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Summer 2013

CAA Newsletter

College of Applied Arts Newsletter A Member  of  The  Texas  State  University  System      

Recent CAA  News  

Dates to Remember September

Texas State Faulty Honored During Convocation

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Official Census Day (12th class day)

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Graduation application deadline for December graduation

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Job Search Boot Camp

On May 28, 2013, Dr. Gene Bourgeois, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs announced the following promotions and elections to tenure from the College of Applied Arts, effective September 1, 2013. PROMOTIONS From Associate Professor to Professor

October

Dr. Michelle L. Toews, School of Family and Consumer Sciences Dr. Dhiraj A. Vattem, School of Family and Consumer Sciences   Dr. Brian L. Withrow, School of Criminal Justice  

2-3

Job and Internship Fair

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Registration for Spring 2014: (October 10 – November 7)

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Midterms begin

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Annual College Faculty Meeting, FCS 158, Noon

From Assistant Professor to Associate Professor

Dr. Scott W. Bowman, School of Criminal Justice Dr. Raphael Travis, Jr., School of Social Work    

November

TENURE Dr. Scott W. Bowman, School of Criminal Justice Dr. Raphael Travis, Jr., School of Social Work  

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Registration for Spring 2014: Ends

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Veterans Day Commemoration

07/30/2013 Posted by Bill Peterson

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Texas State has again been named a top university in Texas for return on investment by the website AffordableCollegesOnline.org. http://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/online-colleges/texas/.

Hooding Ceremony RSVP Deadline, Noon

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Thanksgiving break: November 27-29

Texas State Listed as High ‘ROI’ University

December 5

Thesis Research Fellowships

Last class day

4-13 Final exams begin

Dr. Andrea Golato, Dean of the Graduate College, announced a new Graduate College initiative to support the research efforts of our graduate students, Thesis Research Fellowships. Student applications are due by October 15 to Graduate Advisors and nominations are due to the Graduate College by November 5, 2013. For details, please contact Associate Dean Dr. Paula Williamson pw04@txstate.edu.

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CAA Hooding Ceremony, Alkek Teaching Theater, 6 pm

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Commencement Ceremony, Strahan Coliseum, 6 pm

 

   


CAA Newsletter

Summer

Occupational   Program    G raduateEducation   Studies News    

& Events

The Office of the Dean of the College of Applied Arts cordially invites you to attend the

 

Master’s Hooding Ceremony Class of December 2013 "The noblest search is the search for excellence." Lyndon B. Johnson Thirty-Sixth President of the United States, 1963-1969 Texas State University Class of 1930 The Master’s Hooding Ceremony honors Scholarly Achievement & Graduate Research Alkek Teaching Theater Thursday, December 12th, 2013, 6 pm

RSVP by Noon November 21st to 512-245-3538 For special accommodations, please contact the Office of Disability Services at 512-245-3451, at least 72 hours prior to the event.

Texas State University is a member of The Texas State University System.

2013


CAA Newsletter

Summer

2013

Occupational   Program        G raduateEducation   Student Spotlight      

 

Meet Three Outstanding Human Nutrition Majors: Samantha L. Newton, Amanda M. Reat & Hannah E. B. Thornton The M.S. in Human Nutrition provides graduate education from whole foods and nutrient perspectives in nutrition, metabolism, food science and biotechnology incorporating practical training and research. Graduates will be equipped with the technical skills and scientific knowledge to integrate nutrition, food and nutraceuticals with human health issues and wellness promotion. Texas State Dietetic Internship trains entry-level dietitians who provide high quality and current nutrition services to the public in the ever-evolving health care and nutrition and foods professional environments. Graduate students in the Human Nutrition program are mentored by faculty who are experts in the field of Human Nutrition, thus facilitating a well-rounded experience with exposure to research in clinical and professional settings.

Samantha L. Newton, Human Nutrition Major

Samantha Newton successfully defended her thesis and graduated in August. She got married the same week as her thesis defense and got a job soon after. She is presently working for a healthcare company called Allergan in Austin, in the area of clinical trials monitoring and reporting, drawing on her thesis research experience. Samantha’s thesis committee included Dr. Vatsala Maitin, her thesis committee chair, and Drs. BJ Friedman and Sylvia L. Crixell. Thesis Title: Impact of a synbiotic supplement on body composition and selected metabolic biomarkers in healthy overweight subjects: a randomized pilot study Abstract: The overweight and obesity epidemic faced by the world today is a major concern because of severe health consequences that often accompany excess body weight and fat mass. Obesity is a complex disease that has often been considered the result of an imbalance between caloric consumption and energy expenditure. However, the ecology of the intestinal microbiota is another potential contributor to the accumulation of excess body fat. Favorably shifting the balance of gut flora via probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics may provide a means to help counteract the obesity epidemic. In this study, we sought to determine whether the regular consumption of a synbiotic supplement containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Lactobacillus paracasei CRL-431, Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, and Saccharomyces boulardii in combination with the prebiotics inulin and galactooligosaccharides (GOS) will favorably impact body composition and serum blood lipid levels in overweight and obese subjects. Our results indicate that supplementation with this particular synbiotic formulation can improve the gut bacteria profile of overweight and obese subjects independent of changes in diet and physical activity. These beneficial changes have the potential for reducing fat mass and improving serum lipid concentrations. More research is needed regarding which populations will benefit most and the specific synbiotic formulation that can effectively modify gut bacteria in order to beneficially impact human health and reduce the incidence of obesity and related disorders.


CAA Newsletter

Summer

2013

Occupational   Program        G raduateEducation   Student Spotlight      

 

Meet Three Outstanding Human Nutrition Majors: Samantha L. Newton, Amanda M. Reat & Hannah E. B. Thornton (continued) While a graduate student at Texas State, Amanda Reat completed a thesis, taught undergraduate level classes, conducted research, presented at local and national conferences, and Amanda M. Reat, at the FNCE, received awards for research at the graduate level Boston, MA, April 2013. from both the School of Family and Consumer Sciences and the College of Applied Arts. She also completed the Texas State Dietetic Internship and has gained her credentials as a Registered Dietitian. Amanda is now a lecturer for the Texas State Nutrition program and recently submitted her first manuscript regarding her thesis data. Amanda’s thesis committee included Dr. Sylvia Crixell, her thesis committee chair, and Drs. BJ Friedman and Toni Watt. Thesis Title: Impact of policy change on feeding practices of infants and toddlers in the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children (WIC) in San Marcos, TX. Abstract: In 2009, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) modified food packages to address rising rates of child obesity and sub-optimal duration of breastfeeding and offer foods that are more compatible with current dietary guidelines. We collected 24-hour recalls (using Nutrition Data System for Research) and feeding practices data from 97 caregivers of infants (4-12 mo) and toddlers (1-2 y) in 2009 (pre-policy change) and from 121 caregivers in 2011 (post-policy change) in order to compare feeding practices. Results revealed some positive trends between the two study years, including fewer infants receiving cereal, more infants receiving breast milk, and more infants being ever breastfed in 2011 compared to 2009, as well as positive changes that were significant, including later introduction of formula and fewer caregivers adding cereal to infant bottles in 2011 compared to 2009. However, there were also findings that were in the reverse direction of the WIC package changes, including the trend towards more infants receiving complementary foods before 6 months, and more infants receiving juice before 4 months. Our results indicate that, in this community, the WIC policy change was helpful but not sufficient to bring feeding practices into compliance with existing guidelines. This research met all Institutional Review Board guidelines and was supported by a Texas State University research enhancement grant.


CAA Newsletter

Summer

2013

Occupational   Program        G raduateEducation   Student Spotlight      

 

Meet Three Outstanding Human Nutrition Majors: Samantha L. Newton, Amanda M. Reat & Hannah E. B. Thornton (continued) Hannah Thornton graduated in August. While a graduate student at Texas State, she completed the Texas State Dietetic Internship and passed the national exam, earning the Registered Dietitian credential. She also successfully completed her Hanna E. B. Thornton at the FNCE, thesis research and was awarded the Outstanding Experiment Biology Conference in Graduate Student in the College of Applied Arts for Boston, MA, April 2013. the 2012-2013 academic year. Hannah is currently a lecturer in the Nutrition and Foods program at Texas State. Hannah’s thesis committee included Dr. Sylvia L. Crixell, her thesis committee chair and Drs. BJ Friedman and Michelle A. Lane. Thesis Title: Usual nutrient intakes of infants and toddlers in San Marcos, TX reflect regional differences in nutritional risk Abstract: Estimating the adequacy of dietary nutrient intakes is an important method for monitoring dietary sufficiency within populations. National studies provide useful information about nutrient intake among the population as a whole; however, it is important to investigate nutrition risk on a smaller scale. Race, ethnicity, cultural feeding practices, and socioeconomic status can influence dietary preferences and access to healthy foods, thereby impacting nutritional status. We collected dietary intake data from caretakers of infants and toddlers enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in San Marcos, TX (WIC) before and after a nationwide policy change affecting the WIC food benefits package. The purpose of this research was 1) to assess whether dietary nutrient intakes were different after the policy change, and 2) to assess the quality of dietary nutrient intakes among this nutritionally at-risk population. We used the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method to estimate usual intake of nutrients. Among infants and toddlers, mean usual caloric intakes were lower after the package change, but still exceeded national recommendations. Mean intakes for iron and vitamin A were also lower after the package change. Among toddlers specifically, mean usual intakes of calcium, potassium, and zinc were lower after the package change. San Marcos WIC infants and toddlers had usual intakes of kilocalories, zinc, and preformed vitamin A that exceeded national recommendations, and intakes of vitamin D and vitamin E that fell below national recommendations. These results have implications for nutrition education within the WIC program, and contribute to the national conversation about food fortification, child nutrition, and WIC policy.


CAA Newsletter Department

Summer 2013

of Agriculture

  Student Accomplishments Faculty and Graduate  

Presentations:

*Sembera, J., J. *Montoya and T. M. Waliczek. 2013. University campus composting July, Palm Desert, CA. programs: Initiatives for the future. HortScience,  

*Sembera, J. and T.M. Waliczek. 2013. Composting as an alternative management system for wild taro (Colocasia esculenta) and Brown Algae (Sargassum fluitans and Sargassum natans) HortScience, July, Palm Desert, CA.  

*Short, K., T.M. Waliczek and J.M. Zajicek. 2013. Studying the market potential for specialty cultivars of sunflower, Helianthus Annuus, cut flowers. HortScience, July, Palm Desert, CA.   *Meier, E. T.M. Waliczek and G. Hustvedt.   2013. Incorporating wool-waste into compost to develop alternative compost products. HortScience, July, Palm Desert, CA.      

*Glover, B., T.M. Waliczek and J.M. Gandonou. 2013. Market viability of native central Texan plants as a food source. HortScience, July, Palm Desert, CA.

Publications:

         

Gandonou, J.M. and T.M. Waliczek. 2013. An analysis of the recent trends in U.S. chile pepper production, consumption, imports and the market potential for Texas. Journal of Agriculture and the Environment, 11(1)361-367. Montoya, J., T.M. Waliczek and M. Abbott. 2013. Large-scale composting as a means of managing water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, Invasive Plant Science and Management, 6. McFarland, A., B.J. Glover*, T.M. Waliczek and J.M. Zajicek. 2013. The effectiveness of the National Wildlife Federation Schoolyard Habitat Program: Fourth-grade students’ standardized test scores and science grades. HortTechnology, 23(2). Awards: Bobcat Blend, the departmental composting project, was selected in 2013 for a Texas Environmental Excellence Awards by the governor and the state of Texas. The award honor individuals, organizations, and businesses that protect our state’s human and natural resources while ensuring clean air, clean water, and the safe management of waste.  


CAA Newsletter Department

Summer 2013

of Agriculture (cont.)

 

Small Gas Engine Technology Workshop

June 6, 2013 - During the month of June, the Department of Agriculture and the Agricultural Systems Association hosted four, two day, small gas engine technology workshops for agricultural sciences and industrial technology teachers from across the state of Texas. This   P. Ryan Saucier and instructed by Mr. Pat workshop was developed and coordinated by Dr. Real. 72 teachers were in attendance during the last two weeks of June. These teachers were   instructed in various aspects of engine theory and technology that included: theory of operations, engine systems, disassembly, demonstration, wear analysis, precision measuring,   maintenance, and assembly.  

The Briggs and Stratton Corporation supported these workshops by donating 480 small gas engines, valued at $187,000.00, for the instruction of these teachers and to improve the instruction of engine technology at agricultural science teacher preparation institutions across   the state of Texas. Each teacher received five engines to take back to the school in which they teach and further instruct career and technology education students in small gas engine   technology.                    

The Newly Completed Outdoor Classroom

Dr. Tina Cade, Professor of Horticulture, writes about the new outdoor classroom...a very special place to teach and learn: "Prior to construction, the Living Library garden included small sitting areas with patios and tables, but did not include a larger area for classes or bigger groups to gather. We use the Living Library garden often as our outdoor laboratory space for multiple classes, so it made sense to construct a space in which a whole class could meet. Additionally, sometimes groups or classes from other departments were meeting in our garden in the big circular area outside the Organic Gardening plots on nice days, so building an alternative gathering spot for larger groups became necessary just so that we could use the garden. The Environmental Service Committee on campus provided the funds to construct the area. Most of the Living Library areas are built by students, but because this project required more dirt-moving and load bearing walls, it was hired out to Gardens by Lisa (Lisa Carpenter Prewitt). An alum, Greg Franks, was also involved in the construction of the area. We will use the area as a gathering spot for classes with laboratories that meet outside in the Living Library garden, such as the AG 3308 Organic Gardening class, AGG 3305 Woody Plants class, AG 3302 Herbaceous Plant Materials class, and AG 4304 Landscape Management class. My hope is that other groups and classes will utilize the space when available."


CAA Newsletter

Summer

School of Criminal Justice

2013

 

Randy Zieschang, ALERRT Center Intern

         

Entry #1 Blog

Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training (ALERRT) center at Texas State University was created in 2002 to train police officers to respond the active shooter situations such as Columbine or Fort Hood. ALERRT has trained more than 40,000 officers nationwide. My first couple of weeks were action packed. One of the things I found exciting was the opportunity to interact with SWAT teams who come to our facility to train.

 

Entry #2 Blog

         

Each day here is different and my job will never get boring. This week I “flipped kits” that agencies will use in a training class. Before a kit is sent out I   sure it is fully stocked. I enjoy make flipping kits because it gives me to opportunity to learn the different tools that are used by law enforcement. Here is a picture of what a finished training kit looks like:

Blog Entry #3 This week I helped work on our simulation house, a three-story building used for tactical training. The floors were constructed as maze to test agencys’ tactical strategies in clearing a building. Today we had to remove residue left over from tear gas grenades. It irritated our eyes, even though we were wearing respirators. Here is a picture:  


CAA Newsletter

Summer 2013

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)    

Blog Entry #4

we were invited to help Hays County Sheriff’s Office in tactical training. When the Today

     

simulation began, a co-worker and I ran out of the room screaming that someone had been shot. From here the tactical team infiltrated the room. Even though this was a simulation, it was exciting to see how a tactical team responds. Another task this week was repairing the breaching range. The range consists of multiple doors where officers use different methods to make entry. Here are some pictures of the breaching range:

 

 

 

  This  is  a  link  to  a  video  that  shows  what  the  Alerrt  Center  entails.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eh0ltjPLdnQ  

A Student From Both Sides of the Border Gerardo Antonio Feria was born in Houston but raised in Veracruz, Mexico, and has a bachelor's degree in law from the Autonomous People's University in the Mexican state of Puebla. Wanting to further his education in the United States, he applied to Texas State University–San Marcos — where he studies now — because it offers an intensive English program. “I like big challenges, so whatever I start to do, I always make sure to complete it," he said. "Right now, I am working on a master in Criminal Justice.” After graduation, he plans to stay in the United States and work in law enforcement. Read more.


CAA Newsletter

Summer 2013

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)        

2013 International Symposium on Environment Criminology and Crime Analysis (ECCA)

In June, three faculty members, Dr. Marcus Felson, Dr. Kim Rossmo, and Dr. Lucía Summers, and one doctoral student, Jonathan Allen Kringen, from the School of Criminal Justice presented at the International Symposium on Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis. The symposium was held at Temple University and was hosted by the Center for Security and Crime Science in Philadelphia, PA.   environmental criminologists and researchers in crime science, situational crime prevention, and problem-oriented policing from around the world.  

The following presentations were given:

Dr. Marcus Felson “Shifting Hotspots”

             

The Symposium features

Dr. Kim Rossmo “The Vancouver Missing Women/Pig Farm Serial Murder Case: A Situational Crime Prevention Analysis of a Failed Police Investigation” Dr. Lucía Summers “Predicting violent offenders’ spatial behavior: The roles of physical proximity and ease of access” Jonathan Allen Kringen “Using Bayes’ Factors to Link Serial Crimes” -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other News Drs. Kim. Rossmo and Lucía Summers were married early this summer in Austin, Texas. Jonathan Allen Kringen and Anne Li Kringen, also from the School of Criminal Justice, were married in Fredericksburg, Texas shortly thereafter. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Jonathan Allen Kringen has accepted an Assistant Professor position at the University of New Haven for the Spring 2013 semester. He will continue his research as well as teach undergraduate and graduate level classes.


CAA Newsletter

Summer 2013

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)  

Faculty Accomplishments

 

Pridemore, W. A., Chamlin, M. B., Kaylen, M. T., and Andreev, E. (forthcoming), "The Effects of the 2006 Russian Alcohol Policy on Alcohol-Related Mortality: An Interrupted Times Series Analysis." Alcohol: Clinical and Experimental Research.  

Pridemore, W. A., Chamlin, M. B., Kaylen, M. T., and Andreev, E. (forthcoming), "The Impact  

of a National Alcohol Policy on Deaths due to Transport Accidents in Russia." Addiction.

Pridemore, W. A., Chamlin, M. B., and Andreev, E. (forthcoming), "Reduction in Male Suicide Mortality Following the 2006 Russian Alcohol Policy: An Interrupted Time Series Analysis." Journal of Public Health. American    

Chamlin, M. B., and Sanders, B. A. (forthcoming), "Falsifying Merton’s Macro-Level Anomie  

Theory of Profit-Motivated Crime: A Research Note." Deviant Behavior.

   

Graduate Student Accomplishments PAPERS PUBLISHED

Schildkraut, Jaclyn and Elizabeth Erhardt Mustaine. (Forthcoming). “Movin’, But Not Up To

The East Side: Foreclosures and Social Disorganization in Orange County, FL.” Housing Studies. (Paper accepted for publication July 22, 2013)

Schildkraut, Jaclyn and Tiffany Cox Hernandez. (2013, Forthcoming). “Laws That Bit The Bullet: A Review of Legislative Responses to School Shootings.” American Journal of Criminal Justice. doi: 10.1007/s12103-013-9214-6 Schildkraut, Jaclyn and Glenn W. Muschert. (Forthcoming). “Violent Media, Guns, and Mental Illness: The Three Ring Circus of Causal Factors for School Massacres, as Related to Media Discourse,” in Ben Agger and Tim Luke (eds.) Gun Violence and Public Life. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers. Schildkraut, Jaclyn. (2013, May). Beyond Cold Blood: The KBI from Ma Barker to BTK. Book review for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books, Rutgers University. Available at http://clcjbooks.rutgers.edu/books/beyond_cold_blood.html. PRESENTATIONS Schildkraut, Jaclyn, Amy Donley, and S. Rae Taylor. “Headlines in White (Not Black): Examining Newsworthiness of Homicide in New Orleans, LA.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, Brunswick, GA. June.


CAA Newsletter

Summer 2013

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)  

Professor’s Research Aims to Explain Wrong Convictions

 

University Star Jul 10 2013 - 11:09am Paige Lambert

A Texas State criminal justice professor is researching the theories behind criminal

investigations and finding flaws in cases that can place innocent people behind bars.

According to Kim Rossmo, one less person would have been a victim of murder if police

officers in Williamson County accused the correct man in a case that gained national attention

more than two decades ago. Rossmo said Michael Morton was convicted in 1987 and sent to   prison for a murder he did not commit, and the real murderer struck again two years later in

Austin. Rossmo said he began his research, titled “Wrongful Convictions and Wrongful

Thinking: Failures in Criminal Investigations,” in 2001 after his past experiences as a police  

officer in Vancouver.

Rossmo said his research pinpoints three investigative errors that contribute to wrongful convictions: cognitive biases, organizational traps and probability errors. Rossmo consulted literature about cognitive bias, engineering errors and law enforcement to effectively understand     these type of thinking errors.   “Sometimes there were cases that were solvable but the police just have the wrong theory and

won’t budge when the evidence presented itself,” Rossmo said. “The worst is a wrongful conviction. That’s what I was interested in—why did that happen and what can be done to   prevent it from occurring in the future?”  

Cognitive bias is like tunnel vision in which an individual has made a decision and will not

consider any other evidence, Rossmo said.

Jim Doyle, Boston defense lawyer, said relying one eyewitness accounts too heavily is one of the reasons investigators hold tight to theories that can prove to be incorrect. “Its very difficult in the investigation business to keep looking left or right instead of going straight down the tunnel as fast as they can,” Doyle said. “(Investigators) often ran past warning signs because they just weren’t looking for them anymore.” Jim Trainum, a retired investigator from Washington D.C. who worked with Rossmo, said investigators sometimes become prideful and protective of their theories. “If you’re assigned a homicide case that is your case,” Trainium said. “It is a great disgrace for you to not be able to solve it or to have someone else solve it for you.” Rossmo said it is more difficult to change a theory when group think comes into play. Group think occurs from organizational traps like bureaucracy, Rossmo said. When new evidence requires a theory to be reevaluated, whole agencies are less likely to consider it because of the required time and effort it takes. The third error often made in wrongful convictions is understanding probability, which Rossmo said is very important to the criminal justice system. These three errors all played a part in the wrongful Morton conviction, Rossmo said. (Click here to read the rest of the article. Click here for the YouTube Interview.)


CAA Newsletter

Summer 2013

School of Criminal Justice (cont.)  

Inside the Mind of Texas State’s Serial Killer Hunter

Bobcat Magazine by Hap Mansfield On 22, Jul 2013

It’s called the “Pig Farm” case, one of the most grisly serial            

murder cases ever recorded in Canada or anywhere else.

So grisly that well fewer than one-third of the perpetrator’s alleged murders were ever prosecuted, and he still has life in prison, which is the steepest penalty under Canadian law. As to the cases that were never prosecuted, the evidence that never went before a jury tells how grisly — the DNA of two victims found in packages of ground meat, a partial leg bone of another victim found in a cistern, assorted bones and teeth buried about the farm property, which Canadian lawmen privately called the “killing fields” …

It was   grisly, and it was more grisly than it had to be, due to  

the initial reaction of the Vancouver police.

In 1998, a young Vancouver detective named Kim Rossmo started   to look into a disturbing trend. For years, women turned up missing from a notoriously seedy neighborhood in   Downtown Eastside Vancouver known as the Low Track,   where life is cheap, especially the lives of women, who were disposable, and worse. Drug addiction and the sex trade, poverty and hopelessness — that was the daily bread. Rossmo now is the university chair in criminology and director of the Center for Geospatial Intelligence and Investigation (GII) at Texas State. The Pig Farm case started him on his life’s work. But it was not a glorious start.

Kim Rossmo, a Texas State criminology research professor, is known internationally for his method of geography-based criminal profiling. He has applied his methodology to cases modern and historic including the legendary Jack the Ripper murders. PHOTO by JAMIE MALDONADO FOR BOBCAT MAGAZINE/JAMIEMPHOTO.CO M

Rossmo attacked the case with a new investigative technique called geographic profiling for analyzing serial violent crimes based on an inspired, revolutionary algorithm. After he set up a geographic profiling section with the Vancouver Police Department, he was asked to investigate the concentration of women who had gone missing in the Low Track area. It had all the earmarks, Rossmo thought, of a serial murderer. Rossmo prepared an investigative plan and recommended releasing a public warning that a killer may be preying on prostitutes in the Low Track. He also conducted an analysis of the number of reported missing women over time, adopting an approach used by epidemiologists on disease outbreaks. The analysis statistically supported the serial murderer theory. Rossmo’s analysis was ignored. A hot-headed inspector in charge of the homicide section scoffed at the serial killer idea, upbraided Rossmo, then refused to even talk to him. Several police officers at one particularly fatal meeting said the inspector had what amounted to a “temper tantrum.” Rossmo’s fledgling geographic profiling division was eventually shut down. His contract was not renewed. (Click here to read the rest of this article.)


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

2013

of Family and Consumer Sciences

Texas State Professor Invited to Serve on National Children’s Advisory Committee   Dr. Djiraj A. Vattem, was invited to serve as a member of the National Children’s Study  

Advisory Committee, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) for a term beginning immediately and ending March 31, 2017.

The Committee is advisory to the Director, HICHD, the Director, National Children’s Study, and

the Interagency Coordinating Committee of the National Children’s Study, on present and future issues in the planning and implementation of the National Children’s Study. Specific duties of the Committee are to make recommendations on the planning, development, and implementation of a national longitudinal study of environmental influences (including physical, chemical, biological,   and psychosocial) on child health and development. Congratulations Dr. Vattem!  

Faculty Accomplishments

Refereed Journal Articles Lee, S., & Ahn, M. (2013). Housing affordability of baby boomers. Housing and Society, 40 (1), 85-109.  

Ahn,  M., Hustvedt, G., & Emmel, J. (2013). Exploring the Experiences and Adoption of

Sustainable Laundry Technologies by Older Adults. International Journal of Aging and Society, 3 (1), 1-13.

G., Ahn, M., & Emmel, J. (2013). The adoption of sustainable laundry technologies by Hustvedt,    

U.S. consumers. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 37 (3), 291-298.

Refereed Conference Proceedings and Presentations Ahn, M., Lee, S., & Parrott, K. (2013). Exploring the housing affordability of older Hispanic households (65+) in the United States. Presentation at the 20th IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Seoul, Korea, June 2013. Lee, S., & Parrott, K., Ahn, M. (2013). Housing and Demographic Characteristics of Elderly Households in the Southern United States. Poster presentation at the 20th IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Seoul, Korea, June 2013. Sullivan, P., Shaw, K., DuPont, A. (2013). Different or not: Domestic and Mexican national outshoppers in the U.S. 17th Conference of the International Conference on Research in the Distributive Trades Conference Proceedings, European Association of Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD), University of Valencia, Valencia Spain, July 3-5, 2013. Kang, Jiyun, Hustvedt, Gwendolyn, & Le, Duy. (June 2013). The role of FCS education in fostering sustainable consumption. 2013 AAFCS Annual Conference Proceedings, Houston, TX. Hustvedt, Gwendolyn, Kang, Jiyun, & Le, Duy. (June 2013). Attitudes towards science as an underpinning of sustainable consumption. 2013 AAFCS Annual Conference Proceedings, Houston, TX. Invited Workshop on Sustainability Jiyun “Yuni” Kang, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor of Fashion Merchandising in the School of Family and Consumer Sciences has been invited by University of Missouri-Columbia for a Cotton and Sustainability Workshop held in June 4-5. In the invited workshop, Dr. Kang has shared her teaching experiences at Texas State focusing on sustainability and social responsibility issues with other 16 faculty from a number of universities across the nation.


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

2013

of Family and Consumer Sciences (cont.)  

       

Accreditation Awarded On behalf of the College of Applied Arts, Dean Chahin congratulated the Human Nutrition for all their efforts and planning for the Accreditation visit. The Accreditation Council faculty for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics awarded accreditation to the Didactic Program in Dietetics and the Dietetic Internship at Texas State University. The decision was based upon a peer review of your self-study reports addressing the 2012 Accreditation Standards. The University values the commitment of the faculty and continued improvement of dietetics education at Texas State University.

               

Graduate Student Accomplishments Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Annual Meeting (April 2013) Boston, MA. Poster Elisa M. Gonzales (graduate student first author), Douglas W. Barrett, Francisco GonzalezLima, Michelle A. Lane, Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improves adaptive coping in a rat model of postpartum depression  

Amanda Reat, BS (graduate student first author), Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Julia Von Bank, MS, RD, BJ Friedman, MS, RD, Impact of policy change on juice consumption in infants and toddlers in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in San Marcos, TX Oral Presentation Authors: Hannah Thornton, MS (graduate student first author), Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Amanda Reat, BS, Julia Von Bank, MS, RD, BJ Friedman, PhD, RD, Usual nutrient intakes of infants and toddlers in San Marcos, TX reflect regional differences in nutrition risk Amanda Reat (graduate student in Nutrition). Passed the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) National Examination in July 2013, and earned the credential: Registered Dietitian. Texas Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (April 2013) Austin, Texas. Poster Amanda Reat, BS (graduate student first author), Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Julia Von Bank, MS, RD, BJ Friedman, MS, RD, Impact of policy change on juice consumption in infants and toddlers in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in San Marcos, TX Hannah Thornton, MS (graduate student first author), Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Amanda Reat, BS, Julia Von Bank, MS RD, and BJ Friedman, PhD, RD, The NCI Method: Effective Measurement of Usual Nutrient Intakes in Small Populations Samantha Newton successfully defended her thesis and graduated in August. She got married the same week as her thesis defense and got a job soon after. She is presently working for a healthcare company called Allergan in Austin, in the area of clinical trials monitoring and reporting, drawing on her thesis research experience.


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

2013

of Family and Consumer Sciences (cont.)  

Alfaro Lands Greater Texas Postsecondary Student Success Grant Posted by Jayme Blaschke, University News Service, July 31, 2013

Edna Alfaro, an assistant professor in the Graduate College at Texas State University, has received a grant from the Greater Texas Foundation (GTF) to support her work in areas related   to student postsecondary success.  

The three-year, $90,000 GTF grant to Alfaro is one of four given out to support tenure-track faculty at Texas higher education institutions. Texas State received two such grants for 2013, with Melissa Martinez receiving the other.  

“My interest in student outcomes stems from personal observations I made while transitioning through high school and college,” Alfaro said. “At the time, I was surrounded by family and friends making similar transitions; however, I noticed that there seemed to be almost as many   paths   through these transitions as there were people. These paths led to early, on-time, or delayed graduation or leaving school all together. These observations quickly turned to a   genuine interest in gaining a better understanding for the factors that foster academic success.          

“Having the opportunity to serve as a GTF Fellow will have a tremendous impact on my teaching and research activities. I hope to contribute to our understanding of Latina/o students’ academic success and retention by focusing on cultural, familial and individual assets that enable   students to overcome academic barriers, ” she said. “Partnering with GTF will provide me with the support needed to dedicate my time and energies to implement a research study that examines the importance of parents, culture, individuals and universities in the transitions into and through college. Approaching my research with academic rigor will allow me to effectively serve my students while laying the groundwork for the future development of programs.”

Following a competitive proposal process, the foundation selected four individuals to comprise the first cohort of the GTF Faculty Fellowship Program (GTF Fellows). Each GTF Fellow will receive up to $30,000 per year for a period of three years to support a proposed research agenda. "Greater Texas Foundation’s mission is to support efforts to ensure all Texas students are prepared for, have access to, persist in, and complete a postsecondary education," said Malon Southerland, GTF board chair. "GTF Fellows is a result of our board’s desire for the foundation to have a role in building research and teaching capacity for Texas faculty working in areas related to the foundation’s mission and strategy." After being nominated through a by-invitation-only nomination process, the selected fellows were invited to participate in a competitive proposal process in which they were required to demonstrate significant potential in and commitment to a career in research and teaching at the postsecondary level. In addition, applicants were required to identify a mentor to assist them throughout the three-year fellowship. Each of the selected fellows’ home institutions committed to a partial match for the program. “Only one in five Texas students completes a college credential within six years of graduating from high school,” said Wynn Rosser, GTF president and CEO. Click here to read the rest of the press release.


CAA Newsletter Occupational,

Summer

2013

Workforce and Leadership Studies

      The        

OWLS Welcomes Summer Fellow

department welcomed Tennille Lasker-Scott, a doctoral candidate from The University of Georgia, as a summer fellow. Ms. Lasker-Scott is one of the three recipients of the university’s Summer Predoctoral Fellowship Program. The program brings current doctoral

candidates from other institutions to the   San Marcos campus in an effort to reach        

the goal of creating connections between emerging scholars and current research efforts at Texas State, assisting the (L to R) Tennille Lasker-Scott, Jaime Ruiz, & Andrea Vest candidates in obtaining their doctoral degrees, continue the educational   benefits of having a diverse campus and also to help identify potential scholars for future faculty hires.

hit the ground running, utilizing her opportunities to publish an essay, contributing Lasker-Scott  

to the interviewing and research for a future publication with faculty members Dr. Boden-

McGill and Dr. Eichler, and assisting a faculty member in the design of an online course. Ms.

Lasker-Scott also worked with Dr. Boden-McGill on the design of her research study for her dissertation. Along the way, she visited the faculty and campuses of san Antonio and Round   Rock. She describes her time at Texas State as being” very beneficial, insightful and HOT!” She is looking forward to returning to the campus during the fall semester to revisit the   department and university and hopes to continue researching with the faculty within the department.  

Ms. Lasker-Scott received a masters in adult education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and is currently attending The University of Georgia’s Adult Education, Leadership and Organizational Development doctoral program, where her research includes educating the disenfranchised, the participation of minority groups in adult educational opportunities, and issues of race class and gender in education and workforce development.

HELL Spends Trainings for Representatives of Authoritative Universities of Texas Bentley Fink, Graduate Research Assistant in the OWLS department, traveled to Azerbaijan this summer and participated in International Oil & Gas discussions. (Use Google Chrome to have the text translated into English, http://bit.ly/167jEJz)


CAA Newsletter Occupational,

Summer

2013

Workforce and Leadership Studies (cont.)

   

Faculty Accomplishments

Dr. Matthew Eichler, Assistant Professor, attended the Adult Education Research Conference in St. Louis, Missouri, in June to present a paper coauthored with Dr. Albert S. Dietz, Assistant Professor, entitled Heutagogy and Adults As Problem Solvers: Rethinking the Interdisciplinary Degree. Dr. Eichler also served as convener of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Allies Caucus along with Dr. Mitsunori Misawa of the University of Memphis. Dr. Eichler and Dr. Misawa were re-elected to convene the LGBTQ&A Pre-conference at the 2014 AERC.

                           

Dr. Matthew Eichler, Assistant Professor, attended the Annual Meeting of the Society for Disability Studies in Orlando, Florida, in June to co-present a paper, Anti-Normative Reclamations: Generating a Queer-Crip Pedagogy of Protest, along with Mr. Zachary Richter, a student at Western Connecticut State University. Dr. Eichler served on the Conference Reviewer team and was selected as a site committee representative for the 2014 SDS Annual Meeting. Chahin, dean of Texas State’s College of Applied Arts, will serve on the 2013-14 Jaime Texas Border Colonias Study Steering Committee, assisting in the updating of the Texas Colonia report.  

Sherron, T., Boden-McGill, C.J., & Springer, S. (2013). Historical review and future directions of prior learning assessment at Texas State University. Paper presented at the 25th Annual National Institute on the Assessment of Adult Learning. Atlantic City, NJ. Barbara Wilson, Senior Lecturer was presented with a Certificate of Appreciation from Indra Hernandez, BAAS graduate, at the Round Rock Campus graduation reception on May 8, 2013.  


CAA Newsletter

Summer

Occupational,                    

2013

Workforce and Leadership Studies (cont.)

Caminos – Pathway to Success at Reagan High School During the first summer session, 61 high school students completed Caminos – Pathway to Success at Reagan High School, a five-week summer program designed to strengthen the academic success of tenth-grade transitioning students toward the goal of preparing them for a college preparatory curriculum in fall 2013. Directed by Omar S. López in the Department of Occupational, Workforce, and Leadership Studies (OWLS), the academic summer program included leadership skills and academics in core subject areas relevant to college readiness. The first two-weeks of the program were at Reagan High School located in east Austin, and the last three weeks were on campus at Texas State University in San Marcos. The program provided instruction, leadership opportunities and local transportation for field trips, including room and board while on campus. The high school students also had the opportunity to prepare for and retake their state assessments in Algebra I and English I to increase their total scores to meet new state requirements for on-time graduation.

Dr. López said the program was transformational for many of these students in that it gave them a vision of college life, and the expectations and discipline relevant to academic success. This included the need to be on time, on-task, and focused on learning. Students also learned how important it was to create meaningful relationships with other students that also cared about   academics,   and with teachers who could provide a gateway to college and life success.  

Caminos – Pathway to Success at Reagan High School was made possible through a grant from    

the Austin Independent School District.

OWLS Alum’s Amazing Opportunity

What has taken place in Ezzard Castillo’s life is pretty amazing. One month into the 2012 school

year,  the church that over saw the school that he was directing informed him that they were

dissolving the church and handing the school over to him. Since the school has its own 501 (c) 3 the transition was a formality and he now had ownership of this wonderful school that helps children who learn differently. In addition, this school year he was afforded the opportunity to purchase the property where the school has been located the last 13 years. The value of the property was somewhere in the 2 to 4 million dollar range. Castillo made an offer of $500,000, which was accepted. The catch was he had one year to come up with the money. The one-year mark was this past May 17th, 2013 and, giving all the credit to his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, in 7 months time this little school raised the money and they now own the property debt free. The vision for the school is to renovate the existing building (an old catholic girls school), add some facilities like a community center and provide a transition program for our graduates. This venture will be some where in the 12 million dollar range.  

Castillo tells folks all the time that he knows God has a sense of humor. Who else would take a retired Air Force weapons instructor, immigrant from the ghetto, and use him to not only run a non-profit and yet raise money to help the least of these. Castillo received his BAAS in August of 2007 and his MEd in August of 2009. River City Christian School is located just a few minutes from the airport. OWLS, thank you for the opportunity.


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

of Social Work

2013

 

Network of Services Aids Veterans in Transition from Combat to Classroom

                         

By Annie Drabicky, Community Impact Newspaper, August 17, 2012

Of the 34,000 students expected to start classes Aug. 27 at Texas State University, roughly 2,400 will be veterans and dependents of veterans. The veterans bring with them many of the same challenges facing all students—adjusting to a new environment and schedule, for instance—but they also face a more complex transition than that of a recent high school graduate. Professor of social work Katherine Selber, a founding member of the Veterans Advisory Council and the faculty sponsor for the Veterans Alliance of Texas State, said the university works to provide a welcoming and supportive atmosphere for veterans. “There’s a lot of stress that they deal with. They’ve been out of academia for many years— many of them have been out of high school for somewhere between four and eight years,” Selber   said. “[Some] may be having mild traumatic brain injury, maybe they had some sort of improvised explosive device event. [They] could have some cognitive fuzziness and slowness, and so that makes them need certain tutoring.”  

Click here to read the rest of this article.


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

of Social Work (cont.)

2013

 

Faculty Accomplishments

Norton, C.L., Watt, T., & Penn, A. (In press, accepted 6/27/2013). Exploring the impact of a wilderness-based positive youth development program for urban youth.   Journal of Experiential Education.  

Wisner, B. L. & Norton, C. L. (In press, accepted 4/2013). Capitalizing on behavioral and emotional strengths of alternative high school students through group counseling to promote mindfulness skills. Journal for Specialists in Groupwork.  

Watt, T., & Norton, C.L., & Jones, C. (2013). Applying the strengths perspective to support services for foster care alumni in higher education. Children and Services Review. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2013.06.002 Youth    

 

Assistant

Professor Awarded Hogg Foundation Research Grant

     

Posted by Jayme Blaschke University News Service July 24, 2013

Christine Norton, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at Texas State University, has received a grant from the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health to conduct innovative research in mental health. Norton will use the grant to study the use of adventure therapy, an innovative approach to treatment, on children and families affected by abuse and neglect.

Dr. Christine L. Norton

Norton is among 10 grant recipients in the state. The two-year grants are capped at $19,250 each. The research projects were selected from a pool of 38 proposals from 17 schools across Texas. The goals of this initiative are to increase the pool of junior faculty members doing quality mental health research and to encourage the disbursement of research findings to other researchers, policymakers and service providers through presentations at state and national conferences and meetings. “The foundation is committed to funding promising research that sheds light on various dimensions of mental health,” said Dr. Octavio N. Martinez, Jr., executive director of the Hogg Foundation. The Hogg Foundation advances recovery and wellness in Texas by supporting mental health services, policy analysis, research and public education. The foundation was created in 1940 by the children of former Texas Gov. James S. Hogg and is part of the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at the University of Texas.


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

of Social Work (cont.)

2013

 

Faculty Accomplishments

 

Dr. Betsy Wisner and David Luke Henton presented and facilitated two workshops at the Eighth International Conference of the North American Society for Spirituality and Social Work at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan   nd July 20th-22 : “Visio Divina: New Opportunities for Spiritual Renewal through Visual   Meditation” and “Opportunities for Enhancing Spiritual Self-Care Through Meditative Practices”.  

University Award Dr. Anne Deepak was awarded the University Award for Excellence in Online Teaching by the Office   of Distance and Extended Learning. There will be a recognition reception in fall 2013 where she will present her work to the campus community.  

Appointment to National Council Dr. Anne Deepak was appointed to the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Women’s   Council on the Role and Status of Women in Social Work Education for a three-year term (July 2013). CSWE is a national association representing undergraduate and graduate programs of   professional   social work education as well as over 3000 individual members. CSWE is the sole accrediting agency for social work education in the United States.  

 

Title IV-E Grant Awarded Dr. Nancy Feyl Chavkin, Regents’ Professor of Social Work and Director of the Center for Children and Families, has received an award of $749,499 for 2013-2014 through a Title IV-E grant from the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) to encourage careers in public child welfare with a focus on foster care and adoption. Currently, fewer than 25 percent of child protective service workers in Texas hold a bachelor’s or master’s degree in social work. This funding pays tuition and fees for employees of the Department of Family and Protective Services to earn their MSW degrees. It also provides $5000 educational stipends to preservice BSW and MSW students who are preparing for careers in foster care and adoption and commit to work for the Department of Family and Protective Services. Through this university and agency partnership, 28 social work students will receive specialized education and support, and faculty will develop innovative, research-based curriculum modules for best practices in the field of public child welfare. In addition to the student support, the grant provides workshops for agency employees and training for foster and adoptive parents. Social Work faculty and graduate students also participate in local, state, and national evaluation efforts related to worker retention and worker training to improve child and family outcomes.. Texas State staff who work with this program, now in year 20, are Michele Bauman, Abbi Mott George, Rhonda Smith, and Martha Wildberger. For more information about these educational opportunities, contact ccf@txstate.edu.


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

of Social Work (cont.)

2013

 

 

Posted by Jayme Blaschke University News Service August 20, 2013

                     

School of Social Work Selected to Pilot New Path to Licensure Campaign

The School of Social Work at Texas State University has been selected by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) to partner with the association in developing a curriculum known as the ASWB Path to Licensure Campaign. The purpose of the campaign is to provide social work educators with up-to-date information about social work professional regulation and licensure in their jurisdictions so that they can help their students understand and embrace licensure as an integral part of their professional development—much like doctors and nurses in the medical professions. Like medical   professions, social work is a regulated profession in the United States and Canada. Unlike medical professions, however, the importance of regulation has not been emphasized consistently in the education of social work students.  

As the school chosen to pilot the Path to Licensure Campaign as part of its social work program, Texas State’s School of Social Work will help ASWB design educational activities that will engage faculty and students and raise awareness of: • • •

The critical role of regulation in public protection The critical role of regulation in setting quality assurance minimum standards for the profession The licensure process and the roles of key organizations including ASWB, social work regulatory bodies, the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors (BPD), and the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work (NADD)

The selection of Texas State was made because the school has a stellar social work program and also because its director, Dorinda Noble, has a long association with ASWB. Currently, Noble is serving as president-elect of the ASWB board of directors and will become its president in November. As director of the school of social work, Noble also stays at the forefront of technology and brings that forward thinking to all aspects of the school’s curriculum. Under her tenure as director, the Texas State MSW curriculum became the nation’s first online social work program. (Article continues on next page)


CAA Newsletter School

Summer

of Social Work (cont.)

2013

 

                         

School of Social Work Selected to Pilot New Path to Licensure Campaign (cont.)

“ASWB has a long and collaborative association with Dr. Dorinda Noble, LCSW, who is director of the School of Social Work at Texas State University,” said ASWB Chief Executive Officer Mary Jo Monahan. “Dr. Noble has served in many volunteer capacities at ASWB, both during her tenure as vice-chair of the Texas Board of Social Worker Examiners and afterward. As a former regulator, she sees the potential value our Path to Licensure program can offer educators. As an educator, she can use her creative talents and deep knowledge of social work to help ASWB develop a model program that will ensure that students gain an appreciation of social work regulation as an essential component to practice in their chosen profession.” For more information about the ASWB program, contact Jayne Wood at (800) 225-6880 ext. 3075   or via email at jwood@aswb.org. About the School of Social Work The   School of Social Work at Texas State is a vibrant unit of the College of Applied Arts. It offers both the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW), which prepares students to engage in generalist social work practice, and the Master of Social Work (MSW), which prepares students to engage in advanced specialized social work practice using a generalist framework. Both these degree programs are fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The school is closely connected with the university’s Center for Children and Families, and many of the school’s students are pursuing careers working with children and families. About ASWB The Association of Social Work Boards is the nonprofit association of social work licensing boards in the United States and Canada. Members include 49 states and Washington, D.C., all 10 Canadian provinces, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The association owns and maintains the licensing examinations used by its member boards and also provides services to boards and social workers, such as the Approved Continuing Education program, the ASWB Social Work Registry and the Public Protection Database. ASWB’s mission is to strengthen protection of the public by providing support and services to the social work regulatory community in order to advance competent and ethical practices. The Path to Licensure Campaign is a new initiative developed to give social work educators the information they need to help their students embrace regulation as an essential component of the practice of social work. Following the successful launch of the pilot programs, ASWB’s outreach will focus on the expansion of the Path to Licensure Campaign to other schools with CSWEaccredited social work programs. Visit www.aswb.org for more information.


CAA Newsletter Graduate

Studies News & Events

Summer

2013


CAA Newsletter Graduate

Summer

Studies News (cont.) Graduate Student Travel Fund

The Graduate College has limited funds to support graduate student travel to professional meetings. To be eligible for these funds, the student must be presenting a paper or poster. The student must also be enrolled during the semester the conference is held and meet all Texas State travel regulations. The maximum allocation from the Graduate College is $300 for out-of-state and $150 for instate travel. To request travel funds, the student should obtain the required Graduate Student Travel Funds Request form, complete the form and submit the form to their department. In most cases, the student’s department and academic College also contribute funds for the student’s travel.

_______________________________________________________________ Applying for Graduation You may now apply online for graduation through the new Self-Service Banner system. Please continue to view this Graduate College website for graduation instructions and important deadlines. Undergraduate (bachelor's) students need to contact the Advising Centers for specific information about applying for the undergraduate graduation. All Master's and Doctoral students must apply for graduation in order to be considered a candidate for graduation. The deadline to apply for December graduation is September 20, 2013. If you believe that you are an eligible candidate for the December 2013 graduation and have missed the deadline, you may send a request to apply after the deadline to Dr. Andrea Golato, Dean of the Graduate College at gradcollege@txstate.edu. The request should include the reason(s) for missing the deadline and why you should be given the opportunity to participate in the December Commencement ceremony. Late applications do not guarantee that your name will appear in the Commencement program. DEADLINE IS September 20th. NOTE: If you are applying for a bachelor's degree, you must contact the appropriate undergraduate Advising Center for information about graduation application procedures or the ceremony.

_______________________________________________________________ The Difference Between Participating in Commencement and Graduating It is important that candidates and families understand the difference between "participating in commencement [walking across the stage]" and "graduating [receiving a diploma]". Please visit the Candidate Instructions page for details.

2013


CAA Newsletter Graduate

Summer

2013

Studies News & Events (cont.) August 2013  CAA  Master’s  Hooding  Ceremony    

 

 

     

Criminal Justice Candidates

Human Nutrition Candidates

 

MSIS Candidates

Social Work Candidates


Summer

CAA Newsletter Graduate

2013

Studies News & Events (cont.) August 2013  CAA  Master’s  Hooding  Ceremony      

                                                                   

         

 


CAA Newsletter Graduate

Summer

2013

Studies News & Events (cont.) Master’s Graduation Candidates from August 2013

School of Criminal Justice Doctoral Candidates Erin P. Grant, PhD CJ Sarah E. Scott, PhD CJ Master’s Candidates Angela D. Ashby, MSCJ Margaret K. Brandon, MSCJ Danielle M. Brandon, MSCJ Kristen M. Daggett, MSCJ Stephanie J. Engling, MSCJ Tiffany A. Gentry Rogers, MSCJ Abel Pena, MSCJ Julie A. Ringstaff, MSCJ School of Family and Consumer Sciences Human Nutrition Lindsey E. Duree, MS Charlotte J. Hachenberg, MS Samantha L. Newton, MS Amanda M. Reat, MS Hannah E. B. Thornton, MS

Department of Occupational, Workforce and Leadership Studies Azure G. Brown, MSIS Erica D. Carpenter, MSIS Michael P. Davis, MSIS Danny S. Herndon, MSIS Mazen M. F. Homoud, MSIS Anna L. Shadix, MSIS School of Social Work Crystal C. Alfaro, MSW Melissa J. Axton, MSW Malinda S. Ballesteros, MSW Jennifer L. Beatty, MSW Hannah M. Becktell, MSW Lisa A. Brink, MSW Deborah L. Brockman, MSW Lisa M. Brooks, MSW Danielle Brown, MSW Brittany C. Burkett, MSW Danielle A. Cleveland, MSW Quinesta Y.  Cockerham,  MSW   Jessica  A.  Cooper,  MSW   Bethany  M.  Franz,  MSW   Karen  I.  Gonzalez,  MSW  

School of Social Work (continued) Erika A. Grier, MSW Paige M. Haddock, MSW Tamara J. Hembree, MSW Leslie J. Hernandez, MSW Rachael L. Horton, MSW April D. Hubbard, MSW Brenda L. Izaguirre, MSW Devon C. Jachade, MSW Marquita L. Jones, MSW Marisa Krug, MSW Bob P. Kupcho, MSW Lisa C. Laws, MSW Robert Leal, MSW Nicole D. Leonard, MSW Shirelle M. Lewis, MSW Maria O. Lugo, MSW Natasha Merchant, MSW Hilary A. Nesby, MSW Allison K. Quinones, MSW Ashley N. Rios, MSW Chasity N. Salazar, MSW Breanna E. Smith, MSW Pamela Spangher, MSW Kara C. Sparks, MSW Farrahn R. Stobb, MSW Melissa L. Storseth-Holbrooks, MSW Nicole M. Travis, MSW Kathryn R. Tucker, MSW Christine M. Wagner, MSW

* Graduate Advisors and Graduation Candidates please be aware that participation in the CAA Master’s Hooding Ceremony constitutes that all graduation requirements have been successfully met (thesis defense, comprehensive oral and written exams, completion of field hours, etc.) at the program, departmental and University levels.


CAA Newsletter Graduate

Summer

2013

Studies News & Events (cont.)  

Paperless Application for the CAA Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF)

 

In an effort to support University goals and sustainability efforts we are implementing a paperless application process for the CAA Graduate Research Fellowship.  

The purpose of the Graduate Research Fellowship

program is to allow students the opportunity to   learn more about conducting research by assisting

faculty with various research projects (i.e., book,

research   article, grant proposal). The student will

work with a professor for approximately 20 hours a week. The positions are awarded for a 9-month (September 1 through May 31). duration    

APPLICATION PROCESS:  

Students will apply by filling out the online

application. All attachments will now be submitted PDF format in a compressed zip file.

COMPRESSED ZIP FILE MUST INCLUDE:

A one-page (single-spaced) personal statement of career goals and future plans, including why the student should be awarded a Graduate Research Fellowship. Two (2) letters of recommendation. At least one letter must be from a professor in an academic institution. Recommendation letters should be addressed to the GRF Selection Committee. A current, professional one-page resume. PLEASE NOTE: Submissions of transcripts are no longer necessary. They can be viewed in the Banner Document Management System (BDMS).

Board of Regents A nine member Board of Regents appointed by the Governor governs the Texas State University System. In addition, a nonvoting student regent is appointed annually to the Board. Charlie Amato Chairman San Antonio Donna N. Williams Vice Chair Arlington Dr. Jaime R. Garza Regent San Antonio Kevin J. Lilly Regent Houston Ron Mitchell Regent Horseshoe Bay David Montagne Regent Beaumont Trisha Pollard Regent Bellaire Rossanna Salazar Regent Austin William F. Scott Regent Nederland Andrew Greenberg Student Regent Beaumont Brian McCall Chancellor

Newsletter Editor

A member of The Texas State University System

 

Yolanda Quintanilla Graduate Recruiter College of Applied Arts Agriculture Building, #306 yq10@txstate.edu

Summer 2013 newsletter  

The College of Applied Arts celebrates and recognizes the innovative and collaborative endeavors of its faculty and growing graduate student...

Summer 2013 newsletter  

The College of Applied Arts celebrates and recognizes the innovative and collaborative endeavors of its faculty and growing graduate student...

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