Issuu on Google+

The Future of the Ford Mustang The Ford Motor Company had a lot of expectations for the car that’s 1964 launch was the most successful since the Model A’s in 1928. And while most of these expectations were met during the 60’s and 70’s, things went downhill quickly for the Mustang in the following decades. Sales were so bad in the 80’s and 90’s that many consider these years to be lost decades for the original “pony car.” Therefore, it wasn’t surprising when in the early 2000’s Ford completely scrapped the car’s unsuccessful design and went in an entirely new direction. What was surprising, however, was that the direction they decided upon was backwards. Since 2005, Ford has delighted baby boomers across America by equipping the Mustang with a retro design reminiscent of popular models from its glory days. Sales have been up not only among nostalgic consumers, but among a younger group of first-time car buyers as well. Classic muscle cars like the Mustang and Dodge’s Challenger and Charger were back in style and all was well with the pony car once again. Ford seemed satisfied with the Mustang’s success until last year when they announced that the retro styling was on its way out. While there have been many reasons cited for this controversial decision, Ford’s desire to gain a larger European market share has been one of the most popular. The Evos Concept car introduced at the Frankfurt Auto Show in 2011 looks almost nothing like the Mustang we’ve come to love, but is thought by many to be the future of Ford’s pony car. Though I’m reluctant to call the Evos hard on the eyes, one thing’s for sure—it doesn’t look like a Ford, let alone a classic American muscle car. Because Ford has deviated from the muscle car look once before and the Mustang almost met its end, we’re left to wonder what will be different this time around. We can only assume that Ford’s hoping foreign sales will more than make up for any decline the Mustang sees in the U.S. Unfortunately though, some experts believe that taking the American aspect out of the design will do the exact opposite. They think that without its American edge, the Mustang will be less appealing to foreign consumers, and I hate to say it, but they just might be right. After all, the United States has always been the epicenter of pop culture and consumer demand.

This guest post was written by Brittany Larson of Cornerstone Auto Brokers. She is patiently waiting the Mustang’s new design, which is set to be rolled out in 2014 just in time for its 50th anniversary.Another classic mustang for sale found at MustangTraderOnline.com……………………………

ch_client = "tyankee"; ch_width = 430; ch_height = 90; ch_type = "mpu"; ch_sid = "MTO 430x90"; ch_color_site_link = "000033"; ch_color_title = "000033"; ch_color_border = "FFFFFF"; ch_color_text = "000000"; ch_color_bg = "FFFFFF";

More... http://www.mustangtraderonline.com/the-future-of-the-ford-mustang/

1/1 Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)


The Future of the Ford Mustang