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T exas W ater U tilities

JOURNAL

VOLUME 27

JULY 2017

"Proudly Serving Education Excellence since 1918"

NUMBER 7


Ext. 306

2017

May 8th  –  11th  

Central West  Texas  Regional  School   Abilene  

Kenny Hutchins   (325) 676-­‐6429

Mickey Chaney   (325) 548-­‐2237

May 15th  –  18th  

North Central  Texas  Regional  School   Arlington    

Charly Angadicheril   (817) 392-­‐8299

Jon Mahoney   (979) 721-­‐2261

June 13th  –  15th  

Central Texas  Regional  School   Killeen    

(254) 750-­‐8495

Date

Event

Primary Contact  

Peggy Smith   (830) 598-­‐2424 Ext.   309 Contact   Exhibits  

th th July 24th  –7  2th6-­‐9     February  

Southwest Texas   Regional  School   Far  West  Texas   Region   Laredo   Ft.  Stockton    

Tony Moreno   Norma   Clark   (956) (432) 795-­‐2620 528-­‐1608

Lynn Short   Norma   Clark   (361) (432) 485-­‐3381 528-­‐1608

August 1st2  –6  3thrd  –     February   Mar.  1st    

Permian Basin  R egional  School   TWUA  Annual   School   Odessa   Corpus    Christi  

Norma lark     David  MCoore   (432) 528-­‐1608 512-279-8125  

Norma Norma  CClark   lark   (432) (432) 528-­‐1608 528-1608

th st August Texas  RRegional   March  2218st-­‐    –2  33rd1     East   Panhandle   egional  SSchool   chool   Tyler   Amarillo  

Mike orris   Cindy  NM oss   (903) 939-­‐8278 (806) 378-­‐3019

Mike Norris   Ruben   Arias   (903) (806  6939-­‐8278 74-­‐4834  

th November –     April   24th  –6  27  th th 9    

Matt Kerley   Patrick   Walters   (806) 775-­‐2624 (979) 248-­‐7012

Bill Boyd   Patrick   Gray   (806) 775-­‐3415 (713) 637-­‐8835

Kenny Hutchins   (325) 676-­‐6429

Mickey Chaney   (325) 548-­‐2237

March 4th ­— 7th May 8th  –  11th  

May 15th  –  18th  

UPCOMING TWUA REGIONAL SCHOOL Charlotte Doran  

West Texas  TRexas   egional   School   Southeast   Regional   School   Lubbock   Beaumont   TWUA Annual School - 100th Year Anniversary Corpus Christi Central   West  Texas  Regional  School  

Abilene

North Central  Texas  Regional  School   Charly  Angadicheril   ***** NOTICE ***** Arlington     (817) 392-­‐8299

Ext. 306

Jon Mahoney   (979) 721-­‐2261

Texas Water Utilities Association

June 13th  –  15th  

Central Texas   Regional   School   Charlotte  DSchool oran   Peggy  Smith   62nd Annual East Texas Regional Killeen     August 27th thru August (254) 750-­‐8495 (830) 598-­‐2424 31st , 2017 Ext.  309 Harvey Convention Center, 2000 W. Front St., Tyler, Texas

MARCHT1, 2017 – WATER July 2EFFECTIVE 4th  –  26th   Southwest   exas   Regional   School  & WASTEWATER Tony  Moreno   OCCUPATIONAL Lynn  Short   LICENSE APPLICATIONS HAVE TO BE PRE-APPROVED BEFORE YOU Laredo   (956) 795-­‐2620 (361) 485-­‐3381 CAN CHALLENGE A STATE OPERATOR EXAM. YOU MUST COMPLETE AND SUBMIT AN ELECTRONIC APPLICATION TO TCEQ AT LEAST 60 August  1st  –  3rd   Permian  Basin  Regional  School   Norma  Clark   Norma  Clark   DAYS PRIOR TO EXAM OR TEST DATE. Odessa    

(432) 528-­‐1608

(432) 528-­‐1608

IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO TAKE A TEST AT THE EAST TEXAS August 28th  –  31st   East   Texas  Regional   School  YOU MUST Mike   Norris   Mike  SUBMIT Norris   REGIONAL SCHOOL (TYLER) COMPLETE AND Tyler   (903) 6, 939-­‐8278 (903) 939-­‐8278 AN APPLICATION TO TCEQ BEFORE JULY 2017. November  6th  –   HTTP://WWW.TCEQ.TEXAS.GOV/LICENSING/EAPP West  Texas  Regional  School   Matt  Kerley   Bill  Boyd   9th     Lubbock   (806) 775-­‐2624 (806) 775-­‐3415

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July 2017


In This Edition: President Message...............................4

TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL (ISSN 1051-709X) is published monthly by the Texas Water Utilities Association, located at 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West, Austin, Texas 78723-1093, for engineers, operators, managers, laboratory technicians, customer service personnel, and other professionals employed in, or interested in, the water and/or wastewater industry.

In our industry we have a huge responsibility to the public to deliver quality drinking water for public consumption.

In The News .......................................10

Five dollars of each annual membership dues payment to the Texas Water Utilities Association pays for a subscription. Non-Member subscription price: USA $50 per year; $4.20 per single copy; $60 per year outside USA. Periodicals Postage Paid at Austin, TX.

Vince Lombardi’s secret? An overwhelming desperation to prove his value.

Field News...........................................20

The Texas Water Utilities Association is wholly independent, and is not affiliated with the American Water Works Association, the Water Environment Federation, or any other National organization. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W., Austin, TX 78723-1093. TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is not responsible for facts and/or opinions expressed by contributors or in advertisements herein. Editorials and comments do not necessarily represent the official policy of the Texas Water Utilities Association. All inquiries should be directed to: Texas Water Utilities Association, 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 W, Austin, TX 78723-1093, phone 512/459-3124. Any material accepted for publication is subject to revision and editing at the discretion of the publisher.

NCRS

ADVERTISERS: Classified Ads..................................................................................... 30 American Flow Control........................................................................ 25 Ana-Lab............................................................................................. 19 Data Flow Systems............................................................................... 8 OEI................................................................................................... 19 Global Treat......................................................................................... 7 Hartwell Environmental Corporation....................................................... 5 LCRA................................................................................................. 19

All advertising in the TEXAS WATER UTILITIES JOURNAL is subject to approval of the publisher. Learn more about T.W.U.A. at our Web site: www.twua.org

Samco Leak Detection.......................................................................... 9

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE:

Smith Pump Company, Inc............................................ Inside Back Cover

Donny Carrasco - Chair of Management Chad Jameson - President George Glispin - President Elect John Krause - Vice President Allen Schreiber - Second Past President Jim McCain - Ex Officio Russell Hamilton - Executive Director

_______________________________

Scoop.................................................................................................. 9 Underwater Services, LLC..................................................................... 9 Magna Flow...........................................................................Back Cover

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES: TWUA Training Schedule......................................................... 16

Front Cover Photo Courtesy of: Gonzales, Texas July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 3


President’s Message

by Chad Jameson As I travel through our great state of Texas from Regional School to Regional School, I’m amazed at the amount of dedication of all the volunteers that make our schools possible and run so smoothly. I’ve enjoyed my visit at every school. Knowing that I’m just one person in the big picture the school has made it so easy for me to show up and take care of my duties care free. If you think it’s easy to put on any one of these schools think again, but they make it look easy. The school you attended is the result of a year-long planning effort from individuals that also have a full-time job. So I want to thank every board member, speaker, teacher, exhibitor and the folks responsible for meals and entertainment that is provided at the schools. Most of the schools range from 200 to 500 students, not including the vendors and volunteers. To see everything at these events run so smoothly is a great sight to see. I’ve had a chance to sit in on most of the classes. I am amazed at how much knowledge our instructors have, and of their willingness to often stay after hours and help out a student who needs help on that one math question. Instructors have a passion to make sure that every student gets the proper information needed to advance their career and license. The instructors have gone through hours of training to on their own just to become an instructor. They weren’t paid to do this, they just wanted to help others by sharing their immense knowledge in their field. Please take the time to thank your instructors for their time and effort in helping you progress to becoming a better operator. In our industry we have a huge responsibility to the public to deliver quality drinking water for public consumption. Having to know all the TCEQ rules and regulations for water and wastewater is not easy and takes time and effort to learn. I want to thank TCEQ for sending their licensing employees to every school to answer any questions and administer the exams. It sure makes it easy for the students to test at the end of a class. We must also recognize that the support provided by our employers is crucial to our boards and schools success. We need to let

4 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

the leaders in our cities or companies know that their support and willingness to help make our organization the best in Texas will never go unrecognized. I encourage you to volunteer at your local districts or regional schools. Not only will you help a great cause but make contacts in your field that you can’t get anywhere else. It sure has helped me over the years if I had a question I couldn’t answer. As a student, you may see the development of activities at the school as something somebody is doing. That somebody could be your co-worker. People from all over the area are dedicating a their time to your educational progress, and that makes them very special to our school. TWUA sponsors all of these regional schools and we also need to think about the main office staff in Austin for all that they do for us every day. I have had the opportunity to visit central office several times over the last several years, and each time everyone was so busy and the phones were going crazy! Sometimes when you call and it might take a little longer to get you taken care of, but the staff is constantly working to schedule classes, find instructors, answer questions, process memberships and advance the technology to offer training through many different avenues. They really do a fantastic job. Last, but not certainly not least, on my list of thanks is TWUA Executive Director Russell Hamilton and the Training Coordinator David Moore. Unless you are involved in the planning and coordination of hosting any of these schools, you would not be aware of the thousands of details required -- from producing manuals, arranging rooms, providing transportation and meals, to being continuously available to answer questions and provide assistance. To most attendees, the schools seem to run effortlessly, and that is due to the leadership provided by these gentlemen. So, if you have enjoyed your time at a TWUA school, or feel you have grown in your knowledge of the water and wastewater industry, consider taking the next step and volunteer. If you can’t volunteer your time, volunteer to share what you learned with your co-workers. Spreading the word of the quality instruction you have received with your employer will ensure that the TWUA regional and annual school will be around for years to come.

July 2017


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A

s many of you know, TWUA Central Office has been working with reduced staff in the office for about a year. One of the things that seems to be increasing is telephone calls. This is a good thing. It is a good problem to have and we welcome your questions and participation. PLEASE UNDERSTAND this is NOT an attempt to get you stop calling or avoid taking calls when you have questions or needs. In the very near future, Central Office will be enacting a feature on our phone system known as auto attendant answering / directing of incoming calls. If you have a membership question, we want to be able to connect you with the membership coordinator. We anticipate two ways in which to accomplish this task. Number one, your call will be answered automatically and you will be given a menu of options. Such as all questions related to membership – press a number. If you need to discuss any accounting related topics – press a number. And so on for each function of Central Office.

July 2017

Number Two – listed below are the direct numbers to all Central Office staff. You may dial the staff person or area of need directly by using the numbers below. Executive Director - Russell:............. 512-279-8122 Training Coordinator - David:.......... 512-279-8125 Accounting - Donna:........................ 512-279-8128 Membership - Henrietta:.................. 512-279-8129 General Questions - Susan:............... 512-279-8121 Central Office will try this for a few months and evaluate how it is working and how members are reacting to the change. If it works as we anticipate, great we accomplished our goals. If on the other hand things are not working smoothly, we will turn the auto answer off and revert to the current method.

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 5


Central Office News by Russell Hamilton, TWUA Executive Director

Father we come into your presence seeking your grace and forgiveness. We offer you the glory for all that you do and all that we take for granted. For the rainfall that Texas has received, we give you praise. The effects of this drought are far from over for some, so we ask that you would redirect clouds and rainfall to these areas of need. Father, no task or obstacle is too great for you, so we ask that you fill our lakes and cause our streams to flow with abundance, while leading us to be a more appreciative society. One that does not take the precious gift of water or those who treat it for granted - Amen.

information does not appear accurate and consistent. The actual person desiring to become licensed says - I did not fill out that paperwork, a coworker or staff person of my employer submitted on my behalf – but you attested or someone attested on your behalf. The situation could become complicated.

As of May 30, 2017 – In West Texas, Lake Ivie is sitting at 24.7 % (+ 0.0 %). Lake Spence is sitting at 14.6 % (+ 1.1 %). Lake Sweetwater is sitting at 24.2 % (+ 0.4 %). White River is sitting at 22.6 % (- 1.4 %). Panhandle, Lake Meredith is sitting at 24.8 % (+ 0.2 %) and Greenbelt is at 28.0 % (+ 0.2 %). If you want to get a complete look at lake levels, go to www.waterdatafortexas.org.

Just throwing this information out and hoping those who find themselves in this scenario will exercise good business practice and involve the applicant for the entire licensing application process.

The Regional Training “tour” is well underway. I enjoy attending the different Regions and representing TWUA. We at TWUA understand you have a choice when it comes to choosing operator training classes and we thank you when you choose TWUA.

So why do people choose this path?

If you have not registered for the TWUA Laredo Regional Training events, I encourage you to do so. On a related subject, if you are planning on attending and testing at the Permian Basin School in August – the deadline to submit your TCEQ Application is June 8th. If you are planning on attending and testing at the East Texas School the last week of August – the deadline to submit your TCEQ Application is July 6th. I would like to share a recent conversation. We were discussing the recent TCEQ changes to the licensing application process and the temporary effect it appears to be having on testing at TWUA events. One of the people in the discussion indicated his entity had tasked a particular staff member with “assisting” utility staff with the online application process. At first, this information being discussed seemed commonplace and harmless. As the conversation progressed, another brought up a very relevant point. The forms that are being completed and filed with TCEQ require the applicant, to attest or declare the information on the form is true and correct – 3 separate times. So in the literal aspect of the application process, if the one wishing to test is not the one actually supplying information and participating in the submitting of documents, will this be interpreted as falsifying or misrepresenting state documents? Should something in the application and be questioned by TCEQ and the conversation were something to the effect, this 6 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

When I returned to the office, I contacted TCEQ Licensing, relayed the scenario above, and was told that in fact, this scenario is happening and the entity(s) were at this point, being verbally reprimanded for completing the entire online process on the utility personnel’s behalf and asking that a new application be submitted. We all agree that everyone who needs and will apply for a TCEQ Operators License will not necessarily have computer skills. Take home point - assisting someone is not the same as applying for someone.

Empty The Negativity Negativity is a thief. Negativity steals our joy. Negativity is toxic.

• For some it may appear “funny” or it’s easier to focus on how messed up a project has become or how seemingly unqualified the manager is. • For some being “cynical” is far more appealing that being the model employee who aligns with the mission of the company or the department. • For some the appearance or perception of “looking smart” when you use data and details about how ineffective the boss is, how current direction of the company is failing and what they would do differently. • For some it is “easy” being negative and it is simply easier to throw rocks and focus on the non-fruitful results. At some point, everyone faces adversity and challenges of life. How we choose to react or deal with these challenges, defines our character. Abraham Lincoln once said, “Reputation is the shadow. Character is the tree.” There is no secret formula or one stop fix all, that dictates how we deal with Guilt, Resentment, Doubt, Failure, Envy, Worry, Responsibility or Anger. BUT the manner, in which we respond, is a choice. If it were simple, we could replace all the “negatives” with “positives” such as Confidence, Creativity, Passion, Peace, and Joy, which would make our home lives and work lives more meaningful. July 2017


So why do we let negativity in? Short answer – worry and stress. We tend to become stressed about our job, family, finances, and chasing the American dream. When we become stressed, we allow Worry, Guilt, Envy, Bitterness, Jealousy, Regrets, Self-pity, and Discouragement to take up all the space in our thoughts. Which in turn becomes our actions. There is an old saying that goes something like – Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react. A driver cuts you off in traffic. Your response is either, “wow I was almost in a wreck and I am thankful my car was not damaged and I was not injured” or “that jerk cut me off and I am going to let him know what I think about his driving with a sharp horn honk and a finger gesture”. But what is also happening, is you are conditioning yourself for the next time it happens. In a split second, we do not have time to stop and consider all the contributors. Out of habit, we respond. How do you respond? What act or action are you teaching your children and grandchildren, even co-workers? Have you ever stopped and thought about the example of the jerk driver. Do you think it bothers him or affects his day because you became upset? If we allow anger to take over, it most definitely will impact our day. Who is the looser in this example?

July 2017

When an unplanned event happens, we should all stop and ask – •

Am I still breathing?

What is the worst thing that could come from this?

What is my part?

What is in my control?

What is beyond my control?

What is the most important thing I can do right now?

What can I learn from this?

Will this matter 5 years from now?

Let it go. Learn from mistakes and experiences (mistakes do not have to be yours). You may not be able to control someone’s negative behavior, but you can control how long you participate in it. Do you empty out the negative thoughts daily? There is no room in our thought process for joys if the negatives occupy all the space. Proverbs tells us - a relaxed attitude lengthens a man’s life. Remember - we do not need all the operators in Texas to be a member of TWUA – JUST YOU ! ! ! !

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 7


Association News

NEED YOUR ASSISTANCE AT DISTRICT MEETINGS By: Russell Hamilton, TWUA Excutive Director

1 Corinthians 13:11 – When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put away my childish ways. Part of the heritage of TWUA is Monthly District Meetings, Training, and Presentations. Most of the presentations come in the form of product representatives, engineers, or some subject matter expert, which is associated with the Water and Wastewater industry in some manner, sharing their knowledge. At a Regional School, I was having a discussion with several product vendors/representatives who had recently provided the training program at various TWUA District Meetings. Sadly, the feedback was not very kind toward some of the district attendees.

Meeting, a Special Topics type event or any other operator training in which training credit is being obtained, it is up to the instructor or in this case, the program presenter to determine if someone is attentive, engaged, and part of the event. Should the presenter and district officers decide not to award training credit (like specifics mentioned above) we as an Association will support the local decision. Please join the officers of TWUA and the Districts and assist the Association in controlling this practice. Put your phones away. Be Respectful. Make announcements at the beginning of the meetings; talk among yourselves in peer-to-peer time. In general, please help stop this practice before it becomes a problem.

Seems as the program was being presented, a significant portion of those in attendance were playing games and watching videos on their smart phones. Others were having private discussions and generally disinterested in the program or the fact the presenter traveled a good distance to provide a program for which the attendees, would receive TCEQ training credit. Being courteous and respectful should be a given. If the presenter at your meeting were one of your loved ones or someone whom you have great admiration for, would your actions and mannerisms be different? The association tries very hard to promote and encourage attendance at District Meetings. TWUA also insists on compliance at District Meetings with TCEQ RG-373 at these meetings. The state provides little wiggle room when it comes to compliance. Hopefully, we can all learn from these occurrences and demonstrate to the program presenters that collectively, we are Professional and we will correct any concerns. Take home point – attendance at any training function does not automatically equate to credit hours. Does not matter if it is a Regional School, a 20-hour course, a District

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July 2017


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July 2017

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Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 9


In the News

VINCE LOMBARDI’S SECRET? AN OVERWHELMING DESPERATION TO PROVE HIS VALUE. May 2017, Sam Walker • LOS ANGELES, 1967

Head down, chin strap unfastened, his mind in a whirl, Willie Davis chugged into the shadows of the stadium tunnel. The team he played for, the Green Bay Packers, held a narrow 14–10 lead at halftime over the Kansas City Chiefs, but as he walked into the locker room and scanned the faces of his teammates, he could tell he wasn’t the only one with a knot in his stomach. “There was a bit of fear,” he said. Despite the three championships he’d already won and the accolades he’d received as one of the league’s best defensive ends, Willie Davis had always played football as if he were hovering just above the cut line. He’d only made it to the NFL because a Cleveland Browns coach came to see one of his college teammates play—he hadn’t been drafted until the fifteenth round. After a lackluster two-year stint in Cleveland, Davis was traded to Green Bay in 1960, a team that had only achieved one winning season in the previous twelve. “At that point in my career,” he told me, “I could have been considered a case of chopped liver.” The man who’d saved Davis from football oblivion was Vince Lombardi, who had taken over as Green Bay’s head coach one year earlier with little fanfare and some novel theories about talent. Lombardi defied the racism of the day by rebuilding the Packers with undervalued black players. In 1965, he took the strategy a step further by making Davis the team’s defensive captain, one of the first African Americans to hold that title in the NFL. When they met the Chiefs in this 1967 title game, Davis was one of six black starters on defense, four of whom would end up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. In Davis, Lombardi had seen a rare combination of size, speed, quickness, and intelligence. But he’d also picked up on something else—the kind of hunger that comes from being counted out. This was a quality Lombardi could feel in his own bones. As a highly regarded offensive coordinator for the New York Giants from 1954 to 1958, he’d seemed destined to be a head coach, but the calls never came. Lombardi suspected his Italian surname was an issue, especially when it came to positions with prominent college programs. The only reason he’d ended up in Green Bay was because nobody else would have him. Square-jawed and gap-toothed, with dark half-framed glasses and a buzz cut, Lombardi wasn’t slick or elegant. On the sidelines, he liked to wear suits with white shirts, a skinny tie, and a brown Borsalino hat. He looked like a fire hydrant dressed for a job 10 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

interview. During his time in Green Bay, Lombardi dragged his team from the bottom of the NFL to the top, winning five championships in seven seasons. What distinguished Lombardi the most from other coaches was his knack for oratory. His speeches were simple, forceful, and urgent—rich with emotional overtones and war analogies. At a time when sportswriters had a monopoly on coverage and a weakness for poetry, they shared his quotes in their columns, building a spectacular catalog of inspirational sayings such as “Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing” and “Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection we can catch excellence” and “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” As the halftime break came to a close, the Packers sat silently in their cramped locker room inside the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, a damp mass of nerves and creeping doubt. All that stood between them, the second half, and the prospect of an unthinkable upset was the traditional halftime address from their coach. Lombardi stood up, folded his jacket over a chair, and walked slowly to the front of the room. “I want to talk to you men,” he began. “I want to tell you something. . . .” As Lombardi began, his leg brushed against Davis’s. That’s when Davis noticed something unusual—Lombardi was trembling. “At first, I didn’t know what to make of it,” Davis said. “I didn’t know what was causing his emotions to be so strong.” Eventually, he figured it out. Lombardi’s quivering leg had betrayed him. He was terrified of losing. As Davis remembers it, the coach kept his remarks brief. “You’ve played thirty minutes adjusting to Kansas City, and you probably experienced everything that they had to throw at you,” Lombardi said. “You survived, okay? Now I want you to play thirty minutes of Green Bay football, and let’s see if they can adjust to you.” Lombardi finished his speech with a question: “Are you the world-champion Green Bay Packers? Get out on that field and answer me!” As the team roared out of the locker room, Davis studied the faces of his teammates to measure the impact of Lombardi’s July 2017


words. “It was just so strange, the way it resonated,” he said. “For each one of us, looking at each other as we were going on the field, it was like, ‘Remember what Coach said. We’ve got to go and show ’em what we can do now.’”

make this sense of longing contagious. “He dwelled so heavily on that,” Davis said, “until he had every player feeling absolutely the same way.” Even when the Packers were good, they played like a team clamoring for recognition.

On the fourth play from scrimmage in the second half, Len Dawson, the Chiefs’ quarterback, dropped back to pass on third down. Davis, from his end position, got an incredible jump, shed his blocker, and rounded the corner. Dawson, sensing Davis bearing down on him, let the ball go too early, placing it just behind his intended receiver. A Packers defensive back, Willie Wood, intercepted the pass. As Wood began galloping toward the end zone, Davis turned downfield to help clear the way. He went on to race fifty yards, setting up a touchdown that put the Packers up 21–10.

There is no question that Lombardi knew exactly what he was doing and that he understood the power of his gift. “It is essential to understand that battles are primarily won in the hearts of men,” he once said. “Men respond to leadership in a most remarkable way and once you have won his heart, he will follow you anywhere.”

It’s always dangerous to single out one play as the event that presaged the outcome of an entire game. But there is little doubt that this interception sparked by the pressure Davis put on Dawson, was the decisive blow. Davis, the team’s defensive captain, had somehow absorbed the passion rumbling inside his coach and taken it onto the field, where he’d let it loose. “I don’t know if I had another experience in football like that,” Davis said. “Every time that ball snapped, whatever I did had to be better than what I managed to do in the first half. There was something about that speech that made me play better. I think Coach Lombardi—he created all of this. If you looked at our performance in the second half, we raised the bar. We raised that bar because of the conversation he had with us.” Davis, eighty years old, lived on a hillside in the prosperous Los Angeles enclave of Playa del Rey in a bright modern home with a transfixing view of the Pacific Ocean. After football, Davis got an MBA, owned a chain of radio stations, and sat on the boards of several major companies. He became one of the most business-savvy ex–NFL players of his generation. “I tell ya, Coach Lombardi probably could have been a great minister, because he said things with the voice. Sometimes the voice had a chilling effect on you.” Davis turned away for a moment and stared out the window at the slow-rolling waves. Then, after a long silence, he let go from the depths of his lungs. “Crap, crap, crap! What the hell’s going on?” The voice was no longer Davis’s raspy baritone; it was sharp, forceful, and urgent. He’d conjured the spirit of Vince Lombardi. “He could say something and it would just grab you and do something to you,” he said. “It was like he could make you rise to play at a level you didn’t even know about.”

Leadership, Lombardi added, “is based on a spiritual quality—the power to inspire, the power to inspire others to follow.” On another occasion, he said, “Coaches who can outline plays on a blackboard are a dime a dozen. The ones who win get inside their players and motivate.” Most American sports fans, when asked to name the greatest coach they can think of, will immediately, or at least eventually, point to Vince Lombardi. Since he left the NFL in 1970, nearly every professional sports team in North America has, at some time or another, tried to recruit someone with exceptional charisma. Because Lombardi looms so large in our minds, however, we have failed to notice something else about his Packers: They didn’t become champions until Willie Davis showed up, and without Davis, they might never have become elite. Many other brilliantly coached teams, from the Hungarian soccer dynasty of the 1950s to Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United, Phil Jackson’s Chicago Bulls, and Bill Belichick’s New England Patriots, only reached their full potential after a selfless, relentless, and fiercely committed captain arrived to help transform their coach’s words, and their strategic vision, into action. The public has a tendency to view coaches as singular forces, a rare species of person who can drive a team to greatness without setting foot on the field. In some cases, that’s almost true. In reality, however, even Lombardi only reached his full potential as part of a twin set. A coach is vitally important, for sure, but a coach can only do so much. The surest way to achieve enduring success is to identify the perfect player to lead the team. Want more leadership insights? Read Sam Walker’s interview with LinkedIn Influencer and The Lean Startup author Eric Ries.

Davis believed that the quality at the center of Lombardi’s character was an overwhelming desperation to prove his value. He used his words, and the blunt force of his personality, to July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 11


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATON 34th ANNUAL PERMIAN BASIN REGIONAL SCHOOL JULY 31 – AUGUST 3, 2017 – UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS/PERMIAN BASIN – ODESSA, TX ACADEMIC OFFERINGS WATER Basic Water Groundwater Production Water Distribution *Surface Water Production I Water Lab

WASTEWATER Basic Wastewater Wastewater Collection

WATER/WASTEWATER Water Utilities Safety Water Utilities Management Calculations

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

REGISTRATION FEES TWUA Member Non-Member Pre-Registration (by 7/21/17)………………………………………………$250.00……………………………$315.00 Onsite Registration………………………………………………………….$275.00……………………………$340.00 . Surface Water Production I is a 24 hour class – begins at 1:00 p.m. on Monday, July 31. All other classes begin at 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 1. Student packets can be picked up in front of Room MB 2130 at the Mesa Building at UTPB. Onsite registration for courses other than Surface Water I begins at 7:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 1 at Room 2130, Mesa Building, UTPB. An Opening Session will be held at 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 1 in Room MB 2130. Courses are from 8:00 am to 5:15 pm Tuesday & Wednesday and 8 am to noon on Thursday. TCEQ exams begin at 1:00 on Thursday (please see testing info below).. Lunch will not be provided.

(New Host ) - HOTEL

The MCM Elegante, 5200 E University in Odessa is the host hotel. A special room rate of $97.00 is available. To obtain the special rate, please contact the hotel at (432) 366-5885 and specify the Permian Basin Regional School.

GOLF TOURNAMENT

A golf tournament will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Monday, July 31 at Hogan Park in Midland. Cost of the tournament is $65/person and includes green fee and cart. Proceeds from the tournament will be donated to the V.M. Ehlers Scholarship Foundation. TCEQ TESTING Anyone wanting to TEST at the conclusion of the training MUST pre-register electronically with TCEQ 60 days prior to the School and pay the $111.00 fee online at the TCEQ website. https://www.tceq.texas.gov/licensing/eapp

REGISTRATION FORM - PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY OR TYPE Name ___________________________________________

Social Security or W/WW License # _______________

Representing ______________________________________________

Daytime Phone _______________________

Address ____________________________________________ City ___________________ State ___ Zip __________ Email Address ______________________________________ Course Selection ________________________________ TWUA Member ____Yes ____No Visa/MC # _________________________________________ Exp Date _________ Security Code _______________ Cardholder’s name printed _____________________________________ Billing Address _______________________________ City____________________ State _____ Zip Code_________ Payment MUST accompany registration. No purchase orders accepted. No refunds – Substitutions Only. Credit Card registrations may be mailed to address below or faxed to (432) 332-1965. Make checks payable to Permian Basin Regional School. Mail to P.O. Box 12604, Odessa, TX 79768. If you have questions, please contact Norma Clark at (432) 528-1608 or by emailing nclark874@cableone.net. 12 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

July 2017


Event

60 Days Prior

Tyler 7/6/17 Lubbock 9/14/17 Ft. Stockton

12/8/17

Annual School

1/4/18

Last Day to Submit Pre-approval Paperwork to TCEQ For Testing @ TWUA Regional Training Events. https://www.tceq.texas.gov/licensing/eapp for questions please contact TCEQ at: 512-239-6133

July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 13


In the News

WHY WE SHOULD ALL PROVIDE FEEDBACK THROUGH COACHING Melinda Burks

Feedback is a difficult concept to employ as a new manager. No one likes to be the bearer of bad news, as indicated by a study that ranked the top challenges faced by managers.   To complicate matters, managers are expected to provide individualized feedback to a diverse team to maintain momentum and keep everyone on track. One approach to providing effective feedback as a new manager? Approach the conversation through coaching. Coaching is working with your employee through a lens that considers their whole being. This perspective does not focus solely on the task at hand, the title they may have, or a position this employee wishes to hold in the future.  Instead, it seeks to develop a whole being to enhance performance and increase results.  Here are strategies for providing constructive feedback through coaching. COMMUNICATING THE EXPECTATIONS Starting strong with clear expectations provides a solid framework for a team to work within. This approach also empowers every individual to make decisions on how best to achieve the mission which positively affects other tasks as employees are inadvertently more productive when empowered. When communicating expectations concerning employee performance, it is best to keep it simple and communicate them often. Focusing on a specific area of improvement also separates the person from the task and lessens the difficulty of providing negative feedback. FACILITATE THE CONVERSATION A recent study shows that employees who have difficulty receiving feedback are less likely to be successful. One approach to mitigating this potential pitfall is to guide the recipient of the feedback along a continuum that forces him/her to become aware of areas of improvement through their own processing. This revelation may come at the moment in which the feedback conversation is 14 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

taking place or it may come several weeks down the road. It is important to note that it is a process that also encourages increased self-awareness. Employees receive feedback differently or, in some cases, are not willing to receive feedback at all. By cultivating self-awareness, an employee will soon self-correct thus placing a manager in the position of trusted mentor. MODEL CREDIBILITY Effective managers are not only relatable but they are able to model the behavior they wish to cultivate in the workplace. One strategy to work around the challenge of providing constructive feedback is by taking the initiative to solicit feedback as well.  This is surely easier said than done but the reward is two-fold.  By taking the initiative to solicit feedback or by acknowledging a commitment to genuinely improve one’s managerial style establishes the proverbial circle of trust that decreases defenses.  One knows how impactful conversations are when the agents are in their most comfortable mental and emotional state. Feedback is both an art and a science in which one is continuously dancing between the two tactics.  However, it can be implemented by adopting the skills of coaching.  A coach empowers their team to become self-aware of their own areas of improvement, fosters an environment of open and transparent feedback, as well as maintains relatability by taking the initiative to provide self-reflection creates a workplace that will continue to progress towards one’s goals. In the words of the great Maya Angelou, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

July 2017


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION 61st ANNUAL SOUTHWEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL Laredo Energy Arena 6700 Arena Blvd., Laredo, Texas JULY 24-26, 2017 The City of Laredo hosts the 61st ANNUAL SOUTHWEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL at the Laredo Energy Arena, 6700 Arena Blvd., Laredo, Texas. The La Quinta Inn & Suites Laredo Airport at 7220 Bob Bullock Loop in Laredo, Texas is our host hotel and has blocked rooms for the school at a rate of $92.00/night. The hotel may be contacted at 1-956 / 724-7222 for reservations. Please tell them you are with the TWUA Southwest Texas Regional School to get this rate. The cut-off date for this room block is July 5, 2017 so please call and make your reservations prior to then. We have also blocked rooms at the Holiday Inn Express Laredo-Event Center Area. Holiday Inn Express is offering a rate of $92.00 / night for single occupancy and $159.00 / night for double occupancy. The cut-off date for this room block is July 7, 2017. Reservations for this hotel can be made by calling 956 / 218 – 8888. Please tell them you are with the TWUA Southwest Texas Regional School to get this rate. Monday night we will have our annual Exhibitors Appreciation Event with dinner, live entertainment and door prizes. All school attendees are invited and are encouraged to attend.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

REGISTRATION

(PROOF OF TWUA MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED)

TWUA MEMBERS

NON-MEMBERS

PRE-REGISTRATION (BEFORE JULY 14, 2017)

$250.00

$300.00

ON-SITE REGISTRATION

$300.00

$350.00

ON LINE AND CREDIT CARD REGISTRATIONS WILL INCLUDE AN ADDITIONAL $5.00 CONVENIENCE FEE ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ACADEMIC OFFERINGS

WATER CERTIFICATION HOURS

WASTEWATER CERTIFICATION HOURS

BOTH W & WW HOURS

Basic Water Water Distribution

Basic Wastewater Wastewater Collection

Special Topics Utility Safety

Surface Water II

Activated Sludge

Utilities Management Valve and Hydrant Maintenance

License exams will be given at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday. Grade A exams will be conducted at 8:00 a.m. Tuesday. All testing fees payable to TCEQ.

Note: The deadline for submitting an application to test at this school is May 17, 2017.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

SOUTHWEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL PRE-REGISTRATION FORM

PLEASE PROVIDE COMPLETE INFORMATION FOR EACH REGISTRANT. PHOTOCOPY FORM IF NECESSARY. CHECKS, CREDIT CARDS OR MONEY ORDERS PLEASE. SORRY, NO REFUNDS. SUBSTITUTIONS MAY BE MADE.

NAME: ___________________________________________________________

SS#: ______-________-________

DATE: _________________

BADGE NAME: ____________________________________________________

JOB TITLE: ________________________________________________

ADDRESS: ________________________________________________________

CITY: _____________________________ ZIP: ___________________

EMPLOYER: ______________________________________________________

TWUA DISTRICT: __________________________________________

COURSE SELCTION: _______________________________________________

PHONE NUMBER: __________________________________________

REGISTRATION FEES: _______________________@ ____________________

$_______________________________________

____________________ EXTRA DINNER TICKETS @ $35.00

$ _______________________________________ TOTAL ENCLOSED

$ _______________________________________

*CREDIT CARD TYPE: VISA/MASTERCARD

CREDIT CARD#: _____________________________________________________________

EXPIRATION DATE: ____________________________

SECURITY CODE: _______________________

ZIP: ___________________________

IF PAYING BY CHECK - SEND REGISTRATION FORM AND FEES TO: TWUA SOUTHWEST TEXAS REGIONAL SCHOOL C/O: LYNN SHORT, SECTRETARY/TREASURER 203 WINDWOOD LANE, VICTORIA, TX 77904 Credit card payers may e-mail the form to: lshort@lspssolutions.com

July 2017

*Credit card registrations will be charged a $5.00 Convenience Fee.

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 15


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES To register for any TWUA classes – simply complete the registration form and fax to (512)459-7124 or contact TWUA @ 888-367-8982 for additional details. *NOTICE: Due to recent increases for training materials, class costs have Increased. ***Pre-Registration Is defined to mean 14 Days prior to any scheduled event. All registrations received after the pre-registration cutoff date must pay on-site registration fee. We strongly encourage everyone to please pre-register by fax, e-mail, or calling. On-site registrations are welcome but not preferred.

Date Jul 11-13 Sept 11-13 Oct 24-26

Basic Water Stafford Corpus Christi Beaumont

TCEQ 0092 Basic Water Basic Water Basic Water

20 Hours 902 Corine 2726 Holly 1305 Langham

Water

TCEQ 0223 Ground Water Production Ground Water Production

20 Hours 902 Corine 2726 Holly

Water

Sept 26-28 Oct 9-11

Ground Water Production Stafford Corpus Christi

Aug 8-10 Sep 26-28 Oct 17-19 Oct 17-19 Oct 30-Nov 1 Nov 14-16

Water Distribution Gatesville Waco San Marcos Victoria Corpus Christi Beaumont

TCEQ 0605 Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution

20 Hours 106 S 23rd 425 Franklin 501 E Hopkins 2902 Bluff 13101 Leopard 1305 Langham

TCEQ 0942 Surface Water I

24 Hours 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Water

Nov 1-3

Surface Water Production I Wylie Surface Water Production II Wylie

TCEQ 0954 Surface Water II

20 Hours 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Water

Dec 4-6

Water Laboratory Gatesville Seguin Wylie

TECQ 0285 Water Lab Water Lab Water Lab

20 Hours 106 S 23rd 905 Nolan St 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Water

Jul 11-13 Aug 1-3 Aug 7-9

Basic Wastewater Victoria Stafford Corpus Christi San Marcos

TCEQ 0059 Basic Wastewater Basic Wastewater Basic Wastewater Basic Wastewater

20 Hours 2902 Bluff 902 Corine 2726 Holly 801 MLK Drive

Wastewater

Aug 15-17 Aug 22-24 Sept 13-15 Dec 12-14

Wastewater Treatment Stafford Gatesville Kilgore College

TCEQ 0437 Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Treatment

20 Hours 902 Corine 106 S 23rd 1100 Broadway Blvd

Wastewater

Oct 17-19 Oct 24-26 Nov 7-9

16 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

July 2017


TRAINING SCHEDULE 20 HOUR CLASSES: (PRE-REGISTRATION) $300 MEMBER $360 NON-MEMBER. (ON-SITE) $350 MEMBER $410 NON-MEMBER – 24 HOUR CLASSES (PRE-REGISTRATION) $360 MEMBER $420 NON-MEMBER (ON-SITE) $410 MEMBER $470 NON-MEMBER. YOU CAN REGISTER ON-LINE AT HTTP://TWUA.ORG/TRAINING.PHP FOR YOUR NEXT TRAINING CLASS. *ON-LINE COURSES MAY VARY

TCEQ 0080 Wastewater Collection Wastewater Collection Wastewater Collection

20 Hours 170 Charles Austin Dr 13101 Leopard 425 Franklin

Wastewater

Sep 5-7 Nov 1-3 Nov 14-16

Wastewater Collection San Marcos Corpus Christi Waco

TCEQ 0081 Wastewater Lab Wastewater Lab

20 Hours 2726 Holly 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Wastewater

Aug 14-16 Aug 28-30

Wastewater Laboratory Corpus Christi Wylie Activated Sludge Wylie

TCEQ 0009 Activated Sludge

20 Hours 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Wastewater

Oct 4-6

TCEQ 0550 Utilities Management Utilities Management Utilities Management Utilities Management Utilities Management

20 Hours 2726 Holly twua.org 3901 FM 349 425 Franklin 1305 Langham Rd

W/WW

Jul 17-19 Sep 19-21 Oct 3-5 Oct 10-12 Dec 12-14

Utilities Management Corpus Christi ON-LINE Kilgore Waco Beaumont

TCEQ 0430 Pumps & Pumping Pumps & Pumping Pumps & Pumping Pumps & Pumping

20 Hours 425 Franklin 2726 Holly 2902 Bluff 13101 Leopard

W/WW

Jul 18-20 Jul 19-21 Nov 14-16 Dec 11-13

Pumps and Pumping Waco Corpus Christi Victoria Corpus Christi Utilities Safety San Marcos Beaumont Waco Corpus Christi Stafford

TCEQ 0426 Utilities Safety Utilities Safety Utilities Safety Utilities Safety Utilities Safety

20 Hours 170 Charles Austin Dr. 1305 Langham 425 Franklin 2726 Holly 902 Corine

W/WW

Aug 15-17 Sep 12-14 Sep 12-14 Oct 11-13 Nov 14-16

Valve & Hydrant Maintenance Wylie

TCEQ 0961 Valve & Hydrant Maintenance

20 Hours 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

W/WW

Oct 2-4

Utilities Calculations McAllen ON-LINE

TCEQ 0108 Utilities Calculations Utilities Calculations

20 Hours 2100 W Sprague twua.org

W/WW

Jul 10-12 Jul 18-20

July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 17


Training Schedule (continued from page 17) Date Jul 11-13 Sept 11-13 Oct 24-26

Basic Water Stafford Corpus Christi Beaumont

TCEQ 0092 Basic Water Basic Water Basic Water

20 Hours 902 Corine 2726 Holly 1305 Langham

Water

Ground Water Production Stafford Corpus Christi

TCEQ 0223 Ground Water Production Ground Water Production

20 Hours 902 Corine 2726 Holly

Water

Sept 26-28 Oct 9-11

Aug 8-10 Sep 26-28 Oct 17-19 Oct 17-19 Oct 30-Nov 1 Nov 14-16

Water Distribution Gatesville Waco San Marcos Victoria Corpus Christi Beaumont

TCEQ 0605 Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution Water Distribution

20 Hours 106 S 23rd 425 Franklin 501 E Hopkins 2902 Bluff 13101 Leopard 1305 Langham

Surface Water Production I Wylie

TCEQ 0942 Surface Water I

24 Hours 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Water

Nov 1-3

TCEQ 0954 Surface Water II

20 Hours 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Water

Dec 4-6

Surface Water Production II Wylie Water Laboratory Gatesville Seguin Wylie

TECQ 0285 Water Lab Water Lab Water Lab

20 Hours 106 S 23rd 905 Nolan St 949 Hensley Lane, Building 300

Water

Jul 11-13 Aug 1-3 Aug 7-9

Basic Wastewater Victoria Stafford Corpus Christi San Marcos

TCEQ 0059 Basic Wastewater Basic Wastewater Basic Wastewater Basic Wastewater

20 Hours 2902 Bluff 902 Corine 2726 Holly 801 MLK Drive

Wastewater

Aug 15-17 Aug 22-24 Sept 13-15 Dec 12-14

TCEQ 0437 Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Treatment

20 Hours 902 Corine 106 S 23rd 1100 Broadway Blvd

Wastewater

Oct 17-19 Oct 24-26 Nov 7-9

Wastewater Treatment Stafford Gatesville Kilgore College

18 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

July 2017


Wastewater / Reclaim / Drinking Water Remediation / Field Services / Courier Services

Mention this ad and receive $10 off any one-time service of $100 or more.

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Pre-printed chain-of-custody and container labels Maximum limit exceedance notification Discounted shipping rates Compliance and non-compliance analysis 3505 Montopolis Drive, Austin, TX 78744 512-730-6022 or 877-362-5272

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Rich Oller, PE | 806.993.6227 | rich.oller@oei-eng.com www.oei-eng.com

July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 19


NCRS

Jon Mahnoney

Charly Angadicheril

Stephanie Zavala & Blake Ward 20 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

July 2017


Past Presidents of North Central

Instructors 2017

2017 North Central Board All Photos courtesy of Malcom E. Cowdin July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 21


Texas Water Utilities Association

62nt Annual East Texas Regional School 24hr Classes Start on August 28th All Other Classes August 29th thru 31st, 2017

Harvey Convention Center, 2000 W. Front St., Tyler, Texas COURSE OFFERINGS WATER Basic Water * Surface Water Production I (24hr) Surface Water Production II Ground Water Production Water Distribution

WASTEWATER Basic Wastewater Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection Wastewater Lab

WATER & WASTEWATER Utilities Safety Utilities Management Utilities Calculations Pumps & Pumping

* Pre-Registration Required for Surface Water Production I (24 Hour Class). Class starts at 1:00 p.m. on Monday August 28th 2017 at Harvey Convention Center All other classes start at 9:00 a.m. Tuesday, August 29th, 2017. Final class room locations for 20 hour courses will be available at registration NO WALK UP TESTING PRE-APPROVAL PAPERWORK MUST BE SUBMITTED TO TCEQ 60 DAYS PRIOR TO TESTING. Exams for Class “B, C, D” and Class “I, II, & III” certifications will be given at 1:30 pm August 31st. Class “A” exams are 8:30am on August 29th. Contact TCEQ (512-239-6133) in advance to schedule “A” exam.

ACCOMMODATIONS

Holiday Inn South Broadway – 5701 S. Broadway, Tyler, TX 75703 903-561-5800 $99.00 for King / Double Rooms Breakfast Buffet Included Link: Host Hotel  Reservations  with  Breakfast (Cutoff Date 8/14/2017) Specify East Texas Regional Water School

REGISTRATION FEES PRE-REGISTRATION (DEADLINE 8/18/2017) TWUA Members Only Non-Members

On-Site Registration

$250.00 $300.00

$300.00 $350.00

Pre-Registration check-in and On-Site Registration for 20 hr. courses will be from 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. August 29th Registration fees include lunch on August 29th and 30th. Extra lunch tickets may be purchased for $13

REGISTRATION FORM

PLEASE USE ONE FORM PER PERSON – COPY AS REQUIRED, PRINT CLEARLY PRE-REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS AUGUST 18th, 2017 For Pre-Registration: mail or fax completed form with credit card information, check or money order payable to T.W.U.A., 1106 Clayton Lane, Suite 112 West, Austin TX 78723-1093 www.twua.org Credit card payments may be mailed or faxed (512-459-7124) to T.W.U.A. Register at door - have form completed with check, cash, or money order payable to ETRS, No credit cards Name:

SS# or License # :

Course Selection:

E-mail:

Representing:

Day Phone:

Address:

City:

Fax: State:

Zip:

T.W.U.A. District/Chapter (If Member): Credit Card:

Master Card or Visa (circle one)

Card Number: Signature:

22 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

CVV# Expires On:

/

If you have any questions contact: TWUA @ 1-888-367-8982 or Mike Norris @ 903-939-8278 mnorris@tylertexas.com July 2017


100 Year Anniversary

DRAWING: March 4, 2018 TWUA Annual School 2018 $50 per ticket for the truck (2,000 total tickets) $20 per ticket for the ATV (2,500 total tickets)

Tickets Available online at TWUA.org


In the News

HOW TO BE A GOOD LEADER? CARRY THE LUGGAGE. Dan Lyons Chances are you’ve never heard of Carla Overbeck. She was captain of the U.S. national women’s soccer team that won Olympic gold in 1996 and the World Cup in 1999, a team that over four years of international play posted an 84-6-6 record, making them one of the winningest squads in the history of sports. Overbeck was arguably the key to their success -- “the heartbeat of that team and the engine,” and “the essence of the team,” as one teammate put it. Yet no one has ever heard of her. She wasn’t the best player on the team, or the most talented. She played defense, and rarely scored, though she played almost every minute of every game. To the outside world she was invisible, but to her teammates she was indispensable. Overbeck also had one habit that seems kind of eccentric: When the players arrived at a hotel, she would carry everyone’s bags to their rooms for them. That story about Overbeck schlepping the luggage appears in The Captain Class: The Hidden Force That Creates the World’s Greatest Teams, a remarkable new book that challenges some conventional ideas about leadership. Its author, Sam Walker, is an editor at the Wall Street Journal and an avid sports fan. He set out more than a decade ago to study the greatest teams in sports history and figure out what traits they shared. He reckoned you could apply those same principles to business. Over the course of 11 years, Walker studied 1200 teams in 37 sports. He traveled around the world conducting interviews. After all that he could find only one thing that extraordinary teams had in common, and it wasn’t what you’d expect. It was not the coach. It was not a superstar player. The key to success was that each had an extraordinary captain -- like Carla Overbeck. “The most crucial ingredient in a team that achieves and sustains historic greatness,” Walker argues, “is the character of the player who leads it.” 24 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

What’s more, the great captain is not always a great player. In fact, as with Overbeck, the best captains are often not the superstars. They’re often less gifted than their teammates. Yet they still manage to be great leaders. Walker calls these players “water carriers,” and tells the story of Didier Deschamps, captain of the French national soccer team. In 1996, before a big match, the captain of a rival team derided Deschamps as a “limited” footballer and a “water carrier.” It was true that Deschamps didn’t score much. He mostly focused on passing the ball to others. But his teams won games -- including the 1996 match where an opponent mocked Deschamps as a water carrier. After that game, reporters asked Deschamps about the taunt. No doubt they were hoping Deschamps would offer an insult in return. Instead, he declared, “I don’t mind being called a water carrier.” Another example is Bill Russell, the captain who led the Boston Celtics to 11 league championships. Russell didn’t score much, but he was a dogged competitor, a selfless player who cared about the team more than about himself. “He didn’t care about statistics or personal accolades and didn’t mind letting teammates take the credit,” Walker writes. “So long as the Celtics won titles, he didn’t mind if nobody noticed his contributions.” Elite captains don’t have to be big point scorers, but they do have some things in common. They’re fierce competitors. They play aggressively, to the point of testing the rules. They do the grunt work, the “thankless jobs in the shadows.” They’re the kind who insist on playing even when they’re injured, who practice longer and train harder than anyone else. Does any of this map to the world of business? Walker thinks so. We hear a lot about “visionary” CEOs, especially in Silicon Valley. The new generation of tech founders is treated like celebrities or even superheroes. These days even venture capitalists receive the Jay-Z treatment, with their faces plastered on magazine covers alongside claims about their unique superpower abilities to predict the future. July 2017


But Walker’s book makes me think maybe the best leaders are the quiet ones, the ones you don’t hear much about, the ones who don’t hog the spotlight and don’t want to see their photograph on the cover of Wired or Fortune. They’re the business equivalent of Carla Overbeck – quiet, in the background, but leading nonetheless. And carrying the luggage. What on earth was that all about? It’s not the kind of thing you expect a leader to do. Leaders are supposed to show up surrounded by an entourage, with people carrying bags for them. So why did she do it? The theory is this. Apparently, Overbeck was a relentless taskmaster. She pushed her teammates relentlessly both in practice and during games. Slack off during a game, or slow down, and you’d get an earful from her, usually in some rather colorful language. She had no problem shouting at her teammates, telling them to shape up or work harder. But because she had carried the bags, she had earned the right to be a tyrant. Carrying the bags mean that once the team took the field, “she could say anything she wanted,” her coach says. When the U.S. team won the World Cup in 1999, they all went on a big victory tour. Overbeck skipped the celebrations and flew home to North Carolina. On the day of the big rally in New York

City, she was doing laundry. Overbeck led one of one of the greatest teams in all of sports history, and yet most people have never heard of her. And that was fine by her: “I’ve never cared about getting my name in the paper,” she said. “As long as my team wins, I’m happy.” I love this story because it’s such a great metaphor for the way a terrific boss treats her employees. She doesn’t spend her time “managing up,” trying to raise her own profile and win a promotion for herself. She doesn’t try to grab credit. She cares about her team and wants them to do well. She leads by example. She works harder than anyone else. She doesn’t demand your loyalty, she earns it. She might also be the toughest, most demanding boss you’ve ever had. But you would walk through fire for her. It’s striking how many great captains were humble, selfless players, who seemed to believe that leading people is, paradoxically, a lot like serving them. Anyone who aspires to be a manager, or is already managing people and hopes to get better at it, could learn a lot from The Captain Class, and be inspired by Carla Overbeck. First lesson: Carry the luggage.

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Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 25


SAM HOUSTON WATER UTILITY ASSOCIATION 66th ANNUAL ALL-DAY CONFERENCE & EXPOSITION THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 2017 8 am to 5 pm Humble Civic Center 8233 Will Clayton Parkway

TRAINING CREDIT WATER AND WASTEWATER CERTIFICATION 8 Hrs Dual Credit (Water/Wastewater) APPROVAL PENDING REGISTRATION AND SESSIONS

Registration Time: 7:00 am - Classes start at 8:00 am Morning and Afternoon Sessions: Combined Water and Wastewater Credit Lunch Provided for attendees with wristbands

SESSIONS SCHEDULED: TCEQ—State WWTP Inspections—Why Do We Do It? Cross Connection Control—Overview and Preventions. Automated Flushing in Water Distribution Systems Surface Water Use—A Regional Water Authority Perspective Potable Water Distribution Metering—Smart Meters and AMRs Cloth Media Filtration—Explanation and Examples Water Utility Infrastructure Inventory and Life Expectancy Water Utility Calculations—Refresher Help for Exams & Daily Operations Or-Lead & Copper Sampling—Operator’s Perspective Or-Stormwater Permitting for WWTP—What Do I Need to Do?

EXHIBITORS BOOTHS

Open 7:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. Vendor Prize Drawings and Awards During Lunch.

WRISTBAND REQUIRED FOR LUNCH Costs (For Obtaining Training Hours Credit): Current Sam Houston District Members: Free T.W.U.A. Members: No Charge New Members: $90.00 Visitors Requiring Training Hours: $90 For exhibitor information contact Sarah Guzman at 346-206-9729 or by email at s.guzman@hach.com Program information contact Ben Connelley at 713-296-9698 or by email at bconnelley@edpwater.com You can obtain further information at the Association’s web site at www.shwua.org or contact one of the Executive Directors for additional information.

26 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

July 2017


TEXAS WATER UTILITIES ASSOCIATION connect. engage. educate

CALCULATIONS

ONLINE TRAINING INSTRUCTOR LED

When: Tuesday, July 18, 2017-through-Th u rsday, July 20, 2017 Time: 8:00am - 5:00pm (CDT) Member Fee: $350 Non-Member Fee: $400 (20 Hou rs - TCEQ Approved for Water & 20 Hours For Wastewater) No travel required! Training from the convenience of your own desk or home. Only a phone, computer and internet connection required .

REGISTER!! (Registration deadline: July 14, 2017)

OBJECTIVES WITH THIS TRAINING:

PRESENTERS

Share knowledge and experience that will:

Russell Hamilton TWUA Executive Director

• Improve understanding of math related to water treatment in a utility

David Moore TWUA Training Coordinator

• Provide compliance with TCEQ for core training Russell is currently the Executive Director for TWUA with 30 years of experience in management functions related to water and wastewater.

• Provide compliance with TCEQ for continuing education credit • Improve knowledge and understanding of skills used in the performance of water treatment in public water supplies

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

Russell is a Double A Operator, and has presented traditional 20-hour classroom setting both at the regional and individual training events .

• Anyone who needs basic water training in their pursuit of an advanced operator license • Anyone who needs basic water for licensing or renewal • Water operators who are starting in the water industry

David is currently the Training Coordinator for TWUA with 28 years of experience in operation and maintenance of municipal water distribution.

• Anyone interested in acquiring more knowledge in basic water operations

Online Training: • Cannot be substituted for hands-on training required to teach critical skills • The same distance training repeated in the license renewal period will not receive training credit per 30 TAC 30.28 (p)(3)(c) • The same webinar training may not be repeated within the renewal period for training credit per 30 TAC 30.28 (s)(4)

David is a Double A Operator. He has also presented the TWUA traditional 20 hours classroom setting both at the regional and individual training events.

Requirements :

• • •

Browser must be updated to the latest release and Internet Explorer must be Release 10 or later. Guaranteed bandwidth of at least 1 Mbps downstream. Registrant will be required to complete TWUA's identity verification process upon successful registration

• • • •

Identification verification and polling will be conducted during this training Comprehension and understanding will be tested throughout the course Passing an Exit Exam will be required for successful completion Any questions contact TWUA Central Office (888)367-8982 REGISTER TODAY!

www.twua.org

Follow us on:

July 2017

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 27


TCEQ MAY LICENSES BACKFLOW PREVENTION

CLASS C

ASSEMBLY TESTER

WATER DISTRIBUTION

ARRIAZOLA, MANUEL CLASS B

ADAMS, GLENN R

BOURGEOIS, KALEB A

BOWEN, KENNETH R

BOWMAN, JONATHAN

CARPENTER, CLAIRE

BROWN, CORY A

CARDONA, FRANK I

COX, RICHARD A

CARR, SHANE M

CRISS, CHRISTOPHER

CREEKMORE, ROBERT

ELMORE, JOHN E II

PETTIT, JESUS V

FURNACE, RAY A

EVANS, TREY W

RAYNOR, EDWIN L

GOLDEN, WILLIAM T

EVERETT, PAUL B

ROSE, ADRIAN C

HANSEN, MICHAEL S

GARZA, LARRY

SNYDAL, GREGORY

LUPERCIO, JOSEPH

GONZALES, MICHAEL

MILLER, JASON A

HARRIS, STEVEN H

NINNEMAN, DENNIS R

JORDAN, RODNEY B

OAKLEY, SHANE D

JOSEPH, JUAN D

BAIRD, KENDRA A

PALL, DANIEL A JR

KNIGHT, LESLIE A

BRADSHAW, JOHNNY W

PICKERING, WILLIAM E III

MCQUILKIN, SHANE A

CHAMBERLAIN, CHARISE

RAMIREZ, ARNOLDO

OVIASOGIE, UNITY E

CHAMPION, LESTER R JR

TAYLOR, JONAH Z

PERRY, RANGER L

CLARKSON, DUSTIN E

TORRES, HUMBERTO III

PICKERING, WILLIAM E III

COLORADO-RIVAS, MIGUEL

WALKER, TAMMY R

PRIM, JONATHAN R

COTTEN, LUNDI L

WARD, BRIAN S

RYDER, BEN R

DELACRUZ, GERARDO

WATTS, DONALD W

TIMM, RICHARD M JR

ELIZONDO, ISRAEL

WEBER, JUSTIN R

FLAMENCO, SALVADOR

CUSTOMER SERVICE INSPECTOR

GAUBATZ, ROYCE A SURFACE WATER

GUERRERO, ROGER

TREATMENT

HALL, JOSHUA J HERNANDEZ, NOE C

BOEDEKER, RYAN A BONESTEEL, EVAN D

CLASS C

CLASS B

HERZOG, DAVID T HUFFMAN, KYLE L

BROWN, BENJAMIN H DIKE, JOHN H

LACY, BRANDON M

JACOB, DEREK N

GONZALES, MICHAEL

MOFFITT, WALLACE L

KACKMEISTER, RYAN A

HERNANDEZ, JAVIER

PARKER, MARTIN T

KELLER, CHRIS LOPEZ, ARMANDO A

HESTER, COLTON J HUNT, MICHAEL L

CLASS C

MCCUTCHEON, AMY L MURRAY, MICHAEL R

KEPLER, BRANDON J NICKELL, JAMES K

ABSHIRE, TIMMIE L

NICHOLS, SHAWN E

PALL, DANIEL A JR

ANDREWS, VINCENT T II

OLIVER, ASHTON R

RODGERS, JON T

BELISLE, RICHARD P

PARSONS, JACOB R

SCHULER, MARK D

CABRERA, CARLOS JR

ROBLES, ALFREDO

SEWELL, STEPHEN

GUERRERO, JESUS I

ROSALES, JOHN M

TEMPLE, RICKY D

GUTHRIE, LESLIE B

SHARROW, MICHAEL J II

TIPPS, JUSTIN L

KENNEDY, CHAD W

SHAW, XAVIER I SR

KISER, LANCE W

SMITH, JOSHUA C

GROUND WATER

MALDONADO, JORGE I

SMITH, JUSTIN R

TREATMENT

MARTINEZ, RUBEN JR

TABOR, RANDY L

NEWCOMB, JOSHUA D

THOMPSON, TYLER M

REYES, PAUL J SR

VELASQUEZ, ERASMO JR

RODRIGUEZ, SANTIAGO

WAGGENER, CHRIS

DOBBS, BARRY A

SIMONS, ARTHUR L

WALDRUM, GREGORY J

DOSS, JOYCE L

TAYLOR, ROBERT B JR

WERFELMAN, TRAVIS J

ENIX, THOMAS M

THOMPSON, ANTONIO

WILLIAMS, STEPHEN N

VEDA, SURESH

YBARRA, GARY G

CLASS B

WAGGENER, CHRIS WILLIAMS, DONALD

WATER CLASS A ABRAHAMS, DWIGHT L SR ADETUNJI, OLUFUNSO A BELL, RICKY B BRITTAIN, JOHNNY J BUTLER, KENNY D CAMPBELL, GLEN A CROPPER, CHRIS L GILLESPIE, JASON B MANES, JASON A MCKINNY, GARY G MIGURA, COLTON R NOLEN, JOHN W SUTTON, DAVID L JR TURNER, RONALD L ZAMORA, ALDO CLASS D ALLDREDGE, BILLIE J JR ALLRED, RODDY G JR ARCHER, CECIL G BERRY, RYAN D BOATRIGHT, JOSHUA J BROADBENT, DONALD BROWN, BLAKE S BUCHANAN, JUSTIN W BUCKNER, JEREMY BURTON, MICHAEL W CHAPPELL, BRANDON COLEMAN, DILLAN O COLLE, PRESTON CORNER, DEMARCO CRUZ, FERNANDO CUELLAR, JUAN A DEAN, JEFFREY A DEREFINKO, DANIEL DEVRIES, CASE J DIAZ, ADRIAN R ELLER, KIRSTIN T EPPERSON, JOSH A FAHRENKRUG, EDWARD FINE, CYNTHIA M FUENTES, JESUS D GALLOWAY, JERRY L GARCIA, HEBERTO II GARCIA, ROBERT JR GARTMAN, SHARI L GEIST, AMY P GONZALES, JOSHUA D GRIFFITH, TRACY L GYGER, JOSUHA B HARRIS, BILLY HUBBARD, JARVIS J

28 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

July 2017


TCEQ MAY LICENSES HUBBELL, KEVIN E

HARGROVE, CHANCE W

CALETZ, MARIO A

BURNS, TAYLOR N

HUERTA, CHRISTIAN

LOMBRANA, ARTURO JR

COURTNEY, TED E

BUZOUDES, STEVEN

HUNT, JULIE W

MERCADO, MIKE JR

DSOUZA, JAMES S

CASTANEDA, MARTIN

HUNTER, DANIEL D

PARRILLA, GIOVANNI J

ELLIS, ADAM J

CHANT, JOSHUA J

JOHNSON, JEFFREY

QUINTANILLA, JUAN M

GONZALES, MICHAEL

CRISTOFARO, CALEB

JOHNSON, MARGARET

ROBINSON, NATHAN A

GONZALEZ, LUCAS A

FAVELA, RUBEN

LUCE, KYLE J

RYEL, JEREMY T

GREEN, ERICK A

FIEDLER, JASON A

MCGEE, MAX A

TAPIA, LUCIANO A

HERRERA, JAMES A

FLAMING, PAULA G

MCKINNEY, MATTHEW

THERIOT, MICHAEL A

HREHA, JEFFREY A

FLORES, MATTHEW

MEVIS, MATTHEW D

THOMAS, BRAD J

JACOBSON, SETH M

FUQUA, XAVIER C

MONDS, JOHNNY L JR

TODD, NATHAN A

KILCHRIST, MARK R

FUTUJMA, ALEXANDER

MOORE, JOSHUA B

TUCKER, DAVID M

LYRAFILHO, FRANCISCO

GALE, GARY L

MUNOZ, EDUARDO

VALDEZ, JASON R

MANEAU, SIMEON R

GAONA, CARLOS

MCCUTCHEON, AMY L

GUTHRIE, LESLIE B

MEEK, JON C SR

HEBERT, RUSSELL J JR

MENDOZA, ANTONIO J

HERNANDEZ, VALERIE

NAVARRO, CARLOS NELMS, RODRICK M

COLLECTIONS II

OBERSTADT, ROBERT ORTEGA, SAUL

ADAMS, JOSEPH A

MIFTARI, SHANNON O

HOLLOWAY, CHARLES

OSCARSON, ERIC C

CARONE, PAUL J

OVIASOGIE, UNITY E

HOWELL, CHRIS

PADILLA, ABDIAS

GARCIA, JESUS M JR

POLK, WILLIE J

HURST, BRIAN M

PELFREY, WILLIAM

HENSON, CODY L

RODRIGUEZ, PAUL E

HYDE, BOBBY E

PESAVENTO, GARRY

SEALS, JOHNNY M

ROWLAND, MATTHEW C

JONES, JEREMY B

PETERSON, VINCENT E

SILVA REYES, RAMON

SANDERS, DERRICK L

KELLEY, MARK L

SATTERWHITE, HENRY III

LINDSEY, JOSHUA R

SHELLEY, CHRISTOPHER

MADRID, JAMES J JR

SWEARINGEN, NICOLE

MARLEY, TYLER JAMES

PITTS, DOUGLAS R JR RIOS, REYNALDO

COLLECTIONS III

ROBICHAUX, CARROLYNE RODRIGUEZ, LUIS

DELANCEY, JACK W

UNDERWOOD, JEDREK

MCMULLEN, CHAD A

RODRIGUEZ, STEPHEN E

HELMBOLD, DAMIAN J

WATSON, CHAD E

PITTS, STEVEN A

ROTTHOFF, SEAN A

MILLER, WILLIAM F

WINDERS, BRIAN W

PRICE, RAYMOND W

RUSSELL, ALEX H

ROBERTS, DANIEL L

WORD, STETSON W

PUGA, AARON I

SALDANA, JEREMIAH R

TANNER, DEXTER K

WRIGHT, CHRIS F

RIVERA, WILFRIDO V

SALINAS, VICTOR JR

WILLIAMS, JOHNNY M JR

SATTERFIELD, WENDY SHIRZADI, MASOD

WASTEWATER

SOUTHER, JUSTIN L

TREATMENT

TANNER, TIMOTHY D THOMPSON, RYAN A

RODRIQUEZ, RANDY SMITH, LELAND R JR

CLASS D

CLASS A

THORNTON, JOSH C

TRINIDAD, JAY B ANDERSON, ERIC T

VALENTIN, JESUS N

ATTS, MARKO A

VELA, JUAN JR

BERRY, RYAN D

WEIMER, VINSON A

BLAKE, SHANNON

WILLIS, VICTOR D YELDER, LORENZO

TOLBERT, CHRISTINA J

CONNELL, GERALD SPEAR

BONNEVILLE, TROY

TREME, GREGGORY P

EMMONS, RONALD C PE

BRIETZKE, BARNEY

WEYANT, ROGER L

PARSONS, JACOB W

BRYANT, JEREMY

WHEELER, MICHAEL

REYNOLDS, RAYMOND

WHITE, DIANE K

STABENO, DAVID L

WRIGHT, KYLE A

VARGHESE, SUBY

YOUNG, JAMES M CLASS B WASTEWATER COLLECTION

ELIZONDO, GREGORY S MELLOR, WILLIAM C

COLLECTIONS I

OLSON, CHRISTOPHER PHILIP, THOMAS

ANCHONDO, DEMETRIO D

SIMPSON, JAKE R

ANDERSON, HUNTER J

SMITH, BILLY C

BECKER, JESSICA E BISSETT, ROBERT W

CLASS C

CONAWAY, RONALD D GARZA, WILLIAM E

BELTZ, JUSTIN S

GILLILAND, BROOKS M

BOUZIDI, CHAABANE

July 2017

Exam Prep Optimize Mental Readiness WHAT IF You knew “HOW” you would NOT fail?

Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org 29


TWUA CLASSIFIED ADS VARIOUS OPENING Pearland, Texas Pearland Public Works: Please visit pearlandtx. gov/careers to view and apply for various opening in the Public Works Department Email resume and salary requirements to: jdent@pearlandtx.gov TREATMENT TECH TRAINEE Arlington, Texas Under supervision,  assists  in  the  monitoring  and  operation  of  the  city’s  water  treatment  processes  and  distribution  system  to  ensure  compliance  with  regulations  and  operational  goals Two  years  (60  hours)  of  general  college  courses  including  math,  science,  computer  science,  or  engineering.    Any  equivalent  combination  of  education  and  experience  may  be  substituted  for  above.    Possession  of  a  valid  Texas  Operator’s  License,  Class  C.    Successful  completion  of  the  physical   specified   for   the   position.   (Refer  to  Physical  Standards  File  in  Employment.)    This  position  is  Safety  Sensitive  and  will  require  successful  completion  of  Criminal  Background,  Physical,  Drug  and  Alcohol  and  a  Motor  Vehicle  Evaluation  .  Safety  Sensitive  positions  are  subject  to  periodic  Drug  and/or  Alcohol  testing  in  accordance  to  the  City  of  Arlington’s  Personnel  Policies. Incumbent  is  subject  to  fume/ odor,  dust/mites,  chemical,  mechanical  and  electrical  hazards. Salary: $14.09 to $17.61 per hour http://www.arlington-tx.gov/employment/ career-opportunities/ 8174596600 WATER OPERATOR Silverton, Texas 76257 Water Operator. The Mackenzie Municipal Water Authority has an opening for a full-time water operator with a Texas “C” or better surface water license. Duties include but are not limited to the daily operation and maintenance of electric motors, pumps and valves. Adding chemicals to the water that disinfect, deodorize and clarify the water. Working with all aspects of the plant and water distribution system, including starting agitators, controlling valves and pumps. Clean and maintain filters

monitoring controls, testing water samples, recording data and completing reports as required. Clean and maintain plant facilities, grounds and remote facilities. Background check, drug test, valid TX driver’s license, good driving record, HS diploma or GED required. Must have a valid Class “C” or higher surface water license. Computer experience including use of MS Word, Excel and other software a must. Tractor and/or backhoe experience desirable and two years of related experience preferred. H.S. Diploma/ Equivalent Salary : $14 to $18 per hour Mackenzie Municipal Water Authority Bobby Moudy 806 633-4326 Fax resume and salary requirements to: 806 633-4318 Email resume and salary requirements to: mmwa@ midplains.coop This institution is an equal opportunity employer.

· Operations and Maintenance of a wastewater bio-solids management plant · Microsoft Office and computerized maintenance management databases · Wastewater sludge processing equipment to include thickeners, sludge pumps, belt presses and centrifuges · Working with hazardous chemicals including bio-gas and knowledge of the safety precautions required · Reading engineering specifications/drawings · Supervisory experience of 5+ employees to include hiring, and performance evaluation High School Diploma or GED and a TCEQ Class B Wastewater Operator License Apply online at https://www.austincityjobs. org/postings/60345 Salary $25.80 - $33.43 per hour PLANT MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN Clute, Texas

SR. PLANT OPERATOR Sugar Land, Texas The purpose of this position is to safely operate and maintain wastewater treatment plants Knowledge of methods and equipment used in all sections of wastewater treatment systems. High school graduation, or its equivalent. Current Texas Driver’s License and Class B Wastewater License. Salary: $16.78 to $21.39 Brazos River Authority Crystal Wilde 254-7613119 Fax resume and salary requirements to: 254-761-3157 Email resume and salary requirements to: crystal.wilde@brazos.org TREATMENT O & M SUPERVISOR Austin, Texas Austin Water seeks qualified, experienced wastewater professionals with a balance of technical knowledge and mature leadership for a Treatment Operations & Maintenance Supervisor position leading 12+ employees in the operation and/or maintenance of a wastewater bio-solids management plant. Minimum qualifications: Six years progressively responsible experience in the operations, maintenance and repair of industrial equipment, five years of which must be in a water/ wastewater treatment plant or wastewater collection systems facility with one year of lead or supervisory duties. Key Qualifications, Experiences and Proficiencies Sought:

30 Texas Water Utilities Journal www.twua.org

The purpose of this position is to maintain and repair BRA wastewater facilities, equipment, projects, and grounds. Knowledge of methods, practices, and equipment used in wastewater treatment systems. High School equivalency Class C Wastewater License is preferred. Salary: #13.77 to $17.56 Fax resume and salary requirements to: 254-761-3157 Email resume and salary requirements to: crystal.wilde@brazos.org WATER/ WASTEWATER OPERATOR Near Coldspring, Texas Cape Royale Utility District (Coldspring, TX) is seeking qualified applicants for positions in groundwater treatment/distribution and wastewater collections/treatment operations. Texas “C” or “D” licenses required. The District offers competitive salaries (based on experience) and excellent benefits including medical insurance and retirement savings. The District is located in a gated residential community with 700+ connections. Treatment plant operation Line/manhole repair Service taps Meter replacement Back-hoe experience is a plus High school diploma or GED equivalent Texas “C/C” or “D/D” or combination Salary $15.00 - $22.00 per hour Fax resume and salary requirements to: 936-653-2611 Email resume and salary requirements to: ttucker@cr-ud.org

July 2017


Committed to Texas

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Coverage Area Rely on Smith Pump Company and Flowserve for all your water resource pumping needs. www.flowserve.com

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July 2017  
July 2017