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əyəɬ we each come here with a gift, and if we bring “ Inthisourgiftsnəw̓ out then we—our journey to our ancestors … is shorter,

but if we struggled a bit and we didn’t bring out that gift, maybe the journey is hard.” 20

PRINCIPLE 3:

Failure to be “highly responsible” in one’s actions toward the people, the earth, the ancestors, and all beings has serious consequences, which may include the following: 3.1 Loss of physical sustenance This consequence of failing to respect the principle of ʔaχʷəstəl̕ is exemplified by the story of Waut-Salk in which some young boys act disrespectfully toward the salmon by throwing rocks at them. The consequence of this disrespect is that all the salmon leave the area, endangering Tsleil-Waututh survival by causing our ancestors to lose a critical food resource. 3.2 Loss of access to resources or social status Failure to respect the direction of Tsleil-Waututh individuals who have stewardship obligations toward a particular resource or resource-management location (e.g., regarding when to access a resource or how extensively to harvest it) could damage or destroy the resource over time and may in turn affect their social status or “good name.” In order to preserve and pass down Tsleil-Waututh knowledge of how to steward our territory and of the protocols governing resource use, the environmental integrity of the water and land and the species they sustain must

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be conserved. They are a source of learning and strength. If a resource is depleted significantly or becomes extinct, the cultural knowledge and relationships surrounding that resource are also at risk of being lost. 3.3 Loss of the tools and training that allow Tsleil-Waututh individuals to reach their full potential and the related social and cultural impacts of this loss Each Tsleil-Watt person is born with a gift that enables them to contribute to a thriving family, community, and nation. The natural landscape provides opportunities for transformative learning and growth, offering the potential for learning from the water, the land, the ancestors, and other beings. However, if we fail to maintain healthy environmental, spiritual, and cultural conditions, people will lose the opportunity to uncover and nurture their gifts. Negative personal, societal, and cultural impacts flow from this loss.

 ral Aboriginal traditional evidence given by Gabriel George on October 16, 2014, during the National O Energy Board’s hearing for the TMEX proposal, held in Chilliwack, British Columbia.

Assessment of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and Tanker Expansion Proposal

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Profile for Tseil-Waututh Nation Sacred Trust Initiative

Tseil-Waututh Nation Assessment of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and Tanker Expansion Proposal  

Landmark independent assessment by the Tsleil-Wautuh Nation of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Expansion Project. The assessment applies TWN'...

Tseil-Waututh Nation Assessment of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and Tanker Expansion Proposal  

Landmark independent assessment by the Tsleil-Wautuh Nation of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Expansion Project. The assessment applies TWN'...

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