ensure that the owner is happy beyond the initial stage of occupying the space. I also admire your firm’s involvement in becoming more sustainable-oriented. I see that many new associates of yours are becoming LEED accredited. I am hoping to pursue LEED accreditation within the next year or so, and I see your firm as a valuable asset to my education within LEED. On a recent research on precedents I encountered your unique approach for the parking deck and data center for the Children’s Health System of Birmingham. My current studio projects reflect the urban design approach of respecting visual connections as well as tying in visual cues of scale and proportion within an urban context. I would like to honors and awards also be able to work for a firm that is successful at a residential scale such as the Golden Residence. Your award-winning designs are compelling: how the modern use of wood can still blend in well within a rural setting and still hold true to modern design principles of an open plan. I hope to contribute to these design philosophies and approaches as well as learn more about the architecture firm as a business aspect. Thank you for taking the time to look over my résumé, and I hope you have an interest in hiring me as an intern next summer. If you could call me within the next few weeks I would greatly appreciate setting up an interview via phone or person. I plan on traveling to Birmingham during Christmas break from December 12th through the 17th and would be more than happy to visit your firm for an interview. If I do not hear from you within the next week I will call you on December 6th to confirm my visit and to set up an interview.

t yler jordan blazer 12351 daisywood dr knoxville, tn 37932

Chris Giattina Giattina Aycock Architecture Group 1827 First Avenue North, Suit 100 Birmingham, Alabama 35203

s t a t i o ne r y s y s t e m diane fox, fourth year | fall

The stationery system provides for an expression of personality as well as objectives as an entrant into the professional world. Critical in the design were the careful choice and balance of color, font, and scale of the logo in coordination with providing a letterhead, business card, resumé as well as an envelope. The overall color choice as well as logo design reflects my interests within my initials. Upon closer observation one can see three initials within the logo along with a leaf motif to reflect the current accomplishments and achievements within my education.

tyler jordan blazer 12351 daisywood dr knoxville, tn 37932

Chris Giattina Giattina Aycock Architecture Group 1827 First Avenue North, Suite 100 Birmingham, Alabama 35203

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travel 41


Sforza Castle | Milan

Duomo \ Milan Top of Duomo | Milan

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Swiss Re Tower | London

Millennium Bridge | London

London, Chatham, and Dover Railway

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Krzyztopor Castle Ujazd, Poland

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Malbork Castle | Poland

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Winner of UT Study Abroad Photography Contest Gdรกnsk, Poland

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Gniew Castle Gniew, Poland

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Auschwitz, Poland

Nazi Occupation of Kraków Exhibit Schindler’s Factory, Kraków

Auschwitz-Birkenua Concentration Camps Poland

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Tyler Blazer's Sample Works Portfolio  

A collection of sample works illustrating my design skills and experiences though photography, graphic design, travels, and design studios.

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