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seniorfest

Fun for all at annual event, June 12

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Flag day

Tribute at Marcus Center

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June 2013 Vol 26 No. 6

Sports

Bob never struck out at this old ball game page 20A

living

The story of John page 6A

“Connecting

COMPLIMENTARY

POMMER: A Stash of Cash page 8A

ELLENBECKER: Free Meetings for You page 5A

Apartment & Condo Directory Imagine Your New Life in Your New Place page 2B

Aging Veterans to Their Benefits ”

EDITORIALS

Veteran Robert Ciesielczyk participated recently in a walk at Zablocki, VA Medical Center.

Event June 24 at Milwaukee County War Memorial

Are you a veteran or a single surviving spouse of a veteran? Are you aware of all the benefits you are eligible to receive? According to a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) census, it is estimated that there are approximately 13 million American veterans and their single surviving spouses age 65 and older. Older adult veterans or their surviving spouses are to receive benefits as a part of their service to their country. Typically, they receive cash income from four programs veterans continued on page 24A

2013 Milwaukee County MONEYSenior SENSECitizen Hall of Fame Inductees

Five Milwaukee County residents joined the ranks of highly esteemed senior citizens on Friday, May 24, as they became members of the Milwaukee County Senior Citizen Hall of Fame. The impressive 16th annual ceremony was held at the Italian Community Center and was followed by a special

luncheon for the honorees, their famiBy Karen Ellenbecker lies and the numerous county dignitar& Julie ies who attendedEllenbecker the event. Jill Knight, coordinator of the -Lipsky Area Agency on Aging, a division of the Milwaukee County Department on Aging, said, “This award ceremony does more than just honor these older

adults who have done so much for their communities, it signifies that the people of Milwaukee County do appreciate everything they do to make lives both easier and better. Each of these five people is a wonderful person. The world of Milwaukee County definitely has been touched by their particular

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ways of dedication. They modestly may consider themselves as just ordinary people, but to those who they so efficiently and heartfelt serve, they’re real world beaters.” The honorees that received engraved plaques as well as citations hall of fame continued on page 12A


2A • 50plus • June 2013

www.MilwaukeeRecreation.net

Seniorfest 2013

Wed., June 12th U Doors open at 9AM American Serb Memorial Hall 5101 W. Oklahoma Ave.

Special thanks to our sponsors:

Milwaukee Recreation invites you to the 30th annual Seniorfest to enjoy a variety of activities that includes music, dancing, and bingo. Over 75 exhibitors, who serve older adults, will also be on hand to share resources and speak with you. Food and beverages will be available for sale as well. Tickets cost $4 in advance; $5 at the gate. Park at St. Gregory the Great and ride the free shuttle to The American Serb Hall.

Call (414) 647-6041 for details! SINCE 1911

www.MilwaukeeRecreation.net

Don’t miss the Golden Idol on Tuesday, June 11, 2013


& Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky

MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

June 2013 • 50plus

The “problems” with Social Security APRON By Bruce Nemovitz

I always thought that the problem for people who wanted to privatize and cut Social Security benefits was that too many other people knew too many facts about the program to be hoodwinked by clever sound bites, such as “entitlement reform”, “Ponzi scheme”, “bankrupt”, and “worthless IOUs”. I am worried, however, about the recent attempts by anti-Social Security types who claim that Social Security contributes to the country’s deficit and debt. It seems that they are so hell bent on cutting Social Security that they will resort to any means to accomplish what they want. Even President Obama has included a cut in Social Security benefits (ChainedCPI) as a political compromise to get revenue increases as a part of a bargain to reduce the deficit. Let’s take the easy one first. According to the Economic Policy Institute, Social Security is prevented by law from borrowing so it cannot contribute to the national debt. It can only draw on savings in the Trust Fund to meet its obligations to pay benefits. The deficit is a bit more complicat-

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credit ofEmma the United States, and that the STRINGS United States is pledged toEmma the payBy Aunt ment of the obligation with respect to both principal and interest.” So, Social Security is required to buy U.S. Treasury bonds, and interest is required to be paid on those bonds, but if interest revenue is used to pay benefits then it somehow contributes to the deficit (By the way, I don’t hear the same people attacking China and Japan for adding to our deficit by buying U.S. bonds and expecting to be paid interest on them). Obviously, from a Social Security Trust Fund perspective, revenue exceeds expenses so there is a surplus, not a deficit. Even from a unified budget perspective, the interest expense to the U.S. would have to show up as an offset on the revenue side of the ledger. Since Social Security really doesn’t contribute to the debt or deficit, why is the Chained-CPI, i.e. cutting the Cost of Living Adjustment, even being considered, especially since it hurts those who can least afford it? It is more tortured logic to claim that the Social Security COLA

overstates inflation since older people pay so much more for health care than other age groups. For example, the 2012 Medicare Trustees report states that 24% of the average senior’s Social Security check will be consumed by Medicare out-of-pocket expenses, and that will increase to 44% by 2086. Another assumption made to fit the desired outcome is that Social Security benefits go to wealthy older persons. The average Social Security check for a retiree is around $15,000 a year, and Social Security benefits are already taxed for higher income beneficiaries (a single person with an income of over $25,000 pays taxes on 50% of Social Security income, and 85% if income is over $34,000. The comparable numbers for a couple are $32,000 and $44,000). So it seems quite obvious that a cut in the COLA will hurt lower income people more than “wealthier” older people. If the concern was really about wealthier individuals, why not propose to tax 100% of Social Security benefits over a specified level of income?

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By Tom Frazier

ed. The 2012 Social Security Trustees report states that there is almost $2.7 trillion in the Trust Fund, a $69 billion increase over 2011, and that income is expected to exceed expenses until 2020. But, some people argue, that PLANTING since Social Security TOMORROW’S had to use some of its revenues from DREAMS interest TODAY on TreaBy Brad Olson sury bonds to pay benefits, that there is really a cash flow deficit. Section 201 (d) of the Social Security Act says that “Each obligation issued for purchase by the Trust Funds shall be evidenced by a bond, note, or certificate of indebtedness setting forth the principal amount, date of maturity, SPORTS Sports Plusand and interest rate of the obligation By Jack stating on its face that the Pearson obligation By Jack Pearson shall be supported by the full faith and

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60 The Truth About Reverse Mortgages... the WRIGHT SIDE of By Enis Wright

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone

Rick Kellow Branch Manager License #228329

In 1988 HUD adopted reverse mortgages and with the assistance of Congress, enacted laws that put into place 12 safeguards that guarantee a senior will not give up title to their home and will not put themselves, their home or their family in any

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financial risk. Paying off a traditional mortgage with a reverse mortgage secures the home and eliminates any possible risk of foreclosure due to an inability to make a monthly mortgage payment. “When I received notice that due to an escrow shortage and an increase in my property taxes my house payment was increasing $200 per month, I felt I had no option but to sell my home. When I discovered that by using

a reverse mortgage I could keep my home, have no mortgage payments, and receive monthly income, I couldn’t believe it. My only regret is that it took until I was 78 to start enjoying my retirement.” Mike B. West Bend, WI

425B East Washington St., Slinger, WI • 262-384-4417 NMLS 3001


4A • 50plus • June 2013

June Poem

The 2013 calendar pages are turning from May to June. This month kindness and love become the tune. Happy times will begin with chirping of various birds. Oh, if only their songs could be placed into words. All nature arises to greet great warmth of the sun. We hope it stays that way until work is said and done. Landscapers do busily rake, mow, seed and prune. While on area lakes there appears the first loon. Farmers planting time turns to growing of the crops. Now, what’s needed are an abundance of raindrops. Hustling here and there, this seems to be today’s life. But too much hurrying about could bring with it strife. Wedding bells can be heard everywhere ringing. Men and women join to form a chorus for singing.

While mother’s appreciative day now is past. We’re especially saluting fathers; raise the mast! The old man, pop, Mr. Smarts are names for dad. But being wonderfully dad-like cannot be any fad. Who else could have such wisdom, energy and love? Gosh! I almost forgot about dad’s turtledove. Giving credit, follow dad down the right path. You don’t need a slide rule to do the math. Stepping in dad’s footsteps might most people tire. Sometimes it is as though he’s on a high wire. Dad is steady, even walking on a slippery cable. If you believe him not for real, that’s a fable. Dads stand tall, sheltering others as they’re strong.

Saluting even the least of the bunch could not be wrong.

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EDITORIALS • 5A SocialSTATESecurity data, free seminars are available CAPITOL June 2013 • 50plus

By Karen Ellenbecker COMMENT Social Security By Matt Pommer Social Security is one of the biggest investments you make over your lifetime and it can be confusing to navigate through the process of when to start collecting those hard earned payments. Below I have listed a few of the recent changes with Social Security as well as information on upcoming seminars offered MOVING IN THE DIRECTION at Ellenbecker RIGHT Investment Group. By Bruce Nemovitz Benefits Benefits increased in 2013 for people who receive Social Security or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. According to Karyl Richson, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist, a 1.7 percent costof-living adjustment (COLA) was AGING applied to all Social Security and ISSUESmonthly SSI payments. The average By Tom for Frazier Social Security benefit a retired worker in 2013 is $1,261 (up from $1,240 in 2012) and the average monthly Social Security benefit for a disabled worker in 2013 is $1,132 (up from $1,113 in 2012). These changes were reflected in SSI pay-

ments dated December 31, 2012 and Social Security payments dated in January 2013. Other Changes Another change in 2013 is that a Emma worker will pay Social Security tax on up to $113,700 ofByannual income Aunt Emma (up from $110,100 in 2012). If you are collecting retirement benefits and your age is less than the full retirement age, you may earn $15,120 in 2013 (up from $14,640) without any benefits being withheld. Accessing your Retirement Estimates You may have noticed you no longer receive your statement via mail. Due to budget cuts, the information is now only available online. To access your statement, you must

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Social Security̶

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call for a complimentary consultation! SPORTS Sports Plus By Jack Pearson By Jack Pearson

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̨ȽɴɄɤѳ PLANTING TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

inar at the Ellenbecker Investment Group Education Center in Pewaukee. These seminars will guide you through what you need to know about Social Security – choose one of the following sessions, June 20 at 6:00 p.m., June 25 at 1:00 p.m. and July 11 at 6:00 p.m. Call (262) 6913200 or email rsvp@ellenbecker. com to reserve a seat. Ellenbecker Investment Group, located in Pewaukee, provides comprehensive financial planning services. EIG has an A+ rating with the BBB and has twice been awarded the Wisconsin BBB Torch Award for Business Ethics and Integrity. Learn more at ellenbecker.com or call 262.691.3200 to schedule a complimentary consultation. Securities and advisory services offered through SII Investments, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC & Registered Investment Advisor. Ellenbecker Investment Group, Inc. & SII Investments are separate companies. Diversification and asset allocation do not guarantee positive results; loss of principal may still occur.

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first create an account at https:// secure.ssa.gov/RIL/SiView.do. To create an account, you will provide certain personal information about yourself and answer questions that only you are likely to know. Next you will create a username and password. This process protects you and keeps your Social Security information private. The online statement is easy to use and provides estimates you can consider in planning for your retirement. The Retirement Estimator allows you to get an estimate of your future retirement benefits using different retirement ages and scenarios. Visit the Retirement Estimator at www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator. Be sure to print your information, and bring it with you to your next meeting with us. To learn more about these and other changes for 2013, visit the Social Security website at www.socialsecurity.gov. If you would you like to learn more about Social Security, feel free to attend a complimentary sem-

the WRIGHT SIDE of By Enis Wright

one of the biggest investments you make over your lifetime!

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KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone ellenbecker.com

N35 W23877 Highfield Court, Suite 200 | Pewaukee WI 53072 | 262.691.3200 | MoneySenseRadio.com Securities and advisory services offered through SII Investments, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC & Registered Investment Advisor. Ellenbecker Investment Group, Inc. and SII Investments are separate companies.

It can be confusing to navigate through the process of when to start collecting those hard earned payments. If you would like to learn more about Social Security feel free to attend a complimentary seminar at

EDUCATION CENTER N35W23877 Highfield Court Pewaukee, Wisconsin 53072

June 20 ̶ 6:00 p.m. June 25 ̶ 1:00 p.m. July 11 ̶ 6:00 p.m. Call 262-691-3200 or email rsvp@ellenbecker.com to reserve a seat.


6A • 50plus • june 2013

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT By Matt Pommer

The Story of John: Could it be of you, too? Men are in many cases much more reluctant to make a necessary move. I believe men are a bit territorial and find it difficult to give up the cherished private areas of their home. A basement workroom, a garden in the yard and a garage with electrical outlets and even space heaters can be difficult to leave. I first met John after a phone call from his very frustrated wife. Julie had called asking me for help as to how to begin the process of downsizing a large home and moving to a local senior community. I answered many questions, but noted the frustration in her voice. I decided to wait until my appointment later that week to get past some of the surface layers of upset and get to the real issue Julie was facing. As I entered their three-bedroom ranch home, I noticed her husband, John. He was bent over at a 90-degree angle and was avoiding my gaze. He seemed frail and sad. Julie gave me a great tour of their home and then we sat down at their dinner table to talk. John proceeded to

MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION By Bruce Nemovitz

let me know that his wife was “pushing him out” of their long-time home. He told me to deal with his wife and he will “go along” with any decision she makes. Moving forward, we downsized and sold John and Julie’s home and AGING they moved into a seniorISSUES community near their home. I hadBy notTom heard from Frazier them for some time after and was curious as to how John was doing. One day while working out at a local YMCA, I was reading my daily newspaper and sitting on an exercise bike when I noticed an elderly man in his early 80’s on the walking path, which is just in front of PLANTING where I sat on TOMORROW’S my bike. He was moving at TODAY a rather DREAMS fast pace for his age and it caught By Brad Olsonmy

attention. He looked familiar. After his third orbit on the track toMONEY my surprise SENSE By Karen Ellenbecker this was John! I was in disbelief. This & Julie Ellenbecker frail man bent over just a year -Lipsky ago was briskly walking with a smile. “John, it’s me…Bruce.” John recognized me and pulled over to talk with me. He first apologized for his attitude during his “exile from his home.” Emma I asked him what triggered this By Aunt Emma transformation from a sad and frail man to the one standing tall with a smile. He said, “It was difficult for me to give up my privacy and my home. I knew the neighborhood had changed where all of our friends had moved away. The stairs were killing me, and I rarely talked to anyone. But I had my workroom with all of my tools in the basement. I hadn’t used that room in years, but those were my memories. My garden was unattended for many years, but that was my territory, my patch belonging to me. My health was deteriorating and my back was causing incredible pain. Then we moved. “About two months into my new

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apartment, I noticed my back pain was dissipating. I was standing straighter. I was also eating three healthy meals a day and I felt more energy. My attitude was improving and I met some old friends, who to my surprise, moved to this same community. Eating a meal with others as opposed to sporadic sit down dinners in my old home added to my attitude adjustment. “Now feeling better, I joined an exercise class at the community center. My health plan included a free membership to the YMCA so I decided to take advantage. I began to walk for 30 minutes a day and now I am up to 50 minutes! “I feel better than I have felt in many years. I am enjoying every day and my wife has a new husband. I apologized to her for my reluctance to move and my poor attitude. I let her know that her husband was back and ready to live again.” I thanked John for his story and asked if I could share his transformation with others. The story of John is not an isolated experience. I have seen

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nemovitz continued on page 11A

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KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone


AGING ISSUES

By Tom Frazier

STATE CAPITOL IT MAKES ME COMMENT By Matt Pommer

EDITORIALS

Whom do you trust the least? HighHERMAN ground

The AARP Magazine recently published the results of a survey that asked people of all ages persons they trusted the least. Those in the United States in the over age 50 brackets, not ONEY SENSE aren Ellenbecker surprisingly, trust what a used car sales ulie Ellenbecker person says the least, five percent. -Lipsky Surprisingly, the next least believed people are our elected leaders in congress, 12 percent. We must be becoming a “Doubt-

Aunt Emma

Who would believe that of 17 countries – those in Western Europe, Canada, Japan, Australia and the United States that we would rank as either having the shortest men’s or second to last for women’s longevity? Men, on average, live 75.6 years, while women live to 80.7 years. If you are much over these years, applaud your ancestors and also your own personal good lifestyle habits. Problems that seem to be among the weightiest factors in our shortened

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Going paperless

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Being MONEY encouraged SENSE to go paperBy Karen Ellenbecker less doesn’t& Julie necessarily Ellenbecker mean that you -Lipsky must quit reading your newspaper or magazine. But going paperless to some degree could save our government, according to its own calculaAPRON tions, $1 billion over 10 years. What Emma STRINGS we’re referring to are government By Aunt Emma checks, Social Security, VA benefits and paper correspondence from other

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By Karen Ellenbeck tleground would never be forgotten. & Julie Ellenbecke -Lipsky The World War II Veterans’ Trib-

50, on average, believe the mouthings nothing about The High Ground, ute was installed in 1993. The National Native Americans of their religious leaders only 57 per- which had its groundwork laid in 1985 MOVING IN THE and was dedicated in 1988 as the Wis- Vietnam Veterans tribute was dedicatcent. RIGHT DIRECTION Memorial What about your neighbor? If he consin Vietnam Veterans By Bruce Nemovitz ed in 1995. A Korean War tribute was dedicator she is a high-pressure type sales Park, four miles west of Neillsville ed there in 2007. The first tribute stone person, do you believe what he or along Highway 10. Emma Volunteers and contributors are was placed among the rice paddies. she says when in a conversation that Plus SPORTS Sports By The Aunt Emma the heart of The High Ground. The For further information about By busiJack Pearson involves other topics other thanBy Jack Pearson idea for it came from and was fostered High Ground Veterans Memorial Park, ness? by Tom Miller, a Vietnam War veteran, call (715) 743-4224 or visit www.the who vowed that the mortally wounded highground.org. The park is open daiBy Enis Wright soldier in his arms on a Vietnam bat- ly from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. lives are drugs, alcohol, obesity, diaAGING betes, heart disease and lung probISSUES lems. Perhaps, many of us quit smokBy Tom Frazier ing cigarettes many years ago, but still We read much about the home- 25-year-old Heisman winning forchronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has caught up with us in our less veterans and believe such to be a mer college football star, who has had advancing years. We won’t even put shame. Why couldn’t a place like the short-lived gridiron careers in the NFL gun violence and not wearing our seat 134,000 sq. ft. Old Main building on with Denver and NY Jets, may have belts when in moving vehicles into the the VA grounds be turned into a home- located with another team by publication time. I wonder if he wasn’t so less veterans’ shelter? equation. deeply religious if he would have a qqqq Are we really a more morbid soMotor vehicle crashes PLANTING total costs starting job as an NFL quarterback? ciety? Obviously, the undertakers and TOMORROW’S qqqq approach $50 billion. Will the driverstatisticians believe so. We house husbands got a break less car – projected to beDREAMS availableTODAY by Byinattentive Brad Olson this year. Spring-cleaning was delayed 2025 – take the place of the government programs. Add to these, driver or the little 90-year-old lady so long due to inclement weather that the correspondence that comes from who can barely see above the steer- by late May we just opened the winfinancial institutions and credit card ing wheel? We welcome driver assist- dows to air out any foul odors of wincompanies among many others. What ed technologies, but fear we (at least ter. qqqq some of us) won’t be around to enjoy great savings! them in 2025. Onboard computers The gold and silver market values Now if we could just figure out perhaps will aid even the guy who so are going down from an all-time high how many trees would be saved? Will the next generation even be willingly says the computer age hasn’t a year ago. A friend has decided the SPORTS afforded the opportunity of financial caught up to him. Sports Plustime now is not right to sell the gold qqqq By Jack Pearson in his teeth. paper usage? By Jack Pearson qqqq At the time of this writing, Tim Tebow is on the loose again. The killing time continued on page 22A

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June 2013 • 50plus

WHITE WRITES

PLANTING There are many among us – vetTOMORROW’S ing Thomas” type of country as the DREAMS TODAY erans included – who know little or surveyors found that people over age Olson By Brad

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60 IT MAKES ME CRABBY Answer Man

IME with Jim McLoone

Doctors have patients, but even patients more often than not need patience. Having been at a doctor recently, I tapped my toes and counted to 10 about one hundred times as my patience was tested in the waiting room. Yes, I know that doctors could have emergencies, but I will ask why they schedule people as they do? A friend says he has the answer to the waiting room anger. If his appointment is at 10 a.m., he just shows up at about 10:20. The last time he did this,

the receptionist was indignant because he was late for his appointment. He sat down and still waited about 15 minutes. Are some doctors intentionally building patience among their patients? It is almost enough to make a person crabby. I say, “Accept the inconvenience or find a doctor, who’s not so popular.”

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Hartland, WI 53029

262-367-5303

Publishers Tom and Maureen Slattery Editor Jim McLoone

By Enis Wright Cyndi Strayer Advertising Director Saran Piehl Advertising Margo Lehmann Art Director/ Production Manager Nicole Hesse graphic designer Peggy Duffy Office Manager

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8A • 50plus • june 2013

Embarrassing numbers may see u$$ rerouted Large reserve funds held at University of Wisconsin System campuses are embarrassing the Republicancontrolled state government. Auditors and the non-partisan Legislative Fiscal Bureau last month reported $648 million in reserve funds across UW System campuses, including more than $400 million from student-tuition and fee accounts. Legislators swiftly rushed to promise that tuition levels would be frozen for the next two years. But they were clearly miffed at being surprised by the large numbers. Two years ago, the Legislature, then also controlled by Republicans, and Gov. Scott Walker had given the university its long-wanted financial flexibility. Senate President Mike Ellis of Neenah demanded answers to questions that almost sounded like they had been borrowed from the Watergate fiasco 40 years ago. Who made the decisions? Who knew about them? When did they occur? It’s not the first financial mix-up for the administration. Walker’s new economic development agency lost track of $56 million of loans. Then, the administration was late recently in

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT By Matt Pommer

delivering revenue numbers to federal officials. That resulted in a federal report that was unflattering to Wisconsin. The huge UWS reserve funds cast doubts on Walker’s plan to provide an additional $131 million in taxpayer MOVING IN THEof it funds to the system with much RIGHTtoDIRECTION targeted for attempts improve the By Bruce Nemovitz state’s economy. Walker hinted some of the money might be rerouted to help the state’s public elementary and secondary schools. Advocates had argued Walker seemed more interested in promoting private-school voucher programs than in helping public schools. AGING His initial school-aid plan for the ISSUES next two years threatened toFrazier hurt pubBy Tom lic schools in rural Wisconsin where enrollments have generally become flat or declining. Many of those rural

areas are represented in the Legislature by Republicans. Dramatically expanding Wisconsin’ school voucher plans could help Walker’s chances to be a member of the 2016 Republican presidential ticket. Republican lawmakers sounded like they were looking for a scapegoat over the university surpluses. Budgets are developed by individual campuses across the state and UW-Extension SENSE with overall planning MONEY guidance from By Karen Ellenbecker UW System Administration (UWSA) & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky in Madison. Campuses respond, and provide their tentative budgets for the next biennium back to UWSA officers in Madison who pull the information together into a system-wide budget proposal. This work is overseen by Emma System President Kevin Reilly and By Aunt Emma his cabinet; from there, Reilly presents the system-wide budget to the 18-member Board of Regents for final approval. Did any of the regents question the financial reserve policies or numbers? Did the university explain the potential uses of the reserves to the regents? That may never be clear. It appears the reporters who cover the

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university system did not attend the committee meetings reviewing the policies and numbers. Or, if they had attended the business committee session, they missed a great story. There is some irony in a furor of having large reserves. Wisconsin state government itself is often criticized for not having sufficient “rainy day” funds to buffet against economic downturns. Are the university reserves too big for its billion dollar operation? The university flap shows reserves can also be too big. Finally there is the question of whether UW System President Kevin Reilly can survive the furor. Forty-three years ago, Fred Harvey Harrington resigned as UW president following criticism of student riots against the Vietnam War. Harrington had neither started the war nor the protests. A prominent Republican-appointed regent publicly told Harrington the state was “damn sick and tired” of what was happening on the campuses. Harrington had become a scapegoat. He resigned before spring ended.

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More than a thousand candles for these ageless area bowlers By Jack Pearson This article is about 11 area bowlers, but it does not concern any high averages they may have attained over this past season, or championships they may have won. Rather it is about something else they have achieved that you’d be hard-pressed to find in any other similarly sized group of keglers, anywhere: more than a thousand years of life. Here’s a little math to explain. Five of the bowlers have passed their 90th birthday, three have passed their 91st; one is 92, and two are now in their 94th year. Total all their ages and it comes to 1,003 years, and that is true longevity. We’ll need a goodsized cake to hold all those thousand and three candles. The ageless bunch, ladies listed first, are: Alma Hogan, 90, of Wauwatosa, bowling with the Triple Trouble team at the AMF Bolero; Doris Reinke, 91, of Wauwatosa, with the Orig-

inals, also at the AMF Bolero; Louise Bracey, 90, of Milwaukee, and AlPLANTING ice Devine, 90, of Brown Deer, both TOMORROW’S bowling with the Wednesday Seniors DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson at the Brown Deer Lanes; and Elaine Stumpf, 91, of Brookfield, bowling with the Belles and Pals team at the New Berlin Bowl. Theodore Gurzynski, 91, of Milwaukee, and Wilbert Meyer, 92, of Oak Creek, both with the Friday Seniors at the Classic Lanes in Greenfield; DeLacey Williams, 90, of MilSPORTS Sports Plus waukee, at the Wednesday Morning By Jack Pearson By Jack Pearson Mixed League at the Court Lanes North; Andrew Kanalec, 94, of Milwaukee, with The Wednesday Morning Handicap League at the Riviera Lanes; William Smith, 94, of Waukesha, bowling in the Wednesday Mixed Classic at the Root River Center; and Paul Bruno, 90, of New Berlin, with the Wednesday St. Peter’s Handicap at the Wiseguys Bowling Center. Eleven people who like to bowl;

HERMAN WHITE WRITES

not a major news item perhaps, but still a pretty good yarn. The reason being, most people who once were steady bowlers and who are now past 65 years of age have given up the sport. It takes too much energy, they say, it keeps them up late, and worst

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of all, even if they tried, they couldn’t bowl as well as they did previously. I say, “Excuses, excuses.” You know, they have a motto over at the VMP – Manor Park, “You’re Never Too Old To Play.” It’s a good one, and more of us should take it to heart.

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What about June 6? What does the date June 6, 1945 mean to you? Think about it. To the world the day of June 6, 1945 meant much. What occurred that day certainly is not forgotten, just unremembered. It was the morning of June 6, By the Enis tables Wright of World 1945 on which War II took a dramatic turn in favor of the Allies. It was on that day that the invasion of German-held France had begun. Yes, it was the Normandy Invasion.

the WRIGHT SIDE of

The end of World War II would not occur for months. But Normandy proved to be the beginning of the end for the Nazi troops. A celebration by thousands of grateful French people occurs each June 6, honoring the soldiers from the United States, Canada and other entities of the United Kingdom who stormed ashore that day to liberate, first of all, the French village of Ste Mere-Emglise.

60

KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone


june 2013 • 50plus

• 9A

Both sides can’t be right regarding SSI payments By: Tom Margenau Here is an email from Phil: “I think the Social Security disability program is a complete rip off. I know lots of people getting disability checks who don’t deserve them. It seems like anyone can get on disability. Simply get a doctor to sign statement saying you are disabled, and the checks start rolling in. What can we do to stop this scam?” Here is an email from Kathy: “I have been trying to get on Social Security disability for two years now with no luck. I am in constant pain and take enough medications every day to choke a horse. No one will hire me because of my medical history and my age. I’ve been told that everyone is turned down for disability the first time. But I have applied three times now and I still can’t get benefits. I have statements from two different doctors saying that I am disabled. Do you have any suggestions?” Here is an email from Dave: “This country is going to pot. And one big reason is because there are millions of undeserving people mooching welfare benefits off of the Supplemental Security Income program. They sit around doing nothing each month waiting for their SSI checks and their food stamps to roll in, and then they spend their food stamps on beer and cigarettes, or they gamble away their SSI check. This is the very definition of waste, fraud and abuse!” Here is an email from Ellen: “I get a small Social Security widow’s check. It’s only $1,100 per month. That’s my only income. With that money, I have to pay my rent and buy groceries. I tried to get SSI, but I was

turned down. They said my income is too high. Can you believe that? I get a small food stamp allotment, but it’s hardly enough to get me through the month. Is there anything extra I can get from Social Security or SSI?” Welcome to my email inbox. Every single day, I get letters similar to these with people expressing diametrically opposite viewpoints. I find them so fascinating. And in the case of folks like Phil and Dave who gripe about alleged government largess, I find them so misinformed and so sad. Gosh how I wish that Phil could walk a mile in Kathy’s shoes. And I would love it if Dave could sit down with Ellen and find out what it’s really like to try to get SSI benefits in this country. I know from my 40 years of experience working with disability and Supplemental Security Income that Kathy’s and Ellen’s real life views of these programs are much closer to the truth than the rants expressed by Phil and Dave. To qualify for Social Security disability benefits, the law says your impairment must be so severe that it will keep you from working for at least a year. Or, you must have a condition that is terminal. Phil is simply dead wrong when he says all you need is a statement from a doctor indicating you are disabled and “the checks start rolling in!” Someone applying for disability benefits must provide medically documented proof of their condition. Frequently, they are sent to a “Social Security doctor” for further review. About 65 percent of all first-time claims for disability benefits are denied. (Of course, that means that 35 percent are approved, belying the ru-

mor that Kathy heard that all initial disability claims are automatically denied.) The 65 percent denial rate is high, but that’s because many people file for disability benefits out of desperation. They’ve been laid off, they can’t find work, so they figure it can’t hurt to file for Social Security disability benefits, citing whatever relatively minor ailments that might be afflicting them as their disability. Unfortunately, there isn’t too much I can suggest to Kathy to help her. If she’d been denied for Social Security disability once, I would tell her to file an appeal. If she’d been denied twice, I’d tell her to consider hiring a

lawyer. But Kathy said she’s filed and been denied three times. She might simply have to accept the fact that her condition simply doesn’t meet the legal definition of disability. Or maybe she should talk to Phil. He must know the secret because he seems to think it’s so easy to qualify for Social Security disability. The Supplemental Security Income program is our country’s major welfare program for the elderly and disabled poor in this country. SSI is managed by the Social Security Administration, but it is NOT a Social Security benefit and it is NOT paid for out of Social Security taxes. It is funded by general tax revenues.

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10A • 50plus • june 2013

Skin cancer is preventable with proper sunscreen BY: Dr. David Lipschitz I believe that too much sun exposure accounts for the increasing incidence of malignant melanoma. While I was a teenager, not a summer went by without at least one severe and painful sunburn, which significantly increased my risk of melanoma, the most dangerous of all skin cancers. Fortunately, I have been spared, but my sister and mother were not so lucky. Each had a change in a mole that was recognized early enough to only require removal. The volume of ozone in Earth’s stratosphere — the ozone layer — appears to be declining every year. Meanwhile, the incidence of mela-

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noma has increased. From 1970 to 2009, melanomas increased by 800 percent in women and 400 percent in men. The American Cancer Society estimates that 76,690 new cases of invasive melanoma will be diagnosed in 2013 and 9,480 people will die of the disease. The National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, estimates that Americans developed more than 2 million new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer in 2012 (basal cell and squamous cell cancers), but these cancers caused fewer than 1,000 deaths. By comparison, the institute estimates that in 2013, melanoma will be diagnosed

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in 76,690 Americans and it will cause 9,480 deaths. Despite accounting for only 5 percent of all skin cancers, this disease causes more than 90 percent of skin cancer deaths. Although it seems unlikely, of the seven most common cancers in the United States, melanoma is the only one whose incidence is increasing. Between 2000 and 2009, incidence climbed 1.9 percent annually. New evidence published in the journal Pediatrics suggests that rates of melanoma are significantly increasing in children. If melanoma is diagnosed when limited to the most superficial layers of the skin, the cure rate is 98 percent. If, however, it has spread to distant organs, the chance of surviving more than five years after diagnosis is only 15 percent. The lighter the skin and the more frequent the sunburn, the greater the risk of melanoma. Anyone at high risk must be vigilant and have their skin examined by a physician frequently. A melanoma should be considered if a change in the size, shape or color of a mole has occurred or if a mole is more than one color, has irregular margins or starts bleeding or forms an ulcer. A newly pigmented spot or one under the nails, between the toes or on the genitalia is suspicious and should never be ignored. Once the diagnosis is made, the melanoma can be excised surgically. The entire cancer is removed with a wide margin of normal tissue around it. The extent of the incision depends on the size of the melanoma and whether it has spread to tissue beneath the surface of the skin. In some cases, the incision may be so large that a skin graft is required. Deep growths usually require further testing to assure that cancer has not spread to lymph nodes and distant tissues. If it has, surgery to remove those lymph nodes and chemotherapy may be needed. To prevent melanoma as well as the far more common basal and squamous cell skin cancers, and to avoid ugly blotches, wrinkles and skin lesions that can be precancerous, dermatologists advise us to avoid sunburns and wear sunscreen. Most importantly is sun avoidance during the heat of the

day. Exposure to dangerous UVA and UVB rays occur whether the sky is cloudy or clear. The Food and Drug Administration allows sunscreens that protect against UVA and UVB rays to claim they are broad spectrum. The strength of a sunscreen is determined by the SPF value. While many offer values of 70 or more, there is no evidence than an SPF of greater than 30 offers any more protection. Under new labeling rules that took effect in summer 2012, only broad-spectrum products with an SPF value of 15 or higher can claim to reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging, if used as directed with other sun protection measures. Sunscreen should be applied to chest, back and all sun-exposed areas even if you wear a shirt all day. The average T-shirt provides only SPF 7 protection. A non-oily, water-resistant spray is the best way to provide liberal coverage to all areas including the scalp. (Under FDA rules, sunscreens must not claim to be “waterproof” or “sweat-proof “ because all products eventually will wash off and thus should be reapplied routinely.) During the summer, apply every two hours if outdoors, and continue use during the winter. Stay in the shade during the heat of a day and wear a hat whenever possible. Despite compelling evidence that sun avoidance and sunscreens prevent melanoma, research presented at the American Association of Cancer Research Society meeting showed that 25 percent of melanoma survivors did not use sunscreen and 2 percent reported using tanning beds. Sun damage and all skin cancers are preventable. Lying in the sun and tanning beds can be relaxing, but they are taboo. If you absolutely have to look tanned to feel healthy, consider a spray tan; it is harmless, and it can look quite natural these days. Dr. David Lipschitz is the author of the book “Breaking the Rules of Aging.”

50 Plus News Magazine


June 2013 • 50plus

nemovitz continued from page 6A

this over and over throughout my career. Change is difficult, but there is hope and life ahead if one chooses to accept the necessary steps to happiness. Bruce Nemovitz is a Senior Real Estate Specialist, as well as Certified Senior Advisor, who has sold residential homes in the four county Milwaukee-Metro areas for 37 years. He is one of only a handful of Realtors who are continually included in the top seven percent in client satisfaction in

the Milwaukee metro area. He’s rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau, and was a finalist for Concordia College’s Ethical Business Leadership Award. Bruce works with his wife, Jeanne, at Realty Executives Integrity. Please feel free to call Bruce or Jeanne with any real estate questions you may have at 262-242-6177, or email at Bruce@ BrucesTeam.com. You also can go to their website at www.brucesteam.com.

• 11A

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CV-13-12073


12A • 50plus • june 2013

hall of fame continued from page 1A

from alderpersons and others are Shirley Browne, Tom Chavala, Garry Henning, Cheri McGrath and Lynn Reeves. Their biographical descriptions follow herewith.

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Lynne Reeves Lynne is a person you can depend upon 100 percent. She takes her service in her church seriously at Our Lady of Good Hope. In addition to singing in the church choir, she serves communion during masses, works at the annual auction, assists in baking 380 fruit cakes each Christmas season and works very hard at the annual picnic and church festival. She is also a member of the Bereavement group, which serves refreshments after funerals, and has assisted in the distribution of newsletters over the last 12 years for the parish. She is a faithful worker assisting in the “Trash for Cash” program during the events at the St. Patrick’s Day picnic. Lynne is a member of the Elks Club where she is treasurer of the Women’s Club. She has also assisted with blood drives for 18 years, donated her time working at bingo games at the Eisenhower Center for employees that have Multiple Sclerosis and is a dedicated worker at St. Paul’s meal site serving and cleaning. But she does not stop there, throughout the year she is busy collecting food for at least three families in the Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas seasons as a member of the Brown Deer Seniors Club. “Lynne does not know the meaning of the word “NO” and if anyone needs a helping hand, she is that extra hand.” Shirley Browne When you meet Shirley Browne you’ve met a person who is ageless, caring and compassionate. Dubbed “indefatigable” by Father Michael of Saint Francis of Assisi, Shirley’s unrelenting drive, energy and dedication unquestionably fit the adjective.

A devoted wife, incredible mother and grandmother, Shirley not only excellently fulfills her duties at home, but also extends her reach to helping her community at large. Shirley thrives on spending most of her volunteer time brightening someone’s day; especially seniors, sparked by the tender loving care she gives her mother. It is no surprise her volunteerism encompasses her mother’s senior residence at Hadley Terrace or spreads to touch lives throughout Milwaukee County. Benefactors of her tireless devotion also include her parish, St. Francis of Assisi, The Adult Learning Center, City of Milwaukee Voter Registration, Interfaith Older Adult Program’s Inc., Milwaukee Bucks Seniorgees’ Dance Team (Co-Captain since 2006) and the jazzy Jewels Dance Troupe as a star leader and performer. Shirley captures the essence of joy with her contagious smile and friendly disposition when performing, fundraising, and being an advocate for a driving a senior to the doctor. A phenomenal woman with a huge heart, she gives selflessly to everyone, there are no strangers in Shirley’s world. A 2005 Catholic Herald Newspaper article about this extraordinary volunteer describes Shirley Browne as being, “guided by faith in every facet of her life.” Cheri McGrath Cheri is a woman who has put her stamp on Milwaukee. She has volunteered 2,173 hours over the last two years, donating blood to help save lives, being a tireless advocate for public transit, representing the Milwaukee County Commission for Persons with disabilities as a commissioner as well as proofreading and assembling Braille books at Audio & Braille Literacy Enhancement, Inc (ABLE). Cheri has served with distinction on Milwaukee County’s Transit Plus Advisory Council, and also serves on the Transit Service Advisory Council, a group representing all bus riders. She is currently part of the Milwaukee


June 2013 • 50plus

County Transit’s New Freedom Program conducting trainings for new bus operators on how and when to assist individuals with disabilities. Additionally, she appears in transit training videos and local television commercials to promote riding the bus. As the ABLE board president and a director for a combined 12 years, Cheri has been crucial in helping the organization thrive as a small nonprofit during times when many other small organizations have not been able to survive. Furthermore, this year, Cheri is celebrating 23 years of donating blood with the Blood Center of Wisconsin. She donated 120 units of whole blood, potentially saving 357 lives. Cheri is busy, providing over two decades and thousands of hours of volunteerism. It’s quite unbelievable the time expended on top of the diversity of volunteerism. One can easily see why Cheri received the “Women Putting Their Stamp on Metro Milwaukee” award for Abilities Awareness in 2011. Tom Chvala “Tom’s character and friendly personality make him a great role model for others.” Tom has been an active participant of the Wisconsin Senior Olympics (WSO) for over ten years and has proudly served on the WSO Board of Directors for nine years. Tom is committed to volunteering his service at Miller Park in the concession stands during Milwaukee Brewers baseball games. “Tom demonstrated his dedication by attending over 75 percent of the scheduled work days during this

four year time period. His dependable service was essential to the fundraising efforts of the organization.” In 2007, Tom was chosen as the representative from Wisconsin to carry the banner/flag at the National Senior Games Opening Ceremonies in Louisville, Kentucky. This exclusive honor is awarded to Wisconsin Senior Olympic participants that have demonstrated significant dedication to the organization and can represent Wisconsin Senior Olympics in a dignified manner. Tom also volunteers his time helping others have a better quality of life at St. Alphonsus Parish, St. Benedict the Moor Community Meal Program, St. Vincent DePaul Bread Run, Badgerland Striders and the Greendale Lions Club. He contributes time, energy and spirit serving these community organizations. Chvala is a very humble man. He is loyal and is often the first to ask if he can be of assistance. Tom’s story is very remarkable having recovered from being in a coma for six weeks after he had been struck by a car while running back in 1989. This demonstration of his resiliency and passion for improving his quality of life can also be seen in his volunteer efforts. Garry Henning “Garry Henning shows every senior that no matter who you are, where you live or what your background is – it’s never too late to make a difference in the lives of others. Garry didn’t join an established organization to make his mark. He created a rich legacy out of the ashes of tragedy.” Garry is the founder and executive director of the Quadrevion Henning Foundation, which was named after his 12-year-old grandson, who

he tragically lost to a drowning. Garry transformed himself into a forceful advocate helping families of missing children and serving the needs of youth in the community by advocating and educating safety awareness, civic engagement and moral development. “Mr. Henning is truly a gem to our city and nation.” He had received numerous awards from local, state and national organizations including the Milwaukee Police Citizen Leadership

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Award, Wisconsin Attorney General – Wisconsin Clearing House for Missing and Exploited Children and Adults Community Award and the FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award. Garry is also a veteran of the United States Army 101st Airborne. “Garry is a true role model, and Wisconsin is fortunate to have such an outstanding leader and advocate, always compassionate and ever willing to undertake this unique work, so demanding and emotionally fraught. He is admired and highly respected for his work, and recognition of his efforts is well deserved.

She’s the light of your life. You’re the light in hers. Taking care of a grandchild can be a wonderful gift. It can also be challenging—both physically and financially. If you’ve taken on the responsibility of acting as a parent or guardian for your grandchild and want to know what kind of help is available, contact

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14A • 50plus • june 2013

High ground

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There are many among us – veterans included – who know little or nothing about The High Ground, which had its groundwork laid in 1985 and was dedicated in 1988 as the Wisconsin Vietnam Veterans Memorial Park, four miles west of Neillsville along Highway 10. Volunteers and contributors are the heart of The High Ground. The idea for it came from and was fostered by Tom Miller, a Vietnam War veteran, who vowed that the mortally wounded soldier in his arms on a Vietnam battle-

ground would never be forgotten. The World War II Veterans’ Tribute was installed in 1993. The National Native Americans Vietnam Veterans tribute was dedicated in 1995. A Korean War tribute was dedicated there in 2007. The first tribute stone was placed among the rice paddies. For further information about The High Ground Veterans Memorial Park, call (715) 743-4224 or visit highground.org. The park is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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june 2013 • 50plus

Advancements in arthritis surgery lead the way to improved quality of life like never before, thanks to Aurora Advanced Orthopaedic experts Arthritis affects many joints as we age, and can lead to significant pain, reduced joint motion, and substantially reduced quality of life. Improvements in arthritis surgery are now available that substantially reduce the effects of this disabling illness, and can restore both comfort and function as never before. Aurora Advanced Orthopaedics, a leader in the operative treatment of arthritis, reviews newly available approaches to arthritis that can help you and others suffering from arthritis.

1. Are robotics part

of the future for knee replacement? Actually, robotics are part of the present. The longevity and performance of a knee replacement has always been tied to how accurately it is positioned to tolerate the stresses a knee joint encounters in everyday activities. Although not yet available for all types of replacement, robots are currently being used by Aurora Advanced Orthopaedics surgeons at Aurora Sinai Medical Center to assist in partial knee replacements known as MAKOplasty. The accuracy of the robot is helping to assure more accurate and reproducible results that can shorten hospital stays and potentially reduce pain and extend the life of the implant. For more extensive forms of knee arthritis, Aurora Advanced Orthopaedic surgeons throughout greater Milwaukee offer comprehensive knee replacement services from full knee replacement to complicated re-dos or “revision” replacement.

2. What is a direct anterior

approach hip replacement? Although hip replacements traditionally performed are a very successful way of eliminating hip arthritis pain, progress has been made on reducing the trauma and pain associated with the surgery. A unique way of entering the hip joint through a muscle-sparing ”window” in the front of the hip joint is now possible through Aurora Advanced Orthopaedics surgeons trained in the direct anterior approach. The surgery requires unique skills and a

specialized operating table known as the HANA table, now available at Aurora Medical Center in Grafton, Aurora Sinai, and Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center. Available to most patients, the operation offers significantly less hospital time, operation pain, and substantially shorter recovery time to activities, with outcomes equal to traditional hip replacement.

muscles to substitute for the absent rotator cuff and restore significantly better shoulder function and pain relief. In combination with improvements in traditional shoulder replacements, Aurora Advanced Orthopaedics surgeons now can help improve almost any shoulder arthritis problem with expectations of return of both comfort and activities.

3.

4.

joint for the development of what is known as post-traumatic arthritis. For many years, the only predictable treatments were bracing, or operative stiffening of the joint known as “fusion.” Successful treatments that preserve motion of the joint, as well as reduce pain, are now available with designs of implants that replace the joint, much like a knee or hip replacement. Aurora Advanced Orthopaedics has surgeons with special expertise in the technically difficult surgery of ankle replacement. Ankle replacement surgery can offer the same pain relief that fusions of the joint can accomplish, while still maintaining the motion of the ankle joint.

Who might need Can arthritis of the a reverse shoulder ankle joint be treated as replacement? successfully as knee or hip Successful treatment of painful arthritis? shoulder joint arthritis has required Although not as recognized, ankle the cuff of muscles surrounding arthritis can be equally as disabling the joint, known as the rotator cuff, and painful as knee or hip arthritis. to be present to help support the The ankle is frequently injured by replacement and assist the arm strain or fracture, and is a common in moving after surgery. Patients with rotator cuff damage prior to developing arthritis often had less successful arm function after Our orthopaedic services include replacement. ~?^SXPcah ~5^^cP]Z[T Improvements in ~AWTd\Pc^[^Vh ~7P]SfaXbcT[Q^f ~BW^d[STa ~7X_ engineering and ~B_X]TQPRZ]TRZ ~:]TT technology have ~B_^acb\TSXRX]T ~<dbRd[^bZT[TcP[^]R^[^Vh now led, however, ~?PX]\P]PVT\T]c to much better To request an appointment, visit ortho.ah.com or call function and the greater Milwaukee location nearest you. pain relief with 4PbcTa]<X[fPdZTT2^d]ch FTbcTa]<X[fPdZTT2^d]ch these patients P]S>iPdZTT2^d]ch P]SFPdZTbWP2^d]ch as well. Using 262-387-8300 262-532-1555 a new concept 3^f]c^f]<X[fPdZTTP]S FPbWX]Vc^]2^d]ch where the ball B^dcWTa]<X[fPdZTT2^d]ch 877-600-1999 414-649-7900 and socket of the replacement has been “reversed,” the replaced shoulder is now capable of using other nearby

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• 15A


16A • 50plus • june 2013

Exercise is most important for healthy bones at every age Vital at every age for healthy bones, exercise is important for treating and preventing osteoporosis. Not only does exercise improve your bone health, it also increases muscle strength, coordination, and balance, and it leads to better overall health.

Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds to exercise by becoming stronger. Young women and men who exercise regularly generally achieve greater peak bone mass (maximum bone density and strength) than those who do not. For most people, bone mass peaks

during the third decade of life. After that time, we can begin to lose bone. Women and men older than age 20 can help prevent bone loss with regular exercise. Exercising allows us to maintain muscle strength, coordination, and balance, which in turn helps to prevent falls and related fractures. This is especially important for older adults and people who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis. The Best Bone Building Exercise The best exercise for your bones is the weight-bearing kind, which forces you to work against gravity.

Some examples of weight-bearing exercises include weight training, walking, hiking, jogging, climbing stairs, tennis, and dancing. Examples of exercises that are not weight-bearing include swimming and bicycling. Although these activities help build and maintain strong muscles and have excellent cardiovascular benefits, they are not the best way to exercise your bones. Exercise Tips If you have health problems – such as heart trouble, high blood pressure, diabetes, or obesity – or if you are age 40 or older, check with your doctor before you begin a reg-

ular exercise program. According to the Surgeon General, the optimal goal is at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days, preferably daily. Listen to your body. When starting an exercise routine, you may have some muscle soreness and discomfort at the beginning, but this should not be painful or last more than 48 hours. If it does, you may be working too hard and need to ease up. Stop exercising if you have any chest pain or discomfort, and see your doctor before your next exercise session. Exercise continued on page 18A

What product or products have you found necessary for someone contemplating hip or knee surgeries?” Home Care Medical is proud to offer the following products for an individual who is considering hip or knee surgeries: - Bathroom Safety Products: Grab bar, bath seat, raised toilet seat, long-handled bath sponge and Hip Kit (which includes a reacher, elastic shoe laces, dressing stick,

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june 2013 • 50plus

• 17A

Questions to Ask Your Doctor Questions Your • Are there any other pain relief options for me that could work Doctor May Ask You as well as joint replacement?

• If I have joint replacement, how much will it relieve my pain? • How is the procedure done? • What do you do to manage the pain after the surgery? • What are the risks or complications of joint replacement? • How long will I be in the hospital, and how soon after having the procedure can I get back to my normal daily activities?

• Where is your pain located? Does more than one joint hurt? • When did the pain first begin? What caused it (if known)? • Rank your pain on a scale of 1 to 5 • Has the pain gotten worse recently? If so, is it more severe, does it occur more often, or both?

• Is joint replacement covered by my insurance?

• Does your pain get worse, or occur more often, when you do weight-bearing activities (Example: walking), at rest, or at night?

• After the procedure, will I see you or my regular doctor for follow-up care?

• Are you taking any medications for the pain? (Make a list of both prescription and non-prescription medications.)

• If I decide to have joint replacement, which company’s product do you think will be best for me? Why?

• Are you taking any dietary supplement? (Make a list of vitamins or other “pills” for arthritis, such as chondroitin or glucosamine.)

• If I have joint replacement, will you perform my surgery? • How many of these procedures have you performed? • What kind of activities will I be able to participate in after joint replacement?

• How far can you walk without support? With support? • Can you climb stairs comfortably without help? So you need to go very slowly and carefully? • How physically active are you? • What tests have previously been done to evaluate your joint pain? These questions are brought to you by Stryker

Total knee replacement is intended for use in individuals with joint disease resulting from degenerative, rheumatoid, and posttraumatic arthritis, and for moderate deformity of the knee.

Sometimes circles just make sense. The Stryker Get Around Knee system is designed to replace the knee’s naturally circular motion. Don’t just replace your knee. Replace the way your knee moves. Learn more at getaroundknee.com or call 1- 888 - Get -Around.

As with any surgery, knee replacement surgery has serious risks which include, but are not limited to, blood clots, stroke, heart attack, and death. Implant related risks which may lead to a revision include dislocation, loosening, fracture, nerve damage, heterotopic bone formation (abnormal bone growth in tissue), wear of the implant, metal sensitivity, soft tissue imbalance, osteolysis (localized progressive bone loss), and reaction to particle debris. The information presented is for educational purposes only. Knee implants may not provide the same feel or performance characteristics experienced with a normal healthy joint.

Speak to your doctor to decide if joint replacement surgery is appropriate for you. Individual results vary and not all patients will return to the same activity level. The lifetime of any device is limited and depends on several factors like weight and activity level. Your doctor will help counsel you about strategies to potentially prolong the lifetime of the device, including avoiding high-impact activities, such as running, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. Ask your doctor if the GetAroundKnee is right for you. Stryker Corporation or its divisions or other corporate affiliated entities own, use or have applied for the following trademarks or service marks: GetAroundKnee, Stryker. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners or holders.

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18A â&#x20AC;˘ 50plus â&#x20AC;˘ june 2013 Exercise continued from page 16A

If you have osteoporosis, ask your doctor which activities are safe for you. If you have low bone mass, experts recommend that you protect your spine by avoiding exercises or activities that flex, bend, or twist it. Furthermore, you should avoid high-impact exercise to lower the risk of breaking a bone. You

also might want to consult with an exercise specialist to learn the proper progression of activity, how to stretch and strengthen muscles safely, and how to correct poor posture habits. An exercise specialist should have a degree in exercise physiology, physical education, physical therapy, or a similar specialty. Be sure to ask if he or she is familiar

with the special needs of people with osteoporosis. A Complete Osteoporosis Program Remember, exercise is only one part of an osteoporosis prevention or treatment program. Like a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, exercise helps strengthen bones at any age. But proper exercise and diet may not be enough to stop bone loss caused by medical conditions, menopause,

or lifestyle choices such as tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption. It is important to speak with your doctor about your bone health. Discuss whether you might be a candidate for a bone mineral density test. If you are diagnosed with low bone mass, ask what medications might help keep your bones strong.

What are the advantages for doing rehab after hip or knee surgery and is it covered by insurance? Rehabilitation and therapy services are essential to your recovery after a hip or knee replacement. Therapy can help with controlling pain and swelling, and it improves joint range of motion so you can resume daily activities. Therapy involves strengthening and balance activities to improve safety and your ability to perform daily tasks. Therapists can also provide an assessment for specialized equipment to assist you in your transition back to your home. VMP is a faith-based organization with almost 90 years of experience in caring for older adults. Our qualified and caring staff will guide you through the rehabilitation process. Our therapists, board-certified physicians and interdisciplinary teams work together to deliver a person-centered approach with

the goal of seeing you go back home quickly and safely, resulting in shorter healing time. VMP therapists can also go to your house to make an assessment to ensure that your return home is successful. VMP is unique in the fact that we have our own full-time discharge planner who delivers a plan of care tailored to meet your needs so your return home is safe and timely and you remain independent. VMP accepts most private insurance and Medicare. If you plan to have a hip or knee replacement or related surgery in the future, you can call us in advance to verify insurance and schedule a tour. Call Joe at the Admission hotline at 414-607-4195. See our ad on page 18A for locations in West Allis and Brown Deer.


EDITORIALS

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Home protection checklist for the departing vacationer

E CAPITOL OMMENT

Did you know that summertime is the working burglar’s peak season? Most criminals operate during summer, fully aware that MONEY SENSE their chances of happening upon a By Karen Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker vacant home during this time of year -Lipsky are greater. While installing a burNG IN THE glar alarm will keep your home safe DIRECTION from unwanted entry, there are plen- takes place while you’re gone and a e Nemovitz ty of other hazards that could take water line breaks, you could suffer APRON place in your Emmaabsence. Once you’ve thousands of dollars of damage. STRINGS gone through your standard packing Disconnect all nonessential apBy Aunt Emma Answer Man checklist , it’s time to take some ad- pliances, with the exception of your ditional steps to protect your home freezer and refrigerator. This can from some of the dangers that lurk help minimize the risk of electrical fires that could, in a worst case sceAGING within and without its four walls. SSUES Lock all windows and doors. nario, leave you without a home to om Frazier This is something you should do return to at the end of your vacation. even if you’re only going to be gone Buy and install some house for a few hours. If your away time lighting timers. These work by turnwill exceed this by a few days, it’s ing on certain lights throughout your imperative to secure all doors and home at designated times, to give windows to prevent someone from an otherwise vacant home the apANTING gaining easy entry. pearance of being occupied. While ORROW’S MS TODAY Turn off the main water valve a burglar alarm can work wonders, rad Olson to your home. Do this only if you’re sometimes a well timed light can be going to be away for an extend- enough to ward off curious crimied period of time. If an emergency nals.

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Place all important papers in a well hidden, fire proof safe. This will ensure that irreplaceable belongings will weather any eventuality -- whether that’s a break-in, a natural disaster, or a fire. Don’t leave your computers connected to the internet. Leaving your computer up and connected can leave you wide open to identity theft from crafty hackers. It can also expose your computer to serious damage in the event of a power surge that could wipe your hard drive clean of vital information. Have someone collect your daily mail and newspapers and keep them for you until your return. If you’re going to be gone for a long time, consider contacting the Post Office and putting a hold on delivery of your mail. The sight of an overstuffed mailbox is sometimes seen as a “Welcome” sign in the eyes of would-be burglars. If you have the paper delivered, call and ask that delivery be suspended until you return.

Empty your backyard of any expensive tools or equipment. Just because you’ve got a fence doesn’t mean that prying eyes won’t find their way into your backyard and to a potentially lucrative treasure trove of equipment someone wouldn’t even have to break into your home to steal. By adding these precautions to your things-to-do list, you can avoid having a nasty surprise awaiting you when you return from vacation -whether that’s a broken water pipe or a home completely emptied of its valuables. Now that you’ve taken these precautions, you can go forth and enjoy your vacation with peace of mind. Content Provided by Spot55. com

Looking for a good read? Check US out at:

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5 inexpensivecalendar vacation spots off the beaten track With the heat wave affecting most

Glenwood Springs, Colorado It’s home to the Four Mile Creek Bed and Breakfast in Roaring Forks ing to an affordable out of the way Valley, and just a short ride to area place where you can relax and recoup. attractions. You can rest your body Let’s take a look at five standout and soul at the awesome Glenwood Enis Wright places to go for a By cheap vacation start- Hot Springs Pool. Choose between ing in California and working our way the therapeutic pool or the wild water toward the East coast. tube rides. If you’re up for exploring, Jim Crystal Cove Beach Cottages with visit the McLoone Fairy Caves, Hanging Lake and Crystal Cove State Park, or any of dozens of area attractions. California Right on the ocean, these cottages St. Louis, Missouri represent the earliest attempt to turn It’s chock full of free attractions. California’s coastline into a vacation Start with the zoo -- it’s free except paradise. They were all built in the for a parking charge. Move on to the 1920’s and 1930’s. They’re on the arch for a free tour or pay a few dolnational historic register and have lars and ride 630 feet to the top. It’ll been restored for public use. Cottage give you a superb view of the Gate#13 was used in the making of the way City. Then, visit the Sophia M. movie “Beaches” with Bette Middler. Sachs Butterfly House, tour the AnThey’re chock full of history, a bit heuser-Busch Brewery or take in a funky and lots of fun. Here’s a short St. Louis Cardinals ballgame at the video and here is a link to their web- new Busch Stadium. Scores of low site. Rates run from just $69 per night cost hotels and motels are available up to around $200 per night for the throughout the city. larger cabins which sleep up to eight people.

PORTS orts Plusof the U.S. this summer, it’s time to ck Pearson get away for vacation! Preferably gock Pearson

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Wilmington, North Carolina Hollywood producers make so many movies and TV shows here they’ve started calling it “Wilmywood.” Check out the Battleship North Carolina, take a stroll along the gorgeous Cape Fear River Walk, enjoy a great meal at the Front Street Brewery or hit one of the many beaches. There’s so much to see and do in the Wilmington area.

Bar Harbor, Maine Just across the Bay of Fundy from Nova Scotia, Canada, Bar Harbor is a fantastic summer getaway. While most of us spend our days avoiding traffic and suffering with 90+ degree days, it’s a comfortable 70 in Bar Harbor. Choose among whale watching, music festivals, nightlife, shopping or 18 holes at the Kebo Valley Golf Club. Bar Harbor is a getaway you’ll enjoy and remember for years to come. Content Provided by Spot55.com


20A • 50plus • june 2013

PLANTING TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

HERMAN WHITE WRITES

Singing and baseball are a good combo with Bob Kozlowski Whenever you’ve been at a ball game and heard the National Anthem sung, have you ever wondered who the man or woman singing was? Do you think you could do it? I know I couldn’t, not in a thousand years. It’s one thing to yodel away by yourself in the shower, but out there on the playing field, alone and with more than 30,000 people looking down at you, no musical accompaniment and no teleprompter to help you remember the words, yikes! You really have to give these anthem singers credit. (They have to be given credit; they don’t get paid a cent.) Most of the people who sing the anthem at Milwaukee Brewers games in Miller Park volunteer their services. They write or call in for an audition or they send in a taped recording. Only the best are chosen. Surprisingly, the Brewers receive far more offers to sing than they could possibly use during the course of the 81-game home season. But if they ever have the need for someone on short notice, such as if the scheduled singer becomes ill or can’t make it for any reason, they have an excellent singer to pinch hit, if you’ll pardon the pun, right there in the stadium. His name is Bob Kozlowski, and he’s been with the Brewers’ Guest Relations for the past 12 years, the last two as a supervisor. The Brewers don’t ask Bob to fill

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in simply because he is right there and handy, he is also an excellent singer. In his younger days, he was a featured vocalist for a number of big band orchestras. He was also a radio announcer for three different area radio stations over a 20-year period. “I’ve always loved big band music,” Bob, now 68, said, “such as those of Glenn Miller, the Dorsey brothers, Artie Shaw or Harry James. My favorite vocalists were Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, Tony Bennett and Vic Damone.

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KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone Bob Kozlowski, a member of the Brewers’ Guest Relations staff, often is called upon to sing the National Anthem prior to a game in Miller Park. presence, their vocal control and the way they interpreted a song. They were wonderful role models and, as

History on Our National Anthem Did you know that when we sing The Star Spangled Banner, also known as the National Anthem, at ball games and other events we only sing the first stanza of the song? There are actually four stanzas. The last three stanzas are never sung and rarely appear anywhere, but if you look in a good history text or an almanac, you can find them. The piece was written by Francis Scott Key during the bombardment of Fort Henry in Baltimore on September 13 and 14, 1814. This next year, will be the celebration of our National Anthem’s 200th birthday.

far as I’m concerned, there aren’t any singers today to compare to them.” One of the big bands Bob sang with was the Airmen of Swing orchestra, which was very popular in this area from 1989 to 2011, when it disbanded. (That Airmen of Swing band and their founder-leader, Dan Mathson of Brookfield, were featured in this publication in 2010). Bob’s involvement in music began well before those big band days. As a student at South Division High School in the late ‘50s and early ‘60s, he had his own small group in which he served as its vocalist, and he was also part of a singing trio. At one of the trio’s performances, Tony Wirth, director of the Allen-Bradley Orchestra and Chorus, was in the audience and liked them so During his younger days, Bob sang with the popular big band Airmen of Swing. That’s him, much he offered each of them spots far left in the back row. Band founder and director Dan Mathson is third from the left in the with his band. “That was great and same row. we really enjoyed it,” Bob recalled. I didn’t try to sound like them, rather I studied their mannerisms and stage

“Only it didn’t last very long, as soon after that I went into the Air Force.” In his four years in the service, he rose to the rank of sergeant, and continued his singing with service bands. When he completed his service, Bob attended the old Milwaukee School of Broadcasting on 35th and Clybourn. After that, he went into announcing, first at WRIT, then WOKY and finally at WEZW. During much of this time, he also worked for the Klement Sausage Company of Milwaukee. Not many of his listeners then, if any, knew him by his real name, Kozlowski. This is because he never used it while on the air. In the early years of his radio career, he used the name Bob

During all of the Brewers’ home games you can always find Bob in the Guest Relations booth near the main entrance to Miller Park.


june 2013 • 50plus

Bradley. Then, after he was hired at WOKY, the station manager told him that the name Bradley was too similar to that of the popular announcer Bob Barry, and so he had to come up with another alias. So Bob chose the name Bruce Kellogg. During that time, Bob was featured in a couple of stories in the Milwaukee Journal. Both stories included his picture and identified him as Bruce Kellogg. “It made for a little confusion at home,” he recalled. “My children saw the stories and wanted to know if their last name was Kellogg or Kozlowski.” In addition for his affinity to singing and radio work, Bob has always had a love of baseball. So early in the year 2001, he applied for work with the Milwaukee Brewers in their new Miller Park Stadium. “At my first day on the job, they put me to work out in the parking lot, directing traffic,” Bob said. “As it so happened, it was a wet, very cold day, and I wasn’t real-

ly dressed properly. I got soaked, and was half frozen. I was so discouraged that when I came in after the game, I promptly told them that I was quitting. But fortunately, there was a woman there from Guest Relations and she asked if I’d rather work inside and for them. Anything was better than being out in the freezing rain, I thought, and so I accepted the offer. And I’ve been here ever since.” Guest Relations at Miller plays a major role. If, for example, you’re a newcomer to Miller Park, Bob explained, and you’re not quite sure where your seats are located, or where you can find certain food items to buy, or view displays or whatever, the Guest Relations people will help you. If you’ve lost something, such as a wallet, a purse, some clothing item, or perhaps some field glasses or anything, Guest Relations is the lost and found headquarters. If you need a pocket Brewers’ schedule or any other printed material, you can pick them up

Taking care of Grandchildren

By Joanne Webb, Director of Little Lambs Academy in New Berlin Many grandparents today take care of their grandchildren either parttime or full-time. This is a win-win scenario for many families. For one, parents are often much more comfortable, in many cases, entrusting their little ones to grandparents who have a loving interest in their proper care. Secondly, grandparents have a great resume, loaded with experience. After all, they raised their own children, right? Plus, the care is often either free or much less expensive than a daycare alternative. Finally, grandparents take care of their grandchildren at home. That means a lot less sickness, which is often associated with daycare. If you take care of your grandchildren, you know just what I’m referring too. It is both a joy and a privilege. And what a tremendous responsibility! Read, read, read: And then read some more. Most children love it and should be read to. Studies show that children who are read to on a daily basis perform better in school than those who live in a book-starved environment. Look at and talk about picture books together; read chapter books, playing on the suspense of

what will come next; read information books; read stories of fiction and non-fiction. Read about what excites your grandchild. If you don’t have children’s books at your house, go to the library. The library is among the most intriguing places you can go with your grandchild. If you instill in them a love of reading, you will instill in them a love of learning. And that is a gift of a lifetime. Go on outings: when you read about Curious George’s visit to the zoo, go to the zoo yourselves. When you read about construction trucks, find a nearby construction site and watch for a while, talking about the trucks and workers. When you read about a farm, take a quick drive just outside town and look at the horses and the cows. When you watch an episode of Caillou on TV, and they go to the museum, you can go to one, too. Go on a picnic; go to the park; go to the grocery store; go to the coffee shop. Then, as a way to spice up the learning, help your grandchildren label everything they see to build vocabulary. You can even make a game out of naming things by playing “I Spy with My Little Eye”. Bake and cook: Children as young as one year old can enjoy time in the

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there. If you have a youngster who has wandered off and you can’t find him or her, chances are that one of the ushers has spotted the little runaway and brought him or her to Guest Relations for safekeeping. There are two Guest Relations booths in Miller Park. The primary one, and where you’ll usually find Bob, is near the main entrance, on the right side of the right field concourse. The other is located on the Loge Level above it. Both open 90 minutes prior to the game’s start, and remain open at least a half hour after the game ends. Aside from his regular duties in Guest Relations, as noted, Bob has often filled in as the featured National Anthem singer. At last count, he has sung 15 times, which includes the first two games played at Miller Park this year and the two spring training exhibitions prior to Opening Day. He also sang God Bless America at one of the early home games. As alluded to earlier, National An-

them singers can sometimes be awed when out there on the playing field all alone and before such a huge crowd; and because of this, they can sometimes have a mental lapse or choke up and forget a word or two. This is why most of them, when they are standing near home plate, face away from the stands and toward the giant center field scoreboard, where all the words to the National Anthem are on display. Bob is one of the few who faces the grandstand, where the words can’t be seen. “When I’m singing,” Bob said, “I like to face the people I’m singing to, and at the same time, I want them to see my face, not the back of my head. That’s probably my big band singing experience. Can you imagine a band singer getting up there on the stage and then facing the orchestra and not the audience?” Bob is married and has two daughters, Kim and Kellie, and a son, Shawn, and two grandchildren, Zoe and Nicholas.

kitchen. Start small with letting them help stir. Then move up to gathering ingredients. Finally, children are able

to participate in measuring, counting, dumping and mixing by about two or three years old.


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must first and foremost ask our killing time continued from page 7A political leaders? Obviously, county A Maryland church is feeding board members really are planning on stray cats. It is kind of like starting a sacrificing financially. They’re plannew revolution now that colonialism, ning to lower pay for their part-time slavery, indentured servitude and injobs to $40,000, such great sacrifice. equality at the ballot box all have been qqqq MONEY SENSE eliminated for the human race. While TRAVEL Karen Ellenbecker You know you are aging when Julie Ellenbecker on the subject of animals, a North Car-Lipsky you average attendance at two or three olina politician suggested developing funerals weekly. a system of background checks for qqqq owners of such as pit bulls. Does he The way to set things right has not APRON really believe that decent people don’t been lost. While a woman was inside a TRINGSown any of the obviously easily agitat- store shopping, another woman driver y Aunt Emma ed breeds? Answer Man struck her car. This woman immediateqqqq ly left the scene and parked elsewhere The Humane Society is promoting in the large parking lot. A man, parkmeatless meals. There’s now a meating nearby, saw the incident occur. He less Monday program at work in 1,124 waited for the woman whose car was schools in the Los Angeles Unified struck, told her about the other driver School District. How about having a and where she was now parked along big bowl of beans or rice for lunch? with the guilty person’s license plate Get a free copy of the humane socinumber. The police were summoned. ety’s recommended meatless meals at The woman who drove away will now humanesocietry.org/meatfree. appear in court for creating a hit and qqqq run incident. Thanks, mister, for doing The weather outside is finally dethe right thing. STATE lightful. For most of this year, we real-CAPITOL COMMENT qqqq ly should be describing it as frightful. By Matt Pommer I read recently that you should qqqq never argue with an idiot. Chances are If you are a veteran who may good that he or she will drag you down someday be looking for a place where to his or her level. MONEY SENSE you will be cared for as well as able qqqq By Karen Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker to call home, you may be interested With Father’s Day just -Lipsky ahead, in the American Legion Wisconsin I must admit that most families are Veterans Home annual King MOVING Day onIN THE like candy. They are mostly sweet, Sunday, June 16. King is justRIGHT outside DIRECTION occasionally difficult to swallow and By Bruce Nemovitz Waupaca. It is much nicer than some right sometimes a nut appearsAPRON here and might expect. Emma there. But if you think about it, you’ll STRINGS qqqq realize that the happiest times our By Auntof Emma MuchJim of theMcLoone inner city is reported with lives are spent with our families. to be balancing on the poverty line or qqqq below it. How can this wonderful community score this low? This is whatAGING we

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Delta bows out The downtown Milwaukee con- building. For these, it could be considvention center will soon be nameless as Delta Airlines bows out of its $500,000 branding effort. How about proudly referring to it as the Milwaukee Convention Center? Certainly, the Wisconsin Center District does not wish to lose the $500,000 its charges for naming rights. But let us be honest about this. Who needs their name across that building? We can picture a can of Miller beer and accompanying logo there. Or even a Harley somehow attached to the

ered as real advertising. But for naming rights for non-Milwaukee entities, it has to be considered as a gift. Why not Milwaukee’s Finest or some type of name the downtown’s most successful businesses could contribute to? Delta’s bowing out should come as no real surprise. Bless BMO Harris for its action at the Bradley Center. We suspect that may not have happened if it had not been so new to the community.

As we moved our financial belts inward a few more notches in this tenuously emerging economy, questions arise about our federal government’s support for the Corporation of Public Broadcasting and NPR. Failed presidential candidate Mitt Romney had said, to the effect, that when we must borrow money from China to pay our bills, how can we continue to justify the expense of $144 million for national public radio and television? This annual amount dramatically adds to the debt that our children will inherit. Yes, we were appalled when our net incomes, collectively, had dropped almost precipitously in the last few

years, but during this time of financial turmoil, the amount the federal government spent on public radio gifting went up 11 percent. We question if the voluntary contributors, might not fill that monetary gap if they really wish such broadcasting to continue uninterrupted by commercial advertising. Also, we are not entirely sold on the idea that public broadcasting is entirely unbiased. But this is beyond the prevailing question. With much of the entertaining portions of public broadcasting seemingly coming from England, we might guess that American taxpayers are helping support that industry as well as Chinese financiers.

Public broadcast support

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Dear SAM: I am an older woman and I must admit that I worry all the time about my precious papers, etc. being stolen. Worse, could someone really steal my account information? I will appreciate any advice you may have for me. Gratefully, Alice Issacuoin

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checks, bank statements and anything with a password, PIN and expired or no longer used credit cards, identification cards and expired driver’s licenses. If you do not have a shredder and don’t wish to buy one, ask the people at your bank for their aid. Extra security is important. If you ever shop online, I’d be wary of whom you give your information to. Also, when you are alone in your vehicle, buckle up and keep the doors locked. If a stranger seems to need help, call 911. Best of luck to you, Senior Answer Man

Dear Alice: The number one way you can cut your risk of identity theft is via shredding of old paid bills, receipts when no longer needed, documents that have any of your vital information like Social Security number, bank account number, unneeded tax forms, cashed

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Flag Day tribute June 14 The Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, at the Peck Pavilion, will host its fourth annual Flag Day Tribute, “Celebrating Our Freedom.” from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, June 14. Paul Mathews, Marcus Center CEO, will welcome the guests and encourages all people, veterans and non-veterans, to attend this free event. This celebration and appreciation of our freedom in the United States will begin with presentation of the flag followed by the National Anthem, an invocation by a Vietnam veteran, the Rev. Ray Stubbe. There then will be few moments of silence in honor of those killed and those who were prisoners of war led by a Vietnam warrior, Joseph Campbell of Wauwatosa. Master of ceremonies for the Flag Day event will be John Malan, now a veteran weather forecaster, but also a Vietnam War veteran and Purple Heart honoree. Miss Astha Berry, Franklin High School, will be introduced as the state

winner of the annual American Legion Oratorical Contest. Special music for the occasion will be provided by the VA Jam Band under the leadership of Shep Crumrine. Campbell encourages all Americans to “honor the dead by serving the living.”

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SERVING ALL OF WISCONSIN

August 23 - September 15, 2013 For Men and Women age 50 and older EVENTS Archery

Badminton

Basketball

Shuffleboard

Bowling

Cycling

Horseshoes

Track & Field

Golf

Swimming

Racquetball

Race Walking

Pickleball

Tennis

Volleyball

Lawn Bowling

Softball

Powerlifting

Triathlon

Table Tennis

Basketball Free-Throw

For more information or to register, contact the Wisconsin Senior Olympics office today or go to www.wiseniorolympics.com WWW.WISENIOROLYMPICS.COM (262) 424-2149 INFO@WISENIOROLYMPICS.COM

Contact us:

(Excluding Cremation Permit & Fee)

Wisconsin Senior Olympics

5K Road Race

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I’m 55+. What do I do now? Professionals age 55+ with talent, experience and generosity of spirit can make a social impact and reinvest a career’s worth of skills towards serving a nonprofit in their community. Learn How What is ReServe Southeast Wisconsin? ReServe Southeast Wisconsin is operated by Interfaith Older Adult Programs and matches continuing professionals age 55+ with part-time service opportunities, which are critical in helping nonprofits meet their mission These opportunities allow you to give back to your community while earning a stipend.

Attend a First Impressions information session in Milwaukee or Waukesha. To register, go to www.reserveinc.org and click on “Register” in the upperright corner.

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www.reserveinc.org/ southeastwisconsin or contact us at 414.220.8643 .


24A • 50plus • June 2013 veterans continued from page 1A

provided through the VA. Two of the programs are paid to veterans or their surviving spouses who are non-service-connected disabled. These are referred to as Pension and Death Pension. The other two programs are paid to veterans or surviving spouses due to disability or death from service. These are referred to as Disability Compensation and DIC (Dependents Indemnity Compensation). In 2013, the VA estimates only 13 percent of eligible veterans age 65 and older will have benefits processed. “This low percentage is due to a lack of awareness aging veterans have related to their benefits,” said Jim Duff, Director of Milwaukee County Veterans Service Office. Often the focus is placed on Pension and Death Pension, however, aging veterans could benefit from knowing more about Compensation and DIC. In an effort to provide aging veterans and their single surviving spouses with more awareness of and register them for eligible benefits, the Milwaukee County’s Veteran Services Office and the Milwaukee County Department on Aging will be offering a one-day event, Connecting Aging Veterans to Their Benefits. “It’s important to reach out to our aging veterans and explain the resources and benefits that are available to them and, in many cases, to their surviving spouse,” Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele said. This benefits-specific event will feature representatives from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veterans Benefits Administration, VA Veterans Health Administration, various VA claims agencies, Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs Military Funeral Honors, American Legion Claims Office, Veterans of Foreign Wars Claims Office, Military Funeral Honors, Union Grove Veterans’ Home and Cemetery, Wisconsin Funeral Directors’ Association and the Marquette Volunteer Legal Clinic. Other community service organizations available at the June 24 event include: Hunger Task Force, Social Development Commission, Interfaith Older Adult Programs, Legal Action, AARP, Arthritis Foundation and the Wisconsin Parkinson’s Association. Stephanie Sue Stein, director of the Milwaukee County Department on

Aging, urges, “If you or your parent or grandparent are an aging veteran or a single surviving spouse of a veteran, please do not miss this event. This is a unique opportunity to have veterans’ benefits professionals and community resource representatives all together under one roof to serve our aging veterans.” Connecting Aging Veterans to Their Benefits is being promoted by AARP and 50Plus News Magazine. The free event will be held on Monday, June 24th from 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at the Milwaukee County War Memorial, 750 N. Lincoln Memorial Drive. Free parking will be provided in the O’Donnell Parking Structure located just west of the Milwaukee County War Memorial, or in the lot north of the Milwaukee County War Memorial. Anyone interested in attending Connecting Aging Veterans to Their Benefits should pre-register by calling (414) 289- 6640 or emailing your name and the number of persons attending to agingevents@milwcnty. com At the Connecting Aging Veterans to Their Benefits event, veterans and/or their spouses will be able to sit down with veterans’ benefits representatives and community service staff for an individual one-on-one consultation, sign-up for benefits and ask situational specific questions, all while enjoying free refreshments and learning about available resources. The event will kick off with a welcome from the Milwaukee County Executive’s office and a presentation on eligible benefits for veterans provided by the VA. If you cannot make the 9:00 a.m. ceremony, the information will be provided again at 11:00 a.m. The opportunity to learn about benefits, services and how to register for benefits and services will be available from 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. The Benefits in Detail Pension and Death Pension are generally called “aid and attendance.” They provide cash payments to veterans who served during a period of war or to their single surviving spouses. Pension payments can help cover the cost of home care, assisted living and nursing home services. Pension is also available to veterans or surviving spouses with very low income who do not have long-term care costs. Cash

income payments from Pension range from about $700 - $2,000 a month depending on the type of claim and the medical rating involved. Most people are not aware of this benefit. There are about 16 different monetary levels of aid and attendance or housebound allowances available with non-service-connected and service-connected disability programs for veterans or their surviving spouses. Disability Compensation is a tax-free benefit paid to a veteran for a service-connected disability that happened as a result of active duty, active duty for training, inactive duty training or injury from VA healthcare. Cash income payments for Compensation, range from about $130 to approximately $8,000 per month. Special benefits like grants for new automobiles or modifying existing automobiles, grants for constructing or modifying homes, clothing allowances and so on are payable for severe service-connected disabilities. A veteran cannot receive Pension and Compensation at the same time and a surviving spouse cannot receive Death Pension and DIC at the same time. A choice must be made as to which benefit the beneficiary wants to receive. An aide and attendance or housebound assistance allowance in the form of Special Monthly Compensation (SMC) is available to the veteran who is 100 percent disabled. A veteran rated for 100 percent disability will receive a check for about $2,816 - $3,505 a month in 2013 and if the veteran has a spouse the amount is $2,974 - $3,662 a month. Of particular note for Disability Compensation are Agent Orange claims for each and every veteran who was stationed in Vietnam and who developed presumptive health conditions such as certain forms of cancer, type II diabetes, ischemic heart disease and Parkinson’s disease. Veterans with service-connected hearing loss can also make claims and receive free hearing aids. This hearing disability rating will also get veterans into the health care system. Many veterans do not know about Agent Orange claims or that they might be eligible for service-connected disability for hearing loss. The VA health care system is the largest single provider of health care in

the United States. Not all veterans can receive care in the system. Eligibility requires either service-connected disability, receipt of Pension, special service recognition such as prisoner of war or Purple Heart or low income and less than $80,000 in assets. For all beneficiaries, not to include those who are means tested (means tested relates to certain levels of income), all services are free and medications are $8.00 per month per medication regardless of what it is. Means tested veterans must pay a co-pay for services. There are no other out-of-pocket costs such as health care premiums. Help can also be provided with disability-required home renovation grants of $2,000 or $6,800, orthotics, prosthetics and, in certain cases, hearing aids. VA outpatient clinics are available in most communities. Dependents Indemnity Compensation (DIC) - also called Dependency and Indemnity Compensation - is payable to eligible survivors of a military service member who died on active duty or whose death after service resulted from a service-connected injury or disease. It is also available due to improper treatment of the deceased veteran from VA healthcare or rehabilitation services. DIC is automatically granted to a surviving spouse for a veteran who was permanently and totally disabled for 10 years or more. DIC pays $1,215 a month in 2013 to a surviving spouse. Money is available for burial costs for veterans who were service disabled, receiving Pension or died under VA care. If the death was a result of service-connected disability, $2,000 is available. If the death was non-service related, and the veteran was receiving Pension or Compensation or was entitled to either of these, up to $700 is available for plot allowance and burial/funeral expenses. All veterans also receive free burial in State and Federal VA cemeteries. Under certain conditions, spouses and other family members can receive free burial in State and Federal VA cemeteries. All veterans are eligible for a grave marker (or equivalent monetary allowance), a flag for the coffin, a graveside honor guard and a letter from the President of the United States.


TRAVEL June 2013 • 50plus • 25A

MONEY SENSE By Karen Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky

Emma finds all, but a friend to be in bloom Dear Folks:MOVING IN THE Here we are again. It is already RIGHT DIRECTION By Bruce Nemovitz June and this year is close to being one-half over. Where, oh where, has the time gone? The flowers are in bloom, the early veggies are almost ready to eat, the rhubarb is just about past its prime and, as my Henry says with such enthusiasm, it is this time of year when we regain our strength AGING spent from dealing with the harsh ISSUES winter. We have new determination to By Tom Frazier meet the challenges that we each may face every day while we resultantly achieve the happiness that we each deserve. Believe me, as we do grow older, we certainly seem to need more inspiration. Referring to inspiration, where is that apron? Now, with my “thinking apron” in PLANTING place and complete with the splotches TOMORROW’S from yesterday’s rhubarb DREAMS muffins, TODAY we can get started. By Brad Olson As hubby Henry says, (He does say a lot, doesn’t he?) before we can really get started, meaning to move forward, we first must recognize where we have been. I guess what he really means is that we build a better picture of where we’re going by recognizing our past, what it has meant and where it has Sports brought us. I guess SPORTS Plus our main issue inBy life is to be healthy Jack Jack Pearson Pearson in mind, body andByspirit. In fact, I told the girls at coffee this morning that we must be wearing our thinking caps (besides my apron) at all times as we view the goings-on in the world today. I should have added that we also need a sharp focus. We girls spent a few minutes this morning in quiet time in honor of a just deceased neighbor, Sally Saltsavere. Sally never was active in our women’s groups. She was what we refer to as a loner. We considered that Sally never wanted much to do with the neighbor ladies as she went to one of those different-than-us churches. We weren’t ever sure if she just was a meditating holy lady or whether she had a bout with depression. Joining in the fun that we have monthly at the girls’ Bunco party would have been the last item on her agenda. Sally really took her Pierre’s death about 12 to 14 months ago to heart. I recall her as stone-faced at the funeral

Emma

another company for the buffing and packaging. I guess Henry and another fellow, a guy from management, devised this machine that will do this work now right at the end of the line. The union steward even congratulated Henry, as it will add a man or two to the payroll and more union dues. We had a wonderful Mother’s Day. Sonny, Doris and the kids came to the house and Henry grilled steaks on the backyard grill. Father’s Day is just ahead this month. I must get Sonny to help me plan for Henry’s big day. He’s certainly what you could call one proud papa. Just what could we do for him? He has

SENIOR

APRON STRINGS

Answer Man

By Aunt Emma

and that way from then on. What none of us suspected was that Sally had a bad heart; that it often skipped a few beats. One of her sons, George, said that this scared her half to death. Well, it was a while later that it did more than just scare her, it took her into the Heavenly circle. I might guess that Sally was about as ready for it as anyone. We found out at the funeral that Sally had left a note that if she ever went into a coma or stopped breathing that no special efforts should be made to keep her alive. Was she just interested in seeing her Maker, or did she believe life here was just that bad? I wonder. I guess that is more than enough about Sally. Who wishes to read more woeful words when the world around us is so full of problems? Henry, who normally is bursting with almost boundless energy and excitement, was wearing one of those wry smiles when he got home from work last night. I could tell that he was mightily and rightly proud of himself. Before I could even ask what it was what, Henry said that we were going to celebrate as Wright he’d climbed By Enis the mountain at the factory earlier in the day. I thought this more than a bit strange since Henry sits most of the time in front of a dark blue colored machine that keeps spitting out hot chunks of metal. I may be a housewife, who never has been to college, but I do know all about life from attending the School of Hard Knocks so I figured that mountain was merely a metaphor; that it was a troublesome task that Henry, via his brains and expertise, had solved or should I have said, accomplished? Anyhow, Henry could hardly wait to tell me that he had been the go-toguy in sort of a confluence of ideas that were melded into a new position at the factory for finishing some thingamajigs that are now being sent out to

IT MAKES ME

wisdom, is generous with his time and talents and is recognized as having the courage to stand for what he believes in and the determination to see whatever it is through to its conclusion. I guess one thing I’ll give Henry is a great and thankful hug. Maybe, I’ll make him an apron. He gets kind of sloppy when he’s at the grill and slathering a big bratwurst with sauerkraut, mustard and pickle relish. Yes, he munches while he cooks. I hope we can get together again next month. I also look forward to those nice parades be held again this year in honor of our country’s independence.

CRABBY

HERMAN WHITE WRITES Church and Chapel ARTS

the WRIGHT SIDE of

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• We display monuments, caskets, vaults, and urns making Church and Chapel your one stop planning center. • Pre-planning Centers are open Monday through Saturday or by appointment. Stop by and browse at your leisure and receive free no-obligation information. Should you wish, we can meet in the comfort and privacy of your own home. • Dignified Services with less expensive fees compared to other fine funeral homes. • All cremation service options are available utilizing on-site crematory. PRE-PLANNING CENTERS • 92nd & Bluemound • Bluemound Rd @ Hwy J With Church and Chapel Funeral Service... Savings of $2,000 are common

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www.churchandchapel.com Gordon Hinkley is the spokesperson for Church & Chapel and is not a funeral director.


26A • 50plus • June 2013

Retired educators are strong force in state Milwaukee area members of the 15,000-plus strong Wisconsin Retired Educators Association (WREA) recently attended the annual state convention in Stevens Point at which the case for the future of public schools and the welfare of WREA members were the highlights of two days of informational and discussion meetings. Among the items of interest was the revelation that of 150,570 WRS retired employees, over 86 percent of them have remained in Wisconsin. Other states to which many have moved include Florida, 4,099; Minnesota, 2,374; Arizona, 2,335. WRS retirees are said to be living longer. The average life span for males is just under age 81 and, for females, 83-plus years. The average retirement age is 60.5 years. At the time of writing, original WRS annuitants who reached at least the age of 100 numbered 180. JACK NORMAN The convention keynote speak-

er, Jack Norman, a writer and policy analyst in Milwaukee, spoke on “Will your grandchildren’s children attend public schools?” The former research director at the Institute for Wisconsin’s Future, said attendees should be concerned and to get others concerned, too, about privatization and what lies in the future for the K-12 school systems of Wisconsin. He expressed concern over the planned expansion of voucher schools, their curricula and the lack of state supervision of them. PRES. CAROL LAMP. Pres. Carol Lamp said, “We must learn from the past, but continue to move forward.” She expressed the need to increase WREA membership by communicating with new retirees and showing them how WREA’s interests are in their interest. She continued by saying, “As we have learned, you can get whatever you want if you help others get what they want. We need your help

in building our bases in all of our communities.” Lamp also said that at WREA, “We know who we are, what we are and what we stand for. And we know how we can be of help to educators while focusing on good teachers, great public schools and academically achieving students.” Effective October 1, the regular dues will be $50 yearly and lifetime membership will go from $550 to $625. WREA encourages all of us to join in the battle to preserve public education. Pres. Lamp decried the lack of supervision of voucher schools, lack of accountability, truancy therein, growing tax credits, lack of abilities for special needs students. She said that the legislators are more inclined to listen to the parents than to the teachers. Get your parents concerned about the dollars. Dave Bennett just celebrated his first anniversary as executive, and he is very enthused to be working

with retired educators. He says he has come full circle in the education arena. Bennett is a graduate of Miami (Ohio) University where he received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English and Journalism. He also has a Master of Arts Degree in Journalism and a Ph.D. in Education and Mass Communication from the University of Oklahoma. He was a high school English and journalism teacher and coached various sports. Bennett was also an Associate Professor in Journalism at Northern Arizona University. Before coming to WREA. Other work experiences included being executive director for two other statewide associations, newspaper work and starting his own company as a contract lobbyist. He lives in Madison with his wife, Beth, who is Executive Director of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association.

100-year-olds: “I did it my way” By Chris Abbott For a moment, imagine what it would be like to live your life with absolutely no regrets. If this is difficult to envision now, just give it some time – maybe even a few decades. According to new research, many of the longest-living Americans wouldn’t change a thing about how they lived their lives. In May, to celebrate Older Americans Month, UnitedHealthcare released the results of its eighth annual 100@100 survey, which examines the lives and lifestyles of centenarians. Half of the 100-yearolds polled this year said they would not change a single thing about the way they lived their lives. Baby boomers approaching traditional retirement ages weren’t nearly as content with their past. Of the 300 60- to 65-year-olds who were surveyed to provide a comparison to the centenarians, less than one in three said they could look back without wishing they could

make some changes in how they’ve lived. More than a quarter of them said they wish they had saved more money; only six percent of the centenarians said the same. Of course, no one knows exactly what it takes to live to age 100, but with the centenarian population in the United States projected to increase from 53,000 in 2013 to more than 600,000 in 2050 as boomers reach their century milestone, increased attention is being paid to the secrets of our most “senior” seniors. Year after year, the 100@100 survey shows centenarians are not taking their health for granted: Majorities are exercising every week and making healthful choices when it comes to their diet. But this year’s findings put fresh emphasis on the emotional and mental components of health. A senior who can reflect on his or her life without regret has peace in the present, the kind that enhances one’s sense of well being and can make for a more satisfying

life…maybe even a longer one. It is no secret that we can all learn a thing or two about how to attain this peace from the centenarians and other older adults in our lives. And according to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are more than 1,179 centenarians in Wisconsin. If you are lucky enough to know one of them (or someone approaching 100), re-

member to reach out to them. Their perspective may be just the reminder you need of what’s most important for a healthy, happy life. Chris Abbott is the regional vice president of UnitedHealthcare in Milwaukee-Racine. To learn more about the 100@100 survey, visit www.uhc.com/newsroom.

Holy Hill Celebration Holy Hill, 30 miles northwest of downtown Milwaukee, is the highest peak in a glacier chain of hills that rise 1,349 ft. above sea level. The Catholic Church at the top of that hill is dedicated to Mary, Help of Christians. First founded by a Black Robe chief (Indian lore) in the 1600s, Holy Hill, a Marian shrine, was dedicated in 1906 to the care of the Discalced Carmelites and is now known as The Basilica of the National Shrine of Mary Help of Christians at Holy Hill. The 150th anniversary of the friars be-

ing the leaders of worship there was celebrated in late May. The original 40 acres were purchased in 1855 for $50 from the federal government. The first church was a simple log chapel. The church as it stands today, with some renovations since, was constructed beginning in 1926. The dedication of the expansive and impressive upper church was in 1931. Over 3,000,000 people visit Holy Hill annually.


june 2013 • 50plus

We Saw You At 50 Plus Fest Called the Milwaukee area’s largest indoor event for seniors, the 22nd Annual 50 Plus Fest & Retirement Show was again conducted at Center Court in Mayfair Mall. It was sponsored and conducted by 50 Plus News Magazine, in conjunction with VMP (the Village at Manor Park), Mayfair Mall and the Cherry Creek Mortgage Company. Entertainment was also provided by: singer David Skinner and the Rosettes, singer Robin Adkins, the Golden Idols, and the Ambassadors of Harmony. Also featured were Rick Kellow and Gus Gnorski, who spoke on the value of reverse mortgages.

Radio and television personality Gus Gnorski.

Alice and Chipman of Brookfield, with Jim McLoone of Hartland in the middle.

Rosie and Ken Krzykowski of Milwaukee. Mary Lesniak of Greenfield, Shirley Zabler of Milwaukee and Carole Chwala of Greenfield.

The Rosette Dancers and singer David Skinner.

Ken and Arlene Steib of Brookfield.

Richard and Sue Pershon of Pewaukee.

• 27A


28A • 50plus • June 2013


SECTION B • June 2013

“Homer the Brave” EDITORIALS

STATE CAPITOL COMMENT By Matt Pommer

Was part of the good old days TRAVEL

MONEY SENSE

By Karen Ellenbecker & Julie Ellenbecker -Lipsky

MOVING IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION By Bruce Nemovitz

By JackSENIOR Pearson Answer Man The cartoons depicted herewith might beME considered by some to be IT MAKES politically insensitive. We ask their indulgence. The reason for the artwork is that it WHITE is key toWRITES the following story HERMAN about a joyful, albeit forgotten era in local sports. ARTS ENTERTAINMENT Emma

APRON STRINGS By Aunt Emma

AGING ISSUES

By Tom Frazier

PLANTING TOMORROW’S DREAMS TODAY By Brad Olson

CRABBY

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SPORTS Sports Plus

By Jack Pearson By Jack Pearson

the WRIGHT SIDE of By Enis Wright

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KILLING TIME with Jim McLoone

Roger Rex today. In 1953, working in the Milwaukee Sentinel’s advertising department, Rex created the Homer the Brave cartoons. Sixty years ago this spring, the city of Milwaukee and the whole state of Wisconsin had gone wild over the new Milwaukee Braves baseball team. Transplanted here from Boston by its owner, Lou Perini, it was the first Major League franchise to be relocated from one city to another in more than a half century. Coincidentally, the only other move also involved a Milwaukee baseball team. It was in 1901 and the team was called the Brewers

(the same as today’s), and was here for only one season before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, where its name was changed to the Browns. So for 52 long years, quite a long hiatus when you think about it, Milwaukee’s only tie to Major League professional sports was courtesy of the Green Bay Packers, who from the ‘30s into the ‘90s played a couple of football games here annually. The Bucks had not come into being. Thus, when Major League baseball returned here in 1953, it was tumultuously embraced, to the extent that from that year on for several seasons, the Braves led both major leagues in attendance. TV was in its infancy in those days, and games were not televised as they are today. Therefore, the first time fans who were not at the games found out whether the team won or lost or whatever was when they picked up the morning Sentinel and looked at the front page. There it was, every day of the week a small drawing that immediately revealed what happened. The image was of a lively Indian character wearing a feathered headdress, smiling and joyfully waving his arms if the team won, sulking under a black cloud if it had lost, sadly hiding in a teepee if the game had been rained out, and so on. There were more than 20 poses of Homer, for all different circumstances. For example, there were a lot of doubleheaders in those days, and if the Braves won both games, there would be two Homers, both smiling

and happy; if the Braves won the first game and lost the second, the drawing would also be of two Homers, one in a happy pose, the other sad. There were drawings depicting games called because of rain, versions for games called because of cold, and still others when there wasn’t a game scheduled. In those days, sports cartoons were very popular. Virtually every major newspaper in the country utilized the art form. Willard Mullin, the featured cartoonist for both the New York World Telegram and the Sporting News, was the best known of the lot. In Milwaukee, both the Journal and the Sentinel had their own cartoonists, Al Rainovic for the former, Frank Marasco for the latter. Most people who saw the Homer the Brave cartoon characters on Page 1 of the Sentinel assumed they were drawn by Marasco. They were not. They were conceived and drawn by a member of the Sentinel’s advertising department, Roger Rex. All of the Homer the Brave drawings shown here as well as much of the information for this story was provided by Dan Wildt of Greenfield. Wildt, who was all of eight years old when the Braves came to town, was taken to many of the games in Milwaukee by his father, and he quickly became an enthusiastic fan. He also especially liked the Homer drawings, and collected all of them. By the way, Wildt has had a busy career himself. He worked for the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Department for more than 35 years, primarily as the Clerical Supervisor at the County Jail. He also served in the Milwaukee Public Schools system at sporting events, as a timer, as a statistician and as a public address announcer. And finally, he worked as a foreman in parking operations at Milwaukee County Stadium. homer the brave continued on page 22B


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Burlington

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Cudahy

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Delafield

- Hillside Woods I & II: (262) 370-2662

Franklin

- Clare Meadows I & II: (414) 421-8499

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HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious, remodeled one and two bedroom apartments in a park-like setting. No entrance or endowment fee. Community room, guest suite, beauty/barber shop, garden area, social activities and more!

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Milwaukee

- Southeast Clare Heights: (414) 254-8410 - Northwest Granville Heights: (414) 333-4465

Wauwatosa - Cedar Glen: (262) 719-3884

Crestview: (414) 541-3333 High Grove (Ages 62+): (414) 541-3333 Hill Crest: (414) 541-3333 Prairie Hill: (414) 541-3333 White Oaks: (414) 282-1188


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Cedar Glen 1661 River’s Bend, Wauwatosa Contact Person: 3 Suzanne Steiner 262-719-3884

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Cedar Lake Village Homes

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Cedar Landing at Elkhart Lake 101 Cedar Lane, Elkhart Lake Contact Person: Monica Smith 920-876-4050

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Cedar Ridge Apartments 113 Cedar Ridge Drive, 3 West Bend Contact Person: Betty Christen 262-338-2811

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www.cedarcommunity.org Restaurant, country store, activities, wellness nurse, woodwork shop, 2-hole golf course, college courses, business & shipping center all available on site.

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Located on the southern edge of a residential neighborhood, offering income eligible and market rate apartments. The convenient location is near bus lines, neighborhood shopping centers, restaurants and parks.

Clare Heights 717 W. Holt Avenue, Milwaukee Contact Person: Christine Slock

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414-254-8410

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Offers luxurious, income-eligible or market-rate senior apartment homes. Floor plans are available in one or two-bedroom layouts. Located in the peaceful country setting of Franklin.

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Sponsored by the School Sisters of St. Francis; full-time Pastoral Care, Life-Long Learning Courses; short-term rehab services.

Clare Meadows 7700 S. 51st Street, Franklin Contact Person: Beth Nacker

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4B • 50plus • June 2013

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414-421-8499

Clement Manor

Retirement Community 9405 W. Howard Avenue 3 Contact Person: Kim 414-321-1800 www.clementmanor.com

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REad All The news in

50Plus or

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Willow Brook Court Senior Apartments

Check us out online at mymilwaukeelife.com Senior-Only Living in Beautiful Brookfield Ease of living and convenience are yours to enjoy in comfort and quiet. One and two bedroom apartments are available with multiple floorplan options.

We also offer: Burnham Village

Gonzaga Village Sunset Heights West Allis

Waukesha

Cifaldi Square

Oak West

Valentino Square

West Milwaukee Cudahy

West Allis

West Allis

• 24 hr. Emergency Maintenance • Beauty Salon • Library • Movie Theater • Underground Parking • Chapel • Exercise Room• Planned Activities • Pets Welcome (restrictions apply) • Alarm System • Elevators • Laundry Facilities

Call Today

262-780-1000 17285 W. River Birch Dr. Brookfield, WI


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Cottonwood Trails 4600 S. Nicholson Ave., 3 Cudahy Contact Person: Deb Geisler 414-254-8490

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Offers income eligible apartments. Walk-in closets and laundry hook-ups are available. Within the community there is an exercise room, hair salon, media room with internet access, and spacious common area with fireplace.

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414-479-0660

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Contact Person: Brandon Froom

414-541-3333

East Terrrace

801 N. East Ave., Waukesha Contact Person: Renee Hammen 3 262-544-9757

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Offers income eligible apartments. Cottonwood Trails offers a non-smoking environment for those interested in independent living. Located near the bus route, stores, restaurants, and a shopping center.

courtyardseniorapartments.com Quiet-residential, small city living, big city convenience. Affordable and spacious apartment homes. Heat and water included in rent!

Contact Person: Rebekah Steenbock

Crestview of Woodland Ridge 3904 S. Prairie Hill Lane, Greenfield

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Courtyard Senior Apartments 11505 W Greenfield Ave. West Allis

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June 2013 • 50plus

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Beauty salon, free parking, community room, resale shop, library, exercise area, puzzle area. Located in a city setting.

Foxbrook or Capitol Hill Senior Apartments

Rents Start at $670

1 & 2 Bedroom Units Available • 55 & Over • Income Restrictions Apply Free Weekly Shuttle to Shopping and other events (Foxbrook within walking distance to shopping)

Chapel • Underground Parking • Library • Beauty Salon • Exercise, Movie & Game Rooms Voluntary morning check-in system available

For more information and a tour call Monday-Friday, 9:30-4 pm Foxbrook Senior Apartments Capitol Hill Senior Apartments 18915 Thomson Drive, Brookfield

Carolyn 262-790-0033

Enjoy Easy Living at

COURTYARD SENIOR APARTMENTS

Patio

Living Room

offering

Bedroom

Bedroom

• Apartments for persons 55 or Better • Convenient access to Interstate • In a beautiful, quiet, residential neighborhood on bus line • 24-hour on-call maintenance • Air conditioning • Underground parking • Heat & water included in rent.* Professionally Managed by Oakbrook Corporation

*Income Limits May Apply

Closet

Bath Dining

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Closet

414-479-0660

Closet

Closet

11505 W. Greenfield Ave., West Allis

Closet

17390 Crest Hill Drive, Brookfield

Chistine 262-790-1845


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Farmstead Creek Condominiums

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644 Farmstead Court, Slinger Contact Person: Julie Koehler 262-644-4000

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Foresthill Highlands 8930 West Highland Park Ave., Franklin Contact Person: Lori Woodie 414-425-6611 Forest Ridge, a Wimmer Community Senior Residence

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Contact Person: Carolyn & Christine 262-790-0033/262-790-1845

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Bielinski.com Quiet-residential ranch duplex condominiums with full basements. HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments located in a park-like setting. No entrance or endowment fee. Community room, fitness center, library, social activities and more! www.WimmerCommunities.com

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11077 W. Forest Home Ave., Hales Corners Contact Person: Mary Zurowski 414-425-1148

Foxbrook & Capitol Hill Senior Apts

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6B • 50plus • June 2013

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Senior and Assisted Living, dining, in-house MD clinic, transportation to shopping and activities, bank, fitness center, chapel, store, beauty salon, computer center, bank all located in a quiet-residential location.

cwicklund@vkdevelopment.com clundgren@vkdevelopment.com Foxbrook is located in a quiet-residential park-like setting within walking distance to shopping and restaurants. Capitol Hill is a park-like setting and quiet.

a brand new life at

In July 2004, Judy did not think twice about Independent Living at Harbour Village for her new home. Shortly thereafter, Betty, Judy’s mom, moved in to enjoy the good life in Assisted Living. You will rarely find Judy in her apartment, because she’s always on the go, enjoying the things she has always loved–theatre, museums and so much more. Judy loves life because she feels energized, safe and cared for by her new family and friends.

CALL 888-438-3035 TODAY TO LEARN MORE AND SCHEDULE A FREE LUNCH AND TOUR.

Celebrating 25 Years

of Quality Service and Care to Milwaukee Area Seniors Harbour Village

Independent Living Assisted Living | Memory Care 5700 Mockingbird Lane Greendale, WI 53129

www.seniorlifestyle.com


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Apartment homes for seniors 55 and better in a country setting offering a mix of income eligible and market rate homes. Includes heat and water, 24 hour emergency maintenance, a smoke free community, planned monthly activities and much more.

Francis Meadows

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Tenants pay 30% of income for rent. Gas heat and hot water included. On-site management. Building also includes community room. Cable TV available, but not included. City setting.

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Apartment homes for seniors 55 and better in city setting. Includes heat and water, club room for social gatherings, planned monthly activities, deck or patio on all homes, an option for heated underground parking and much more.

Gonzaga Village 1415 S. 92nd St., West Allis 3 Contact Person: Ken Becker 262-240-9406 www.beckerpropertyservices.com

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Granville Heights 6840 W. Granville Circle, Milwaukee

Contact Person: Nichelle Primm

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2209 Browns Lake Dr., Burlington Contact Person: Stan Janowski 262-210-8501 www.horizonseniorhousing.com

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June 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ 50plus

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414-333-4465 www.horizonseniorhousing.com

Greenbrook

4955 S. Greenbrook Terrace Contact Person: Karin Strubel 3 414-282-5020

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Harbour Village 5700 Mockingbird Lane, Greendale

Contact Person: Nancy Verlinde-Meyer

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414-421-9600 www.seniorlifestyle.com

Harvest Pointe Condominiums

856 Sweetbriar, Elkhorn Contact Person: Jeff Petersen 262-743-1340 Bielinski.com

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Heritage Lake Apartments are located in a park-like setting.

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Offering luxurious market rate apartments for adults 62 & better. Apartments range from 707 sf. to 1310 sf. Located in Greenfield, on the maturely wooded campus of Woodland Ridge.

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High Grove of Woodland Ridge 3940 S. Prairie Hill Lane, 3 Greenfield Contact Person: Brandon Froom

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414-541-3333

Highlands at Riverwalk 10954 N. Cedarburg Rd., Mequon 262-243-8888 www.HighlandsCommunities.com

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Additional amenities offered are 24hour emergency response, concierge services, wellness center, convenience store and coffee shop. The monthly fee includes a flexible meal program, weekly housekeeping, transportation services, appliances and all utilities.

Quiet-residential ranch duplex condominiums with full basements.

Heritage Lake Apartments

5020 South 55th Street, Greenfield Contact Person: Ruby Thiel 414-282-0506

Greenbrook is located in a park-like setting.

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Opening August 2013. Kitchens feature granite countertops, stainless steel appliances and plank flooring. Other on-site amenities include a guest suite, library, media room, sunroom and walking path located in a park-like setting.


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Highlands at Wildwood Lake

N77 W17700 Lake Park Dr., Menomonee Falls Contact Person: Kelly Duncan 262-251-9999

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8B â&#x20AC;˘ 50plus â&#x20AC;˘ June 2013

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Hill Crest

3993 S. Prairie Hill Lane, Greenfield 3 Contact Person: Brandon Froom 414-541-3333 www.horizonseniorhousing.com

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HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments, located in a part-like setting. No entrance or endowment fee. Community room, guest suite, fitness center, beauty/barber shop, social activities and more! Apartment homes for those 55 and better in park-like setting. Includes heat and water, community room for social gatherings, planned monthly activities, 24 hour emergency maintenance, smoke free community and much more.

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Quiet residential setting.

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Quiet residential setting.

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Apartments with Lake View Balconies, 24 hr. staff, housekeeping, linen service, recreation and professional entertainment, meal service, assisted living also available. Park-like setting.

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Marquette Manor is located in a quiet-residential city setting. Heat and storage included with rent.

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Amenities such as underground heated parking, community room, computer room, chapel, workout room, gazebo, scenic pathway, patio/balcony, in-unit washer/dryer and spacious living areas all in a quiet-residential neighborhood.

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HighlandsCommunities.com Spacious one and two bedroom apartments and townhomes located in a quiet-residential setting. No entrance or endowment fee. Community room, fitness center, library, social activities and more!

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We offer professional site manager, inside mailboxes, elevator, clubroom with activities, beauty and barber shop, media room, chapel, van for shopping, smoke-free and meal program.

Hillside Woods I 3280 Hillside Dr., Delafield Contact Person: Tori Bean 262-370-2662

Hillside Woods II

3270 Hillside Dr., Delafield Contact Person: Tori Bean 262-370-2662 Jackson Crossings

Retirement Community N168 W22022 Main St., Jackson 3 Contact Person: Amy Lloyd 262-993-2838

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Marquette Manor 2409 10th Ave. South Milwaukee, WI 53172 Contact Person: Candace 414-764-7997

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Meetinghouse 10901 W. Donna Dr., Milwaukee

Contact Person: Lisa Storheim

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414-357-8596

www.meetinghousemilwaukee.com

Parkwood Highlands

13800 Park Central Blvd., New Berlin Contact Person: Julie Mattes 262-821-5106

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Prairie Hill of Woodland Ridge

3953 S. Prairie Hill Lane, 3 Greenfield Contact Person: Brandon Froom 414-541-3333

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June 2013 • 50plus

• 9B

Affordable Housing for

Ten years ago I said I’d never move to a senior community.

55+ and 62+

Pay only 30% of gross income in rent! One-bedroom apartments located in Milwaukee, Butler and Racine

I lied. “They say when you get older you get wiser and, well, I guess I wised up. Between the lawn, the repairs, my friends and neighbors moving away … the idea of staying in that house the rest of my life lost its appeal. I decided Cedar Ridge might be worth checking out. I got to choose my own décor, have plenty of room, met so many interesting people who share my interests. Now I’m free to enjoy my retirement years.

Call Reilly-Joseph Company today for an Application

414-271-4116

“It’s OK to change your mind! I’m glad I did.”

e 2013 -13

Ask about immediate openings

Call 262.338.8377 to schedule a visit or receive VIP event invitations. Independent living for adults age 55 and better.

cedarcommunity.org

Hometown Senior Living at a Great Value in Hales Corners! From just $910 per month! Assisted Living starting at $2,460 per month.

Let us give you a one-on-one tour of our beautiful campus & private apartments.

TAKE ADVANTAGE  OF  OUR  SPRING  RENT  SPECIAL:                           For  a  limited  time  only,  sign  a  12  month  lease  and  receive:

ONE MONTH  FREE  RENT!* at  our  Brookfield  location

*On select  units.    Some  apartments  reserved  for  moderate  income  seniors  at  select  locations

UÊ iiÌʜÕÀÊÀiÈ`i˜ÌÃÊEÊÃÌ>vvÊ UÊ ˜œÞÊ̅iÊœÀiÃÌÊ,ˆ`}iÊ UÊ Àˆ˜}ÊޜÕÀÊv>“ˆÞÊ>˜`ÊvÀˆi˜`à iÝ«iÀˆi˜ViÊEʈÌÃʓ>˜ÞÊ>“i˜ˆÌˆià UÊ …œœÃiʈ˜`i«i˜`i˜ÌʜÀÊ UÊ ˆ˜ˆ˜}ÊEʅœÕÃiŽii«ˆ˜}ÊÃiÀۈViÃÊ >ÃÈÃÌi`ʏˆÛˆ˜}ʜ«Ìˆœ˜Ã œvviÀi`

Personal Tours Daily

Monday - FridayÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊn\ääʇÊ{\ääÊ Saturday & SundayÊ££\ääʇÊ{\ääÊ Or by appointment

Brookfield  |  262-798-9898        Franklin  |    414-425-6611 Menomonee  Falls    262-251-9000  and  262-251-9999 New  Berlin  |    262-821-5106 MEQUON  OPENING  IN  AUGUST  2013     262-243-8888

11077 W. Forest Home Ave., Hales Corners (414) 425-1148 www.WimmerCommunities.com


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10B • 50plus • June 2013

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The Regency 200 Southtowne Dr., South Milwaukee Contact Person: Ruby Thiel 414-764-5335

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Regency Brookfield Senior Living Community 777 N Brookfield Rd., Brookfield Contact person: Terry Sommers 262-780-0321

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Regency-Brookfield, situated on a 23-acre conservancy, park-like setting, offers a range of health and lifestyle activities for today’s senior. Nine different floor plans, includes underground parking, scheduled transportation and an optional dining program make Regency a great place to live! For information, contact Terry.Sommers@phci.org.

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55 and above community with continuum of care located in a beautiful park-like setting. Private lake with patios and balconies. Clubhouse with many extras. Close to shopping with free transportation.

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Regency-New Berlin offers health & fitness areas, a computer lab, mini-market, plus numerous recreational and leisure programs every month, with access to select health services. Affordable chef-prepared meals are also available. Located in a city setting.

www.RegencySeniorCommunities.com

Regency Muskego Senior Living Community W181 S8540 Lodge Blvd., Muskego

Contact Person: Judy Sorce 262-679-0888

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www.RegencySeniorCommunities.com

Regency New Berlin Senior Living Community 13750 W. National Ave., New Berlin Contact Person: Arleen Houssaye

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262-789-1699

www.RegencySeniorCommunities.com

Steeple View Deluxe Apartment Homes For Seniors 55 & Better 12455 W. Janesville Road New Berlin, WI 414.525.5500  www.steepleview.org Office hours: Monday – Friday: 8:00 am - Noon Secure, Carefree Independent Living for Active Seniors in a Supportive Christian Atmosphere Spacious 1, 2 and 2 bedroom plus den apartments homes  Heated Parking/Car Wash  In-Unit Washer/Dryer

 Individual Heat & A/C  Generous Closet Space

OPEN HOUSE

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June 7 & 8 (10 am – 3:00 pm) Please call 414.525.5500 or email info@steepleview.org to reserve your tour time

RIDGEDALE Quiet Senior Community 7740 W. Grange Ave. Greendale, WI 62 & Older Don’t Delay, Call Today

(414) 421-9314

• Affordable Income Based Rent • Great Floor Plans • Attractive 1 Bedroom • Heat Included • Picturesque Setting • Appliances/Microwave • Elevator & Laundry Facilities • Convenient to Shopping

The Regency is located in a park-like setting.

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u? Are Y•o62+ • Make less than $25,350 a year? • Enjoy Bingo, Movies, Parties? • Want to spend your day playing cards or going on day trips? Plus, on site Hair Salon & Garden Plot for the “Green Thumb” If these sound like things you enjoy then your new home is waiting...

Call today for more information: GREENBROOK APTS

414.282.5020

4955 S. Greenbrook Terrace Greenfield, WI 53220


June 2013 • 50plus

• 11B

Here’s what our residents have to say about life at Regency! “We even have our own sports pub here at Regency. We’ll get ‘em next year, green and gold!” - Rudy

“I get all the help I need at Regency. Now I can just enjoy my daughter’s company.” - Betty Jean

“I do my painting out in the atrium. The light is perfect and I can chat with my neighbors.” - Dorothy

 REGENCY BROOKFIELD

777 N. Brookfield Rd.

REGENCY MUSKEGO

3.5 mi. S of I-43 on Racine Ave.

REGENCY NEW BERLIN

13750 W. National Ave.

262-780-0321 262-789-1699 262-679-0888 RegencySeniorCommunities.com


12B • 50plus • June 2013

Alta Mira II Senior Apartments Courtyard square

Bay pointe Condominiums

Brookfield Highlands LLC

Breezewood Village

Cedar Landing at Elkhart Lake

Clare Meadows

Clement Manor Retirement Community

Cottonwood Trails

Clare Heights Crestview


June 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ 50plus

Granville Heights

East Terrace

Foxbrook & Capitol Hill Senior Apts

Harvest Pointe condominiums

Farmstead Creek condominiums The Silvernail

Francis Meadows Harbour Village

Forest Ridge a wimmer community senior residence

Heritage Lake

â&#x20AC;˘ 13B


14B â&#x20AC;˘ 50plus â&#x20AC;˘ June 2013

High Grove of Woodland Ridge

The Highlands at Wildwood Lake

Hillside Woods I

Hillside Woods II

Marquette Manor Living Communities

The Meetinghouse

The Regency

Regency Senior Communities New Berlin

The Centennial

Jackson Crossings Retirement Community

Prairie Hill of Woodland Ridge

Regency Senior Communities - Regency Senior Communities Muskego Brookfield

River Shores

Riverfront Condominiums


June 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ 50plus

Sunrise Village Senior Living Community

Steepleview

San Camillo

Thompson Meadows

VMP Manor Park

VMP Trinity

Villas at the Station White Oaks

Woodfield condominiums

Willow brook court

â&#x20AC;˘ 15B


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Ridgedale Apartments 7740 West Grange Ave., 3 Greendale, WI 53129

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Milwaukee, Wauwatosa, Butler, Racine 414-271-4116

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16B • 50plus • June 2013

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Several different locations in quiet, residential city settings. Affordable 1-BR for 55+ and 62+. Rent based on 30% of gross income. Laundry & on-site management. Ask about immediate openings.

Ridgedale Apartments is located in a park-like setting.

Contact Person: Sarah Timmerman

414-421-9314

Riverfront Condominiums

at River’s Crossing 2724 Portage Circle, Waukesha Contact Person: Jackie Johnson 262-650-9917 Bielinski.com

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Find You New Home At . . .

Marquette Manor 62 and better community!

All units include Heat, Water, Sewer, Trash and much more!!!

2 Bedroom Units Available Located conveniently in South Milwaukee

2409 10th Ave.

Call Today!

414-764-7055 Professionally Managed by Oakbrook Corporation

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Quiet-residential ranch duplex condominium featuring sunroom, covered outdoor living area and full basement.


Rivershores Regency

555 Veterans Ave., West Bend 3 Contact Person: Dave 262-483-9150

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Rivershores Regency is in a quiet-residential setting. Beautiful community room, w/full kitchen and planned activities, laundry in each unit, salon, library, game room, 2 br/2 bath available.

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San Camillo is located across the street from the Milwaukee County Zoo in a quiet-residential city setting. Residents have the security of continuum of care St. Camillus offers.

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On site chapel, beauty/ barbershop, bank, car wash, all appliances included, heated underground parking, building security.

San Camillo

10200 W. Blue Mound Rd. Wauwatosa, WI 53226 Contact Person: Catrina Keane 414-259-6310 www.stcam.com

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Steeple View

12455 W. Janesville Rd., Muskego Contact Person: Ron Spear 414-525-5500 www.steepleview.org

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Sunrise Village 2500 10th Ave South Milwaukee, WI 53172 Contact Person: Candace 414-764-7997

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â&#x20AC;˘ 17B

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Thompson Meadows

3120 E. Norwich Ave. 3 St. Francis, WI 53235 Contact Person: Sheila Crabb 414-769-9240

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Sunrise Village is located in a quiet-residential city setting. Heat & storage included with rent.

Quiet-residential setting. Community room, library, game room, garden area, 24 hour maintenance, elevator, resident activities.

Villas at the Station 8935 S. Wood Creek Dr. Oak Creek, WI 53154 Contact Person: Audrey Miller 414-788-0242

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On-site senior center, medical clinic, rehab center, chapel, bank, beauty shop/barber, transportation, wellness center, library, emergency response system, on-site store, and gardening. Quiet-residential city setting.

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Activity room, bank, beauty shop & barber, emergency response, library, on-site store, medical clinic, rehab center, chapel, transportation, wellness center, housekeeping. Quiet-residential park-like setting.

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Apartment homes for seniors 55 and better in quiet-residential park-like setting featuring a community room for social gathering, 24 hour emergency maintenance, heat and water included, deck or patio on all homes and an option for heated underground parking.

VMP Manor Park Wesley Park 8621 W. Beloit Road, Milwaukee 3 Contact Person: Tamara 414-607-4322 www.vmpcares.com

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VMP Trinity

7300 W. Dean Road, Milwaukee Contact Person: Peggy 414-371-7316 www.vmpcares.com

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White Oaks 4200 South 35th St., Greenfield Contact Person: Macy Anderson 3 414-282-1188 www.horizonseniorhousing.com

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Villas at the Station is located in a quiet-residential setting.


18B • 50plus • June 2013

N168 W22022 Main Street Jackson, WI 53037 www.jacksoncrossings.com

Retirement Community • Independent Apartments • Assisted Living • Memory Care

(262) 993-2838 Hwy 45 North to Hwy 60 East Exit

Call for a tour of our beautiful Assisted Living apartments on the lake Enjoy Lakeshore Living Only Minutes From Milwaukee

HERITAGE LAKE

THE REGENCY

HERITAGE LAKE

5020 South 55th Street • Greenfield • Call 414-282-0506 Beautiful serene country setting overlooking a private lake. Close to shopping, churches and medical facilities. Heated underground parking, blinds and ceiling fan. Beautiful community room. • Heat & Water Included • Air Conditioned • Intercom Access • Appliances • Community Room with Kitchen • On Bus Line starting at • Laundry on each Floor

2 Bedroom, 2 Bath 930 Sq. Ft. $870 / month

THE REGENCY

200 Southtowne Dr. • South Milwaukee • Call 414-764-5335 Quiet spacious apartments, elevator, underground parking, community room, library and exercise room. Friendly atmosphere. Larger units available. • Heat & Water Included 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath • Air Conditioned • Fitness Center 930 Sq. Ft. • Resident Library • Laundry on each floor starting at $870 / month • Quality Appliances • On Bus Line

Enjoy the quiet residential neighborhood and make it your new home.

We Offer Offer:: • Air Conditioning • Secured Entrance • Cable TV hook-ups • Exercise Room • Pets Welcome • Garages available • Parkside is handicap accessible

• Convenient access to Interstate • Close to shopping and more • 1 & 2 Bedrooms • On Site Management • Heat & Water Included

Call Today for More Information

414-352-1237

PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY OAKBROOK CORPORATION


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Spacious one and two bedroom apartments and townhomes in a park-like setting. No entrance or endowment fee. Community room, fitness center, beauty/barber shop, social activities and more!

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Park like setting, close to churches and theater. On site 24/hour staff, activities director, billiards room, elevators, movie theater, chapel, onsite senior cab available and guest suite.

Wildwood Highlands 3

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Willow Brook Court 17285 W. River Birch Dr., 3 Brookfield Contact Person: Patti Bednarski 262-780-1000

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Woodfield Condominiums 499 Woodfield Circle, Waterford Contact Person: Michelle LaPorte 262-514-3955 Bielinski.com

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Quiet-residential ranch duplex condominiums with full basements.

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Centennial / Silvernail Oak Creek and Pewaukee Teri Zeise 414-762-7762 www.wimmercommunities.com

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Condominium

N78 W17445 Wildwood Dr., Menomonee Falls Contact Person: Joyce Block 262-251-9000 HighlandsCommunities.com

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Quiet-Residential. Your rent includes underground parking & laundry. Other ammenities: transportation for shopping, salon, chapel, on-site bank, country store and many activities & wellness programs.

Exceptional Living For those 55 and better Affordable independent living with amenities to enhance a comfortable & secure lifestyle. L Prime Locations L Free Transportation to Grocery Stores L Free Underground Parking L Free Laundry L Social & Recreational Activities L On-Site Banking L Salon L Chapel L Craft Center L Fitness Center L Pet Friendly L Smoke-Free

one month free!* * or Discoun

ted rents on select units. Move-in by 7-1-13

wimmercommunities.com *Income restrictions may apply


20B • 50plus • June 2013

Connecting Aging Veterans To Their Benefits The Milwaukee  County’s  Veteran  Services  Office   and the Department on Aging delivering benefits to veterans and surviving spouses of veterans

Monday, June 24, 2013 9:00am - 1:00pm

Milwaukee County War Memorial Center Special Welcome and Benefits Presentation at 9:00am & 11:00am Gain awareness of the benefits you are eligible for Ask questions about your benefits On-site benefit and pension registration Additional information and registration about community services will be provided (foodshare, energy assistance, home repair, and legal action) Free Refreshments Please pre-register by calling (414)289-6640 or by email agingevents@milwcnty.com

Promotional support provided by: AARP and 50 Plus Newsmagazine Free parking available in the O’Donnell Parking Structure and in the lot north of the Milwaukee County War Memorial Center (750 N. Lincoln Memorial Drive) Milwaukee County Department on Aging 1220 W. Vliet Street , Milwaukee WI, 414-289-5973 www.county.milwaukee.gov/aging Milwaukee County Veterans Services Office, 6419 W. Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, WI http://county.milwaukee.gov/ VeteransAffairs7757.htm, 414-266-1235


HERMAN WHITE WRITES June 2013 • 50plus

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June 1 & 2 Free Fishing Weekend Fish anywhere in Wisconsin without a license or trout stamp, By Enis this includes allWright inland waters on Wisconsin’s side of the Great Lakes and Mississippi River. Fishwith ing rules apply, limits on number and size of fish and more. Visit dnr.wi.gov/topic/fishing for more information.

the WRIGHT SIDE of

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June 2 Summer Arts Series Carroll University The Plaza, Waukesha Children’s Choir of Waukesha, 5 p.m. Event is free and open to the public. For more events visit: http://www.carrollu.edu/events/ summerartseries.asp. June 4

Music by Nightingales at Jackson

Crossings Retirement Community N168 W22026 Main St., Jackson Event is open to the public and free of charge, (Lakeshore building) 6 p.m. For details call (262) 677-8864. June 5 Badgerland Water Ski Show Frame Park, Waukesha Free show every Wednesday 7 p.m. through Labor Day. June 6

Jazz in the Park

Cathedral Square Park Enjoy free music from 6– 9 p.m. each Thursday in June. For more information visit easttown.com. June 6 – 13 Downtown Dining Week Be sure to visit at least one of the restaurants in the area and try something new! For listings visit www.milwaukeedowntown.com/

June 6 Pewaukee Lake Water Ski Show Lakefront Park, Pewaukee Free weekly event starting at 6:45, Jim McLoone weather permitting. Visit plwsc. org for more details. June 7 – 9 Cedar Valley Hosts Watercolor Workshop 5249 County Rd. D, West Bend Learn how to layer your washes, creating contrast and increase your understanding of the essentials of values, color and composition. Limited space; call (262) 6299202 for price and registration. Visit cedar-valley.org for more activities for the public. June 8 – 9 Maxwell Street Days Mukwonago Field Park Hwy 83 & NN, Mukwonago Free admission with parking available in field across Hwy NN for easy access to the event, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily. Call (262) 363-1501 for details. June 12 – July 7 Wicked Marcus Center for the Performing Arts Back by “Popular” demand, one of Broadway’s biggest blockbuster’s Marcus Center Box Office, (414) 273-7206. June 12 Wednesday Live Concert Series State Fair Park Budweiser Pavilion 640 S. 84th St., West Allis Free concert series this summer featuring some of the top bands in the Milwaukee area. Indoor

and outdoor seating with music starting at 6:30. Parking fee on grounds. June 12 Music by Alan Graveen, Elvis Impersonator Jackson Crossings Retirement Community N168 W22026 Main St., Jackson Event is open to the public and free of charge, (Lakeshore building) 6 p.m. For more, call (262) 677-8864. June 15 Treasures of OZ 2013 Tour Forest Beach Migratory Preserve 4970 Country Club Rd., Belgium Visit treasuresofoz.org and download your event passport to 8 different locations throughout Ozaukee County. Event is free and open to the public. For details, call (262) 375-2070. June 16 Wishing all Father’s a Great Day! June 16 Milwaukee County Zoo Dads get in free on their day! For information, call (414) 771-3040. Parking fee remains. June 16 – 17 Pioneer Village Open House 4880 County Hwy I, Saukville Free admission days, 12- 5 p.m. Take a tour of 24 historic structures, see heritage demonstrations and enjoy the Ice Cream Social. For details, call (262) 377-4510. June 21 – 23 Fiesta Waukesha Frame Park, Waukesha The festival is free to the public and offers entertainment, Latin American cuisine, amusement rides, children’s area and much more. Friday 4 – 11 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. – 10 p.m.

• 21B

June 21 – 22 Annual Lake Country Clean Water Festival Pewaukee Lake Front Food, music, education, fishing clinic, pontoon rides and more. For more details visit: http:// cleanwaterfestival.com/pages/activities.html. June 22 - 23 Cedarburg Strawberry Festival Festival in downtown Cedarburg from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Sunday. Enjoy live music, unique shopping, contests, children’s activities, demonstrations and much more. June 29 Music by Randy Roeder at Jackson Crossings Retirement Community N168 W22026 Main St., Jackson Event is open to the public and free of charge, (Lakeshore building) 6 p.m. For details, (262) 6778864. Future Events August 1 – 11 Wisconsin State Fair Save 50% now through June 30 on State Fair deals, visit wistatefair. com. Buy $5 State Fair admission at all Wisconsin Bank Mutual Bank Offices, participating Wisconsin Sentry Food (vouchers right at check out), WIStateFair. com (service fee applies) or at Fair Ticket Office, 7722 W. Greenfield Ave. Summer Ongoing Events June 2, 9 and 23 Summer Art Series Carroll University At 5 p.m. – outdoors, at The Plaza, and June 23, main lawn, bring blankets, picnic baskets and non-alcoholic beverages. Free and open to the public. Visit: http// www.carrollu.edu/events/summerartsseries.asp for changes and latest information.


22B • 50plus • June 2013 homer the brave continued from page 1B about the Braves. He said that the

One day, Wildt saw a story in the Sentinel about Homer that said its creator was Rex. “That’s when I discovered who the Homer artist was,” Wildt said. “But oddly enough, I didn’t manage to get in touch with him until many years later, in the fall of 2010, in fact. I learned he had retired and had moved to Sarasota, Florida. It was then that I obtained his address and wrote to him.” Rex wrote back to Wildt, thanking him for his interest and explained a bit of how the drawings had come into being. He recalled that it had been early in the ’53 season, and how virtually everyone was talking

Sentinel’s advertising art department then consisted of four copywriters and four artists, of which he was one. One of the copywriters, a lady named Gretchen Greiner, had previously worked in Cleveland, Ohio, for a paper known as the Plain Dealer. “She told me about a cartoon character the newspaper had used involving the Cleveland Indians baseball team,” Rex said. “We discussed it and thought the same concept could be used here. I drew a few sketches and took them to the promotion manager, Andy Hertel, who, in turn, took them to the Sentinel’s publisher, Frank Taylor. He liked them so much he ordered

1

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that they be used on the front page, which was very unusual in that Page 1 was sacrosanct and never used for promotion. The reason was the Sentinel had a high percentage of street box sales then, and the thought was to quickly illustrate whether the Braves had won or lost right on the front page so that it would generate a purchase by the viewer to read the whole story inside.” Rex actually drew more than 30 versions of the Homer the Brave cartoons, only a few of which are seen here, in just one day. From that point on, little input from him was necessary, as the drawings were used over and over again. “The only time I had to draw a new one was for special occasions, such as when the team won several games in a row or were playing in the World Series,” Rex said. Three years after Homer’s debut, Rex left the Sentinel to go into advertising agency work. He was the Milwaukee Art Studio doing graphic design for a few years, and then was given an offer to become the art director for DCI Marketing, a nationally known advertising company. He was with them for 28 years, eventually becoming its creative director

and finally, in 1984, its president and CEO. He retired in 1987 and moved to Sarasota, Florida. Since then, he and his wife, Mary, have returned to Wisconsin every summer to spend time in Door County. As for the Homer the Brave era, it was only 12 years after coming here that the Braves team pulled up anchor again and departed for Atlanta. That was in 1965, and of course, little Homer disappeared from view. Other things were changing, too. After a few more years, the Sentinel also disappeared, as it was purchased by the Milwaukee Journal (they called it a merger). And across America, throughout the newspaper industry, it was determined that cartoon art on sport pages was passé. Time marches on, and sometimes it stumbles.

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June 2013 • 50plus

Services Offered United Seniors of Wisconsin

Play Bingo Every Day! Doors Open at 7:30 am & 4:30 pm Morning Sessions: 9:30 & 11:00 am Evening Sessions: 6:30 & 8:00 pm

U P TO $2500 IN P RIZE S !!!

414-321-0220

4515 W. Forest Home Ave. Greenfield www.unitedseniorsofwisconsin.org

SENIOR HANDYMAN,

licensed, fully insured, needs work; carpentry, painting, porches, glass block windows, vinyl replacement windows, gutters, tiling, siding, kitchens, baths, cabinets, drain cleaning, window & gutter cleaning. Reasonable, reliable. No job too small. Senior discounts available.

(262) 784-7940

Cash Paid

Junk C ars Running or Not 7-day Service FREE pickup

414-394-3116

• Antiques & Collectibles • Gold & Silver • Watches • Musical Instruments • Lamps/Lighting • Advertising Signs

Top Cash Paid!! If you don’t wear it. . . . We buy it.

• Antique Jewelry • Pocket & Wrist Watches • Plastic Pins • Costume Jewelry • Diamonds • Scrap Gold • Cameo’s • Rhinestones • Stick Pins • Estate Jewelry • Cufflinks

Look through your jewelry today.

414-546-1818

• Costume Jewelry • War Relics • Swords & Knives • Dolls • Coin Operated Machines • Railroad items

WE BUY HOUSES $$ CALL NOW! 414-241-8062

• Clocks • Cameras • Tobacco Items • Figurines • Pottery • Gas & Oil Items • Stoneware

• Beer Items • Vases • Old Toys • Electronics • Tools • Collections • Entire Estates

CA$H PAID • TOP PRICES

Autos • Trucks • Vans Serving 4 County Area Prompt Courteous Service Pickup 7 days/wk Tow / Flat Bed Service Call Don

414-305-3341

Wanted to Buy Antiques & Collectibles

Attic to basement & garage. Jewelry, pottery, crocks, old kitchen items, old toys including tin & steel cars & trucks. Advertising items, tins & signs, old fishing lures, old wood working tools & planes, old gas station signs & automotive items.

Call Frank or Karen

262-251-6545

262-443-6009

• 23B


24B • 50plus • June 2013

Seniorfest 2013

50 Plus News Magazine  
50 Plus News Magazine  

June 2013 Issue

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