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ACADEMIC WORK P.1

MEDIATHEQUE du MONTREAL

04

SOLAR DECATHLON

14

MATTER OUT OF PLACE

16

SUPERBURB

24

SOHO HOUSING

26

STAIR DESIGN

30

WATER TRANSIT

32

SANT’ IVO

34

WATERMAN TENNIS

38

INDIA TOWER

40

. ta  ble   [tey-buhl]      -noun architecture,  consisting  of   a  flat,  slablike  top supported on one or more legs or other supports

P r o j e c t m at t e r

o u t o f p l ac e

ta b l e T h i s a s s e m b l ag e o f m at e r i a l s c o n v e y e d t h e i m p o rta n c e of repurposing OBJECTS. the ta b l e s ta b i l i z e d f u n c t i o n & e rg o n o m i c f e at u r e s n e e d e d i n a wo r k I N G s u r fac e .

TOP VIEW


PROJECT DURATION [WEEKS]

15

YEAR COMPLETED

TEAM PROJECT

DRAFTING PROGRAM

A

06

a u toc a d

04

A

08

a u toc a d

15

07

SIDE VIEW

F RO N T V I E W


SKETCH MODELS SCALE1:500M

fa l l 2 0 0 6

/

1 5 w e e k p ro j e c t

Mediatheque

du

Montreal

location: Montreal, Quebec (Canada) professor: Nadia Anderson [in collaboration with teammate]

PROJECT: The location for the project is unique in terms of climate and culture. It has a developed concentration of a diverse, multilingual population consisting mainly of French and English speakers. The site, situated downtown, is a 50m by 80m plot with a heavy influx of pedestrians along the cross-roads Rue Bleury and Rene-Levesque. The brief asked to provide library stacks, center for new media, reading/ study spaces, children’s center, teen center, multiple cinemas and galleries, cafe, retail space, administrative offices, and parking and service spaces. Allocation for the existing public transit by foot or bike was encouraged to integrate with the required twenty-five percent of open public space.

INDIVIDUAL DUTIES: As a teammate, I worked diligently with my partner to produce work with equal contribution. I applied myself in every design element represented for this project.

04

F OA M S I T E M O D E L S C A L E 1 : 5 0 0 M


S I T E d i ag r a m s p o p u l at i o n & l a n g u ag e s t u d i e s

Stratification diagram that shows possible building entrance. Colors represent affinities. Block size not scaled but proportional to each program. building entrance

periodicals

conservation library stacks

study

teen

exhibition

upper level

garden new media stacks

main lobby -storefront office -storefront gallery youth

staff

rare books

library entry

cir. desk

cinema lobby restuarant

commercial

ground level loading sm. cinema mechanical

parking lg. cinema

underground STRATIFICATION DIAGRAM


t r a n s e c t d i ag r a m d o c u m e n t i n g s i t e t r a f f i c [ r e n d e r e d b y t e a m m at e ]

p ro g r a m m i n g d i g i ta l d i ag r a m s to s t u dy p ro g r a m m at i c e l e m e n t s

07


DESIGN: The design focus for the mediatheque became an initiative to promote international connectivity and emphasize the importance of educating and entertaining oneself. Massing the building into three “zones” allows for a tall sanctuary to store all books and media (zone one), while being divided by a circulation mediator (zone two), from the cinemas and theatrical aspect (zone three) of the building. The use of linear circulation within each “zone” allows for a familiar and repetitive way to navigate the mediatheque. Each program results in easy accessibility through the central spine of circulation.

zone 1

zone 2

zone 3

M O D E L W E S T E L E VA T I O N

M O D E L R E N D E R O F P RO J E C T O N T H E S I T E


l e v e l 6 A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

l e v e l 3 - 5 L I B R A RY S TAC K S

l e v e l 2 L I B R A RY S TAC K S / T E E N C E N T E R

l e v e l 1 m e d i a s tac ks / g a l l e ry

l e v e l 0 p e r i o d i c a l s / t h e at e r / c a f e

l e v e l - 1 yo u t h c e n t e r / c i n e m a l o a d i n g b ay

l e v e L - 2 C A R PA R K

09


d r aw i n g s e c t i o n d e t a i l s h o w i n g f a c a d e at tac h m e n t

M O D E LS C A L E 1 : 1 BU I L D I N G D E TA I L

10


MODELSCALE 1:50m SECTION MODEL


INTERIOR VIEWPERSPECTIVES INTO THE L I B R A RY S TAC K S & T H E M E D I AT O R

12

M O D E LS C A L E 1 : 1 BU I L D I N G D E TA I L


spring 2008

/

4 w e e k p ro j e c t

Solar decathlon location: Washington D.C. (National Mall) professor: Claire Cardinal-Pett [first semester of three, integrated studio competition]

PROJECT: I was to design an active/passive solar home acE S I Gsubmitted N cording to aDproposal by my studio for the entry in the Solar Decathlon biennial competition. The main concept for development, a courtyard was formed The was pre-fabricated unitwith consists of suburban the competition to INTERLOCK an existing three living home by fitting a housemodules: design of 800 s.f. on space, the vacantbetween area in the southern modules to allow privacy but also give room for dining/kitchen, sleeping This the back/front yard. Our team plannedspace. to create an extension produce to grow on edible facade. A off the existing house, allowing more nuclear/extended design harmonizes the room use offorpassive family to share plot ofsystems land, ultimately densifying the suburban bermed facadeB E becomes andtheactive while filtering rain R M E D F A C Athermal DE neighborhood. Theto extension was planned to produce enoughto insulate and finish the vegwater distribute throughout the mass energy to livehouse. off the Using grid with aim to eventually connect backlook that grows off the house. etative thean1920’s farm house in order to sell directly to the community. as harvested a jumpingenergy off point for the massing SIDE ENTRY My concept for the proposal was a pre-fabricated unit consisted of three modules: living space, dining/kitchen space and sleeping space. This design harmonized the use of passive and active systems while filtering rain water to be distributed throughout the house. For a precedent, I used the 1920’s farm house as a jumping off point for the program development. A courtyard was formed between the southern modules to allow privacy, which created a duality where it gave space for vegetables to grow on an edible facade. For the north, a bermed facade became thermal mass to insulate and finish the vegetative look of a green fabric woven with lush vine plants.

14


d r aw i n g s m a s t e r p l a n & f l o o r p l a n

water to distribut house. Using the 1 as a jumping off poin

MODELindividual scheme design

d i ag r a m t h e r m a l & v e n t i l at i o n c i rc u l at i o n

15


fa l l 2 0 0 7

/

1 5 w e e k p ro j e c t

matter

out of

place

[from image to haptic realm] location: College of Design: Ames, Iowa professor: Tom Leslie [Independent studio project]

PROJECT: Paul Bierman-Lytle coined the term “waste equals food” to express the concept that waste from one system should provide food for another. Through the scale of obsolete consumer products, I analyzed the disposal of materials and the cycle of material reuse to examine Bierman-Lytle’s theory. The destruction of an object needs to avoid harm on the environment through decomposing, recycling or reusing. I chose the method of reuse to develop a permanent installation (built mostly from reused material) for the college of design cafe to encourage other forms of reuse. The plan was to transcend the temporary solution set for the paper coffee cup (being manufactured out of non-recyclable material) that ultimately impedes the search for a sustainable approach to drinking coffee. There is no industrial design product that exists in the market to perform the needed task. Therefore, a creation of a product without a draw from a predecessor requires a unique approach. I began with assemblages of two-dimensional and three-dimensional collages in order to construct conceptual ideas to innovate the way the design took shape.

16

c o l L ag e 2 d a s s e m b l ag e o f r e p u r p o s e d o b j e c t s


18 k i t o f pa rt s t y p e w r i t e r c o m p o n e n t s


A . product pieces are disassembled from:

XEROX Lazor Printer

. part identification

. material

. designed purpose for machine

. energy put into manufacturing & producing

. hazardous to the environment

. example of substitute piece

. potential of recycling

. workability

shield cover screwed in on the sides of the mechanical center to protect main gears

central tray below fuser with vent holes for cooling fan

electric compression finishing roller

feed carttrige with rollers attached to 64 tooth gears, rotating rubber axles similtanieously for paper passage

ribbon wire

stepping motor powers the rollers that pass paper through machine

pressed 1/128 aluminum sheet metal

aluminum punched tray

aluminum shell clip 1.5� rubber roller, PVC body and steel axle

polyvinyl chloride(PVC) molded shell PVC axle and 64 toothed gears with rubber plunges, alluminum clips

interior structural base with solid rectalinear shape to fix central mechanical piece in place. air space allowed for fans to cool down mechanical parts when in use.

pass paper through printer with rubber rollers, using compression

light weight PVC mold with extruded fins that become the surface paper passes along for less resistence, fins curved to line up gears and axles.

PVC skin sandwiching conductive flat metal wires electrical conductor with insulation that organizes space in computer

steel case with copper sprockets, steel axle, electromagnets

block dust particles and abrassivesfrom contact with gears and printbed

Several mechanical and chemical stages occur to refine bauxite to recover alumina. Multiple passages through filters and heating alumina hydrate in 2,000° F kilns yield a white powder(pure alumina) which is electrochemically reduced to metallic aluminum. 1% of all the energy used in US is used to make aluminum. 6.2 kWH of electricity is required to produce 1 lb of aluminum from alumina. It takes 2 tons of alumina to make 1 ton of aluminum. STEEL- 22 million Btus expended for each ton of finished steel produced, production of steel from scrap requires approximately 39 % of the energy required for production of steel from raw materials by use of the basic oxygen furnace process

mechanically operate gears and rollers

Ethylene dichloride(EDC) is heated to form vinyl chloride monomer(VCM). Pressure is applied to VCM, dispersed in water as a suspension, in high pressure chambers at temperatures of 50-70°C. The role of water is to remove and control the heat given off in the polymerisation process. PVC forms as tiny particles which grow and when they reach a desired size the reaction is stopped and any unreacted vinyl chloride is distilled off and re-used. The PVC is separated off and dried to form a white powder.

shipped from china

non-biodegradable, produces poisonous hydrogen chloride gas and dioxin when burned, use of chlorine and carcinogenic VCM during manufacturing, toxic and potential endocrine-disrupting effects of various additives, toxics controlled when recycled, only 43% of vinyl comes from nonrenewable petroleum feedstocks

PVC emits toxic dioxin when burned.

non-biodegradable, difficult to recycle, off-gasses

non-biodegradable, non corrosive, non toxic, large consumption of fossil fuels,

non-biodegradable, non corrosive, non toxic, large consumption of fossil fuels,

screen, shelf cover,

drawer,

light fixture, structure,

storage unit, lid, table, structure

guard railing, tension members

fan motor,

recycling helps save large amounts of energy that goes into mining Bauxite, a reddish clay like ore that is rich in aluminum compounds.

paint coated aluminum leads to quality deterioration and yield rate is decreased due to oxidation,

overall recycling rate for steel is 66 %, zinc recovered from new and old galvanized steel scrap,

dioxin emissions are created by incinerators but with certain incinerator operations with temperature is key to controling dioxin formation, PVC is a huge contributor of chlorine for copper, steel, lead and other materials when recycled in facilities

more valuable to reuse to rebuild computers then melt PVC for wire.

recycle at local print and office supplies store; they use Amandi Services, Inc the first national e-waste recycling infrastructure

malleable, permeable, reflective, strong metal with high melting point,

malleable, permeable, reflective, strong metal with high melting point, attach structure to it,

strong, durable,

manipulate mold by drilling holes, rigid with crate like grid structure, clips for circular tube attachments, unique form disadvantage for easy use, strong, flexible,

bendable, durable, holds to folds, little conductivity,

steel case with bolt holes, electrical wiring, toothed axle head

STEEL ROD - pollution results from remanufacturing, take up valuable space in landfills, water pollution in ore mining, dispose of various sludges from manufacturing into the land,

d r aw i n g s c a l e 1 : 1 s e c t i o n o f l i g h t u n i t

A

A


DESIGN: The Locker/Shelf operated in conjunction with the cafe. This installation, made out of 80 percent reused materials, allowed students/faculty to store their reusable cup. When filled, it transformed into a colorful art sculpture for the students to interact with while waiting in line.

S h e l f d e ta i l o f a s s e m b l ag e

d r aw i n g e x p l o d e d a x o n o m e t r i c

d r aw i n g s e c t i o n


ACADEMIC WORK P.2

MEDIATHEQUE du MONTREAL

04

SOLAR DECATHLON

14

MATTER OUT OF PLACE

16

SUPERBURB

24

SOHO HOUSING

26

STAIR DESIGN

30

WATER TRANSIT

32

SANT’ IVO

34

WATERMAN TENNIS

38

INDIA TOWER

40

P ro j e c t EFFICIENCY P E N C I L C O N TA I N E R A N E I G H T I N C H B Y T E N I N C H S H E E T O F O PAQ U E P L E X I WA S U S E D T O F A B R I C A T E A F U N C T I O NA L O B J E C T W I T H O N E P E R C E N T WA S T E . T H I S C O N T A I N E R ASSEMBLES WITH NO ADHESIVEs. PERSPECTIVE VIEW


PROJECT DURATION [WEEKS]

10

YEAR COMPLETED

TEAM PROJECT

MODELING PROGRAM

S

05

sk e tc h u p

10

A

06

a u toc a d

06

S

06

sk e tc h u p

06

C

04

c in e m a 4d

07

07

F RO N T V I E W

SIDE VIEW


fa l l 2 0 0 5

/

1 0 w e e k p ro j e c t

superburb location: Boone, Iowa professor: Kevin Lair PROJECT: I was to propose a plan of urban development by using suburban sprawl, monoculture and row-crop development as a point of departure. I was designated a rural site for the master plan, located on the west bank of the Des Moines River outside of Boone, IA. The master plan densely splayed prefabricated modern style homes made out of switchgrass panels. The landscape encompassing each dwelling consisted of tall switchgrass plants laced with a permaculture of edible plants and vegetables. They are specifically grown for harvest on every plot of land while also creating a barrier between individual dwellings. Each switchgrass dwelling consisted of a facade that changed with the season by storing and distributing bales of switchgrass. This was a representation of a local “corn crib� where the volume of harvested crop creates multiple textures and undulating spacial relations.

24


S T U DY B U I L D I N G M AT E R I A L & FA B R I C W I T H I N C O M M U N I T Y

D R AW I N G S I T E S E C T I O N T H R O U G H C O M M U N I T Y M A S T E R P L A N

25


spring 2006

/

1 0 w e e k p ro j e c t

soho housing location: New York, New York professor: Jason Alread PROJECT: Design a mixed-use structure in Soho comprised of housing and commercial blocks. Phase one looked abstractly at the volume of the assigned site by working with a 12-inch cube, mapped to fit site constraints, for interpretation of the existing spacial elements in order to create a massing composition of the proposed structure. Phase two looked at an18’x9’ studio interior. I designed the interior relating to the idiosyncrasies of the main character in the novel “The Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison. This client-based study investigated the relationship between the needs of the client and the intent of the designer. The final phase was the thirty-unit residential structure integrated with a conference center, an indoor theater and an outdoor performance stage. My proposal exhibited a dichotomy between the outdoor theater and conference center by sharing the two spaces. With the building parti, a wide visual connection linked the flux of pedestrians to the local food markets in Soho.

S T U D Y S E C T I O N D R AW I N G & M O D E L O F V O L U M E T R I C S T U D Y


MODELSCALE 1/4 LOFT interior

28

D R AW I N G S C A L E 1 / 4 S E C T I O N


D R AW I N G P E R S P E C T I V E o f I n t e r i o r

LEVEL 0MEETING HALL/PERFORMANCE

LEVEL 1-8LOFT UNITS

29


fa l l 2 0 0 6

/

6 w e e k p ro j e c t

s t a i r d e s i g n : DIAPHANOUS lust description: 20’ x 20’ x 20’ concrete cube professor: Jason Alread PROJECT: Design a stair inside a concrete shell to travel from one level to the next. Care was taken in the details to maintain a sheer lightness inside the heavy cube.

30

D E TA I L S TA I R T R E A D AT TAC H E D T O S T R I N G E R


FLOORPLAN

PERSPECTIVE

31


spring 2005

/

6 w e e k p ro j e c t

Water transit location: Chicago, Illinois professor: Clare Robinson

PROJECT: Create a systematic means of alternative transportation using the Chicago River. The water taxi hub is attached to a parking garage fronted to the river. The screening works at multiple levels: A screen facade to filter all visual annoyances of the car park along the river front; A living wall where foliage grows on the screen to shrink the scale of the city as passengers walk inside the transit hub; An outlet to provide more vegetation in a cityscape. The hub is modular in design for the prefabrication of multiple hubs to erect and ensure an efficient taxi service the full length of the river.

32

m o d e l wa t e r t r a n s i t f i t t e d o n t o t h e s i t e


s c r e e n l i v i n g wa l l s m a s k pa r k i n g l o t

section


spring 2007

/

7 w e e k p ro j e c t

Sant’ ivo location: Rome. Italy professor: Charlie Masterson [graphite on parchment, 130cm x 90cm]

PROJECT: Craft became the primary focus for our Rome studio, investigating the renaissance techniques of art and architecture. A section drawing of the church Sant’ Ivo alla Sapienza, designed by the sixteenth-century architect Borromini, evolved into a pedagogy to my understanding of his theories and practices.

34


PROFESSIONAL WORK

MEDIATHEQUE du MONTREAL

04

SOLAR DECATHLON

14

MATTER OUT OF PLACE

16

SUPERBURB

24

SOHO HOUSING

26

STAIR DESIGN

30

WATER TRANSIT

32

SANT’ IVO

34

WATERMAN TENNIS

38

INDIA TOWER

40

P ro j e c t book

s h e l f / ro o m

S h e l f - ro o m i n e v e ry o p e n s t u d i o e n v i r o n m e n t , p r i va t e s p a c e i s d i f f i c u lt t o m a i n ta i n . T h e n at u r e o f a s h a r e d s pac e i s u n g u a r d e d & v u l n e r a b l e t o e x p l o i tat i o n . t h e s h e l f - r o o m t a k e s away s p a c e t o c r e a t e a p r i va t e s e c t o r b u t g i v e s b a c k a s t o r a g e wa l l f o r s h a r e d s t u d e n t r e s o u rc e s ,

s t r u c t u r e e x t e r i o r s h e l l f o r p r i va t e s p a c e


PROJECT DURATION [WEEKS]

06

YEAR COMPLETED

TEAM PROJECT

DRAFTING PROGRAM

R

07

re vit

24

M

09

m ic rosta tion

b o o k s h e l f s to r ag e

/

l a n t e r n f e e l w h e n i l l u m i n at e d


summer 2007

/

B n i m a rc h i t e c t s

waterman tennis location: Kansas City, Missouri architect assisted: Devon Chase [I completed each study for design, authored massing, sole model builder for both digital and physical representation and produced renders]

PROJECT: The Stephanie Waterman Tennis and Whole Child Program provides a service for disadvantage inner city youth to play tennis for a brighter future. The proposal of a new structure for their program rests on the site metaphorically as a butterfly. The wings give shape for the function of a tennis court, while the programmed functions (weight room, offices, storage, changing rooms and concessions) align down the middle to create the spine of the structure.

38


......

Kansas City - Tennis Courts 1 Building on site 1 1/8� model start of schematic design for six tennis courts, weight room, locker rooms, office, concessions, storage and two baseball fields

ledom �8/1 1 etis no gnidliuB 1 struoC sinneT - ytiC sasnaK sdleif llabesab owt dna egarots ,snoissecnoc ,eciffo ,smoor rekcol ,moor thgiew ,struoc sinnet xis rof ngised citamehcs fo trats

......

m o d e l s c a l e 1 : 4 s e c t i o n o f t e n n i s fac i lu t y


year 2008-2009

/

s i r f o s t e r + pa rt n e r s

i n d i a t o w e r : Hyatt Hotel location: Mumbai, India group 2 senior partner: David Summerfield [in collaboration with a diverse team of eight]

PROJECT: We formulated a design for India Tower to meet the economic, social and environmental responsibilities set forth in the project. The design strived to increase localized density and community connectivity to conform to desired density goals. Pursuing a LEED Platinum rating, we chose to respect the site by restoring the natural habitat and creating exuberant open space by having a three level automatic underground car park and an underground entrance leading up into the multiple sky lobbies.

m o d e ls c a l e 1 : 1 0 0 m s e c t i o n p ow d e r m o d e l o f a p a r t m e n t l ay o u t s

40


DESIGN: We were to provide hotel rooms, long lease apartments, luxury apartments, four restaurants, kitchens, pools and spas, conference/business centers, ballroom, parking and service spaces. The lift scheme required much attention to control the circulation paths to each of these programs. The central atrium displaced the building core into the three legs of the structure, reinforcing the rigidity of its slender form and grand height. INDIVIDUAL DUTIES: My involvement consisted of arranging programmatic divisions for every level and designing layouts for each type of living. I planned the car park configuration, organizing the automatic car lift system and integrating the large spaces reserved for energy systems.

42

M O D E L S TAC K I N G M O D E L I P RO D U C E D

d i g i ta l r e n d e r i n t e r i o r v i e w o f a s i n g l e - B E D h ot e l RO O M


L E V E L 1 1 3 O B S E R VA T O R Y D E C K

L E V E L 8 8 L U X U RY A PA RT M E N T S

LEVEL 49HOTEL

L E V E L 1 3 L O N G L E A S E A PA RT M E N T S


S K Y L O B B Y E AC H S K Y L O B B Y I S D E S I G N E D W I T H A H E L I O S TAT T O C H A N N E L L I G H T B AC K I N T O T H E O P E N AT R I U M .


PERSPECTIVEINTERIOR VIEW


CLIMATE: Mumbai, India presented a challenge with its regional climate consisting of constant hot and humid temperatures throughout both day and night. Our strategy was to integrate a responsive passive and active system that will efficiently and environmentally control the building to optimize performance. Simultaneously, we had to minimize the increased load on existing district infrastructure. [the four displayed renders were outsourced]


t h e at r i u m v i e w

e n t r a n c e g ro u n d l e v e l d ro p - o f f

S K Y L I N EO C E A N L E V E L V I E W O F TOW E R

47


Portfoilo: Academic and Professional Work