Page 1

An Official Publication of Texas Wesleyan University

Give back to your alma mater — while you shop! Print off the Kroger Neighbor to Neighbor form (located at www.txwes.edu/alumni/showyourpride. htm) and take it with you the next time you shop there. The cashier will scan the bar code on the form to link your KrogerPlus Card to Texas Wesleyan. From then on, every time you shop with your KrogerPlus Card, a percentage of your sales will go to the Texas Wesleyan Alumni Association Fund.* *Please Note: the Kroger program must be renewed every year, beginning in May. A reminder will be sent so we can continue to receive this awesome benefit!

Tell your cashier to link your Tom Thumb Reward Card to Wesleyan’s Alumni Association #4298. The Tom Thumb Good Neighbor program will pay the Texas Wesleyan Alumni Association Fund a percentage of all your purchases.

Wesleyan W elcomes Frederick G. Slabach as 20 th P resident

Spring 2011

Former Law School Dean Began New Role in January


T r i b ute T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S  |   SPRING 2 Frederick G. Slabach, 20th President of Texas Wesleyan University

18 Wesleyan Dominates Table Tennis World 19 Wesleyan’s Rising Golf Star 20 A Basketball Season to Remember

8 Theatre Wesleyan’s Third Playmarket

22 Ensuring a Quality Educational Experience

9 Texas Wesleyan Students and Faculty Take Award at International Film Festival

A gift to a charitable organization is a wonderful way to recognize someone of importance in your life. Texas Wesleyan is honored to receive gifts in memory or honor of alumni, faculty, staff, students and friends. These gifts acknowledge the relationship individuals have with the University and the community. We are pleased to recognize these gifts and the role each honored person and donor has in the lives of our students. We gratefully acknowledge the following donors for their tribute gifts received from 9/15/2010 through 5/31/11.

24 A Look Back at 10 Years 25 Goostree Symposium Welcomes Author Melany Neilson

10 One of the Exceptional Few

26 Alumni Remember Good Times at Wesleyan, Renew Friendships at Reunion

13 Wesleyan Athletic Hall of Fame Welcomes Six New Members

28 Outgoing SGA President Brought Energy, Enthusiasm to Campus Politics

14 Texas Wesleyan’s Finest Musical Talent Shows Off at The President’s Honors Concert

29 In Memoriam

16 MultiMedia Center Unveiled

R e cog n iti o n

2011

6 A Day of Peace: Arun Gandhi Brings a Message of Nonviolence to Campus

9 Dr. Lamar Smith Returns to First United Methodist Church

G i ft

30 Alumni News 32 Lifelong Educator Marie Glick, 103, Remembered for Her Generosity

In Honor of Dr. Jerry Chism ’76 to the Religion Scholarship Fund Arlington Heights United Methodist Church Robert (Bobby) Cornett ’72 to the Golf Program Jan E. Fersing Dr. Joy Edwards to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Sixty-Two Club, Fort Worth Women’s Club William A. Bleibdrey to the GPNA Program Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia James M. Lind ’03 to the Wesleyan Fund John & Barbara Lind Richard J. Lind ’04 to the Wesleyan Fund John & Barbara Lind John H. Maddux ’59 to the John Maddux, Jr. Endowed Scholarship Madelon L. Bradshaw Marty & Mike Craddock Wanda Hunsaker Russell ’64 to the Wesleyan Fund Ben ’63 & Kaye ’64 Younger President Frederick G. Slabach to the Texas United Methodist College Association Fund Texas United Methodist College Association Claudia A. Stepp ’72 to the Encore Scholarship Fund Karen H. Barlow Claudia A. Stepp ’72 to the Wesleyan Fund Robert & Carolyn Robertson Catherine Wakefield ’39 to the Wesleyan Fund Sharon Allen

In Memory of Jo Shannon Baldwin ’82 to the Music Scholarship Fund David Bassham Don Bassham Drs. James & Robin ’81 Hall Mr. & Mrs. Phil Taylor Dr. Donald Bellah to the Wesleyan Fund Euel H. Belcher ’50 Cecil Cole & Walter L. Gill to the Cecil Cole Award Fund Thelma Standlee Cole Gill ’52 Roberta Bray ’42 to the Wesleyan Fund Margaret A. Kimmins ’42 Letha Jane Brown ’61 to the School of Education Letha Grace McCoy ’66 Marshall Campbell to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Marilyn N. Hagan ’99

Frances Stokes Cannon to the Encore Scholarship Fund G. Alfred Brown Anne Street Skipper ’78 Chris Condron to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Reverend Jay Darnell ’60 to the Burleson Scholarship Fund James & Beverly Norman Maxine Denson to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Alta Lewis Dollar ’66 to the Alta Lewis Dollar Endowed Scholarship Thane R. Arther ’86 David Dollar ’85 Johnnie (Jay) Edwards ’39 to the Hart/Bridges Men’s Basketball Endowment Fund Gerald Baum ’54 Kelly Fearing to the Wesleyan Fund George Grammer ’47 Marie Moser Glick to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Gilbert ’44 & Dorris ’47 Ferrell Merlene Ogle Grossman ’64 to the Wesleyan Fund Marlene H. Loughran ’64 Dr. Charles W. Hager to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Rosa Lee Weiler Mr. & Mrs. William D. Weiler Dan Hart to the Hart/Bridges Men’s Basketball Endowment Fund Gerald H. Baum ’54 David E. Mitchell to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley “Leo” Norman to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Reverend Farrell Odom ’53 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Janie Pokluda, Taylor Pokluda and Family Tim Russell ’64 to the Wesleyan Fund Wanda Russell ’64 Paul B. Sandstrom ’51 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund O. Otis & Frances Bakke Murray E. Brown ’53 Irma B. Crites

Joseph K. & Mary Dulle Susan L. Hittle John H. Maddux ’59 Kathryn Speegle to the Ruth Keating Literary Award Dr. Carl Schrader Elizabeth Shawver Cramer ’43 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Judson A. Cramer ’42 Grayson Satarina to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Margaret Weed Talkington to the Bob & Shirley Student Textbook Fund Steve & Tish Deffenbaugh Elden Traster to the Elden D. Traster Scholarship Fund Craig Lidell Donna C. Volkman ’62 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Deborah Huse Gifts made by Steve & Tish Deffenbaugh to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund In memory of: Charles Hayden Bowers Chuck Clarkson Chris Condron Hal Dean Betty Wetz Dietert Dick Fletcher Jean Howard “Leo” Norman Geraldine Landrum Pudlo

Gift in Kind Dr. Eugene ’54 & Mrs. Ann ’54 Burge Dennis Camp ’64 Scott Cannon ’77 Charlie Claffey ’89 Keith Dennis Charles E. Duke ’53 & Joe Don Conger David Hall ’01 J. J. Henry Mr. & Mrs. John Markward David Rauter R & D Jewelers Heath Scott ’11

Stay Connected with Texas Wesleyan Be in the know on all things Texas Wesleyan. Follow these steps: Winter weather took Fort Worth by surprise in early February. While the campus was closed, Sharon Manson, residence life director, toured the campus with camera in hand to capture a rare glimpse of the snowy landscape.

Read Learn what’s happening at Texas Wesleyan at www.txwes.edu

S u bs c r i b e E-mail DeAwna Wood at dwood@txwes.edu to subscribe to our monthly alumni e-newsletter

Interact Keep up with us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ TexasWesleyan and on twitter at www.twitter.com/ TexasWesleyan


Dear Alumni and Friends,

I

t feels great to be home. I am delighted to be back at Texas Wesleyan, where I previously served as dean of the law school. And in some ways, it’s as though I never left. I continued to teach at the law school as an adjunct professor during the years that I worked in Washington, D.C. This is an exciting time to be at Texas Wesleyan. This year, U.S. News & World Report ranked Texas Wesleyan University in the #1 tier of all regional universities in the West — from Texas to California, Minnesota to Washington state, and everything in between. This is a great validation of what we already knew — that Texas Wesleyan nurtures motivated students in intentionally small classes taught by exceptional faculty members who are committed to student success. Another great asset is our alumni base. Graduates of the University carry with them school pride and the drive to attain their goals. The many successes of our alumni reflect well on Wesleyan and make us more visible in the community. With that success comes the opportunity to network, to stay involved, and to give back. Our alumni are known for their generosity, whether assisting financially or with recruiting events or devoting time to specific interests. Our alumni understand not only the value of our undergraduate schools, but also our graduate programs in business, law, education, counseling, and nurse anesthesia. And I couldn’t agree with them more. I believe that higher education is the greatest socioeconomic elevator ever devised by man. And the importance of higher education will only increase in the future. Economists tell us that a graduate professional degree will increasingly be necessary to get ahead in life. Our undergraduate program, with its small classes and focus on written and oral communication, offers students the opportunity to develop the critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and creative problem-solving capabilities necessary to gain admission to graduate professional schools and to thrive there. But most students are not able to go straight from undergraduate school to graduate professional programs. Most must work for a number of years before returning to school. In fact, many graduate programs in the country highly recommend that students work for at least a few years before returning to graduate school. Most people who seek graduate professional degrees must also continue working while pursuing those degrees. So graduate professional programs must be accessible to working adults. As a result, graduate professional programs situated in major metropolitan areas are best positioned to provide what working adults need. Texas Wesleyan University is blessed to be in Fort Worth and a part of one of the largest metropolitan areas in the country — one of the few major metropolitan areas still viewed as an engine for economic growth. People are attracted to this area for jobs and the quality of life. And if they don’t already have professional graduate degrees, they soon realize they need that additional degree to advance in their careers. The place to get it is at a U.S. News ranked #1 tier regional university. We’re on a mission to make Texas Wesleyan University the best it can be and I look forward to working with you to achieve all our goals.

Sincerely,

Frederick G. Slabach

PRESIDENT Frederick G. Slabach EDITOR Laura J. Hanna CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Laura J. Hanna Mark Hanshaw Meghan Foster Josh Lacy

Cristina Noriega Paul Sturiale Connie Whitt-Lambert Darren White

DESIGN AND PHOTO EDITOR Linda Beaupré PHOTOGRAPHY Meisa Keivani Najafabadi Sargent N. Hill ’65 Tom Pennington Darren White OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT AND ALUMNI RELATIONS Texas Wesleyan University 817.531.4404 1201 Wesleyan Street 817.531.7560 Fort Worth, Texas 76105-1536 alumni@txwes.edu www.txwes.edu Wesleyan is an official publication of Texas Wesleyan University for alumni and friends. It is published semiannually in the fall and spring by the Wesleyan Office of Communications. The views presented are not necessarily those of the editors or the official policies of the University. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2010-2011 Barry Baker ’84 Mac Belmontes ’09 Daphne Brookins ’01 Dennis Camp ’64 Patsy Clifford ’55 Karen Cole ’99 MBA ’04, vice president Martha Earngey ’77, secretary Presley Hatcher ’74 Larry Kitchens ’63, immediate past president David D. Martin MBA ’04, president Cheryl McDonald ’87 Gladys Moore ’73 Sharon Roberson-Jones ’96 Wanda Russell ’64, secretary Amy Tate-Almy ’95 Glen Tuggle ’85, treasurer EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Jorge Vivar ’76 E. Frank Leach ’53 Kathy Walker ’97 Dr. Carl G. Schrader, Jr. TEXAS WESLEYAN STAFF Joan S. Canty, vice president for university advancement Gina Phillips ’97, MSP ’07 director of development and alumni relations DeAwna Wood ’05, assistant director of alumni relations Chuck Burton, assistant vice president for marketing and communications Laura J. Hanna, director of communications


2 

“The small private school setting gave me the opportunity to explore all sorts of interests, whereas at a large university, I probably wouldn’t have been www.txwes.edu allowed to try out for plays and musicals.”


Frederick G. Slabach, 20th President of Texas Wesleyan University By Darren White

W

hen Frederick G. Slabach discusses living on the Texas Wesleyan campus, he’s speaking from firsthand experience. The 20th president of Texas Wesleyan University began his term in January in a rare way: He moved into the West Village student apartments. He lived in an efficiency room usually occupied by a student. “The reason I’m doing this is so that students will know that we’re committed to campus life,” Slabach said. “And the positive side effect of it is that I actually have a different take on student life than if I had not lived in the West Village . . . . It’s not to say that I know everything about the student experience, but when students say, ‘This is what we think the University ought to be doing to enhance the quality of campus life,’ I can filter that through my personal experience.” Not all decisions can be based on anecdotal evidence, Slabach said, but by combining that with analytical approaches, he can view issues in creative ways that lead to good decision making. That’s what Slabach hopes to do as President of Texas Wesleyan — make decisions that continue to move the University forward. Slabach, who served as the executive secretary and chief executive officer of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation in Washington, D.C., before accepting the Texas Wesleyan position, has since moved off campus, but the experience remains — he was able to see the campus from a different perspective, to develop an understanding of the what student life on campus is like. He will be joined in Fort Worth at the end of the semester by his wife, Melany Neilson, and their three children — twin 12-year-old boys and a seven-year-old daughter, who are finishing their school terms in Virginia.

The importance of experience Spring 2011

The passion for education began during his own student experience. Slabach, a Mississippi native who served as dean of the Texas Wesleyan School of Law from 2003 to 2006, said he loved the intellectual curiosity and atmosphere of his undergraduate

3 


and law school experiences. As an undergraduate, he attended Mississippi College, a small school similar to Texas Wesleyan’s student-focused learning community with an emphasis on pre-professional preparation. There, he discovered many interests outside his history and political science major. He performed in theater productions, sang in the concert choir and involved himself in activities that might not have been available to him at a larger university. “The small private school setting gave me the opportunity to explore all sorts of interests, whereas at a large university, I probably wouldn’t have been allowed to try out for plays and musicals,” Slabach said. “Or, I might not have been the president of the pre-law club, vice president of the student government association, or on the debate team.” He once played the role of Henry David Thoreau in a performance of The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. As the play revealed what Thoreau believed and what motivated him — including the death of his beloved brother — Slabach could hear people in the audience crying. “It was a sense that I was able to convey what the playwright had in mind,” Slabach said, “and connect emotionally with the people who are watching it in a way that they had an understanding of Henry David Thoreau.” Those extracurricular activities would become important as Slabach continued his education, attending the University of Mississippi School of Law (JD ’82) and Columbia University School of Law (LL.M. ’91). He said they helped him become a better law student, a better lawyer and a better academic administrator. 4 

“There is tremendous value in participating in the arts. Whether or not people become professional performers, the arts are beneficial in preparation for a wide variety of professions,” Slabach said, “and I think participation in the arts is an important part of an undergraduate liberal arts preprofessional education.” The lessons Slabach learned are evident when he speaks — he listens and thinks carefully about what a person is saying before considering his own words with equal care. “How to listen, present and project ideas in front of people is very important,” Slabach said.

www.txwes.edu


“He’s truly a people person.” —The Rev. Dr. Lamar Smith

A commitment to service Public service and education have been the two concentrations that Slabach has rotated between; however, he says the two aren’t that different. “I view education, especially at the higher education level — but also obviously K-12 — as a key public service,” Slabach said. “In my opinion, it’s perhaps the most important aspect of public service.” Slabach was vice dean and professor of law at Florida Coastal Law School in Jacksonville, Fla., from 2001 to 2003, where he worked with Michael Z. Green, currently the associate dean for faculty research and development and professor of law at Texas Wesleyan University. Green valued Slabach’s work ethic and leadership; he said it played a large part in accepting a job at Texas Wesleyan, where Slabach served after his time at Florida Coastal. “He has the ability to work internally and externally to get things done,” Green said, “and he’s able to work with diverse and varied groups to get there.” At the School of Law, Slabach lived up to that reputation. Green said that he is still remembered for his skills in capital fundraising and building bridges into the community. “When you meet him, you get the feeling this is a guy that gets things done,” Green said. “I think it’s a great coup for the University to have him return.” There is enthusiasm for President Slabach on the historic campus as well. The Rev. Dr. Lamar Smith ’50, HON ’65 served as interim president immediately before Slabach’s term and worked as assistant to the president. “I heard him say that he was a quick study, and he really is,” Smith said. “His desire to know the school and his people skills impressed me very much. His ability to listen and make decisions is remarkable.” Smith, who has been involved with the University for more than six decades, said that Slabach brings vital experience — particularly in problem-solving and fundraising — that will benefit the University. “As I’ve gotten to know him,” Smith said, “it became evident that he is a leader and a visionary who will continue to take the long view of our history, and the history of our area. He has the capacity to create a long-range plan for Texas Wesleyan.” Listening sessions were set up quickly after Slabach began his term. The sessions enabled him to gain a variety of perspectives from different members of the faculty, staff, alumni, and student body. “He’s truly a people person,” Smith said.

The Voice of the Community President Fred Slabach didn’t address students Jan. 26. Instead, he listened. Students gathered in Lou’s Place to meet the president and give their thoughts about the pros and cons about the University and the past and future of the campus.

President Slabach divided the time into strengths and weaknesses, as well as internal and external opportunities. Students brought up everything from class size, to online education, to the way the washing machines work in the campus residence halls. Many students felt the event set a good precedent for the University’s new leader. “It’s not a bad idea. It’s actually pretty good. It shows he actually cares about our opinions and wants to see if he can do anything,” Collier Jennings, sophomore English education major, said. “It communicates that his door is always open — it’s not closed. It communicates that the views of the student body are important to him,” said Ray A. Cox, senior criminal justice major. “He wants to solve issues for the students as well as the University. He seems to know that if the students succeed, the University succeeds also.” Slabach has also held other listening sessions with faculty, staff, and alumni in an effort to better understand the Wesleyan community’s mission, goals, and viewpoints.

5 


A D a y of Peace ARUN GANDHI BRINGS A MESSAGE OF NONVIOLENCE TO CAMPUS FOR UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DAY By Mark Hanshaw 

| 

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi and Tom Pennington

I In this age of the atom bomb, pure nonviolence is the only force that can confound all the tricks of violence put together. —M.K . G A N D H I

6 

n 1930, a little-known social activist from India gained global attention by ushering in a broad revolution against Britain’s colonial rule over the South Asian nation. His name was Mohandas K. Gandhi and, instead of seeking to challenge the rule of the British through violent measures, he sought to employ principles of nonviolence as the method of resistance. Gandhi caught the imaginations of individuals around the world by using simple means to challenge the long-standing British bureaucracy. In the spring of 1930, he began a peaceful march of protest, covering a 240-mile path across Northwest India to the salt mines of the seaside village of Dandi. By the time the march was concluded, Gandhi and more than 80,000 Indians had been arrested. His arrest did not quell the movement, but led to widespread demonstrations across India. His method of nonviolent resistance raised global awareness of both the Gandhi name and his mission. The great Salt March is recognized as a beginning point in a process that led the British to vacate India and grant the state its independence by 1947. Still, Gandhi was not concerned exclusively with the goal of political independence for India, but also worked on behalf of the millions of impoverished outcast Indians to prompt greater social equality. Through this work, he was given the honorific title of Mahatma, or “great soul.” Gandhi was assassinated in 1948, but his legacy of nonviolent activism has been carried on by others around the globe since his death. Perhaps the most dedicated and tireless proponent of the Gandhian legacy has been the Indian leader’s own grandson, Arun Gandhi. www.txwes.edu


MEMBERS OF TH E WORLD COMM U N I T Y

A M A N O F H ERITAGE Having worked alongside and lived with his grandfather as a youth, Arun Gandhi came to understand the philosophy of nonviolent activism through his own experience. On April 5, he brought that experience to Texas Wesleyan University, in a lecture titled “Lessons Learned from My Grandfather.” For Gandhi, the experience of growing up with his grandfather served as a living laboratory environment in which he was exposed to the principles of nonviolence through episodes of life, rather than lectures or books. Perhaps the most vivid example of this came during a time when Gandhi was living with his grandfather and attending school in India. Each day, when he came home from school, the elder Gandhi would ask his grandson to recount the events of his day and consider any events that had led to the mistreatment of any of his peers. These events were then to be classified as acts of either physical or passive violence, with passive violence referring to instances where another is harmed through words or other activities that do not involve physical confrontation. “We commit passive violence every day, consciously and unconsciously,” Gandhi explained. “And that creates anger in the victim and the victim resorts to physical violence to get justice. It is passive violence that fuels the fire of physical violence in our world.” These varying instances of violence were then written on small pieces of paper and placed upon a genealogical tree of violence the younger Gandhi had constructed on his wall in his bedroom. Through this exercise, he came to understand how much violence one faces on a daily basis in an average life.

Spring 2011

For students of Texas Wesleyan, the presence of Gandhi on campus offered an opportunity to engage both the topic of nonviolence and a storied figure of global prominence. In addition to his keynote speech, Gandhi took the time to meet with individual students and even to sign a few autographs. As Wesleyan junior Timothy Reece observed about Gandhi’s presence on campus, “This was really a great experience. It was wonderful to get the opportunity to meet Mr. Gandhi and really benefit from his wisdom. As well, his lecture was really powerful.” In reflecting upon her own meeting with Gandhi, Wesleyan sophomore Amy Hollis added, “It was a once-ina-lifetime experience. You don’t often have the opportunity to meet someone who carries such an important message, but is still interested in learning from other people.” In addition, Gandhi was presented a key to the City of Fort Worth in a special ceremony led by City Council member and Texas Wesleyan Board member Kathleen Hicks. Gandhi visited the Texas Wesleyan campus as part of the annual University College Day program. During this year’s program, students and faculty presented more than 200 sessions highlighting their own research. Based upon the legacy of his grandfather and his own “lessons,” Gandhi has been driven to serve as a voice for the promotion of the philosophy of nonviolence. In this effort, he has founded the Center for Social Unity in India, an organization focused upon the elimination of caste discrimination, and the M.K. Gandhi Institute For Nonviolence, located in Rochester, New York. L-R: City Council member Kathleen Hicks, Arun Gandhi, Provost and Senior Vice President Dr. Allen Henderson, and Student President Heath Scott ’11.

7 


Cast and crew from Certificate of Death, left, and in perfomance at Rattlestick in 2009, above.

Theatre Wesleyan’s Third Playmarket

T

his year marks Theatre Wesleyan’s third Playmarket in New York! What started back in the early ’90s with a group of students and faculty brown-bagging it on the stage of the old Fine Arts Auditorium during free period has grown into an official New York event. There weren’t many of us at the first official Playmarket event in the fall of 1999. But, thanks to a supportive faculty and administration, dedicated students and devoted alumni, we’ve created a tradition here that has proven to be a success. Mark Lowry of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram was a guest at that first Playmarket. In his column that week, he said, “Wesleyan‘s Theatre Department is well-respected for its playwriting program. Kudos for Playmarket! How about making this a semesterly event?” While we haven’t been able to do it every semester, we have presented 22 original plays written by 19 different playwrights since the original production of Playmarket more than a decade ago. The ultimate goal of Playmarket is to serve as a venue for Wesleyan playwrights where they can showcase their original work. This year at Rattlestick Playwrights Theater in New York’s West Village, we presented a concert reading of the original script Lycanthrope by theatre major Chuck Fain ’11 on Tuesday, May 17. Chuck’s original full-length play was selected by a group of judges who read all entries submitted by current and former Wesleyan theatre students. Many alumni have contributed to the success of Playmarket. It was Thad Smotherman ’69 who originally said, “Why don’t we have it in New York?” and he started making phone calls. 8 

By Connie Whitt-Lambert

Within a day of my conversation with Thad, Mike Skipper ’78 had offered his theatre, 37 ARTS, for our NYC premiere. Anne Street Skipper ’78 has been participating since the first Playmarket in ’99, when she read a role in Georgianna Hatcher’s Silence as Sad as the Dog — one of our first scripts. Anne now is an active member of our New York producing team and was also highly instrumental in securing our first venue. Mike also has continued his support of our endeavors for more than a decade. Not only has he served as our liaison with the New York theatre world, but he is also one of our final judges for the playwriting contest and hosts the alumni reception at his home in the city. Claudia Stepp ’72 also has provided financial assistance for students as have Anne, Mike and Thad. In short, Playmarket in New York is more than a résumé line for our students and alumni. It’s a group project involving our entire Theatre Wesleyan network. From left: Chuck Fain ’11 (Lycanthrope, 2011), Walt Wykes ’92 (Certificate of Death, 2009), Angela Gant ’97 (The Body of Eva Perón, 2007). Each of these playwrights has been a New York winner.

www.txwes.edu


Dr. Lamar Smith Returns to First United Methodist Church

W

hen he began his term as Interim President of Texas Wesleyan University in June 2010, the Rev. Dr. Lamar Smith ’50, HON ’65 made building bridges to the Methodist community a top priority. Smith, who then became Assistant to the President under current President Frederick G. Slabach, visited many local churches, including Edge Park United Methodist Church, Morningside United Methodist Church and Genesis United Methodist Church during the spring 2011 semester. Smith spoke to congregations about what Texas Wesleyan offers during the service. He also visited with churchgoers before and after services. His visit to Meadowbrook United Methodist Church was even a “Texas Wesleyan University Day,” where Smith, along with others affiliated with the University, spoke about the school. “We are a Methodist institution, and a Methodist institution is a faith-based institution,” Smith said. “That ought to make a difference — we offer something special in attention and support.” Smith found the most relevant message he communicated was information about potential scholarships and financial aid from the University, as well as from third-party sources. The amount of resources available to incoming students was very impressive, Smith said. The doctorates at Wesleyan add up, too, Smith said. The fact that Ph.D.-degreed professors teach classes — as well as the University’s continued growth — make it a top choice for Methodist students. He was also accompanied by an admissions counselor who helped answer questions on topics such as transfer credits. Smith will return to First United Methodist Church at the end of the semester, capping off a year of service to the

University — an institution he’s been part of for more than six decades. As Smith reflects on his year at Texas Wesleyan, he says he is very pleased with the direction of the University, and he takes great interest in its future and growth. He hopes that Wesleyan will continue to develop a Board of Visitors — which he resurrected during his term — as well as communicate more information about the progress of the University to the community. “We need to do everything we can to bring people on to this campus,” Smith said, “so they can see the great things we are doing here. I want people to come on this campus and see for themselves what we’re doing at Texas Wesleyan.”

TEXAS WESLEYAN STUDENTS AND FACULTY TAKE AWARD AT INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Texas Wesleyan faculty and students brought the stories of the second largest country in the world to the second largest film festival in North America with a documentary film shot on a study abroad trip. The Ritual of Life in India — written, produced and narrated by Mark Hanshaw, department chair and assistant professor of comparative religious studies, and filmed by Wesleyan student Micah Brooks — received the “Bronze Remi” award in the Short Documentary category at the 44th Annual WorldFest — Houston International Film & Video Festival in April. The Ritual of Life in India was also presented at Texas Wesleyan during the 2011 University College Day event in April. The event focuses on the scholarly pursuits of the Texas Wesleyan community. The documentary was filmed on location during a recent Hanshaw-led study abroad trip to India, and the film crew was staffed by members of the Texas Wesleyan community. More than 4,000 films were entered in the festival from worldwide participants. Hanshaw says that he would like to make the film into a series by adding more episodes in the future. Hanshaw, a Fulbright-Hays scholar, has visited more than 40 countries and has lived in the United Kingdom and India. He has also studied with religious leaders in South Asia, North Africa and the Persian Gulf. He was integral in bringing peace activist Arun Gandhi to speak at the Texas Wesleyan campus for University College Day 2011. In May 2011, he led a group of students on a study abroad trip to Turkey. Spring 2011

9 


One of the exceptional few By Paul Sturiale

Some members of Texas Wesleyan’s family make their marks in the community. Others leave their marks on campus. An exceptional few — like former Trustee Sheila Broderick Johnson — stamp an indelible mark on both.

10 

Ms. Johnson recently received one of the University’s highest honors, an honorary Doctorate of Humanities degree, in recognition of a lifetime of volunteer leadership to Fort Worth’s service community and two decades of support and friendship for the University. She has been instrumental in supporting women’s and children’s safety and health issues, as well as contributing to the University through her involvement on the Board of Trustees and as a fundraiser and friendraiser for many of the most prominent facilities on campus. She also has added a Texas Wesleyan alumnus to the family. Her daughter, Elizabeth Johnson, earned her Bachelor of Arts degree magna cum laude in 2000. www.txwes.edu


Dr. Sheila Broderick Johnson and Dr. Lamar Smith ’50, HON ’65.

“This is just what

building, the Ed and Rae Schollmaier Science and Technology Center, the Rosedale redevelopment project, and I have had the the Jack and Jo Willa Morton Fitness Center. Ms. Johnson joined the Board of Ms. Johnson described receiving opportunity to do. Trustees in 1994 at the invitation the honorary degree as “a very of then-President Jake Schrum, who humbling experience. I was amazed. I make connections wanted to strengthen the University’s It was humbling to have that kind ties to community leaders. In of recognition. I look at it every day and say ‘Wow!’ It was a lovely tribute between people to help response, she created the Visitors Committee, which annually hosted to the things that I have been able to do in the community and to the them do whatever they several meetings of up to 50 people to learn more about the University. contributions that I have been able to “I saw that the University had a make to the University.” can to be successful.” lot of potential. The school is really, Ask community and University really important for the community leaders and they will tell you that the because it fills a need. Not everyone needs to go to TCU honor is hard-earned and well-deserved. or UTA. Texas Wesleyan is a good alternative for many As a granddaughter of Fort Worth icon Amon G. Carter, students,” she explained. Ms. Johnson recognized early that her family’s heritage of civic While serving as the University’s interim president, the service opened opportunities to become an active advocate for Rev. Lamar Smith ’50, HON ’65 said that he nominated Ms. two of her passions: women’s safety and children’s health. She Johnson for the degree because “Personally, I was impressed used that opportunity to create and/or support many of the with what she had done for us and for the community. And city’s social service groups. While serving as the first female I felt that if any person deserved an honorary doctorate, it Chair of the Board of Cook Fort Worth Children’s Medical was she. Center, she created the system’s network of school-based “And for her to be so delighted about it certainly pleased clinics and its mobile medical van service. us. We gave her a gown, stole and hat. And she responded by In the late 1980s, she co-founded The Warm Place, one saying that she wanted to keep them always because this was of Fort Worth’s most prominent grief support centers for one of the nicest things that had ever happened to her.” children and adults. In 1991, Ms. Johnson co-founded the In typical fashion, the 63-year-old matriarch downplays Alliance for Children, which included developing a child-care her leadership of the area’s social service community. Or how unit at Cook Children’s for young victims of sexual abuse. she has been personally affected by her hands-on work with Her imprint on Texas Wesleyan has been equally children who suffered sexual abuse and battered women who impressive. As a University Trustee, she promoted strategic were trapped in the cycle of violence. planning initiatives that have shaped the University’s growth “This is just what I have had the opportunity to do. I make for almost two decades. As part of her efforts to turn those connections between people to help them do whatever they plans into reality, she has leveraged her Board membership on can to be successful. I am still working and still consulting the Amon G. Carter Foundation to support the improvement on families living in violence. We are trying to provide and/or creation of prominent University buildings such as prevention services and/or get them out of that situation, and the Nenetta Burton Carter psychology building and the to help the person who is creating the violence. Dan Waggoner Hall Education Center. Ms. Johnson was “It is hard sometimes to see the types of things that are instrumental in establishing the bilingual education and happening. But it is one of the best and most gratifying graduate nurse anesthesia programs. experiences that I have ever had,” she said. “I am just thankful Her support also includes renovations for the School of that I am in a position to help.” Law, the Polytechnic United Methodist Church education Spring 2011

11 


Helping Students Succeed

The

Wesleyan Fund “I feel blessed to be receiving

such a valuable education from intelligent professors who really care about me. They are willing to work with students no matter what the circumstances. Playing on the soccer team at Texas Wesleyan has also enhanced my college experience. I can’t imagine not being a part of something so amazing.” Math/Secondary Education ’12

Texas Wesleyan University has a great tradition of helping students succeed, thanks in part to the Wesleyan Fund. Gifts to the Wesleyan Fund serve as the foundation for the University’s ongoing success and are dedicated solely to providing institutional scholarships and program support for our students. Thank You – alumni, parents and friends – for believing in our commitment to provide the best educational environment for students pursuing their dreams. Show your support for Texas Wesleyan by making a gift to the Wesleyan Fund.

Give today at www.txwes.edu/advancement Texas Wesleyan University Office of Advancement 1201 Wesleyan Street Fort Worth, TX 76105 817.531.4404


Wesleyan Hall of Fame Welcomes Six New Members BY JOSH LACY

T

he Texas Wesleyan University Athletic Department inducted six new members into its Hall of Fame in a ceremony at Ridglea Country Club in January. The induction came after Athletic Director Kevin Millikan ’98 and Gina Phillips ’97, MSP ’07, Director of Development and Alumni Relations, reinvigorated the Hall of Fame program after 17 years of dormancy. The induction ceremony was emceed by award-winning broadcaster Scott Murray, and through an official proclamation: Fort Worth City Council declared January 21 to be Texas Wesleyan Athletic Hall of Fame Day. “This event is a celebration of athletic achievement and the support of that endeavor,” Millikan said, “and I am honored to be able to recognize and share the stories of these amazing people. Each of our recipients used their skills and talents to leave an enduring legacy on Texas Wesleyan Athletics, and it is that legacy that continues to grow and mature within the student-athletes that represent our University today and in the future.” Gene ’54 and Ann ’54 Burge gained induction through meritorious support. Their connection with Texas Wesleyan has lasted more than 50 years. At the annual Athletic Awards Banquet, the Gene and Ann Burge Sportsmanship Award is given to the male and female athlete who best exemplify the characteristics of true sportsmanship. Dan Hart ’47, was inducted posthumously. Hart played one season on the men’s basketball team before enlisting in the U.S. Army in 1943. He led the Rams to the NAIB National Tournament that season. Hart served in the military until 1946, departing with a rank of corporal and seven medals of valor including two bronze stars. He returned to Wesleyan and received his bachelor’s degree in 1947. He served as Texas Wesleyan’s head men’s basketball coach from 1948 to 1956 and was known for his gentle spirit and strong leadership. In his four seasons, he led the Rams to two Big State Conference Championships. Willa Gipson ’83 was an All-American selection in volleyball as a junior in 1982. In her senior year, Gipson led the Lady Rams to a National runner-up finish with a record of 45-22. The team’s 45 wins are still a school record. Gipson is also a member of the NAIA Hall of Fame. She later became the athletic director for Birdville Independent School District, becoming only the fourth female AD in the State of Texas and the first African-American female AD. At any level of college golf, 17 players have won two individual national championships, while three have won three titles. Only one golfer has ever won four individual national championships, Texas Wesleyan’s Danny Mijovic ’83. Mijovic was the NAIA’s individual medalist in 1980, 1981, 1982, and 1983. Meanwhile, he led the Rams team to national runner-up finishes in each of those seasons. In his four years, Texas Wesleyan won 24 tournaments while Mijovic was individual medalist in nine tournaments. Bill White ’62 was a member of the Texas Wesleyan men’s basketball team from 1958 to 1962. He is a member of the 1,000 Point Club, and is still the program’s career record holder in field goal percentage at 55.6 percent. During the 1960-1961 season, he put together one of the strongest individual years in program history, averaging a career-high 22.8 points and 10.1 rebounds per game as a junior. Texas Wesleyan Athletics is currently in its 75th year. With the 2011 induction class, 43 of the greatest players, coaches, and supporters in Wesleyan’s history are currently enshrined in the Athletic Hall of Fame.

Spring 2011

Gene ’54 and Ann ’54 Burge

Dan Hart ‘47 (posthumously)

Willa Gipson ’83

Danny Mijovic ’83

Bill White ’62

13 


Texas Wesleyan’s Finest Musical Talent Shows Off at the

President’s Honors Concert

l–r: Beverly Volkman-Powell ’92, MBA ’99, President Frederick G. Slabach, Ryan Amador ’11, Becca Mitchell, Luke Miller, Leslie Elston, Mary Banks, Justin Mikulencak, Wiley Lindsey, Samuel Griffith, Leigh Smith, David Gast, Katreeva Phillips ’11.

14 

www.txwes.edu


Joe Don Conger, Heath Scott ’11, and Charles Duke ’53

Dr. Jerome Bierschenk and President Frederick G. Slabach

T

he 15th annual President’s Honors Concert once again highlighted the diverse and unique musical talent in the Texas Wesleyan Department of Music. The concert, which was hosted by President Frederick G. Slabach and Charles and Beverly Powell, Texas Wesleyan Board of Trustees vice-chairman, featured performances by 11 students: Katreeva Phillips ’11, David Gast, Samuel Griffith, Leigh Smith, Wiley Lindsey, Justin Mikulencak, Mary Banks, Leslie Elston, Luke Miller, Becca Mitchell and Ryan Amador ’11. The students, dressed to the nines for the occasion, performed the work of legendary composers like Schubert, Puccini and Chopin on instruments ranging from piano to trombone, as well as vocal performances. The students were accompanied by Keith Critcher, vocal coach/

accompanist and instructor, and Eileen Downey, vocal coach and accompanist. The concert was emceed by Student Government Association President Heath Scott ’11, who served as master of ceremonies for the evening. The President’s Honors Concert began in 1996 to showcase the musical talent of select students and to acknowledge the University’s tradition of leadership in the arts. Getting into the event is no easy task — the students must audition before a panel of judges that includes some of the area’s finest musical talent. It’s a special event that “represents the continued artistic achievement of our students,” according to Dr. John Fisher, chair of the music department. The concert was followed by a lively reception in Lou’s Place, where patrons mingled with performers, talking about the show and congratulating the performers.

Ryan Amador ’11 and Dr. John Fisher

Spring 2011

Beverly Volkman-Powell ’92, MBA ’99 and Charles Powell


By Meghan Foster n April 14, the Texas Wesleyan University President, Fred Slabach, along with supporting faculty and staff members, unveiled the new state-of-the-art MultiMedia Center (MMC), located in the basement of the Eunice and James L. West Library. The MultiMedia Center supports the University’s strategic plan for fostering student success and increasing retention rates by providing tools to create highly engaging audio and video content. The MMC provides a unique signature experience at Texas Wesleyan University. This project serves the needs of not only the Mass Communications Department’s Television and Audio Production classes, but also the entire University community. Faculty members from Education, English, Music, Mass Communications, Management, Marketing, Political Science, Nurse Anesthesia, and Theatre have expressed a direct interest in using the MMC to fulfill a wide variety of learning outcomes. In addition to academic departments, various support services will have access to the MultiMedia Center, including the Office of Communications, PreProfessional Programs, Athletics, Career Services, and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

R

M

L

EDIA CE M N TI TE

U

0

UNVEILED

BUILDING AN IDEA The initial planning phase began in May 2010, but after realizing that the Information Technology Department experienced a lack of both momentum and funding, the CIO reached out to the Title III Grant Director to obtain additional funds. In July of 2010, Meghan Foster was recruited to become the project lead under the direction of Debbie Roark as a result of the funding provided by the Title III grant. During July and August of 2010, constituency groups were identified and polled on their technology needs for a state-of-the-art MultiMedia recording studio. By soliciting such a wide variety of input, a collaborative team was formed to support the purchasing, construction, and installation of the new space. Using this feedback, Meghan Foster, Title III, George Blackwell ’08 and Charles Martin, IT Media Services Department, worked to create a comprehensive project plan which was presented and approved by the IT Steering Committee in September. In October the existing facilities were gutted to remove outdated equipment, and broken furniture, and to repair aging electrical and networking infrastructure. In November, the MMC was freshly painted and cleaned. Additionally, a new stage was constructed 16 

www.txwes.edu


in the video recording studio with the assistance of Bryan Stevenson ’01, technical theatre faculty member, and his technical theatre class. The theatre students were also recruited to assemble a sound isolation booth in the audio recording studio. Modern furniture was installed in November to create efficient workspaces for students and faculty for editing recordings on new highpowered computers. These new computers are a mix of dual monitor PCs and 24-inch Mac monitors to provide the most flexibility and comfort for students and faculty using various media technologies. Additionally, these computers were provided with current industry standard video and audio editing software to ensure students are prepared for meaningful careers within the communications industry.

TOOLS OF THE TRADE New equipment began arriving in December, and Martin completed the video studio installation by the end of January. The audio studio was completed with a sound isolation booth, digital recording mixer, and five editing computers, as well as the University’s modern interactive classroom technology standard with a lecture-capture camera and recorder. The facilities were designed to maximize the flexibility of the space and be accessible to students and faculty members from a wide variety of skill levels. The video studio area was designed to support basic Spring 2011

recording from a single operator, a scripted interview for multiple operators, or a live or recorded performance with multiple cameras directed from the control booth. In the video-editing booth area, the four editing stations were expanded to five. The audio studio area was designed to support either basic recordings from a single operator or a recorded performance with multiple tracks from within a sound isolation booth directed from a control area outside the booth. The audio studio also was equipped with five new editing computers. Additionally, the audio studio houses the University’s standard classroom setup (projector, Smartboard, computer, podium, etc.) with a microphone and camera setup to record lectures for distance education courses or practice teaching sessions for education majors. As a result, the final solution delivered an extraordinarily flexible space that serves the needs of the entire University.

RamblerTV is a newly created media outlet at Texas Wesleyan University. Originally it was The Rambler’s YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/ thetwurambler, but it has since expanded to Channel 25 on campus and in the dorms. RamblerTV now has two programs all its own, a weekly newscast and Wesleyan Sports Access, which can be viewed on campus or at www.therambler.org/ under the multimedia tab. Stay tuned as RamblerTV expands in the fall to include a more in-depth newscast, commercials and more programming. “We hope to expand our broadcast time so that we can submit our newscasts to the local cable access channel in Fort Worth,” said Dr. Kay L. Colley, Rambler faculty liaison and student media director. “Our staff this semester has done a great job of kicking off RamblerTV. With the support of Texas Wesleyan administration, faculty, staff and students, we know the upcoming year will be even more successful.” —Kay Colley

17 


Wesleyan Dominates Table Tennis World

T

exas Wesleyan University continued its dominance of the College Table Tennis world in 2011. After taking only three of seven national championships in 2010, this year’s squad breezed to six of seven titles, all while posting an impressive team GPA of 3.16. The team capped the three-day tournament held in Rochester, MN, by winning both the coed and women’s team titles. The coveted Coed National Championship was first decided in 2004. Texas Wesleyan has never lost that event, winning eight consecutive team titles. For the second straight year, the championship came down to Texas Wesleyan and Lindenwood University, and the Rams came up with a 3-2 win. On the women’s side, the title also came down to Texas Wesleyan and Lindenwood. The Lady Rams won 3-1. Their championship was the fourth for Texas Wesleyan. The men’s singles event came down to two of the top players in North America. Mark Hazinski, who will represent Team USA at both the Pan American Games and the Table Tennis World Championships this year, defeated Ottawa University’s Pierre-Luc Hinse, who won the Table Tennis North American Championship this year. Women’s singles was an all Wesleyan affair as three Lady Rams reached the final four. In the end, Sara Hazinski topped Hung-Yu Tina Chen for her second consecutive title. Similarly, Texas Wesleyan dominated the field in men’s doubles with

18 

BY JOSH LACY

Mark Hazinski and Yahao Zhang defeating their teammates Jose Barbosa and Lukasz Fita in the final. Mark Hazinski added a third title by teaming with his wife Sara in mixed doubles. Sara almost pulled off the same feat, but the combination of Hazinski and Ines Perhoc was defeated in the final round of women’s doubles by Lindenwood’s Leine Agata and Karin Fukushima. This season marks the third time that the Rams won six titles in one season. The team won six titles in 2006 and swept all seven titles in 2007. The Rams also won all five available titles in 2002. Texas Wesleyan has won over 70 percent of all the table tennis national championships decided in the last decade, taking 47 of a possible 66 championships since the program’s inception in 2002.

www.txwes.edu


Wesleyan’s Rising Golf Star BY JOSH LACY

T

he Texas Wesleyan University men’s golf team is one of the most storied programs in the NAIA. Entering the 2010-2011 season, the Rams have won a remarkable 192 tournaments. They have made 49 NAIA National Tournament appearances where they have never failed to make the cut. Their six national championships rank second all-time to Oklahoma City University’s seven, while their nine runner-up finishes are a national record. The program has seen 73 All-American athletes and nine NAIA National medalists, but few have been better than Armando Villarreal ’11. Villarreal, a senior out of Los Mochis, Mexico, also became the second four-time All-American in program history. As a freshman in 2007-2008, Villarreal earned 2nd-team All-American honors. That year he was the Red River Athletic Conference medalist (his first tournament win). He then helped the team to a tenth-place finish at the NAIA National Tournament, placing 69th individually. That was only a humble preview of what he had in store for the following two seasons. As a sophomore he was named to the Ping NAIA All-American 3rd-team. During the year he notched three top-five finishes, but he found his swing at the national tournament. In the fourth and final round, Villarreal was three-under at the turn, pulling into a tie for the lead. He made just one bogey on the day and turned in a second straight round of two-under 69 at TPC @ Deere Run to take second in the field of 151 individuals. Two-time Champion Sam Cyr from Point Loma Nazarene University made a pair of birdies in his last four holes to hold off Villarreal by three shots. Villarreal’s performance powered the Rams to a runner-up finish, marking the team’s best finish since its 1999 National Championship. Last year Villarreal notched the second best scoring average in school history at 72.769 just missing Reino Deetlefs’ record of 72.766 set in 2003-2004. He was named 1st-team All-American after notching five top-five and ten top-ten finishes in eleven events. He fired the low round of his career, 66, in the first round of the UST-Mamiya Texas Intercollegiate on his way to a fourthplace finish. In the final round of the national tournament, he went low again with a card of 67 that lifted him to third place at four-over par in the field of 156 individuals. Through eight tournaments this year he holds a scoring average of 72.368 with four top-five finishes including his second career win. His 36-hole score of 148 led the field of 57 golfers at UT-Brownsville’s Sen. Eddie Lucio Invitational and led the Rams to a second consecutive win as a team. The Rams are currently ranked 11th in the NAIA Coaches’ Poll and seventh in the Golf World/Nike Coaches’ Poll. To be in the conversation of best player for a program with Texas Wesleyan’s history is indeed high praise. He is already one of only six players in program history to receive All-American recognition three times and he could join four-time NAIA Medalist Danny Mijovic as the program’s only four-time All-American later this spring.

Spring 2011

19 


A Basketball Season to Remember

BY JOSH LACY

T TY GOUGH

JEREMY MAYFIELD

20 

he Texas Wesleyan men’s and women’s basketball teams made this season one to remember. Both teams won at a record pace on the hardwood, and, for the first time in school history, both teams advanced to the NAIA National Tournament in the same season. Terry Waldrop’s men’s team entered the year with serious national championship aspirations, with four starters returning from a team that won the program’s third consecutive Red River Athletic Conference Championship the year before. The team had an extra challenge this year with the addition of LSU-Shreveport to the RRAC. The Pilots had won six consecutive Gulf Coast Conference championships before bolting for the Red River this year. Both teams were ranked in the top-ten nationally all season, with both teams hovering between third and fifth for much of the year. The Rams started the year with 11 consecutive wins, marking the second best start in school history (the 1940-1941 team began the year at 19-0). At 13-1 overall, the Rams rolled into Shreveport to take on the Pilots, who were then the top-ranked team in the country at 13-0. The Rams erased a ten-point deficit in the second half and led 66-61 with 3:33 to play, but LSUS rallied for a narrow 74-68 win. Texas Wesleyan went right back to its winning ways, closing out the regular season with 15-straight wins, including a 77-66 overtime win over LSUS on Valentine’s Day in front of a packed house at the Sid Richardson Center. The Rams and Pilots met one more time in the final of the RRAC Tournament with LSUS winning 71-61. Still, the Rams went into the NAIA National Tournament as the fifth overall seed. The team appeared to have its first-round contest well in hand with a 63-57 lead with less than a minute to play, but Rogers State pulled off a stunning comeback and ended the Rams’ season with a 66-64 loss. In spite of the disappointing finish, the Rams won at a record pace. At 21-1 in conference play they won their fourth consecutive RRAC Regular Season Championship. With an overall record of 30-3 they also matched the highest win total in program history (the 1946-1947 team went 30-4). The team featured five All-Conference players and two All-Americans. Senior guard Brian Wanamaker was named RRAC Player of the Year and 1st-team All-

www.txwes.edu


STACY FRANCIS ’04

TIFFANY ADAIR

American (only the third Ram to receive that honor). Wanamaker ranked in the top-50 nationally in nine statistical categories. He scored 652 points (19.2/g) and became the 19th member of Texas Wesleyan’s 1,000-point club with 1,046 points in his two-year career. Stacy Francis’ ’04 Lady Rams kept pace with the men’s team for most of the season. At 12-1, the Lady Rams also had the second best start in school history (the 1978-1979 team started 16-0). The team really began to hit its stride when a 63-58 win at Southwestern Assemblies of God University moved them into second in the conference standings at 11-3 in league play. The Lady Rams closed the regular season on a high as well, winning each of their final seven games, including a very impressive 89-64 thumping of eleventh-ranked Langston University on Senior Day at the Sid Richardson Center. Still, the Rams needed to reach the RRAC Tournament Championship Game in order to advance to the NAIA National Tournament. The Rams breezed through Texas College in the quarterfinals and then played a thriller with LSU-Shreveport in the semifinals. The year before, Texas Wesleyan had lost in

overtime in the semifinals after their buzzer-beater at the end of regulation just missed. This year it was LSUS that took the shot at the end of regulation. The ball bounced twice on the rim before falling out, and the Rams went on to win in overtime, 68-64. That win put the Rams into the NAIA National Tournament for just the second time in program history (the 2004-2005 team also made an appearance). Although the Rams lost in the first round of the NAIA Tournament, their overall record of 28-6 was one shy of the school record for victories set in 1978–1979. The RRAC regular season and tournament runner-up, the team featured four AllConference players and one All-American. Junior guard Brittany White was named Honorable Mention NAIA All-American after averaging 12.2 points, 5.5 rebounds, and 1.8 assists per game, becoming only the fourth All-American in program history and the first since 1990. The men’s and women’s basketball teams thrilled Texas Wesleyan fans all year long. The teams combined for an overall record of 58-9, including a record of 31-1 in front of the home fans at the Sid Richardson Center.

TERRY WALDROP SHAYLA MOORE

Spring 2011

21 


QUALITY

Ensuring a Educational Experience

T

exas Wesleyan is working hard to ensure that students receive not only a quality education, but a rewarding educational experience. Two distinct programs are underway that will complement each other for years to come.

Wesleyan’s Quality Enhancement Plan A Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) is focused on improving learning outcomes and accomplishing the University’s mission to develop students to their full potential as individuals and as members of the world community. A QEP is required by the institution’s accrediting body, the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and will be submitted prior to reaffirmation in 2013. Dr. Elizabeth Battles, Professor of English and Director of the Honors Program, was appointed Chair of Wesleyan’s QEP team in 2010. Dr. Battles chartered the course of action and then set

out to implement each phase, a monumental task that is still ongoing. “First and foremost, we had to ensure that the choice of the topic of the QEP involves all areas of the University,” notes Dr. Battles. “Although academic in nature, the topic should be implicitly tied to the University’s strategic plan, and choosing it involves faculty, staff, students, alumni and trustees.” Dr. Battles conducted a thorough survey to arrive at an understanding of the University’s current state as well as insight into the desired state. Proposals for QEP topics recommending specific courses of action have already been accepted. These proposals will be reviewed and a QEP topic will be chosen by the Leadership Team in early Fall 2011. A dedicated website monitors the progress of the QEP and is available from Wesleyan’s homepage through “SACS Reaffirmation 2013” in the yellow quick-links panel.

SIGNATURE STUDENT EXPERIENCE CHARTER PROJECTS Enhancing Transfer Student Engagement

>

Goal: Develop an intentional community-driven process by which transfer students become engaged and successful members of the Wesleyan community. This process begins at the student’s time of acceptance and continues through the time at which the student truly feels he or she belongs at Wesleyan. Pati Alexander BBA ’90, MSE ’97

Organizing to Deliver on the Career Promise

>

Goal: Develop an integrated approach to career preparation that includes academic programming and career counseling. Create opportunities for meaningful career-related experiences and services that help lead to placement in a preferred profession. Dr. Allen Henderson 22 


Two programs take aim at enhancing student learning, institutional effectiveness, and the overall student experience Signature Student Experience Charter Projects Wesleyan’s Signature Student Experience, which is designed to sharpen our focus on student satisfaction, has moved from the planning phase to the implementation phase. At the end of last year, faculty and staff members were selected to help create “quick wins” that could deliver timely results using only a minimum of resources. At the same time, the executive administration team was working to determine areas of focus that were more strategic in nature. Those areas would also deliver near-term results, but more importantly, they would be aligned with the University’s longterm strategic plan. The areas of focus were announced on March 29th by Wesleyan’s four vice presidents. Nearly 70 faculty and staff members and students immediately signed up to help drive the planning and execution of one of the four charter projects. Many of the quick wins that were proposed by faculty and staff were incorporated within the charter projects. One activity, Campus Cleanup Day, was met with resounding enthusiasm.

Campus Cleanup Day 2011 Students were invited to join faculty and staff for a day to come together and help beautify the Wesleyan campus. The “wear your jeans and T-shirt” approach was complemented by a beautiful spring Friday. Over 150 volunteers came together to improve landscaping, reviving weather-worn benches and tables, and installing new structures to add personality to the campus.

Making Our Spaces Count

Sherri Mata ’95, MAP ’06, Director of Career Services, headed up the volunteer effort. “We decided to do something for the students and let the students participate so they could be part of the Wesleyan community,” she said. “It helps build pride among the students, faculty and staff.” “At Dan Waggoner, we cleared out the beds, planted flowers and put out mulch. I’ve walked around campus today and looked at the different areas we’ve been working on and it’s just been beautiful.” “Since gardening is my passion, I decided to sign up,” said Elda Vela, a junior education major. “I was planting flowers at the church and started talking with someone from the Admissions Office. I didn’t know her and had never seen her, but we started talking and shared what brought us to the school. It was a great day.” Clearly, the pride is something you can not only see, but feel. And the good news is, we’ve only just begun.

>

Goal: Using input from stakeholders, make our physical and virtual spaces positively contribute to the overall student experience. Identify what elements attract and engage students, and integrate insights and recommendations with ongoing work in long-range planning. Bill Bleibdrey

Enhancing Campus Communications

Goal: Develop a process that coordinates and facilitates the scheduling and communication of “events-based” information to the campus community. Communicate about the Signature Student Experience to all constituencies and develop a sustainable model for developing long-term communication materials. Led by Joan Canty.

Spring 2011

23 


A Look Back at 10 Years

by Cristina Noriega

National Adoption Day began in California in November 2000 as a partnership between law firms, state foster care agencies, child advocates and courts to complete hundreds of foster care adoptions. That first year nine cities nationwide participated, including Fort Worth. Texas Wesleyan School of Law has been involved with the event from the very beginning. “Judge [Jean] Boyd became aware of this national adoption effort, and she wanted to bring it to Tarrant County. She called me and asked if we could help,” Patti Gearhart Turner ’94, assistant dean for student affairs and the director of the Equal Justice Program, said. “Our students were involved from the very beginning. Dean [Vickie] Rainwater [associate dean for graduate and certificate programs], Charlotte Hughart [director of the law clinic] and I all took adoptions that first year.” Hughart participated in the first two National Adoption Days in 2000 and 2001 by supervising Texas Wesleyan law school students. She remembers a case in 2001 that student Desiree Voth ’02 worked on. “After her hearing, the 4-year-old girl involved asked Desiree, ‘Is this my mommy now?’ Desiree said, ‘Yes, this is your mommy forever.’ The little girl ran up to her mom, grabbed her leg and asked ‘This mommy?’ Desiree said, ‘Yes.’ And the little girl cheered with happiness,” Hughart said. “Obviously, she had more than one mommy in her mind and she wasn’t completely sure what had happened until then.”

Law Clinic director Charlotte Hughart (second from left) supervised law school students Ann Bacchus ’01, Jesse Nevarez ’01 and Desiree Voth ’02 (left to right) during the second National Adoption Day on Nov. 17, 2001. Nine law school students participated.

Hughart said being involved in National Adoption Day was very gratifying. “Both years that I did it, at least one of the adopted children involved was really affected by the day,” Hughart said. “And that just made it all worthwhile.” Traditionally, the event is held on the Saturday before Thanksgiving with judges and attorneys volunteering their time to finalize adoptions for foster children. Law school students assist attorneys with interviewing clients, preparing pleadings and appearing at the adoption hearings. As a student at the law school in 2005, Debbie Hinds-Morris ’07 said she participated in National Adoption Day because she was interested in going into family law. “Any student remotely interested in family law should get involved in this program,” Hinds-Morris said at the time. “It was a great way to see inside the legal realm of adoption. It allowed me to see how adoption really affects people’s lives. The best part is that everybody wins. There are no losers in this case.” The law school’s participation in National Adoption Day has grown over the last nine years. In 2000, seven Texas Wesleyan law students partnered with 13 attorneys to oversee the adoptions of 27 children. In 2009, 37 law students worked with 20 attorneys to work on the adoption cases of 80 children. During the opening remarks of National Adoption Day in 2009, Boyd recognized Texas Wesleyan’s participation in National Adoption Day since its start in Tarrant County. “We could not do National Adoption Day without Texas Wesleyan and their support,” Boyd said. “Can you imagine a better experience for your first time in a courtroom, handling adoption? I can tell you that was not my first experience as a lawyer, but that has got to be the greatest experience ever.” Nationally since 2000, more than 30,000 children have had their adoptions finalized on National Adoption Day. “Looking back over the past 10 years of the law school’s participation in National Adoption Day has revealed the impact our students have had on this ongoing program,” Turner said. “Hundreds of law students have been trained to represent clients who need adoption legal services. Hundreds of students have enabled foster children to leave foster care and become part of a permanent and loving family. Hundreds of students continued to give pro bono legal services after they became licensed attorneys. “The law students who we have trained over the past 10 years are now the expert trainers, the leaders and the volunteers who sustain National Adoption Day.” Judge Randy Catterton of the 231st District Court holds a newly adopted child during the first National Adoption Day in Tarrant County on Nov. 18, 2000. Seven Texas Wesleyan School of Law students participated in that first event.

www.txwes.edu


Goostree Symposium Welcomes Author Melany Neilson

I

n 1981, Mrs. Faye Goostree endowed a women’s symposium at Texas Wesleyan University. The purpose was to provide an annual event to promote women in leadership roles by bringing a noted speaker to campus. The speaker for the 2011 Goostree Symposium was author Melany Neilson. Neilson’s book, Even Mississippi, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. The book is an account of her childhood in Mississippi and her experience working on Robert Clark’s bids for Congress in 1982 and 1984. Neilson’s 2002 novel, Persia Cafe, tells the story of a young white woman in 1960s Mississippi. She is currently working on her second novel. The theme for this year’s symposium was “The Stories We Keep: Women and Narrative.” Neilson’s keynote speech was entitled “Writing is More Like Raising Children than You Think: The Perception and Reality of Nurturing Our Stories into Long and Happy Lives.” In her comments, Neilson traced her life as writer and mother, showing how creating characters and stories resembles the relationships and challenges of raising children. What was most poignant was her realization that the ties of relationship for both are fleeting and fragile, and there comes a time when both must be released to the wide world to stand on their own. While Neilson expressed her discomfort with public speaking, her wit, humor, and intelligence belied her fears. The keynote address was followed by a luncheon in Lou’s Pavilion.

Spring 2011

Neilson traced her life as writer and mother, showing how creating characters and stories resembles the relationships and challenges of raising children.

Dr. Beth Battles, Melany Neilson, and her husband, Frederick G. Slabach

25 


Alumni Remember Good Times at Wesleyan, Renew Friendships at Reunion Esmeralda Ordonez, Rachel Horton ’11, Ashly Spencer ’11

26 

David Floyd ’76

John Maddux ’59

www.txwes.edu


L-R: Armando Villareal ’11, Jorge Ruiz, Derek Brown, President Slabach, Larry Kitchens ’63

below: Quentin McGown ’79, JD ’00

James Lind ’03 kicked off this year’s Alumni Reunion weekend with a trumpet performance during the 5th Annual Alumni Invitational Recital. The next two days were full of activities for visiting alumni. On the afternoon of April 15, alumni who enjoy the links took to Glen Garden Country Club for a golf outing. Proceeds from the event benefited the alumni scholarship endowment. Great fun for a great cause! Then friends old and new gathered at Los Vaqueros for the All-Alumni Dinner. The next day began with the traditional Alpha Chi/Golden Shears Breakfast. Later came the All-Alumni Gathering and the group reunion photo. After lunch, the President’s Ambassadors led campus tours. Other afternoon activities included the 1950s and 1960s gathering and a School of Education reception honoring retiring professor, Dr. Sue Passmore. The reunion wrapped up with an evening of quality entertainment: Theatre Wesleyan’s 57th annual musical production, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, which was followed by the Afterglow party. We’ll see you in 2012 for the next reunion!

Bobby Deaton

Spring 2011

Catherine Wakefield ’39

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

27 


Outgoing SGA President Brought Energy, Enthusiasm to Campus Politics

U

pstairs in Otho C. Armstrong Hall, Heath Scott ’11, outgoing Student Government Association president, is packing away his legacy. More than 3,000 documents — e-mails, paperwork and gifts — are jammed into three banker’s boxes that will go into the University archives. It took a while to get everything into only three boxes, but he’s done it. Archiving their legacy wasn’t much of a priority for many past presidents, Scott said. But then again, in his two terms, Scott has redeveloped — and reasserted — the role of SGA president on the Texas Wesleyan campus. “As tuition-paying individuals, I believe we have a right to a voice on this campus,” he said. Scott, who graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in political science, helped bring peace activist Arun Gandhi to campus, emceed the President’s Honors Concert, worked to put a Student Bill of Rights in the handbook and approved 18 new on-campus organizations in two years. Scott also brought a new era of formality to the office — he often attended meetings in a business suit.

The fire and drive came from inspirational experience on the campaign trail. Scott worked to register voters during the 2008 presidential campaign, and he also worked for two years in the office of Texas State Senator Jane Nelson. He was invigorated by the ideas and enthusiasm he saw during his time in politics, and he wanted to bring that energy level to Texas Wesleyan. “Change brings new ideas to the floor,” Scott said. “During the election, I saw what 18 to 20 year-old kids could do when they were passionate about issues. This is our local form of government, and I wanted to bring that here.” So, what is Scott up to now? Soon after commencement, Scott will leave for basic training. He joined the Army National Guard, where he hopes to become an officer. As for his political aspirations, well, he’s holding those close to the vest. “I was told once that you should never say what office you might want to hold,” Scott said, “but I’ll go as far as this takes me.”

8 STEPS TO STRENGTHENING TIES WITH YOUR ALMA MATER 1. Read the Wesleyan Magazine 2. Attend the annual spring alumni reunion 3. Become a Ram Wrangler 4. Make an annual gift to the University 5. Send updates/news to the Alumni Office 6. Attend University Events 7. Stay Connected through Wesleyan’s Facebook Page and the Alumni E-Newsletter 8. 28 

Join the Morton Fitness Center! www.txwes.edu


In Memoriam 1930s Hollyce Johnson ’32, Aug. 15, 2010. Fort Worth.  |  Johnson was a civilian employee of the Department of Defense. William Ernest Yarbrough ’36, June 23, 2010. Dallas.  |  Yarbrough excelled at golf while at Texas Wesleyan and worked in the treasury department of Texas Utilities for more than 35 years.

1940s

Elizabeth Cramer ’43, Sept. 10, 2010, Fort Worth.  |  Cramer was an associate in J&J Supply, her husband’s business, and worked as an interior designer at W.C. Stripling Department Store. Hardie Fortenberry ’47, Oct. 14, 2010, Hurst.  |  Fortenberry played basketball at Texas Wesleyan, and was inducted into the Athletics Hall of Fame in 1972. John Grammer ’43, June 9, 2010, Fort Worth.  |  Grammer served with the 1st Division in Europe during World War II and received the Purple Heart. Klaude Kendrick ’45, Aug. 28, 2010, Fayetteville, AR.  |  Kendrick was president of Evangel College (Now University), Southwestern Bible Institute (now Southwestern Assemblies of God University) and the Far East Advanced School of Theology (Now Asia Pacific Theological Seminary). Amy Jo Long ’41, Dec. 7, 2010, Austin.  |  A former journalism instructor and public relations director for Texas Wesleyan, Long was also a former reporter for the Fort Worth Press and a voracious reader. Blake Yager ’47, Oct. 9, 2010. Arlington.  |  Yager was a teacher, principal and administrator in the Fort Worth ISD from 1952 to 1980, and a student body president at Texas Wesleyan.

1950s

1970s

Margaret O. Adams, Jan. 21, 2011, Fort Worth.  |  Adams was a devoted homemaker, substitute teacher and avid traveler.

John Ulrickson ’74, Jan. 30, 2011, Fort Worth.  |  Ulrickson was a longtime member of University Christian Church.

Jean Coleman ’51, Jan. 18, 2011, Midlothian.  |  Coleman taught school for 25 years in Midlothian and grew up in the Polytechnic Heights neighborhood.

Rebecca Long ’76, Jan. 24, 2011, Napa, Calif.  |  Long was an avid traveler, gardener and animal lover, and held a master’s degree in university administration.

Pheby Belle Myers ’51, Alvarado.  |  Pheby was a jewelry store owner and powder puff drag racer. Farrell Odom ’53, March 27, 2011, Portales, NM.  |  Odom was a lifelong pastor who led churches in Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico. JoAnn Steel ’56, Sept. 22, 2010, Odessa.  |  Steel was director of the Odessa Cultural Council from 1979 to 1994. Lois Warr ’52, Dec. 22, 2010, Birmingham, AL.  |  Warr was a teacher and a board member of the Town and Country Library.

1960s Charles A. Cox ’60, July 25, 2010, Arlington.  |  Cox was a charter member of the Fort Worth chapter of Scottish Rite, and a lifelong Fort Worth resident. James Dudley Alexander ’64, Aug. 3, 2010. Arlington.  |  Alexander served in the Texas National Guard during the Berlin Wall crisis. Jo Ellen Dugger ’66, Nov. 11, 2010, Granbury.  |  Dugger was a teacher in Fort Worth ISD, Round Rock ISD and CypressFairbanks ISD for 30 years. John Glass ’66, Nov. 29, 2010, Fort Worth.  |  Glass worked in his family’s business, Texas Sewing Machine Distributors, for more than 30 years. Patricia Tekell ’62, Jan. 6, 2011, McKinney.  |  A Cleburne native, Tekell is survived by her husband of 48 years, Jack Tekell. Barry E. White, Sept. 15, 2010, Fort Worth.  |  White was an educator, band director and construction business owner. Frederick Wolfe ’68, Feb. 8, 2011, Fort Worth.  |  Wolfe worked for 36 years at General Dynamics in the estimating department and was an avid flea market attendee.

1980s Jo Hopson ’82, Dec. 7, 2010, Fort Worth.  |  Hopson was a former Miss Fort Worth, a songwriter for Kids Who Care, and host of the local cable show About Town.

1990s Belinda Loveland ’98, June 20, 2010, Rowlett.  |  Loveland was a respected judge and attorney in the Rowlett area.

In Honor Of . . . Leon Breeden, Aug. 11, 2010, Dallas.  |  Breeden was a renowned director of the University of North Texas Jazz Studies Program. Dick Davis, Dec. 25, 2010, Arlington.  |  Davis was a Korean War veteran and former Board of Trustees member. Lola Frazee, Sept. 21, 2010. Arlington.  |  Frazee is the honoree of the Bob and Lola Frazee Texas Wesleyan University Scholarship Fund. Joe Greenhill, Feb. 11, 2011, Austin.  |  The Hon. Joe R. Greenhill was chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court from 1972 to 1982 and is the honoree of the Chief Justice Joe Greenhill Scholarship at the Texas Wesleyan University School of Law. Joshua Gregory, Nov. 27, 2010, Fort Worth.  |  Gregory was majoring in business and attending Texas Wesleyan on a university scholarship. Barrett Havran, March 14, 2011, Fort Worth.  |  Havran taught courses in trial advocacy and worked with the Mock Trial team at Texas Wesleyan University School of Law. Margaret Talkington, Dec. 15, 2010, Lubbock.  |  Talkington was a philanthropist and owner of a fashion store in Lubbock.

Dr. Richard Dobbs Strahan ’48, Nov. 22, 2010. Round Rock.  |  Strahan built a career in higher education and was the first president of Lee College in Baytown.

Spring 2011

29 


Alumni News 1950s Virginia Kluck ’59 is currently serving as Chair of the Fort Worth Public Library Advisory Board.

1960s Don White ’61, and Vivian (Wieting) White ’59, retired from 40 years in ministry at the Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. They are currently serving as the National Executive Clergy Couple for Marriage Encounter-United Methodist. Don is a Native American advocate and serves on the Texas Conference United Methodist Committee on Native American Ministries. Martha June (Crow) Graber ’62 and her husband moved to Harrisonburg, Virginia, where they volunteer as translators for the local food pantry and at the free health clinic. They spent last fall in American Samoa helping with the clean-up efforts after the tsunami and earthquake in September 2009. Alumni Board Member Dennis Camp ’64 generously donated a custommade 18-foot flatbed trailer to the University. The trailer, painted Wesleyan blue, was used for the Chesapeake Energy Parade of Lights held in downtown Fort Worth Nov. 26, as well as other University functions. Karen (Pair) West ’65 was selected as a 2010 Hometown Hero by Interfaith of The Woodlands. West taught law for four years and has worked as general counsel for The Woodlands Development Company for 27 years. She also has served on the Board of Directors of the Center for the Performing Arts at The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion. West is married to Waylan West and has two sons and four grandchildren. Charlie Anderson ’69 is American Water Works Association’s presidentelect. He will assume his new position in June 2011, and begin his year-long term as president in 2012. Nancy (Bransom) Arnold, ’69, was invited to have an author signing for her book, Patriotic Pups, at the historic Virginia home of George and Martha Washington. This signing took place at Mt. Vernon on March 27. Mrs. Arnold was also presented a Certificate of Award for her “Outstanding Contributions to Children’s Books on American History” by the Arizona State Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. Thad Smotherman ’69 was asked by Arlington Mayor Robert Cluck to serve on the Youth Town Center committee, chaired by Emmitt Smith. The committee supports the Youth Education Town (YET), which provides at-risk young people an opportunity to learn and live in a safe environment. Building the youth facility is part of the agreement the city accepted when chosen to host the 2011 Super Bowl.

1970s The Golf Coaches Association of America inducted Bobby Cornett ’72, Texas Wesleyan head golf coach, into its Hall of Fame. Cornett was honored at the GCAA Hall of Fame Reception and Awards Banquet on Monday, Dec. 6, at the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas. Lyle Kanouse ’75 appeared on NBC’s Perfect Couples as Mr. Reiger, the owner of a garage door company, on March 17. He is currently filming a western, The First Ride of Wyatt Earp, starring Val Kilmer as Earp. Kanouse plays Dodge City’s Judge Hinkle. The movie also stars country singer Trace Adkins as the patriarch of Dodge City’s criminals. Debbie Brown ’78 was in the cast of the Dallas Children’s Theatre production of The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs at the Baker Theater in Rosewood Center, Dallas. In the play, the wolf tells his side of the story and the audience determines the ending. She was voted Fort Worth Weekly Reader’s Choice for Best Female Actor. Anne Street Skipper ’78, Janie (Ellis) Faris ’77 and Stephanie Faris Sanders ’01 performed in Graham Regional Theatre’s production of the hit musical I Do! I Do! in February at the Graham Memorial Auditorium. Anne Street Skipper ’78 and the staff of Wildcatter Ranch hosted a group of women veterans. These veterans are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. They spent the time with staff from the Veterans Administration and the Wounded Warrior Project enjoying all the ranch has to offer, from great food and activities to the peace and quiet of rural North Texas.

George Warner ’79 is newly certified as an Accredited Estate Planner by the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils. His offices are in Rockwall and Fort Worth. Warner is also this year’s recipient of the Hulsey Award, established by the American National Bank of Texas in 2005 in honor of Riter Hulsey, the bank’s chairman of the board. This award recognizes his commitment and contributions to service and excellence. Warner is a five-time recipient of this award.

1980s Stan Graner ’81 played the role of King Arthur in Artisan Center Theater’s Camelot, which ran Dec. 31 through Jan. 29 at the theater in Hurst. He also performed in the world premiere production of the new musical Debutante Warriors: Girl Power in 3D, which opened in March in WaterTower Theatre’s Out of the Loop Fringe Festival. He also will appear in a production of The Young Man From Atlanta at Uptown Players in Dallas. Curtis H. Pickering MA ’82 took professional basketball teams to China for the fourth consecutive year. Pickering, former head coach of the Rams in 1981-82, is owner of the Santa Barbara Breakers, a professional basketball team in Santa Barbara, Calif. The Breakers and Team Canada AllStars both played a 10-game schedule in six different cities. Pickering previously worked for the New Jersey Nets and Dallas Mavericks. He resides with his son Sage, age 13, in Santa Barbara. Terri Wilson ’85 was selected as Birdville High School Teacher of the year for 2011. Dr. Victor Test ’86, has taken a job as professor of medicine and chief of pulmonary medicine and critical care at the University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine in Tulsa. Margaret Mitchell ’87 co-authored Making the Scene: A History of Stage Design and Technology in Europe and the United States, published by the Tobin Fund for Theatre Arts and distributed by UT Press. This book received the USITT Golden Pen Book Award. Michael Wolf ’88, a certified registered nurse anesthetist from Berlin, Wisconsin, was named the 2010 Clinical Instructor of the Year by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA). This award, established in 1991, recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution to the teaching of nurse anesthesia students in the clinical area.

1990s Aron Head ’90 was promoted in January to associate vice president of provider relations with Amerigroup Community Care, a Fortune 500 Company. Elise (La Chiusa) McVeigh ’90 is a manners expert in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Her new DVD titled, “Mrs. McVeigh’s Magnificent Manners Show,” teaches children good manners. Amy Milakovic ’90 has been appointed chair of the department of English and foreign languages at Avila University. Jeremy Reed ’91 is senior vice president for Content and Editorial at Demand Media, overseeing content production that feeds the company’s owned-and-operated sites, including eHow.com and LIVESTRONG.COM as well as third-party partners USA Today’s “Travel Tips” and YouTube. Previously, Reed was the vice president of content at Citysearch.com and has written about books, music, business, arts and travel for many publications, including the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Austin Chronicle and Austin American-Statesman. Walter Wykes’ ’92 play Family 2.0 was adapted into a film that premiered at the Sedona Film Festival in February. The film starred Christopher Atkins. Rhonda Aghamalian ’93 has launched a full-service communications enterprise called Creative Genie Communications. R. Michael Rose ’94 has written a book which will be published in October. The title is Return on Energy, a term he has trademarked. Rose also teaches an extended education class at TCU and guest lectures on the same topic at SMU. Jan Pettigrew Wilde ’94 was named July 2010 employee of the month at the Dr Pepper StarCenter Ice Arena in Euless. She was also among the top fundraisers at the Dallas MK5K in October 2010.


Christy (Davidson) Collard ’96 directed and choreographed Aledo High School’s production of Guys and Dolls in February. Trey James ’96 was recognized in Accounting Today as one of the 2010 Most Influential People. His company, Xcentric, has taken the lead in providing advanced technology to CPA firms. Kacey Neece-Fielder ’96 now works at the University of Texas at San Antonio as the Director of Strategic Planning and Assessment for the Division of Student Affairs. She recently was featured in a UTSA “Spotlight” article, in which she credits Allen Henderson, university provost, for her career path. Lynn Preston ’96 was a contributing author on two college biology textbooks published by McGraw-Hill. Both books, Human Biology 12th edition by Mader and Windelspecht and Essentials of Biology 3rd edition also by Mader and Windelspecht, were published in January 2011. The Fort Worth Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (FWHCC) is pleased to announce Patricia Castillo ’97, MBA ’08 as Economic Development Manager. Patricia leads the economic development effort to position the FWHCC as the leader in helping to build area businesses through workforce, legislation and grants. Before joining the FWHCC, she held various positions in business operations for radio stations, marketing agencies and a production company managing national programs for Procter & Gamble, the National Football League and the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Melissa Stanford Oden ’97 recently published an article in the Texas Public Health Journal. The article is entitled “Real Talk for Real Girls: Enhancing Communication Between Mothers and Daughters About Sexual Health Issues.” Melany Bivens ’98 recently returned from a mission trip in Cape Town, South Africa, where she assisted women and girls afflicted with HIV. She is currently in Houston working with playwright Thomas Meloncon and also teaches at E-Stem Academy, a charter school funded by Bill Gates. Amber Womack ’99 made her New York City cabaret debut at the famed Don’t Tell Mama Club. In Should I Be Sweet? Amber tells the story of how she got from her hometown in Joshua, Texas, all the way to the Big Apple.

2000s Todd Miller ’00 was the master of ceremonies for the Tarrant County Heart Ball in April 2011. James Lind ’03 performed an Alumni Recital on campus at Martin Hall in April. Selections included “Caprice” by Joseph Turrin, Concerto No. 2 for Trumpet and Orchestra by Anthony Plog and “The Hollow Men” by Vincent Persichetti. Alicia Glenn ’04 completed her master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction: Reading Specialist. Chris Adams ’05 is finishing up his master’s degree in education at Lamar University. He is working with Onstage in Bedford on the production of The Fantasticks and will be working with Denton Community Theatre on their production of Bye Bye Birdie this summer. Courtney Williams Burks ’05, MBA ’08 recently started working for Mary Kay Inc. and is excited about the opportunity of owning her own business. Texas State Senator Leticia Van de Putte hired Servando Esparza ’07 as a legislative assistant. He is responsible for legislative support on issues involving natural resources, criminal justice, transportation and homeland security. He also focused on providing research on human trafficking in preparation for the Human Trafficking Summit held Oct. 19 in San Antonio. Cristin Martin ’07 had a short story, titled “A Night in Polidoria,” published in an anthology titled The Endlands. Mike Meier MBA ’07 was recently featured in the October issue of Toastmasters magazine. The article featured his involvement as a table tennis umpire and his public-speaking training. Kelly Ayala MS ’09, Michael Carney MAP ’10 and Jorge Gama MAP ’09 all work at the Sundance Behavioral Center. They have represented the University so well that the Center asked Michael Ellison, director of graduate counseling programs, to send more Wesleyan graduates its way. Robert Carroll ’09 is the chief sound/lighting technician for Martin Hall for the Texas Wesleyan music department. Rob also is working the Stockshow Concert Series at Casa Mañana. Whitney Greer-Doby ’09 was accepted to UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Physician Assistant Studies Program, beginning in May 2011 and concluding in December 2013.

Julie Jacobson JD ’09 was recognized for her pro bono service with Legal Aid of NorthWest Texas in LegalFront Newsletter by the State Bar of Texas. Max Marquez ’09 is the new technical director at Theatre Arlington. Ben Phillips ’09 recently appeared in Theatre Arlington’s Don’t Dress for Dinner. He also appeared as Citizen Chauvelin in The Scarlet Pimpernel with Cleburne’s Plaza Theatre Company. Professor Joe Brown HON ’10 was honored at the Gentle-Men Against Violence Awards Luncheon on March 3. Nevin Nichols ’10 accomplished his student teaching with Edward Smith ’79 in the choral departments of Alvarado High School and Alvarado Junior High School in Alvarado.

Births Janie (Ellis) ’77, MA ’83 and Evan Faris ’76 are the proud grandparents of Charlie Noel Sanders, who was born Sept. 27. She weighed eight pounds, 12 ounces, and was 20.5 inches long. She joins her big sister Faris. Jennifer (Nutt) Sullivan ’98 and her husband Frank announce the birth of their second daughter, Emily Grace Sullivan, born July 11, 2009. She weighed six pounds and was 19 inches long. Big sister Katherine is five. The Sullivans currently reside in Granbury, where Jennifer is a fifth-grade teacher and Frank is a senior account manager for TD Ameritrade. Lark (Wallis) Johnston ’03 gave birth to a baby boy, Benton Wallis Johnston, on March 3. Congrats to her and grandmother, Melissa (Benton) Wallis ’80. Sebastian Gael Saenz was born to Arlene (Valle) Saenz ’03 and Santiago Saenz ’06 Sept. 16, and weighed eight pounds, six ounces. Aaron Whaley ’03, director of the Morton Fitness Center, and Rachel Loftin Whaley ’06 had a 21.5-inchlong, eight pound, 15-ounce baby boy, named Addox Cotton Whaley, on March 17. Bryant BS ’03 and Heather (Latimer) Wilson, BS ’03 celebrated the birth of Arden Reese Wilson on April 16, 2009 — seven pounds, 14 ounces and 19.75 inches long. She joins her big brother, Clayton. Katie (Cole) Fuller ’04 and her husband Eric celebrated the birth of their baby boy, named Josiah Michael Fuller, on May 23, 2010. Lisa Wilks ’04 MAP ’07 is the proud grandmother of London Eisley Loftin, born Oct. 31, 2010.

Vincent ’06 and Jessica (Krizek) ’05,’08, Sangsvang had a baby, Stryder Li Sangsvang, Nov. 25.

Marriages Heather Spore ’93 was married to actor Brian Kelly on Aug. 28, in New York City, where they currently reside. Colleen (Burnie) McKnight ’07, ’08 was married to Ryan McKnight Jan. 1, in Austin. They have a home in Houston where they will reside after their honeymoon. She has also accepted a job offer from Hogan Lovells US LLP in the Houston office to begin working in fall 2011.


Lifelong Educator Marie Glick, 103, Remembered for Her Generosity By Laura Hanna

F

rom the student scholarships to the numerous anonymous gifts to the donation of her home to the counseling program, Mrs. Marie Glick gave her talents and treasures to Texas Wesleyan for more than 70 years. The generous benefactor died in April at the age of 103. “She had a wonderful life and she has been a wonderful benefactor to the University,” said Joan Canty, vice president of advancement. “She helped dozens of students and international students succeed, almost always anonymously. She was very generous.” Mrs. Glick came to the school in 1938 with her husband, Dr. Walter Glick, dean of the College. They lived in Wade Hall for their first decade of marriage and then decided to buy a two-story brick home just off campus. They shared that home for many years, until his death in 1960. She stayed in the home until she was 80. At that point, she decided to move back to Wade Hall and donated her home to the University. In the fall of 2007, the Glick House Community Counseling Center celebrated its grand opening in conjunction with Mrs. Glick’s 100th birthday. She was escorted to the door and was the first one through the doorway to see the renovated house, which she pronounced to be “beautiful.” She was joined by family, trustees, Wesleyan faculty and staff, media, and community supporters. After touring the home, she visited with friends

32 

and then gave interviews to print and broadcast media. The counseling center has continued to thrive over the years. From the time it opened through April 2011, there have been 10,680 counseling sessions. “Marie’s gift of her home ensures thousands of counseling graduate students will receive training they will use throughout their professional life, which will then influence the lives of millions of clients,” said Michael Ellison, director of graduate counseling. “What a tremendous gift to Wesleyan and the community, and what a terrific legacy. Her name will live on for generations. We are so grateful.” Mrs. Glick touched many lives through her time at Wesleyan and during her many years as a teacher and a principal at the Fort Worth Masonic Home High School. A few years ago, she spoke about her approach to teaching during her 36 years there. “I wanted them to be prepared for the day they left. The day when they were going to be responsible for making their own way in the world. When the three squares a day were on them.” She also had the opportunity to see many parts of the world. In 1961, she traveled with her friend, Dr. Alice Wonders. Their journey included the Taj Mahal, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Singapore, Calcutta, New Delhi, Egypt and Greece. She will long be remembered by the many students whom she taught, helped and nurtured on their journeys.

www.txwes.edu


T r i b ute T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S  |   SPRING 2 Frederick G. Slabach, 20th President of Texas Wesleyan University

18 Wesleyan Dominates Table Tennis World 19 Wesleyan’s Rising Golf Star 20 A Basketball Season to Remember

8 Theatre Wesleyan’s Third Playmarket

22 Ensuring a Quality Educational Experience

9 Texas Wesleyan Students and Faculty Take Award at International Film Festival

A gift to a charitable organization is a wonderful way to recognize someone of importance in your life. Texas Wesleyan is honored to receive gifts in memory or honor of alumni, faculty, staff, students and friends. These gifts acknowledge the relationship individuals have with the University and the community. We are pleased to recognize these gifts and the role each honored person and donor has in the lives of our students. We gratefully acknowledge the following donors for their tribute gifts received from 9/15/2010 through 5/31/11.

24 A Look Back at 10 Years 25 Goostree Symposium Welcomes Author Melany Neilson

10 One of the Exceptional Few

26 Alumni Remember Good Times at Wesleyan, Renew Friendships at Reunion

13 Wesleyan Athletic Hall of Fame Welcomes Six New Members

28 Outgoing SGA President Brought Energy, Enthusiasm to Campus Politics

14 Texas Wesleyan’s Finest Musical Talent Shows Off at The President’s Honors Concert

29 In Memoriam

16 MultiMedia Center Unveiled

R e cog n iti o n

2011

6 A Day of Peace: Arun Gandhi Brings a Message of Nonviolence to Campus

9 Dr. Lamar Smith Returns to First United Methodist Church

G i ft

30 Alumni News 32 Lifelong Educator Marie Glick, 103, Remembered for Her Generosity

In Honor of Dr. Jerry Chism ’76 to the Religion Scholarship Fund Arlington Heights United Methodist Church Robert (Bobby) Cornett ’72 to the Golf Program Jan E. Fersing Dr. Joy Edwards to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Sixty-Two Club, Fort Worth Women’s Club William A. Bleibdrey to the GPNA Program Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia James M. Lind ’03 to the Wesleyan Fund John & Barbara Lind Richard J. Lind ’04 to the Wesleyan Fund John & Barbara Lind John H. Maddux ’59 to the John Maddux, Jr. Endowed Scholarship Madelon L. Bradshaw Marty & Mike Craddock Wanda Hunsaker Russell ’64 to the Wesleyan Fund Ben ’63 & Kaye ’64 Younger President Frederick G. Slabach to the Texas United Methodist College Association Fund Texas United Methodist College Association Claudia A. Stepp ’72 to the Encore Scholarship Fund Karen H. Barlow Claudia A. Stepp ’72 to the Wesleyan Fund Robert & Carolyn Robertson Catherine Wakefield ’39 to the Wesleyan Fund Sharon Allen

In Memory of Jo Shannon Baldwin ’82 to the Music Scholarship Fund David Bassham Don Bassham Drs. James & Robin ’81 Hall Mr. & Mrs. Phil Taylor Dr. Donald Bellah to the Wesleyan Fund Euel H. Belcher ’50 Cecil Cole & Walter L. Gill to the Cecil Cole Award Fund Thelma Standlee Cole Gill ’52 Roberta Bray ’42 to the Wesleyan Fund Margaret A. Kimmins ’42 Letha Jane Brown ’61 to the School of Education Letha Grace McCoy ’66 Marshall Campbell to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Marilyn N. Hagan ’99

Frances Stokes Cannon to the Encore Scholarship Fund G. Alfred Brown Anne Street Skipper ’78 Chris Condron to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Reverend Jay Darnell ’60 to the Burleson Scholarship Fund James & Beverly Norman Maxine Denson to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Alta Lewis Dollar ’66 to the Alta Lewis Dollar Endowed Scholarship Thane R. Arther ’86 David Dollar ’85 Johnnie (Jay) Edwards ’39 to the Hart/Bridges Men’s Basketball Endowment Fund Gerald Baum ’54 Kelly Fearing to the Wesleyan Fund George Grammer ’47 Marie Moser Glick to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Gilbert ’44 & Dorris ’47 Ferrell Merlene Ogle Grossman ’64 to the Wesleyan Fund Marlene H. Loughran ’64 Dr. Charles W. Hager to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Rosa Lee Weiler Mr. & Mrs. William D. Weiler Dan Hart to the Hart/Bridges Men’s Basketball Endowment Fund Gerald H. Baum ’54 David E. Mitchell to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley “Leo” Norman to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Reverend Farrell Odom ’53 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Janie Pokluda, Taylor Pokluda and Family Tim Russell ’64 to the Wesleyan Fund Wanda Russell ’64 Paul B. Sandstrom ’51 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund O. Otis & Frances Bakke Murray E. Brown ’53 Irma B. Crites

Joseph K. & Mary Dulle Susan L. Hittle John H. Maddux ’59 Kathryn Speegle to the Ruth Keating Literary Award Dr. Carl Schrader Elizabeth Shawver Cramer ’43 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Judson A. Cramer ’42 Grayson Satarina to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund Robert & Shirley Corley Margaret Weed Talkington to the Bob & Shirley Student Textbook Fund Steve & Tish Deffenbaugh Elden Traster to the Elden D. Traster Scholarship Fund Craig Lidell Donna C. Volkman ’62 to the Tribute Scholarship Fund Deborah Huse Gifts made by Steve & Tish Deffenbaugh to the Carol Corley Employee Library Fund In memory of: Charles Hayden Bowers Chuck Clarkson Chris Condron Hal Dean Betty Wetz Dietert Dick Fletcher Jean Howard “Leo” Norman Geraldine Landrum Pudlo

Gift in Kind Dr. Eugene ’54 & Mrs. Ann ’54 Burge Dennis Camp ’64 Scott Cannon ’77 Charlie Claffey ’89 Keith Dennis Charles E. Duke ’53 & Joe Don Conger David Hall ’01 J. J. Henry Mr. & Mrs. John Markward David Rauter R & D Jewelers Heath Scott ’11

Stay Connected with Texas Wesleyan Be in the know on all things Texas Wesleyan. Follow these steps: Winter weather took Fort Worth by surprise in early February. While the campus was closed, Sharon Manson, residence life director, toured the campus with camera in hand to capture a rare glimpse of the snowy landscape.

Read Learn what’s happening at Texas Wesleyan at www.txwes.edu

S u bs c r i b e E-mail DeAwna Wood at dwood@txwes.edu to subscribe to our monthly alumni e-newsletter

Interact Keep up with us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ TexasWesleyan and on twitter at www.twitter.com/ TexasWesleyan


An Official Publication of Texas Wesleyan University

Give back to your alma mater — while you shop! Print off the Kroger Neighbor to Neighbor form (located at www.txwes.edu/alumni/showyourpride. htm) and take it with you the next time you shop there. The cashier will scan the bar code on the form to link your KrogerPlus Card to Texas Wesleyan. From then on, every time you shop with your KrogerPlus Card, a percentage of your sales will go to the Texas Wesleyan Alumni Association Fund.* *Please Note: the Kroger program must be renewed every year, beginning in May. A reminder will be sent so we can continue to receive this awesome benefit!

Tell your cashier to link your Tom Thumb Reward Card to Wesleyan’s Alumni Association #4298. The Tom Thumb Good Neighbor program will pay the Texas Wesleyan Alumni Association Fund a percentage of all your purchases.

Spring 2011

Wesleyan W elcomes Frederick G. Slabach as 20 th P resident Former Law School Dean Began New Role in January

Spring 2011 Wesleyan Magazine  

An official publication of Texas Wesleyan University covering student life, alumni information, campus events and university featured inform...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you