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THE IOWA SPORTSMAN • 1517 3rd Ave NW • FORT DODGE IA 50501 • 877-424-4594 Presorted Standard U.S. Postage

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FEATURES

32 THE TURKEY SEASON DILEMMA 12 THE LEGEND OF VIRGIL EVERY IOWA SPORTSMAN SHOULD KNOW HOW TO DO” 16 BECOMING A BETTER CATFISH ANGLER 36 “THINGS OF A CONSISTENT BEARD COLLECTOR 20 TRAITS 44 2017-18 DEER HARVEST NUMBERS 24 SPAWNING SEASON SUCCESS 50 2018 PHOTO HARVEST REPORT WHITETAILS 365: AND TRUE FISHING TACTICS YOU SHOULD ALWAYS FALL BACK ON 28 PLANTING SMALL FOOD PLOTS 56 TRIED By Nick Johnson

By Ryan Graden

By Brad Durick

By Joel Johnson

By Earl Taylor

By Nick Johnson

By Tom Peplinski

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By Todd Reed

DEPARTMENTS 60 GUNDOG CORNER 6 PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT THE SPORTSMAN SPORTSMAN INTERACTIVE 64 ASK 8 IOWA IOWA COOKBOOK MOON PHASES/ 66 SUNRISE-SUNSET 9 68 FISHING IOWA 31 AROUND THE STATE 42 TROPHY ROOM By Patrick McKinney

By Ryan Eder

Turkey Recipes By Bob Jensen

Photos Submitted by Readers

ON THE COVER Welcome to the April issue of The Iowa Sportsman Magazine! On the cover this month is Travis Haney and his monster Iowa Whitetail he harvested during the second shotgun season. To read more about the hunt and the Haney Buck go to page 12.

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April 2018


PUBLISHER STATEMENT

SPRING IS ON MY MIND! In a few weeks’ time….hopefully, the temperatures will start to warm, the snow

cover will melt, the trees will start to bud, the grass will green, and the desolate Iowa

landscape will once again come alive. This all means that Spring is finally here!

Actually the Winter wasn’t all that bad in Iowa this year so I am not complaining too

TWIN RIVERS MEDIA, LLC.

much. We had a few stretches of cold that would make you think twice about stepping

1517 3rd Avenue NW Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501 877-424-4594

out until late December!

VOLUME 16 • NUMBER 4 • APRIL 2018

outside, but all in all the weather was fairly tolerable. Heck I didn’t get the snow blower No matter how mild the winter was it is always a blessing to see the warm

temperatures on the forecast this time of year. It seems to give everyone a little pep in their step and a cure to the cabin fever that has some of us chomping at the bit to get outside. For some sportsman though the thought of Spring is bitter sweet as they hate to see winter go. Winter sports and hobbies such as ice fishing, coyote hunting,

snowmobiling, and ATV riding have really flourished the last several years. Since

these are sports that really only have a shelf life of four months the thought of waiting another eight months doesn’t sit well with winter lovers.

Nevertheless, change is a part of life, especially when talking about the seasons

here in Iowa. With the Spring coming we will once again welcome the new life that

will come along with it. I say it pretty much every year this time, so I will do so once again. While the New Year is technically marked by January 1st, for sportsmen and

outdoor enthusiasts I think the New Year is really the beginning of Spring. The change in weather brings a new set of hunting sesasons, new life, brighter landscapes, and for

the most part happier people. Hey if nothing else if you already shot your first New Year’s resolution to shreds, go ahead and make a new resolution for the Sportsman’s New Year.

Gale W. McKinney II, President & CEO Patrick McKinney, Publisher Audra McKinney, VP of Finance Dustin Hector, VP of Sales Aaron McKinney, Field Editor Brandon Peterson, Art Director/Graphic Designer Dawn Busse, Office Manager Shawna Nelson, Circulation Manager

OUTDOOR MARKETING SPECIALISTS

Joyce Kenney - joyce@twinriversmedia.com Ed Juncker - ed@twinriversmedia.com Kristen Adams - kristen@twinriversmedia.com Kendra Sassman - kendra@twinriversmedia.com

SUBSCRIPTION SALES

Shawna Nelson - shawna@twinriversmedia.com Falon Geis - info@twinriversmedia.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Tom Peplinski, Nick Johnson, Brad Durick, Todd Reed, Joel Johnson, Ryan Graden, Earl Taylor, and Bob Jensen.

I can’t talk about Spring without mentioning what really has hunters and anglers

excited…turkey hunting and open water fishing! Starting in April and running through

mid-May Iowa’s turkey hunting seasons will be occurring. Soon thunderous gobbles will sound off in the mornings, bringing life to a new day in the Iowa timbers, and thousands of camo clad hunters won’t be far behind trying to put a tag on the elusive bird.

Open water anglers are chomping at the bit too this time of year as the melting ice

and runoff brings new life…and food to hungry fish.

The grass is greening, the fish are spawning, and the turkeys are gobbling….Spring

is in the air!

The information and advertising set forth herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable and compiled with great care. Twin Rivers Media, LLC. however, does not warrant complete accuracy of such information and assumes no responsibility for any consequences arising from the use thereof or reliance thereon. Our advertisers are solely responsible for the content of their respective advertisements appearing in this publication, and Publisher shall not be responsible or liable in any manner for inaccuracies, false statements or any material in such advertisement infringing upon the intellectual rights of others. Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement or space reservation at any time without notice. Publisher shall not be liable for any costs or damages if for any reason it fails to publish an advertisement. This publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopied, recorded or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2018 All rights reserved.

Patrick McKinney

@TheIowaSportsmanMagazine

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The Iowa Sportsman

The Iowa Sportsman was awarded the Niche Magazine Award for best consumer magazine in the nation!

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INTERACTIVE PAGE

WHAT AM I

IOWA SPORTSMAN ONLINE POLL ARE YOU PRIMARILY A HUNTER, A FISHERMAN, BOTH, OR NEITHER ONE? Hunter Angler Both hunt and fish I Neither fish or hunt 2.42%

21.77% 26.61%

49.19% 124 votes

CAN YOU GUESS THE OBJECT IN THE PHOTO?

Please send your guesses to The Iowa Sportsman at 1597 3rd Ave. NW Fort Dodge, IA 50501 or email to info@twinriversmedia.com. Answer will be given in the following month on the interactive page.

WHAT AM I WINNER

The winner of last month’s “What Am I” was Mark Trenton. The answer was: a snowblower blade.

Like us on Facebook! @ theiowasportsmanmagazine

FIND THE MISSING ANTLER We need your help readers! The antler in The Iowa Sportsman logo has come off and we need your help to bring it back! This antler could be anywhere, but most likely it will be hiding in a photo, so it will not be easily found. If you find the missing antler in this month’s The Iowa Sportsman magazine, send in your guesses via email to info@twinriversmedia. com or by mail with the page number and a brief description of where the antler is found. A reader with the first correct answer will be listed in next month’s magazine. Good luck! The antler last month was located on page 18.

THE WINNER OF THE MARCH ISSUE WAS KYLE LAWSON

PHOTO HUNT: CAN YOU FIND THE 12 DIFFERENCES ON THIS PHOTO?

Answers: Top left corner a rock has a piece added, top right a rock is turned around, white rock has a hole in it, green rock is red, bottom a rock is missing, bottom left of the red rock is lighter colored, top right orange rock is missing a piece, a toy soldier in bottom left corner, necklace in top right, bottom silver black rock is bigger, green gem in top right, gray rock is darker on one end,.

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April 2018

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I FIRST MET TRAVIS HANEY about seven years ago while I was working for The Iowa Sportsman Magazine and filming hunts. We were searching for a prostaffer to film with and Travis was one of the applicants whose video interviews came across my desk. I immediately saw that he had a deep knowledge of deer and deer behavior and an absolute passion for the sport, that of which he carried in a respectful manner. Qualities that make a truly great hunter. After spending time filming with Travis and meeting his father, Bob, it was obvious to me that deer hunting is a way of life for the Haney family and they take every aspect of it very seriously. The Haney’s have a beautiful property in Southern Iowa and have developed Bee and C farms which they meticulously manage in efforts to grow and support healthy, mature deer. Bob and his 12

The Iowa Sportsman

wife Brenda bring a slice of southern charm to Iowa and have always welcomed me in with open arms, to which I am grateful. Just downright good people. The Haney property definitely has the right ingredients to grow and support trophy bucks but since they first purchased the initial chunk of it back in 1995, a giant pushing 200 inches has eluded them. They have seen

bucks of this caliber on various occasions and a handful have been taken by neighbors over the years but giant deer like this are elusive. The mold finally broke this Winter while I was out duck hunting the final leg of our Iowa south zone season, a picture from Travis came across my phone and when I opened the image I was left speechless. An absolute monster buck with Travis sitting proudly behind it.

MANAGING VIRGIL

The Haney property is nestled in the hill country of south central Iowa, one of the meccas for big Whitetails. Large chunks of timber coat the ridges, valleys and bottomland open up to reveal food plots, grassland and small to medium planted fields in strategic placement. The whole design To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


is centered around giving the deer food and cover throughout the year. Aside from planting, mowing trails, checking cameras, turkey hunting and general maintenance, their intrusion on the property is kept pretty minimal, especially leading into deer season to keep human pressure low. I’ve had many in-depth discussions with Travis about deer management and how they approach their ground and it always fascinates me to learn about the different techniques and practices they employ. Travis tells me that it may take 10-15 years to produce a giant buck. What he means by this is several factors repeated over time coupled with genetics & hard work to promote growth and development as that buck matures in ages 5 and 6. One thing they advocate is not focusing on shooting a Boone and Crocket deer April 2018

each season. If it happens, great, if not then nobody is going home crying about it. On the flip side, the mindset that you have to shoot a Booner every year can sometimes lead to “buck fever”. Their reasoning for this is nothing new, but it involves passing on large bucks that may not be fully mature and giving them a chance to reach their full potential. The star of this article, Virgil, is a prime example which we will discuss in a bit. One critical factor to the Haney’s management plan is food plots and making sure the deer have nourishment throughout the seasons. They focus heavily on planting corn and soybeans which are a staple winter diet for the deer on their ground. They use electric fences during the growing season and into early fall to avoid the deer destroying the crops too early. I got to witness two things in a year

where they had a poor growing season and heavy deer activity. Come late season a lot of the deer activity had moved onto neighboring properties which still had crops available. Or high mortality rates effected yearlings and older to mid-aged bucks. One thing Travis stresses in combination with the food plots is harvesting does. This not only helps to keep the deer herd in balance but also cuts down on competition during leaner times. Another major ingredient to this whole mix is effective cull management. When Travis talks about a “Cull” deer, to him this is any buck that does not have the potential growth to be a 170”+ deer. Some of these “Cull” deer could be main frame 8 at 3 years old or mature buck that has been observed to the age of 5 and has reached his potential at mid 150”s. The Haneys run multiple TheIowaSportsman.com

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THE LEGEND OF VIRGIL cameras across the property and put in the time to identify bucks using certain areas each season, watching them grow or fail to grow and deciding which animals make the hit list of cull or shooter. Almost always the number of cull bucks will outnumber the number of genetically superior deer, so relatives get a chance to help out in this effort. By culling bucks with less desirable traits they - hope to expand the voids within herd population in favor of trophy potential to then move in and fill that void.

HUNTING VIRGIL

The success of the Haney’s management strategy over the years has paid off with a few superb bucks being taken along with many mature does. What this management has also done is grow a giant, a buck affectionately named Virgil. Now I’d like to tell you that Travis crawled through mud for 6 miles uphill and fought this deer bare handed but that simply wasn’t the case. This buck had a pattern and they knew it well. Virgil first started showing up on their trail cameras about 4 years ago and he only gave slight indication that he would amount to a giant. He was a nice buck with potential so they kept their eye on him. Aside from the

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The Iowa Sportsman

winter months, it was a complete mystery as to where Virgil lived. He was a ghost and even the neighbors who all hunt and run cameras had never seen him before. Over the next two years, Virgil would start showing up around Thanksgiving in a specific area and then stay for the winter to capitalize on the food and cover offered. He was a big deer by now but apparently loved to fight because when they would start seeing him, he would have numerous broken tines. Although he was big he still didn’t have much mass which could possibly attribute to the broken mess of a rack he displayed. Virgil was a very patternable deer and seemed very comfortable in his winter area. Come spring, Virgil would disappear again and not be seen until late fall. Fast forward to the 2017 deer season and Virgil once again graced the Haney’s property with his presence around Thanksgiving. This year was different though, Virgil had exploded into a massive 6x6 with tall tines and a few stickers to add character. When he showed up on the trail camera the Haneys excitement grew tenfold. The product of years of hard work and strict management was paying off. Travis now had him zoned in and hoped for the right wind. Travis hunted Virgil diligently and had

an encounter with him early on when bow hunting the field the buck was using. He placed a buck decoy about 30 yards away from the tower blind that he was sitting in that night, hoping that if Virgil came in the large 12-acre beanfield, this decoy would close the gap. - Before long a decent 5-yearold buck showed up and began sizing up the decoy. After a bit the buck’s attitude began to change and he lowered his ears and turned to leave the field. It was then that Travis saw the giant. Virgil had pushed this mature buck out of the field and stood where the 5-year -old buck had just been. Virgil did not care about the decoy and - was out of range. He never did present a shot but that only left Travis determined, for he knew Virgil would slip up before late season. The bow season passed and Travis and his Dad made plans to hunt this same field during second shotgun season with a muzzle loader. When opening day came, Travis and Bob slipped into the blind around early afternoon knowing the deer would begin to filter in soon. Around 2:30 pm the field began to load with deer and they both sat still, scanning patiently. 3:00 PM rolled around and both Travis and Bob knew that it was a special evening when they had 3 of their “Cull” shooter deer already in the field. They both knew that even these deer had to be passed on a night like this. All the signs were alluding to a true giant stepping out from the darkness. A half-hour passed when Travis looked over and saw a huge buck at the edge of the field staring out at the other deer. He quietly whispered to Bob, “Virgil is in the field”. They had to contain their excitement and work in slow motion since there were 40-50 does near their blind and that’s a lot of eyes and noses that could spoil the party. As Virgil approached out of the creek bed, Travis eased open a shooting window and tried his best to calm the nerves that were surging through him. By the time Travis and Bob had lowered the shooting window and got the gun into position, - - Travis ranged him at 141 yards, steadied the crosshairs behind the shoulder and let the muzzle loader do the work. Virgil fell where he stood and lay motionless on the ground. A buck of a lifetime lay before Travis and his Dad. Virgil marks a historic achievement for the Haneys. He is the largest deer they have taken to date from their property and a testament to their efforts in management. The buck is much more than just a trophy on the wall though. Virgil is a legend, a memory of countless hours and sweat, land management, family gatherings at the farm, hanging tree stands, years of effort and so much more. A true monarch of the woods. To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


April 2018

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CATFISHING IS EXPLODING IN THE UNITED STATES. In many circles it is considered the fastest growing segment of fishing. While some long time catfish experts deny this increase in anglers and insist it is just people coming out from the shadows and being seen like they never have before. One thing we cannot argue is catfishing is popular. It is obvious that catfishing is getting more press, and why wouldn’t it? Of course it would when pictures of huge fish show up on social media every day. It is actually becoming common April 2018

to see blue cats over 100 pounds caught somewhere in the United States. If you take a look at social media catfish groups you will see many people getting into catching catfish. You see

those who have always catfished but are now going all in and upping the game to reach the next level. You are seeing people who have fished for other things changing species to catfishing. Even with all the hype of catfishing growing, there still is not much new in terms of information on how to catch these great fish. Sure there are articles everywhere, most are very basic. Of course there is some new info coming in with new techniques and gear. As the catfish world catches up with TheIowaSportsman.com

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BECOMING A BETTER CATFISH ANGLER the likeness of say bass or walleyes there are some simple steps that can help you become a better and more efficient catfish angler. I use these steps on a daily basis and I know many other successful catfish anglers do too. • Understand the catfish – The best catfish anglers are students of the fish, knowing and understanding what makes them tick. The spawn, habitat, patterns and what triggers them to do what they do. These successful anglers understand seasonal migrations and what dictates their location throughout the season. They also know about baits and the best way to present them to have the best success. • Fish the Best Catfish Waters The best catfishermen fish the best destinations. Larry Myhre, retired outdoor writer for the Sioux City Journal in Iowa wrote “you should fish where the fish are.” This does not just mean the best places for catfish, but also the best times of year, time of day, and best locations. All while

prepared anglers around. They have to produce fish every day but when the fish don’t cooperate they have to find a way to put a positive spin on it to keep the clients entertained as they tweak the plan and adjust in hopes of finding success. They have an extremely positive attitude.

using the best baits and methods to catch more and bigger catfish. If budget won’t allow travel all over the United States, pick the best catfish water that you can find to stay in your budget. • Be Mentally Prepared – Successful cat anglers are some of the most mentally

The next catfish is just one anchor drop or cast away. They are able to focus on connecting the dots to find what will put fish in the boat, while ensuring the guests have a good time. The best anglers are already thinking two or three spots ahead of where they are actually fishing.

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• Confidence in Catfishing – This could easily go into the category of mentally prepared but it is such an important piece of the puzzle that it should stand on its own. Confidence is demanding success. If you don’t believe you can catch catfish in every situation you probably won’t. If you are sure of yourself, your techniques, knowledge, electronics and gear you are prepared to succeed and won’t except anything else. Confidence is more important than many people think but it is a key to success. • Hard Work – The best catfish anglers work hard. They move and use efficiency in the boat or shore to cover more water and put more fish in the boat with the time allotted. They study the surroundings and utilize their equipment to find the fish in given locations and match the findings with the knowledge of the fish they have learned over the years of experience. On the water success is directly correlated with hard work off the water as well, such as preparing a game plan and reviewing catch records and notes to head off any situations that may arise.

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• Top-notch Equipment – The best catfish anglers don’t always use the most expensive equipment, but they always use the best equipment that can stand up to the constant abuse that it must endure. From their electronics to rods, reels, hooks, sinkers and nets. They also maintain said equipment to keep it in working order so there’s no surprises on the next outing. • Technology – For the advanced angler, technology is what sets them apart. Besides understanding what makes the fish do what they do they know how to utilize the best technology available to them. For Example, with the new Humminbird Helx G2N or Solix units, catfish anglers now have access to the best side image technology with MEGA imaging. They also have the newest weapon in catfishing on uncharted rivers and lakes with AutoChart Live. This goes back to hard work but one can now put in the work and time to create a custom map of the lake or river. They can also run side image while mapping to get a lay of the land. Once this is done they simply go back to the areas of the map that hold fish and look at the spot. Tie all of that in with new trolling motors like the Minn Kota Ulterra. A trolling motor with spot lock can be used as your anchor. With just a push of a button on the remote and you can make a move. This simply saves time with moving and allows you to be more efficient in the number of spots you can fish in a given day. This will directly increase catfishing efficiency. • Organization – The best catfish anglers have a plan. A plan of where to start fishing based on previous days April 2018

or weather conditions and time of year. The book Advanced Catfishing Made Easy can help with the planning of these starting points. The angler is also organized in that the gear is set up and ready to go. Bait is loaded and in an easy to get to Frabill bucket or Big Frig (for frozen baits). The boat is clean tidy for easy movement, and ability to find and quickly get to everything you need when you need it. • Attention to Details – Everything stated so far are details, but now that you are getting out on the water you need to pay attention to what is going on. How is the weather, how is the water. What are the fish reacting to and how are they biting. By paying attention to these small details you can make adjustments and fine tune the gear, pattern or baits to the situation you are being faced with. Sometimes these conditions change two or even three times in a given day and the attention to detail and ability to go with the flow can keep you more successful through it all. These are nine suggestions to make you a better catfish angler. They are steps that all great anglers in many species use. You probably will not be able to master all of the steps overnight but fishing is an ongoing adventure and over time you can learn and adapt to these steps eventually mastering them all making yourself a better angler day in and day out. There truly is no better teacher than time on the water and with these simple steps your time on the water will be a more effective and you will be a more successful catfish angler.

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I LOVE TURKEY HUNTING. It will be part of my Spring routine until I can’t walk and when my trigger finger is too weak to set off a shell. Turkey hunting is the one hunt that a kid or an octogenarian can hunt with success regularly; there is no magical formula; when it works, it works, and when it doesn’t, there are still great sights and sounds of spending a spring morning in the timber. There are three different aspects of the hunt which must come together consistently to score on the long beards. If you don’t understand and implement each part well, there will be a lack of consistency. Create a rhythm and philosophy about your style of hunting that works for you. Your philosophy supersedes your calling ability; your approach to turkey dictates the level of success. I have shot a turkey in the first ten minutes of the hunt, and I have hunted for four straight days without hearing a 20

The Iowa Sportsman

gobble. You might think you have all the right gear and your calls sound terrific, but turkeys don’t always react immediately or as you would expect. When they’re hot, they’re hot, but when they’re not, it easy to give up and go home too early. Don’t give up on a favorite spot just because of a silent day or two. Persevere through the dry days. When you have plenty of time, you can be more patient. When I try to hunt and work my day job, I rush and push the hunt too fast and too hard. It is tempting to try to seal the deal in the first two hours

instead of letting the hunt unfold more naturally. Be willing to roll over and take a nap for an hour or get up from your spot and look for mushrooms. The very first thing I do when I set up is to take every call out of my vest and have them laid near me. The last thing I want to do is rummage through my vest looking for the slate or my box full of mouth calls with a tom hollering nearby. I use my range finder and identify distances to different landmarks; I need to know where I can’t shoot; big toms look closer than they are when the excitement climaxes before the shot. Never approach a new set up casually; you must anticipate several scenarios playing out for you. Believe every set up has a turkey just over the ridge edge which could be on you silently before you have all equipment ready to shoot. What worked yesterday may not work tomorrow. Experiment with a different To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


set up as the day passes. Start with a set up deeper into the timber and close to a roosting area, but move along to field edges for the nine o’clock feeding. Turkeys have a routine that takes them from the timber to the fields and then back to the roosting area by evening. In my younger years, I liked the run and gun method for covering several different ravines during the afternoon; by standing at the head of a ravine and calling, I could arouse even the sleepiest gobbler to gobble back. In most cases of life and work, I promote hustle. With turkey hunting, I promote NOT being in a hurry to head to the timber in the dark. If I could remember the last 50 turkeys I have shot, I shot only two before 8 a.m. The other 48 I shot with the sun shining brightly, the grass is dry, and me having had a good breakfast before the hunt. I like to get to the timber by nine rather than 5:30 a.m. April 2018

And, if there is no action, after I make a few loud calls, I roll over and take a midmorning nap. Experiment with hunting at different times besides the early morning two hours. I have shot birds as late as 7 p.m. It is not enough to own equipment;

sound like a boss hen to young hens. Not all gobblers will react to a bossy old hen; sometimes a lighter pitched call will stimulate him. When I want a completely different quality of sound, my slate call fits the bill. Just as a child throwing a temper

WHEN YOU HAVE PLENTY OF TIME, YOU CAN BE MORE PATIENT. WHEN I TRY TO HUNT AND WORK MY DAY JOB, I RUSH AND PUSH THE HUNT TOO FAST AND TOO HARD. consistent successful hunters know which call to use in which situations. It is easy to go online and order a vast array of calls. There are more call manufacturers today than ever before. My six-dollar Burnham Brothers box call that I started with back in 1980 still works, but I would feel nearly naked just using a box call. I carry a variety of mouth calls that can

tantrum in Walmart gets a parent’s attention, so does my 10 minutes of nonstop calling. With only pausing to catch my breath, I have consistently forced a gobbler out of being quiet and reclusive. Armed with a mouth call, slate, and box calls, I carry on continuously with an attitude. It is loud, aggressive and in your face. I often use a mouth call, TheIowaSportsman.com

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TRAITS OF A CONSISTENT BEARD COLLECTOR and a Quaker Boy Boat Paddle box call simultaneously. This stereo-sounding fake hen can pierce even the most-windy of mornings with its high volume and henlike racket; sometimes three yelps and a cluck or purr is not enough. I am a big mouthed turkey hunter; I call loud. I set up along the edge of open fields where I can see 500 yards or more. I want my calls to penetrate the deep woods, but also boom across an open field. My loud calling fits my personality. Set up in places that fits your calling style. My brother’s style is soft and gentle; he prefers to set up on a timbered ridge right above a roosting tree. There is not much variance between today’s calls; we all have our preferences in brand names. Our loyalty to a certain brand is developed by how a call feels in our mouth, how long it will last, how much time does it take to maintain the call, and perhaps even initial cost of the call. Consistent hunters settle into just a few calls that they learn to trust. Decoys work. Period. However, don’t

get cheap and try to use a decoy that belonged to your dad; today’s decoys are vibrant and realistic. The hundred dollars it takes to purchase a high-quality decoy will give you a good return on your investment. The poorly painted decoys of yesterday should be the object of target practice. Keep it simple; don’t over accessorize your arsenal to the point of ridiculous. Your equipment doesn’t finalize the hunt; your equipment allows you to get into a position to harvest a tom. Persistence and drive will provide the needed mental edge to overcome mistakes and unfilled tags. When I first began hunting, I worked ten different birds over a two-year period and screwed up on harvesting a single bird. When I finally shot the eleventh bird that I had called in, I felt the curse lifted. Had I given up and picked up golf, I would not be turkey hunting today. Mistakes are part of learning to become a consistent turkey hunter. Regardless of your calling ability, your desire, or your philosophy of hunting, successful turkey hunters make sure their set up is near perfect. Turkeys will do their best

to surprise you; overlook a brush pile, and the turkey will work his way into you only to hang up behind a pile of shot-proof tree limbs. Set up too close to a ravine edge, and all you might see is a turkey eye-ball peeping over the edge looking for the location of the soon-tobe love of his life for the day. Most setups are done quickly after hearing a hot tom; we don’t have time to cut branches and create any temporary blind. My consistent success rate is due to my preparing several calling trees before the season. I know which tree I will set under before the actual hunt. I have cleaned out any underbrush and pulled over some downfall to break up my position. Good scouting is more than just knowing there are birds in the area. Iowa is a great state to turkey hunt. There are birds in every county. Our seasons allow a hunter to choose the number of days he can commit himself to be successful. I prefer hunting in May rather than April. Each season has its advantages; pick the one that fits your style and personality.

TURKEY HUNTING TIPS • Sleep in. A rested body makes better decisions and can last longer in the field. • Mentally and physically prepare for the hunt by creating temporary natural blinds, by knowing yardages and by having all calls ready to use. • Turkeys move from timber to farm fields throughout the day; you must move also. • Purchase a high-quality decoy. • Don’t rush the hunt. Let it unfold naturally. • Try a turkey calling tantrum around midday to stir up the quiet woods. • Loud calling works, but learn to adjust the volume down once the tom responds to your loudness.

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April 2018

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WHEN FISHERMEN THINK of fish spawning in Iowa, a few key species come to WALLEYE

mind. Bluegill, crappie, white bass, largemouth, smallmouth, and arguably the most celebrated, walleye. These species in particular become susceptible to angling during these key spawning times and offer anglers a chance at a truly large specimen. White bass and Walleye for example make large runs in rivers and can congregate in numbers below natural and manmade obstacles en route upstream. Bluegill, crappie and bass often migrate to shallower water and construct beds where they vigorously guard their developing fry. Not all of these species spawn at the same time though so what makes them flip the switch and begin spawning?

PERCH AND PIKE

Some of the earliest spawners in Iowa are the Yellow Perch and Northern Pike. Pike sometimes spawn before all of the ice is off a given water body. The timing of this is dictated by photoperiod, water temperature and water levels. Typically, a female pike is accompanied by one or more males in very shallow water where she deposits her eggs amongst emergent vegetation. Reed beds are classic examples of this. Areas where creeks or snow runoff enters a body of water can congregate numerous pike looking to spawn. Pike can be caught pre-spawn and a common method for this is during late ice using tip-ups rigged with dead bait such as herring, tullibee or smelt or even live bait like shuckers and large shiners. Be wary of ice conditions though! Look for areas where water may flow into a shallow bay with a soft bottom. When pike begin to spawn and shortly post-spawn, they can be difficult if not impossible to catch. They simply shut down for a bit while April 2018

they recover. Perch are a bit later and generally spawn when water temps reach 4050 degrees, the upper 40’s being more common. Photoperiod plays a large factor in the timing of this. Perch are group spawners and the females will lay large ribbons of eggs on aquatic vegetation and especially submerged trees. Spawning generally occurs at night or in the early hours of morning in depths ranging from 2-10 feet for most Iowa lakes. Late ice perch fishing can be some of the best all season as these fish school up in droves. Once the ice goes out these fish can be caught using conventional methods and even trolling such as you would for walleye, just with downsized gear. The perch that spent the winter roaming deeper basin areas now congregate along breaks and contours that separate the deeper basin from shallow water. When spawning hits, perch move shallower and can be difficult to catch as their focus is on spawning rather than eating.

Walleye spawning comes at a similar timeframe to Perch and this generally occurs in late April or May depending on water temps. Photoperiod, moon phase and water levels are factors that play in. Water temperature is the biggest factor that dictates walleye spawning and this occurs around 43-47 degrees. A sudden cold snap that drops water temps may delay this activity and the walleyes play the cards to ensure their eggs have the best chance at survival. In lakes, walleyes spawn over shallow gravel substrate and this most often occurs at night or in very low light periods. Their transition to spawn in the Spring brings them out of deep water to stage along depth breaks and contours similar to perch. Slow trolling these breaks and finding areas of moving water are key locations for catching spring walleye. In rivers, the water temperature factor for spawning remains the same but the timing may be slightly different and is largely affected by water levels. If water levels get too high and blow a stream or river out, walleyes may forego spawning altogether. It is this key migration in Iowa that draws hordes of fisherman to the local dams to try their luck at the Spring walleye run. You will often see the smaller males arrive first, followed by the larger females. When the spawn is complete, a second wave of smaller males and sub-adult females will show up or still remain and actively feed. This action can go on for up to a few weeks depending on mother nature. TheIowaSportsman.com

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SPAWNING SEASON

WHITE BASS

For those river anglers who love to target walleye, stick around for a couple weeks after the walleye spawn and keep lines tight with some hard fighting and arguably decent tasting white bass. Some people won’t eat them but if you take the red meat out I think they make great table fare. White bass are also temperature driven spawners. However, in rivers or areas with flowing water they can also be triggered by rises in water levels. They ideally like to spawn when water temps hit 54 degrees and they often accompany the first rise in water levels after the walleye spawn, at least in my experience on the Des Moines River. In reservoirs, these fish begin to congregate along windswept shorelines and the mouths of creek arms. Target them using a multitude of conventional tackle such as twisters, rapalas and spoons. These fish are aggressive feeders and generally aren’t too picky about what they hunt down.

BASS

From a water temp standpoint, largemouth and smallmouth bass spawning has slightly less rhyme or reason than other species

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The Iowa Sportsman

but that is only because I have seen bass guarding fry on beds from late-May all the way through mid-July. Generally speaking though, bass look to spawn when water temps reach into the low 60s. Some fish will spawn deeper, 6-10 feet but most will post up in shallower water. The parent fish clear sediment and debris from the bottom to create a “bed” and this is where eggs are deposited and fry are guarded until they are completely free-swimming and can readily feed on their own. Sometimes bass will select non-traditional spawning sites which may be the side of a rock, tree stump or even an old tire on the bottom. Just like other sunfish, the male bass of both smallmouth and largemouth are the ones responsible for guarding the fry. Bass sitting on their beds can be pretty susceptible to angling so if you catch one, handle them gently and return immediately if that is the intent. They can also be very tough to catch when locked on a bed, it just depends on their mood! Before spawning, bass will slowly start to transition out of deeper water when the ice comes off and when water starts to hit the 50s they begin to move shallow again. Pre-spawn bass are a blast to catch especially when they move shallow and are feeding aggressively, and this offers a chance

to catch some really big female fish.

CRAPPIE

Spawning behavior in crappies is very similar to bluegills and bass and they sometimes spawn in large congregations when conditions are ideal. Crappies typically spawn in shallow water amongst emergent vegetation such as pencil reeds but in places like Brushy Creek I have seen them spawn on the sides of fallen trees and alongside old stumps. The ideal temp for crappie spawning is around 6264 degrees give or take a couple. After the eggs are deposited and fertilized, the male remains with the brood until the fry are free-swimming and self-sufficient. Catching crappies pre-spawn can be as simple as locating the basin they posted up in during the Winter and fishing slow with light tackle. These fish after ice-out will often remain suspended in these basins in large schools and as the water warms they slowly begin to move towards shallower breaks and weed edges. Suspending a small minnow on a hair jig below a bobber is a deadly combo for early Spring crappie.

BLUEGILL

Many of us as kids came to love catching bluegills during their spawn. The sight of that honeycomb bottom of little pits with dark male bluegills darting and flashing about, angrily defending their brood is a comical sight. Bluegills spawn when water temperatures approach 70 degrees. They are notorious colony spawners and groups of 100 or more can sometimes be seen guarding their beds crammed into one small area. They select areas with a soft bottom that offers ease of ground clearing and adjacent cover and often return to the same spawning areas each year. Bluegills are incredibly susceptible to angling when they are on beds and are not difficult to catch so take care not to exploit them during this vulnerable time. This is often when I catch my biggest gills of the season and I like to return the big guys and if I’m in the mood for fish tacos, keep a few of the smaller fish for the table. Each fish species has its own unique way of carrying out the miracle of life, Mother nature is the governing hand that dictates when this occurs and we as anglers are responsible for respecting this mission. Capitalizing on certain species when they converge to spawn can be an absolute blast and some of the best fishing all season can be had during these times. Be safe and good luck on the water!

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April 2018

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THIS MONTH’S QUESTION comes from Al in eastern Iowa. His question is “I’ve planted some food plots in the past but have never attempted a grain plot like soybeans. I have a tractor and disc, a hand seeder, and a backpack sprayer. I have about two acres to work with and would like to plant soybeans in hopes they last until December. Can you give me a step by step of how to get this accomplished with the equipment I have? Is two acres enough for soybeans? Thank you for your help.” I’d like to start with the step by step on how to plant soybeans with the equipment Al has to work with.

PLANTING SOYBEANS

First, you need to till the ground enough so that when the seed is spread you are able to go back over with the disc and work them into the ground. This can 28

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be hard with just a disc if you’re going into fallow ground or tall grasses for example. A good way to clear grasses from a firsttime plot is by burning…but I’m always a little worried about burning simply because of the risk of the fire getting away from me. If burning is an option, that is a great way to clear away dead and matted weeds. If not, discing over and over will

usually break up the ground enough to get some soil over the soybean seeds at planting. You would be surprised at how little soil soybean seeds need over it to germinate. So, step one is to simply disc the ground to expose the soil. Second, if you are planting a field into soybeans for the first time, you’ll want to inoculate the seeds. Inoculating seeds is essential for legumes (which soybeans are) so that they can produce their own nitrogen. Your seed supplier should be able to supply you with the inoculant. Follow the directions on the inoculant bag/container and try to make sure the inoculant is spread into the seeds so that all seeds are covered. Next, you spread seed and fertilizer over the tilled ground all at the same time. I would recommend a category 2.7To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


3.5 Roundup ready seed for eastern Iowa planted around the end of April to the beginning of May. For two acres, I would use three bags of seed. With normal planting, a good seeding rate is 140,000 seeds per acre (one bag is 140,000 seeds). But when discing in soybean seeds, I recommend going a little heavier. Because soybeans are legumes and produce their own nitrogen when inoculated, you only need to fertilize with a low nitrogen/ high potash fertilizer. I have access to pre-mixed fertilizer of 5-14-42, I use this blend at about two 50-pound bags per acre. For Al’s two acres, he would want to spread out three bags of seed and 200 pounds of a low nitrogen/high potash fertilizer. You can literally throw the seed and fertilizer out by hand, or you can use your hand seeder…do whatever you find more efficient! The next step is to work in the seed and fertilizer using your disc. Soybean seed germinates best when planted at a depth of ½ to 1 ½ inches…but don’t worry too much if some is a little deeper and some seed is still on top the ground. Remember we planted a little heavy anticipating less than perfect germination. Once you see most of the seed in the ground (some will always be on top using this method) after

April 2018

you are finished planting. Cultipacking the field is a good next step but entirely not necessary. You have now finished with planting your soybean plot. The last step in this process is spraying to kill weeds. If done correctly and at the right time, you only need to do this once per year. I like to wait until about 4-6 weeks after planting to go back and spray. This is all dependent on the weather, how much rain you get, and what growth you have on your soybeans and weeds. Ideally, the soybeans will be up to about

four or five inches and the weeds right there with them…maybe the weeds are slightly taller. If you spray right at this time, you’ll get good control of the weeds and hopefully the soybeans will canopy over before new weeds start to grow again. A typical backpack sprayer will hold two gallons of solution. To spray two acres of food plot, you’ll most likely need to refill a two-gallon sprayer 6-10 times. You can either mix a solution of 1.5-2% glyphosate (the active chemical in Roundup), or figure out an application

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WHITETAILS 365

rate of .5 to 1 quart per acre. For small sprayers like Al’s backpack sprayer, it is usually easier to just keep mixing a 1.52% solution and keep spraying until your plot is covered. Glyphosate is rain-fast in an hour (four hours or more is ideal) and you need the plants to be growing for it to work effectively. Spray on a warm day just after any dew has burned off from the morning. Follow all label instructions for the chemical you are using…mix a solution…and spray until your plot is covered. Using a hand held or backpack sprayer on larger food plots isn’t the most efficient method of spraying, but I’ve used a hand-held sprayer in the past for as much as five acres when my boom sprayer was broke. Planting soybean food plots with minimal equipment isn’t really that hard. Soybeans are actually very easy to grow for a food plot. Usually the more difficult issue with growing soybeans is will they be able to withstand browsing pressure by the local deer herd, or withstand severe weather. These are sometimes the bigger reasons many people can’t grow soybeans. I’ve had soybean plots as small as one acre be a total success, and had larger plots as big as three acres fail. Drought and severe browsing by deer are the two biggest reasons for plot failure. If drought occurs, there is little you can do but watch your plot burn up…replanting with a fall plot. Deer pressure is in our control…at least somewhat. If weather conditions are normal, and deer densities are “normal” (that’s subjective) there should be no reason two acres of soybeans won’t grow and thrive giving you a great fall plot to hunt over. Obviously, higher deer densities, poor surrounding habitat, or overall lack of summer forage will put a tremendous 30

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amount of pressure on a soybean food plot. To counter these issues, you can try to locate your soybean plot near agricultural soybeans so that less pressure is put on yours. Another thing to consider is doing what you can to increase the quality of surrounding habitat (keep reading this column for those ideas). Under normal conditions, it is my opinion two acres or more of soybeans should be able to withstand deer browsing. Each hunter/landowner must assess their own situation…but if your soybeans are getting browsed off on two, three, or even five acres or more you might have a problem with an over-populated deer herd. I’ve seen this before dozens of times. My initial suggestion if this happens to you is to harvest more does…not for the sake of being able to plant a soybean plot… but because a ravaged larger soybean plot is simply a symptom of too many deer. Many hunters get emotional about this topic, and I realize it’s not a particularly popular concept with many…but it is directly relevant to Al’s question of “is two acres enough for soybeans?”. The short answer is two acres should be enough to plant a soybean plot. The great thing about a soybean plot is if you get around to August and you are realizing that your soybeans aren’t going to make it because of drought or over browsing, you can always till under the remaining soybeans with your disc and plant a green fall plot. It’s for this reason that soybeans are such a great choice for the food plotter. Al, I hope this helps you plant your first soybean plot. Make sure to send any questions or ideas about what you’d like me to write about to tapeppy@gmail.com. Give me as much information and details about your scenario as you can! To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


AROUND THE STATE

FATAL DEER DISEASE CONFIRMED IN WAYNE COUNTY FIRST CASE IN WILD DEER OUTSIDE NORTHEAST IOWA

A hunter-harvested adult doe taken in southeast Wayne County during the first shotgun deer season has tested positive for the presence of chronic wasting disease (CWD). This is the first hunter-harvested wild deer outside of northeast Iowa to test positive for the always fatal disease.The deer was shot on Dec. 5. “We contacted the hunter once it was confirmed,” said Terry Haindfield, wildlife biologist, and coordinator for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources chronic wasting disease monitoring effort. “The test results are disappointing but not surprising. We are seeing an increasing number of CWD positive deer in northeast Iowa and from our neighboring states.” Haindfield said there have been seven additional CWD positive tests so far from deer in northeast Iowa that came from the 2017 seasons – six in Allamakee County and one in Clayton County. The Iowa DNR is awaiting the final set of test results from the special collection in Allamakee and Clayton counties in January. “We will set up a meeting in Wayne County to discuss what this means for local hunters and landowners and listen to their

concerns and together we will form a plan to try to prevent or contain this from getting a solid foothold,” he said. Chronic wasting disease is a neurologic disease of deer and elk, belonging to the family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases. Though it shares certain features with other TSEs like bovine spongiform encephalopathy (“Mad Cow Disease”) or scrapie in sheep, it is a distinct disease apparently affecting only deer, moose, and elk. It is always fatal. The disease first appeared in the wild deer herd in 2013 and each year since, the Iowa DNR has placed extra emphasis on tracking the movement and attempting to stop or slow the disease with the cooperation of successful hunters.

UPCOMING FAMILY FISHING EVENTS: Ottumwa Park Pond

March 24

11:00 am

Ottumwa Parks & Rec

Terry Trueblood, Iowa City

March 24

11:00 am

Iowa City Parks & Rec 319-356-5100

641-682-7873

Prairie Park (Cedar Bend), Cedar Rapids

March 31

11:00 am

Cedar Rapids Parks & Rec

319-286-5799

Banner Lake (South), Indianola at Summerset State Park

April 7

11:00 am

Warren County Isaac Walton League

515-229-7418

Heritage Pond, Dubuque

April 14

10:00 am

Dubuque CCB

563-556-6745

North Prairie, Cedar Falls

April 14

11:00 am

Dan Kirby, Iowa DNR Fisheries

563-927-3276

Sand Lake, Marshalltown

April 21

11:00 am

Marshall CCB

641-752-5490

UPCOMING URBAN TROUT STOCKING Discovery Park, Muscatine March 23, 10:00 am Lake of the Hills, Davenport March 23, 10:30 am Wilson Lake, Fort Madison March 23, 12:00 pm Ottumwa Park Pond, Wapello County March 24, 11:00 am Terry Trueblood Lake, Iowa City March 24, 11:00 am Prairie Park (Cedar Bend), Cedar Rapids, March 31, 10:00 am Banner Lake (South), Indianola at Summerset State Park April 7, 11:00 am Heritage Pond, Dubuque April 14, 10:00 am North Prairie, Cedar Falls April 14, 11:00 am Sand Lake, Marshalltown Marshall County April 21 11:00 am

• courtesy of the Iowa DNR

April 2018

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THERE IS NOTHING LIKE a cool crisp morning in the Spring. A gentle blanket of

a mouth diaphragm along with a slate or box call at the same time. You need to convince those roosted toms that there is a pile of ladies waiting for him to come. With luck, your setup will offer a shot.

dew, or possibly frost, on the ground, the sun slowly warming up the sky, and the silence that is shattered by a tom turkey sounding off from his roost. A gobble will get a hunters heart a-pumping, his adrenaline running, and his senses focused. Hearing that call is just the SEASON 1 (APRIL 16-19, 2018) beginning of the hunt. The rest is the hard part. The real question is, are you up to it? If you’re planning on purchasing a turkey tag for one of the 2018 turkey seasons, read through some of the following tips and tricks that will hopefully allow you to carry a “jelly head” out of the timber and back to your home!

YOUTH SEASON (APRIL 7-15, 2018)

The Iowa youth season is one of the greatest opportunities for a youngster to harvest a large Iowa turkey. The added bonus of purchasing a youth tag is that if a harvest is not made during the youth season, the tag will carry through the remaining four seasons for use. Toms and Jakes are both valid harvests during the seasons as well as bearded hens. Make sure that you know how to identify which bird is which. We need to teach our youth to do things the right way! The early weeks of the Spring find the flocks just coming out of their Winter routines and responding to the natural feeling to breed. Toms, for a few weeks now, have already been in the fields amongst their hens strutting and showing off. However, the hens haven’t been quite ready to breed until now and Iowa youth get the first chance to take advantage of that. Hunters will also have an advantage of pursuing birds who have not been pressured by hunters since the previous year. We hope, that birds who are over a year old have forgotten about last season’s April 2018

hunters and they are ready to respond with less caution that they might a few weeks later. Calling and decoying are going to be keys to success during the youth season. I would encourage a good blind set when you are hunting with youth. It will certainly help with the “hiding” from the turkeys you are pursuing. Kids can move and fidget if needed without being busted by the keen eye of a turkey. Find an area on the edge of a field or in some timber that you know (from scouting!) that turkeys often feed in. Make sure there are good shooting lanes and that your child is comfortable in the setup. In the Winter, turkeys are often in flock formations. There is safety in numbers and during the Winter months, predators are a turkey’s number one concern. Since they are just coming from this natural way of life, you might take advantage of this in a decoy setup by a spread that resembles a flock of turkeys. Most hunters don’t have a “flock” of decoys at their disposal. Talk to family member, friends, or others who might loan you some extra hen decoys. Setup a feeding flock within shooting range of your blind. When a lone tom comes looking, seeing a number of hens will excite him and add comfort to his visit. Until you disrupt that! I would also take advantage of early morning hunting and calling off the roost. Call hard and aggressively. Maybe use

Iowa’s First Season is not too convenient for the “working person” unless you have some time-off days burning a hole in your pocket. The season runs from a Monday to a Thursday. However, if you can make it happen, it is a good time to hunt for a couple of reasons! Personally I hunt this season every year. It has proved to be productive and I enjoy finally having an excuse to be in the timber again! One of the greatest benefits is the “surprise” to the birds. Now, I know that the youth season has come and gone and as a result some flocks are probably savvy to hunters in the woods again. However, where I hunt, the pressure has not yet begun and I always experience “fresh” birds who have not wised up to what is out there yet. A second benefit of hunting the first season is the lack of hunters in the woods. Because the season happens during the week, as I mentioned earlier, it’s not always the ideal time for a working man or woman to hunt. With limited vacation days, turkey hunting isn’t always a good excuse to use them. (Depending on the person!) This is a huge advantage when hunting public properties that others might be hunting too. By this time, toms have usually discovered a flock of hens that they will tend to and protect from any other intruding males. They have probably established some sort of routine as to roosting and feeding so, when it comes to a dominant tom, you might be stuck with a challenge on your hands. TheIowaSportsman.com

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THE TURKEY SEASON DILEMMA There are also those lone toms who have not gathered a flock for breeding yet. They are in search and ready to challenge a dominant tom if they think they can take on the challenge. Calling to and setting up for these situations are unique so take time to prepare for both. Through some preseasons scouting (I suggest a week or two prior to your hunt), you should know where the flocks are showing up and where that might put you. Again, early morning calling is an advantage here. Roost them the night before with some “shock” calls. Use an owl, coyote, or crow call to get a roosted tom to gobble. Pick a setup spot and get there at least a half hour before legal shooting light. A few hen decoys and some soft clucks should bring those toms or the entire flock down to your setup. If the flock chooses to go another way, stay put! You might encounter those lone toms or jakes that are trying to become part of a flock or are trying to create one of their own. It’s worth sitting there for a while to make sure all of your chances are tried. If you make a harvest, be prepared for a heavy bird! Typically a mature tom has not burned off his weight with a few weeks of displaying and strutting. The last two years, my first season harvests have weighed twentyseven and twenty-five pounds respectively!

SECOND SEASON (APRIL 20-24, 2018)

By these dates, breeding is well underway. Usually the older hens will be ready to breed earlier than younger hens. Regardless, your calling and strategy have to be key to fooling and ol’ tom into range. This is a season that is usually heavily hunted across the state of Iowa. Again, for the individual who works during the week, having a weekend to hunt is a good deal. By this time in the Spring, most of the hens are flocked up and they are pretty well guarded by a tom. There might be a few jakes that are satellites of the flock, but for the most part a group of birds will have a routine and a flock to protect them. I would suggest your best move would be to do a little walking and scouting while you hunt. It’s going to be VERY hard to pull a tom away from a flock of hens. But, if in your walking you see some loners off in the distance, those are going to be your best targets to pursue for a harvest. If you’d like to use any sort of decoy setup, I would avoid making use of a strutting tom or a turkey fan on a lone turkey. These loners are by themselves for a reason. There’s a good chance that they’ve been pushed out of flocks by a dominant tom. Seeing a tom decoy would only cause them to avoid the setup. Setup a few hens and let out a few soft clucks. You’ll have a much better chance at 34

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coaxing him in. If you are only seeing toms with flocks of hens, this might be your best chance to use a “challenge” decoy to entice that tom to come closer to you for a “fight”. Maybe you’ve seen some of those newer decoys out there that you physically hold and walk towards toms in flocks with. Take a chance! It’s really a 50/50 situation. Hold this decoy, or simply an old turkey fan you might have, and let out a gobble call. The tom might hustle his hens away from you. On the other hand, he might engage in that challenge and you might have a very exciting situation on your hands that involves a charging tom!

THIRD SEASON (APRIL 25 – MAY 1, 2018)

Third season is much like second season, but with any luck, towards the end of this time you will begin to see a slight shift in the responsiveness of toms when it comes to calling. It’s a longer season and that can be to your advantage too. However, those turkeys will still make you work for a successful harvest. One thing that I think you could use to your advantage during this week of hunting is the fact that the hens are beginning to nest. You see, for the past two weeks, if the hen is physically ready, she will lay about one egg per day at a chosen nesting site. Usually clutches of eggs will number between nine and twelve eggs total. However, during the couple weeks that she is laying, she is not on the nest all the time. Most of that time is spent foraging, feeding, and roosting for the evening. Only when she is done laying her entire clutch of eggs will she begin to incubate them to hatch. If the hens breed most of second season and third season, the estimate would put the more mature hens on their nest towards the very end of third season and the beginning of fourth season. This can be a huge benefit to a dedicated turkey hunter. At this point in the season, I might suggest for you to go ahead and “sleep in” in the morning. Don’t worry about setting up for an early morning fly-down intercept. Get up, have breakfast, and get out to the timber by 9 a.m. You’ll be right in the prime time of turkey hunting during these dates. You see, hens, whether they are roosted or nested, will often times get up in the morning and go out to feed. Toms will be with them and it would be hard to pull them from a flock of ladies. By late morning, these hens have had their fill for the morning and will promptly return to their hidden nests somewhere on the ground. That will leave these poor fellas looking for love and that’s where you come in. By late morning, a tom without hens is To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


like a lost puppy. Quite often, a love-sick tom will come to any hen call that he hears. He’s hoping that there is still a lady or two out there who would like his attention and he will spend quite a bit of time and energy on the look. Find a good hiding spot and set out a few hen decoys in front of you. Field edges, old logging roads, pastures, and thin timbers offer a good setup to call in a lonely tom. One morning, my wife took two different shots in two different setups just 30 minutes apart on two mature toms. Now, her ability to connect when she was overly excited is another lesson (one I shared with my wife that morning) but nonetheless, she experienced a great “at its best” late morning hunt that day.

FOURTH SEASON (MAY 2 – 20, 2018)

In my experience, fourth season is one of my favorite seasons for a few reasons. First, it contains a good amount of time to hunt. The dates add up to almost three weeks of hunting. For a person who works during the week, this is a great option for a hunt. Second, the state of Iowa will allow Iowa residents to purchase up to two turkey tags in the spring. Your first purchase must be for one of the four existing seasons. If you wish to purchase a second tag for the spring, Iowa will allow a second purchase for the fourth

April 2018

season dates. Again, if you have limited time, an extended period to hunt would be to your advantage, you could purchase both of your spring turkey tags for fourth season. A third reason would be, in my opinion, it’s relatively easier to bag a turkey during the fourth season than it is during the first three. By May 2nd, and later, hens are spending more and more time on their nests. They might leave their clutch of eggs here are there to get a bite to eat, but for the most part they are sitting alone for quite a few hours in the day. Toms during this time are not quite “finished” with the idea of breeding. They are still on the search for that last hen that still is willing to breed and that’s where this season becomes an advantage to you and your skills. Again, this is a season that I don’t think you need to do too much early morning hunting. If you enjoy your sleep, go ahead and sleep in a bit. When you get out to the timber, I would suggest having your walking shoes on and begin a quiet, still, cautious, walk through some areas that you know contain some birds. Precede any walking you do in any direction with a few loud hen calls. Take a little time to wait for a response. If you hear one, come up with a quick game plan and put it into action. If you do not get an answer, again, take

a moment to look around before you move on. Trust me, I’ve had a few lucky harvests in these moments! Birds might come in quietly to investigate. Be ready! If you are more of a “sit and wait” type of hunter, this is a good time for you too. Put out a decoy setup of a few hens and maybe a jake. The best position would be to have a laying hen and a jake behind her as if he’s getting ready to breed. A lovesick tom, if he sees that, will charge in at full speed to try to push your jake decoy off this hen. Hopefully, you are ready for your shot.

IN THE END

Regardless of what I say, you’ll find other hunters with good reasons for why they hunt certain seasons here in Iowa and that’s just fine. It’s a brotherhood that likes to share advice, and if you’re wise, you’ll test some of these “theories” until you see what works best for you. For me, I’m a first and fourth season hunter. I’ve had great success with those dates over a good many years now and I don’t see any reason to change things up. I’d encourage you to figure out your own “equation of seasons” and enjoy what Iowa has to offer. When you do have a successful harvest, don’t forget to display that turkey tail proudly on your wall! Good luck!

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BEING A SPORTSMAN, or should I say a “good” sportsman isn’t something you can simply do. Much like any profession, hobby, or passion if you want to be good, or at least proficient at it, you have to be able to perform dozens and dozens, if not hundreds of small fundamental tasks. These tasks added together is what makes a good, average, or bad anything. The same is true for us sportsmen and women. If we want to be the best at it then we need to be able to check off those tasks. The more tasks you can check off the better you will be. So I thought it would be fun to compile a list of tasks that every sportsman should be able to do. While this isn’t even the tip of the iceberg it will give you a good read, (I wrote this with some seriousness and some humor thrown in), and hopefully thinking about other things that one should know how to do. • Tie more than one fishing knot Palomar, Trilene, cinch, improved cinch, loop, Rapala, etc. Some knots are easier to teach/learn, others have better strength, and some provide better action depending on different situations. • Select the right bobber You can use a slip bobber at almost any depth, but stationary bobbers are simpler and easier in 5’ of water or less. You don’t need a beach ball to float a minnow or night crawler! For panfish a stick, cigar, or small (golf ball or smaller) round will cover 99% of situations. • Fish on the bottom Cannon balls not required! Only use enough weight to get your bait to the bottom and keep a finger on the line to detect bites. • Select the right hook We don’t have sharks in Iowa! Match your April 2018

hook to the species and presentation, and you will catch more fish. • Back up a trailer with vehicle side mirrors only Some trailers and boats are too big to see over and learning to use your mirrors will save a lot of zig zagging and pulling up at the boat ramp. • Re-wire trailer lights If you own a trailer long enough, at some

home safe. • Change the oil in any vehicle Save yourself time and money by doing it yourself. • Put the plug in a boat To avoid wet feet or worse, make sure the plug is in the bilge drain, not the live well drain. • Select the proper fishing line Match your line to the species and presentation. Sounds pointless but it won’t take long for you to notice a difference. • Select the proper rod/reel Match to the species and presentation and you will detect strikes better and catch more fish.

BORE SIGHTING IS A GREAT START, BUT YOU SHOULD NEVER TAKE A GUN HUNTING UNTIL YOU HAVE PROVED ITS ZERO ON PAPER AT DISTANCES YOU EXPECT TO SHOOT. point you will need to replace a light or rewire the entire trailer. • Launch a boat If you want it to float, it has to be unhooked from the rear of the trailer. • Load a boat The point is to load on the trailer, not the tailgate. Take it easy when power loading! Also learn to steer your boat in the wind and save yourself the embarrassment of over or under shooting your trailer. • Wear a lifejacket! Find a comfortable model, wear it, and get

• Re-string a fishing reel Re-string your reels at least annually to take more big fish pictures and tell fewer big fish stories. • Repair a fishing rod guide or tip A quality rod can run $100 or more and have priceless sentimental value. • Pick up and maintain your own nightcrawlers Mixing your own bedding and picking your own worms ensures you have the liveliest and best possible bait and can save hundreds of dollars over a long fishing season. TheIowaSportsman.com

37


“THINGS EVERY IOWAN SPORTSMAN SHOULD KNOW HOW TO DO” • Sein or cast a net for your own live bait Minnows, chubs, and crawdads are expensive and tough to keep fresh. Learning how to catch your own ensures you have lively bait and can save hundreds of dollars over a long fishing season. • Rig minnows, chubs, and crawdads Present minnows, chubs, and crawdads as naturally as possible to catch more fish. A jig through the nose or an Aberdeen under the dorsal fin will keep the bait alive longer and provide the best action • Tie off a boat anchor properly Before you throw an expensive anchor over the side, make sure the tag end is tied to a cleat and not your leg. • Warm up a 2-stroke outboard To avoid engine damage and optimize performance, learn how to use the fast-idle assist mechanism on your throttle or simply manage the choke on your tiller. • Hold a catfish or bullhead without getting horned Getting horned or sliced can be extremely painful and cause nasty infections.

• Fillet any fish Through the ribs or over the ribs? It’s up to you, and after a few thousand fish you will be a master and your guests will thank you for it. • Review/understand annual fishing and hunting regulations Don’t rely on message boards or your buddies when you have a question about the rules. “My bird dog ate the regs” isn’t going to stand up in court. • Contact a local conservation officer or TIP line Find your county conservation officer’s number in the regs and add it as well as the TIP line to your contacts. • Tag and report deer and turkeys via automated system It is the law and critical to population management. • Disassemble, clean, and maintain your firearms Guns are an investment, and with proper care they will remain reliable and maintain if not appreciate in value over time.

• Service your vehicle- fluids, filters, and grease points Many dealers charge $85-100 per hour for shop time and use scare tactics to get you to spend more money. “Look at this PCV valve!” “This air filter looks pretty dirty” “We recommend new shocks and struts every 50,000 miles”... • Change a vehicle or trailer tire Make sure you have a spare first, then be efficient in changing it out. You will save a ton of time and money if you can do it yourself. • Cross a barbed wire fence To avoid a tragedy, ALWAYS hand off to a buddy or set firearms and bows on the ground flat and pointed in a safe direction before going over or under a fence. • Drive a manual transmission Some say their days are numbered, but every Iowa Sportsman should know how to drive a stick. • Sharpen a knife with a steel rod or stone Quality knives are an investment, and there are few things more dangerous or useless than a dull blade. • Unload a gun safely Dad used to say, “…it’s the unloaded gun that kills…” Check and double check the magazine and breech before calling a gun safe. • Field dress, skin, and butcher your own deer Your local meat locker makes these tasks much easier, but I like to know where my meat comes from and how it was handled. • Dress and butcher all upland game species Don’t be the one that “doesn’t know how” to clean birds, rabbits, or squirrels at the end of the hunt. You may not get invited on the next go-round. • Swim well enough to get rescued If you are going to be around water, you need to know how to tread water at a minimum. This could be the difference between life and death. • Start a fire with flint and steel or ferro rod Knowing how to start a fire without a lighter or matches could prevent hypothermia, frostbite, or worse. Study this skill and practice it BEFORE you venture into the wild.

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• Identify poisonous/stinging plants, insects, and animals This will help you avoid a sticky/itchy situation. • Leave the trail better than you found it When you see trash pick it up. We are the ambassadors for our sports. • Be a hunting and fishing mentor Our children are the future of the sport and their time in the outdoors should always be fun! • Interpret a road map or atlas Electronics break down and batteries die. • Use a compass and follow a bearing Thousands of people get lost in well-known parks and wilderness areas every year. Don’t be the guy that gets lost in the woods and has to be rescued. • Ask for permission to hunt or fish Manners go a long way so remember to say sir, miss, please, and thank you whether permission is granted or not. • Proper first aid You don’t need to be an EMT, but having some knowledge in first aid can save your or someone else’s life. • Sight in a rifle scope Bore sighting is a great start, but you should never take a gun hunting until you have proved its zero on paper at distances you expect to shoot. • Get your vehicle unstuck There is actually an art and science to getting vehicles dislodged. Save yourself from a lot of stress and headaches by learning tricks to getting your truck out of the mud. • Thank and give back to spouse and loved ones after a long season Make sure you take care of those who sacrifice so much to support your outdoor lifestyle. • Lead waterfowl and upland game birds If you want to consistently have a full bag you had better learn the fundamentals of leading your target. • Hanging a treestand If you archery hunt for whitetails you had better know how to hang your shooting platform. • Sight in your own bow Not all archers are created equal, and neither are their fundamentals. Meaning the bow will perform differently for you if you are not the one sighting it in. You would be surprised how often I have witnessed this. • Pitch a Tent While most people eventually get it done, there are so many that struggle. Save yourself the viral videos of you struggling with a tent and learn to throw that tent up in no time.

April 2018

April 2018

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TROPHY ROOM

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS!

TROPHYROOM TODD MEADOWS

CADEN SLOAN

Want to share a photo of your recent harvest or catch? Submit your hunting, fishing, camping and other outdoor photos to The Iowa Sportsman Trophy Room and you could be in an upcoming issue! To Submit: E-mail a high-resolution photo along with your name and where you are from to: patrick@twinriversmedia.com or directly mail them to: The Iowa Sportsman, Attn:Trophy Room, 1597 3rd Ave NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Show Off Your TROPHY!

FAITH STAMM

AUSTIN PHILLIPS

KEN JEFFERSON

TO SUBMIT, SEND TO: PATRICK@TWINRIVERSMEDIA.COM * Photos are placed in the order they are received

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April 2018


April 2018

TheIowaSportsman.com

43


IOWANS HARVESTED 105,928 deer during the 2017/18 seasons, up 4.3% from last year’s numbers. Among that total 48,645 does, 47,993 bucks, 8,793 button bucks, and 497 shed antlered bucks were taken. Overall it was a pretty consistent year in regards to the past 3 years where harvests have checker boarded from 101,000+ totals to 105,000+ totals the next year. Not factoring in any major snow storms or other variables this is probably what Iowans can expect for harvest numbers in the foreseeable future. The last five years the totals haven’t went over 105,000 and 44

The Iowa Sportsman

seems to be the level that makes everyone happy (insurance, farmers, hunters, DNR, etc.). The only thing that will affect an increase in numbers is if the overall deer herd population increases back to numbers

in the early 2000’s and 1990’s. So we could see a spike in numbers a year here and a year there as the DNR tries to establish a happy medium for everyone. As far as county ranks go for total harvest it was the same old situation with Clayton outpacing every other county by far. Then came Allamakee at #2, Madison moved up a spot from last year to claim #3, Van Buren and Warren rounding out the Top 5. Take a look at the maps and charts provided and see how the harvest density population is around your area. • DNR collected data as of 1/31/18


91

98

79

325

124

239

84

91

239

380

69

93

537

219

76

345

149

759

268

990

99

119 82

74

46

397 81

88

1066

291

244

543

53

996

710

908

5

2849

2767

1487

1461

2148

998

1203

1722

1452

2009

2202

1800

2794

55

1128 37

1267 1202

4

19

788

39 33

1175

31

1330

27

38

1319

1253

1670 21

32

34

23

26

13

6

2486

1851

1868

36

8

1766

1366

17

44

2036

2146

1471

9

12

10

18

932

734

2106

20

873

1340

934

25

52

50

60

4478

1887

30

49

11

1921

29

24

66

14

35

1218

657

1088

1

738

125

40

16

59

65

432

3

45

1081

97

73

848 1390

51

629

699

1910

61

67

304

28

672

68

764

15

63

986

62

3315

41

981

80

2

2316

1007

48

444

56

454

289

47

285

71

42

542

191

136

43

660

72

7

759

64

503

84

58

797

70

268 94

96

242

330

86

344

54

78

233

77

86

89

95

58

252

75

285

92

87

Information courtesy of Iowa DNR

STATEWIDE TOTAL HARVEST NUMBERS FOR 2017

22

1687

BUCK HARVEST FOR 2017 83

89

86

217

334 60

360

95

85

98

171

= 1-9 = 10-19 = 20-29 = 30-39 = 40-49 = 50-59 = 60-69 = 70-79 = 80-89 = 90-99

April 2018

97

87

74

457

85

218

515

176

68

293

54

374 67

410

193

403

48

221

433

55

386

343

576

364

443

383

709

45

31

456

579

1196

919

14

9

38

513

808

923

65

23

27

16

8

616

796

966

13 11

911

747

882

34

58

39 36

5 530

1125

372

564

693 609

607

566

696

28

29

33

24

6

1060

757

25

35 21

593

759

22

550

851

12

19

423

56

30

20

49

46

1127

1889

799

59

481

1

15

62

650

10

1412

51

32

3

2

992

26

354

422 702

7

421

61

73

317 319

440

85

4

50

318

98

42

57

492 263

764

47

471

78

17

155

41

70

88

66

43

223

53

225

326

72

178

71

171 82

37

81

139

98

279

64

416

69

174 91

96

126

44

COUNTY RANK KEY

164

94

190

83

190

52

80

133

80

87

204

63

75

145

77

170

153

92

90

131

All harvest numbers are from Iowa DNR Harvest Reporting System.

204

93

99

77

759

509 40

499 19

TheIowaSportsman.com

45


ANNUAL IOWA DEER HARVEST REPORT 2017-18

DOE HARVEST FOR 2017 79

87

96

104

35 92

86 82

111

172

34 93

41

332

99

61

458 471

182

91

99

957

255 56

67

242 68

5

437

1470

1305 14

402

578

954

26

29

19

273

624

865

682

1005

45

40

20

443

503

852

1007

8

630

38

532

15

1075

921 36

574

806

25

721 21

847

931

1062

22

28

10

11

742

925

291

12

9

16

424

405 1026

24

18

48

61

50

609

35

63

215

674 3

51

337

30

46

65

432

27

400

572

257

2231

52

37

64

174

1

921

321

32

72

338

13

70

47

55

18

58

98

246

1644

39

521

416

66

95

71

99 82

43

299

82

150

83

2

1126

473

49

186

60

26

74

44

94

42

277

70

7

355

62

190 85

43

53

315

69

78 94

97

74

95

57

136

59

117

89

82

90

77

86

76 88

146 73

78

94 75

99

65

87

85

605

1413

1197 582 345 31

34

54

41 32

4

6

592 765

492 33

587 23

COUNTY RANK KEY = 1-9 = 10-19 = 20-29 = 30-39

= 40-49 = 50-59 = 60-69

2017 TOTAL HARVEST – TOP 15 County 1. Clayton

46

2017 4478

= 70-79 = 80-89 = 90-99

2017 TOTAL HARVEST – BOTTOM 15 Last Yr. Rank 1

County

2017

Last Yr. Rank

99. Calhoun

119

97

2. Allamakee

3315

2

98. Osceola

124

98

3. Madison

2849

4

97. Grundy

125

99

4. Van Buren

2794

6

96. Pochontas

136

96

5. Warren

2767

5

95. Ida

149

95

6. Jackson

2486

3

94. Humboldt

191

94

7. Winneshiek

2316

7

93. Buena Vista

219

87

8. Wayne

2202

11

92. Winnebago

233

90

9. Marion

2148

10

91. Dickinson

239

89

10. Dubuque

2146

8

90. Sioux

239

93

11. Lucas

2106

9

89. Sac

242

88

12. Monroe

2036

17

88. Audubon

244

91

13. Appanoose

2009

15

87. Emmet

252

86

14. Clarke

1921

21

86. Hancock

268

92

15. Guthrie

1910

14

86. Palo Alto

268

83

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REGIONAL HARVEST AVERAGE FOR 2017 279

1824

457

724 575

830

1419

2035

1493

Palo Outdoors

1204 1st Street Palo, IA 52324 319-851-5290 www.palo-outdoors.com

R & R Sports

3250 Fields Drive Bettendorf, IA 52722 563-243-4696 www.randrsportsinc.com

Southern Archery 325 11th St SW Spencer, IA 51301 712-262-7213

Fin & Feather

125 Hwy 1 W Iowa City, IA 52246 319-354-2200 www.finfeather.com

Sommerfeld Outfitters 330 N Main St Lidderdale, IA 51452 712-822-5780 www.shopsommerfeld.com

The Iowa Outdoors Store 1597 3rd Ave NW Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-955-HUNT (4868) www.iowaoutdoorstore.com

April 2018

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47


TOTAL HARVEST NUMBERS PAST 10 SEASONS PER COUNTY County

48

The Iowa Sportsman

2017 2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Adair

996

1025

1049

896

834

937

1092

1108

1044

1271

Adams

908

819

864

898

983

1105

1289

1438

1377

1579

Allamakee

3315

3500

3634

3569

3011

3654

3616

3243

3866

4009

Appanoose

2009

1810

1760

1676

1707

2139

2389

2375

2743

2974

Audubon

244

206

256

234

257

280

309

320

286

312

Benton

932

946

929

974

900

941

968

1179

1214

1254

Black Hawk

738

721

767

679

651

726

637

713

720

696

Boone

848

967

996

978

878

979

931

976

1146

1133

Bremer

1081

1143

1236

1186

1131

1293

1231

1352

1279

1376

Buchanan

873

838

863

784

723

798

727

858

822

844

Buena Vista

219

218

290

243

215

282

255

261

287

343

Butler

981

902

990

998

853

992

892

972

993

1095

Calhoun

119

112

109

113

111

145

128

129

154

133

Carroll

289

302

293

277

291

376

333

391

321

382

Cass

672

644

656

630

613

703

845

848

829

938

Cedar

1253

1224

1255

1188

1228

1405

1474

1583

1847

1803

Cerro Gordo

503

478

475

448

446

528

484

529

490

517

Cherokee

537

467

602

531

458

642

546

571

635

587

Chickasaw

1007

974

1088

994

942

1063

1001

1098

1138

1217

Clarke

1921

1618

1631

1619

1460

1580

1699

1607

1693

1650

Clay

380

399

471

393

375

481

404

481

513

522

Clayton

4478

4313

4382

4282

4091

4622

4729

4856

6029

6739

Clinton

1319

1256

1271

1146

1155

1291

1434

1464

1685

1645

Crawford

397

457

425

440

453

484

583

680

638

665

Dallas

1390

1343

1387

1356

1168

1359

1381

1321

1440

1531

Davis

1800

1637

1575

1654

1694

2378

2474

2623

3136

3343

Decatur

1766

1622

1632

1615

1653

1825

2124

2170

2543

2409

Delaware

1471

1462

1427

1349

1435

1532

1629

1833

1971

2093

Des Moines

1202

1136

1109

1023

986

1066

1260

1203

1518

1534

Dickinson

239

213

261

217

242

280

216

269

258

267

Dubuque

2146

2152

2137

2021

2074

2045

2304

2232

2468

2650

Emmet

252

232

269

216

205

210

209

258

251

249

Fayette

1887

1885

2003

1953

1909

2064

2081

2222

2451

2974

Floyd

660

745

813

659

638

751

699

646

853

936

Franklin

444

425

438

388

409

483

374

408

453

517

Fremont

543

490

551

543

535

718

1028

1281

1201

1284

Greene

454

428

425

418

408

524

551

480

514

565

Grundy

125

104

127

78

91

144

123

138

88

118

Guthrie

1910

1851

1840

1893

1711

2131

2288

2182

2208

2206

Hamilton

304

272

289

278

292

405

331

307

403

337

Hancock

268

203

238

193

204

231

224

249

279

266

Hardin

699

714

799

712

745

874

783

761

854

997

Harrison

1066

1091

1132

1075

981

1249

1519

1737

1554

1601

Henry

1267

1204

1319

1210

1073

1309

1302

1266

1542

1506

Howard

759

688

766

750

707

880

798

833

892

948

Humboldt

191

180

183

211

198

223

219

211

264

253

Ida

149

152

138

137

111

162

175

189

184

180

Iowa

1461

1426

1486

1440

1416

1565

1633

1828

1931

2160

Jackson

2486

2657

2771

2564

2607

2721

2840

3002

3251

3342

Jasper

934

900

901

873

924

1116

1092

1344

1634

1733

Jefferson

1452

1201

1269

1303

1166

1425

1472

1466

1701

1925

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TOTAL HARVEST NUMBERS PAST 10 SEASONS PER COUNTY County

Johnson

2017 1670

2016 1695

2015 1833

2014 1715

2013 1720

2012 1972

2011 2068

2010 2320

2009

2008

2526

2631

Jones

1851

1734

1748

1819

2050

2205

2377

2435

2707

2724

Keokuk

1203

1074

1222

1170

1275

1548

1622

1798

1683

1866

Kossuth

344

351

327

430

392

421

426

401

486

485

Lee

1687

1484

1549

1978

1980

1998

2169

2140

2030

2291

Linn

1868

1943

1931

2171

2227

2286

2537

2483

2960

2956

Louisa

1128

1086

1111

1190

1264

1328

1446

1431

1561

1771

Lucas

2106

2049

2052

2386

2409

2365

2326

2219

1962

1809

Lyon

325

254

284

339

291

372

345

436

516

469

Madison

2849

2603

2107

2496

2702

2784

2659

2701

2161

2110

Mahaska

998

938

975

1043

1194

1282

1287

1544

1417

1641

Marion

2148

2041

1833

1907

1958

2033

2246

2319

2132

2260

Marshall

657

632

683

900

834

917

1040

1123

1149

1173

Mills

542

521

603

773

1000

1036

1172

1129

1134

1074

Mitchell

797

870

800

882

826

847

999

935

1000

966

Monona

990

1007

836

1026

1394

1568

1402

1404

1391

1386

Monroe

2036

1723

1536

1754

1870

1995

2389

2464

2326

2515

Montgomery

710

685

800

1050

1283

1333

1242

1480

1209

1243

Muscatine

1330

1298

1355

1506

1506

1547

1720

1710

1922

1803

Obrien

285

249

250

309

313

328

319

343

407

317

Osceola

124

107

136

165

140

143

167

178

224

244

Page

629

619

911

1048

1420

1534

1539

1514

1506

1617

Palo Alto

268

263

246

329

309

335

365

387

419

429

Plymouth

345

321

376

558

565

596

494

511

576

540

Pocahontas

136

120

111

167

140

182

143

147

213

246

Polk

1088

1052

1091

1290

1408

1314

1398

1494

1361

1277

Pottawattamie

986

953

1007

1296

1728

1792

1761

1777

1605

1677

Poweshiek

734

697

655

792

791

839

897

980

1134

1130

Ringgold

1366

1162

1247

1426

1663

1758

1669

1833

1680

1935

Sac

242

216

227

238

290

337

323

399

430

486

Scott

788

755

684

861

899

1050

1190

1292

1365

1436

Shelby

291

316

334

444

420

514

379

388

430

471

Sioux

239

192

250

271

279

311

353

328

419

447

Story

432

487

442

520

492

501

625

588

693

658

Tama

1340

1364

1323

1516

1350

1590

1730

1772

1930

1969

Taylor

1487

1384

1922

2168

2600

2573

2579

2558

2329

2478

Union

1218

1001

1054

1291

1358

1413

1307

1517

1496

1573

Van Buren

2794

2492

2725

3421

3656

3785

4541

4438

4473

4742

Wapello

1175

1028

1060

1179

1339

1385

1704

1902

1718

1936

Warren

2767

2565

2440

2858

3285

3278

3092

2920

2618

2489

Washington

1722

1592

1680

1942

1778

1991

2298

2258

2381

2416

Wayne

2202

1986

1927

2252

2179

2145

2377

2374

2083

1952

Webster

764

737

713

824

646

707

830

847

907

927

Winnebago

233

212

192

245

189

206

244

218

284

310

Winneshiek

2316

2343

2186

2410

2558

2499

2452

2827

2873

3043

Woodbury

759

837

797

1169

1343

1633

1475

1292

1478

1457

Worth

330

320

288

340

293

315

347

365

421

382

Wright

285

285

308

371

328

364

385

356

425

441

99402

115608

121407

127094

136504

142194

Harvest Totals

April 2018

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Paige Van Dyk

Mike Olson

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April 2018

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2018 WHITETAIL PHOTO HARVEST

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Jason Mcllravy

Jon Rahlf

Violet and Gracy Johnson

Josh Dornbusch

Doug Abbas

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Bekka Cappussi

Scott Varo

Nick Cappussi

Ryan Graden

Dennis Paulson

Jason Eaton

Justin Cornelisse

Paul Van Donge

Tyler Gelhaar

Zane Gray

Will Williams

Dakota Clark

Phil Nietfeldt

Gabriel Sherman

Nic Swalla

David E. Wallis

Tyler Haynes

Josh Goodling

Jayden Archer

Karl Schmid

Andrew Lewis

Ayden Stegen

Easton Kerns

Ryan Smith

Denise and Brayden Horkey

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Kaycee McGregor

Faith Stamm

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James Ostheimer

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Jesse Freeman

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Brody Collins

Kris Klinker

Adam Hazelett

Austin Phillips

Callie Gitch

Wyatt Bruch

Jessica Hintzman

Remington Kerns

Jacob Sturtz

Jacob Nietfeldt

Austin VanHamme

Darin Uhl

Aaron Lindholm

Bryan Kwapis

Steve Murphy

Cole Floden

Luke Risdal

Ken Jefferson

Peter Schachow

Alex Jaspering

Zane Gillespie

Devin Gelhaar

Ledger Smith

Mike Risdal

Shelley Iverson

Geoff Englin

Shannon Murphy

Alazay Banuelos

Casey Henderson

Rick Green

Kevin Sturm

Ryan Ward

Mitchell Schultz

Caden Knapp

Todd Meadows

Kurt Wagner

Travis F Cunningham

Coby Taylor

Dan Runnells

Alanceson Sawyer

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2018 WHITETAIL PHOTO HARVEST

Jay Froah

Chris Swalla

Nick Hogan

Trapper Rogge

Deron Myers

Michael Griffin

Daniel Heim

Taylor Daubenberger

Jackie Goodman

Tyler Howell

Abigail Sherman

Meredith Gibson

Sean Thompson

Ryan Flugge

Jaidyn Paulson

Tasha Nielsen

Mac Chilton

Taydem Graden

Devin Uhlenhopp

Josh Reetz

Paysen Graden

Natalie Gibson

Cody George

Tom Buckroyd

Madison Berkley

Riley Plymesser

Les Van Kooten

Chris Osier

Preston Johnson

Clint Foster

Maddox Dodson

Tommy Carroll

Lonny Ascher

Owen Hoover

Mike Doornenbal

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WOULDN’T LIFE BE great if we could go fishing on our favorite lake or riverbank and catch fish using our favorite lure each time? Sure, but wouldn’t it get boring too? We all know this never happens, those fish we chase are a lot smarter than we think. Some days those crappies will only eat a pink and white jig, while other days a brown and orange crankbait is the only thing a bass will eat. Well, it is fishing, and not catching, however we all want to “catch” the fish we chase, and we need some secret weapons once in a while. When all else fails we need some tried and true fishing tactics that will help us gain that edge on the fish so we can catch a meal or get that photograph of a lifetime when that fish swims away. Here are five tried and true tactics that you need to remember when you go out fishing...or catching. April 2018

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TRIED AND TRUE FISHING TACTICS YOU SHOULD ALWAYS FALL BACK ON

MATCH THE HATCH

This tactic seems like a no-brainer, but many anglers do not pay attention to it enough. “Matching the Hatch” refers to using baits with similar size, color and general shape of the actual food fish are preying on. Various factors play into what to use, and there is never one perfect solution, but studying what the fish eat will be your first step in matching the hatch. Minnow imitations work well year round, however in many bodies of water the crayfish is the main prey for larger fish, as well as small bluegills and crappies. If a lake has an abundant population of shad, the best choice would be shad colored. If possible when visiting a body of water try to get an understanding of what the prey looks like and the size of it, this will indeed up your chances of catching any species that swim nearby.

SUMMER & WINTER: DAWN AND DUSK

Fishing in the Summer and Winter have a lot of similarities. In general, fish like to be around the deepest water available with a good food source. Fish also will feed at peak times during the day in these opposite seasons. Dawn and dusk will be optimal feeding times during

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The Iowa Sportsman

these months. Capitalize and plan your fishing expeditions around these times to increase your chances of catching fish of any species. Typically the two hours after sunrise and the two hours before sunset can make your day a memorable one.

SMALLEST LINE POSSIBLE

The fact of the matter is, too many anglers use too large of line for fishing. Heavy pound test line has its purposes, but for most species in Iowa you can keep it pretty simple. When ice fishing for panfish, 2# test line is enough. A good drag system on your reel will allow to catch all the panfish you want and even catch some of those surprise fish like catfish, bass and walleye. Panfish during the rest of the year can be caught using 6# test line. Most lures used for bass and walleye will work the best with 10-12# line. When going after those large catfish, carp or pike you better go with 20# test or a braided line. Of course there is no one set line for every situation, but when you are preparing your reels for fishing this spring pay attention to what you will be fishing for, and go with the smallest pound test line you can. This line will get you more bites, let you feel and see more

bites with the smaller diameter, and will allow you to cast the baits and bobber rigs much easier with the thinner diameter of line.

SLOW-DOWN

More than not, on any “tough fishing” day anglers should slow down their presentations. Often times we are in the search mode too much as anglers. When things aren’t going right for you, slow down. Whether you are fishing a spinnerbait for bass, casting cranks for walleyes or trolling minnows for crappies; your day could be saved by taking things back a notch. There are days where fish are inactive, it could be because of weather patterns, murky water, and a sudden rise or fall in water levels, the list goes on and on. When the fish “aren’t biting”, that is your sign to slow your presentations down. There are two methods to do this, slow your retrieval rate/trolling speed, or change techniques completely. Instead of trolling, anchor and vertical jig, instead of a spinnerbait, try a Texas rigged soft plastic. Slowing down will most likely save a bad day of fishing.

DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE WEEDS

No matter what body of water you like to fish, weeds can be a real pain in the... well you know. They tangle your lures, your line gets coated in slime, you hook a fish and they get off in the weeds, the list goes on. Yes, they can be a hindrance in the process of fishing, however fish love to hang around weeds, so fishing next to them can be a huge benefactor too. Weeds have three things that fish need; shade or protection, oxygen, and food. Weeds provide an endless place to hide and ambush prey, when green will hold optimal pH levels for fish, and are the beginning of the food chain on most bodies of water with bugs and microorganisms. Fish will be around and near weeds when the weeds are healthy. If the weeds are green, then fish will be there. Making targeted casts to the edges of weeds is important and will keep you out of the snags and slime. Using floating frogs is a great way to search out pike and bass that lurk in the weeds for their next meal. Don’t be afraid of the weeds, they are your friend and a fishes friend too. Spring fishing is heating up in Iowa, I hope you find many successes this year. When in doubt, give these tips a try and I hope they produce some extra fish for you as they have done for me in the past.

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GUNDOG CORNER

PUPPY DEVELOPMENT – THE MOST IMPORTANT STAGE IN YOUR GUNDOGS TRAINING In the past months we have been discussing puppies, starting with picking a breed, a reputable breeder,

and then basic puppy management. This month let’s touch on some concepts to help you develop a great companion, both at home and in the field. I will confess that most, if not all of these ideas are not original. They have come from different sources and people. What I can tell you is they have worked well with me and clients. There is a lot of good books and videos that touch on this subject and I would encourage you to check many of them out. Local pro trainers and training clubs can also be a great source of information and help. Dogs love and thrive in a well-established routine. This extends to exercise, feeding times, and play times. Routine is the greatest tool for house training a young puppy. Try and stick to a schedule and your dog will find a great deal of comfort in knowing what to expect in daily activities. Positive socialization is vital to the development of your puppy’s social skills. Unfortunately dogs remember bad events as well as the good ones, so closely monitor their interactions. I recommend exposing your pup to as much as you can in the first 6 months. Dogs are a pack animal and need to be treated as such. They live in a very hierarchical society; someone has to be established as a leader and an order of subordinates. You have to become the leader of the pack in order to maintain consistent control. Many puppies will challenge

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you for dominance, so prepare yourself to handle these little battles in a way that is not detrimental to their future development, but still clearly establishes you as the head of the household. IF you have multiple dogs, you may need to influence the order of the pack. A question came up at a training seminar that I recently attended about having two puppies at the same time and how to handle their training and interaction. It was discussed that if left together a dominant pup would emerge and a subordinate would be established. One of the pros said this would in essence produce “one good hunting dog for the low price of two”. The point is that having multiple dogs of similar age, you must train and foster each puppy separately or the full potential of the pup may not be realized. The key to remember is that there are no such things as equals in the dog’s world. Short, frequent training sessions are better

than one long session. A puppy’s attention span is not that long, so if the puppy is distracted or bored, it is hard for them to learn. Better to do multiple 5-15 minute sessions per day than one hour on the weekends. Also add plenty of unrestrained play times. This will help burn off some of that extra energy, develop their independence, and add in their muscle and bone development. Watching a dog grow from a clumsy puppy into a great family and hunting companion is very rewarding. A majority of the dog’s personality is created between 3-8 months of age. This is also the time that we can most influence the end result. The time and effort devoted to the puppy during this period will provide the foundation that future training can be built upon. Proper puppy development will make a more confident, trainable, and successful dog in the field and in the home.

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ASK THE SPORTSMAN

ASK THE SPORTSMAN IS IT WORTH HUNTING TURKEYS IN THE RAIN?

Tim from Clarion Thanks for the question Tim! It all really depends on what kind of rain you are talking about. If it is a down pour with constant heavy rain, wind, and lightning it is best to wait it out. Turkeys will usually seek heavy cover to shield themselves from the dangers of such a rain and you should do the same. Now if it is a gentle rain and one that you can tolerate by all means get out and hunt. Using a ground blind would be the best bet to keep you dry, but I guess it isn’t necessary if you have some waterproof clothing and don’t mind the annoyance of the rain hitting you. A gentle rain can actually help you pinpoint birds as they will be fleeing the timber and cover for more open areas. The reason turkeys do so is because the rain hitting the timber actually impedes their hearing, making it difficult for them to detect any approaching danger. If the forecast calls for light rain then look for turkeys in feeding areas tucked back in next to timber. They will use areas like this in order to hear better while keeping the timber close in case they need to flee from approaching danger.

I ALWAYS HEAR PEOPLE TELL ME TO SLEEP IN DURING TURKEY SEASON…WHY? Scott from Monticello People use this tactic when toms have 64

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located hens in the roost that are ready to mate. In return it makes it very difficult to get a tom’s attention and bring him your way until he does his thing and wanders off to find a new mate…usually later in the morning. Hence the sleeping in part. If you believe toms are henned up from the get go, then you can wait a few hours and go after them when they are looking for another hen in the mid morning to early afternoon hours. It isn’t bad advice as it is what toms tend to do. However I might suggest still getting up early and hunting the fly down time regardless. Even if a tom has their mate lined up in the roost already you can still try and position yourself in the fly down zone of the hen. It won’t take long for the tom to follow and hopefully present a shot. If nothing else, at least you have firsthand information on what the tom is doing and where he is going so that you can be in pursuit and close by when he is looking for another hen.

I AM NOT THE BEST TURKEY CALLER IN THE WORLD. ANY ADVICE ON WHAT I CAN DO TO PUT A TAG ON A TURKEY THIS YEAR?

Jacob from Dike The obvious answer is to keep practicing your calling and you will eventually get better. Start out with easier calls and sounds and then move your way up to other calls. A box call is a novice hunter’s

best friend. Learn to make the basic yelp and progress from there to other turkey sounds. Eventually you will be good enough and have enough confidence to use those calls to coax in a tom. While getting better at calling should be your main goal, you can still shoot a turkey without using calls. It will be a bit trickier but it is done all the time. I would suggest having a lot of patience, use decoys, and pattern the birds you are going after. Since you are not actively calling the birds they won’t be coming your way intentionally. So you will need to set up in known roosting areas, feeding areas, and strutting zones. Find those places and wait for something to show up. When a bird comes into view you have to give them something to react to. In your case decoys is the only way to go. Set up a few hen decoys along with a jake. Any tom looking for a mate will not stand for the subordinate jake hanging out with the hens and hopefully come cruising in to break things up. As mentioned this scenario takes time to develop, and if you can pre-scout the birds you hunt you will know where to set up and when to set up. Thanks for the questions!

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R & R Sports 3250 Fields Drive Bettendorf, IA 52722 563-243-4696 www.randrsportsinc.com Fin & Feather 125 Hwy 1 W Iowa City, IA 52246 319-354-2200 www.finfeather.com Palo Outdoors 1204 1st Street Palo, IA 52324 319-851-5290 www.palo-outdoors.com Sommerfeld Outfitters 330 N Main St Lidderdale, IA 51452 712-822-5780 www.shopsommerfeld.com The Iowa Outdoors Store 1597 3rd Ave NW Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-955-HUNT (4868) www.iowaoutdoorsstore.com

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65


IOWA SPORTSMAN COOKBOOK

TURKEY WILD RICE SOUP INGREDIENTS

• 3 (10.5 ounce) cans condensed chicken broth • 2 cups water • 1/2 cup finely chopped green onions • 1/2 cup uncooked wild rice • 8 slices bacon

• 1/2 cup margarine • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

• 2 cups half-and-half cream • 1 1/2 cups cooked, diced turkey meat • 2 Tablespoons dry sherry

DIRECTIONS • In a large pot over medium heat, combine chicken broth, water, green onions and wild rice. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until rice is tender, 35 to 40 minutes. • Meanwhile, cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp. Allow to cool and then crumble. Set aside. • When rice is tender, melt the margarine in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Stir in flour, salt, poultry seasoning and pepper all at once. Cook, stirring, until smooth and bubbly. Stir in half-and-half and cook until thickened, 2 minutes. Stir half-and-half mixture into rice mixture. Stir in bacon, turkey and sherry. Heat through and serve.

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WILD TURKEY BREAST IN WINE SAUCE INGREDIENTS • 3 lb turkey breast, cut into strips • 4 Tbsp flour • 1 tsp onion powder • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

• 2 tsp paprika • 1 tsp sage • 2 Tbsp canola oil • 1/2 cup dry white wine

• 8 oz fresh mushrooms, cleaned and sliced • 1 bunch fresh chives, chopped

DIRECTIONS • In a skillet, heat canola oil to medium high heat to brown the turkey strips. • In a resealable bag, add the flour, onion powder, pepper, paprika and sage together; shake to mix. Add the turkey strips and shake to coat evenly. • Brown the turkey strips and lower the heat while adding the wine, mushrooms and chives. Cover and simmer for approximately 45 minutes.

WILD TURKEY RECIPE FOR BREAST FILLETS IN MUSHROOM SAUCE INGREDIENTS

• 1/2 lb turkey breast fillets • 1/2 cup onion, chopped • 1 cup button mushrooms, sliced • 1 cup cremini mushrooms, sliced (optional) • 1 cup shiitake mushrooms, sliced (optional)

• 1-3/4 cups homemade chicken broth • 2 Tbsp cornstarch • 1 Tbsp fresh parsley, chopped • 1 tsp white sugar • 1/2 tsp kosher salt

• 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper • 1/8 tsp dried thyme • 2 Tbsp canola oil

DIRECTIONS • Lightly coat the clean grill grates with canola oil and you will need to prepare the grill for medium direct heat. • Meanwhile, in a skillet over medium high heat, add the remaining canola oil with the mushrooms and onions; sautéing for five minutes - or until the liquid from the mushrooms has evaporated. • Combine the broth and cornstarch, mixing well until the cornstarch has dissolved. Now add the broth, parsley, sugar, salt, pepper and thyme to the broth mixture and bring to a rolling boil. Stir constantly until thickened. Remove from heat and cover to keep warm. • Lightly brush breast fillets with canola oil and place on the prepared grill. Grill 5-7 minutes, turning twice. Turnover and repeat on the other side and grill until the meat is no longer pink. Serve with the warm mushroom sauce.

WE WANT YOUR RECIPES!

We want to see what our readers are cooking up, more importantly we want to taste what you are cooking. Please send us some of your most tastiest wild game recipes and we will publish them in the Iowa Cookbook Section. You can send recipes to patrick@twinriversmedia.com or mail them to The Iowa Sportsman, 1517 3rd Ave NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

April 2018

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FISHING IOWA

PREPARATIONS FOR THE OPEN WATER FISHING SEASON By Bob Jensen

Some Midwest anglers have found open water to fish in, but most of us are still on the ice. For many anglers, that first open water fishing trip is still a few weeks or maybe even a couple of months away. It’s hard to predict ice-out because we never know what Mother Nature is going to do. However, when the opportunity to go fishing gets here, it’s good to be ready. Here are some things you can do now to help get ready for your first open water fishing trip of the year. It’s sportshow season, and sportshows or in-store events like those that Cabela’s frequently offer are great ways to get ready for the next fishing season. You can learn about new products from factory reps, and you can often learn new techniques at fishing seminars. A day or a couple of hours at these events can be very helpful in preparing for the next fishing season. Now let’s get ready to go fishing. It’s important to be prepared, because much of the time, that first day or afternoon on the water is a spur-of-the-minute deal. A friend calls and says the walleyes are biting below the dam on the local river and he’ll pick you up in an hour: You need to be ready! That means you’ve got to have fresh line spooled onto a least a couple of reels. You should start every season with new line. Remember, your line is the only link between you and the fish, and you want that link to be a good one. We have a lot of line choices and it can be confusing which line is best for 68

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your needs. For me, monofilament, or something like mono is still a really good choice for a lot of applications. P-Line CX is an outstanding choice, although it’s maybe not a true mono. It’s a copolymer that has a fluorocarbon coating. It’s low-diameter but very strong, abrasion-resistant, pretty much invisible underwater, and casts well. It’s an outstanding product: Spool some up now so you’ll be ready when your buddy calls. Lots of anglers like to fish in waders early in the year. Make sure that if you noticed a leak last time you waded that you get that leak fixed. Go through your tackle and see if you need to replace or add some baits. Also check for rusty hooks on crankbaits. If you notice rust, replace those hooks. Some folks like to replace the standard hooks on their crankbaits with a specialized crankbait hook. Now is the time to do that as well.

If this is the year you update the sonar on your boat, you’re going to be impressed, even amazed, with some of the new technology. Raymarine has been the leader in big-water sonar for a long time, and anglers are starting to learn of all the advantages they offer for the smaller inland waters. Raymarine has a sonar unit that will be perfect for anglers of any level of expertise. You owe it to yourself to check them out if you’re in need or want of a new depth-finder, and they truly are more than depthfinders. I discovered recently that they’re making line even less visible this year, and the eyes on baits that you tie your line to are smaller also. Tie a few knots to see if you need to take some cheater glasses along to help tie your lure to your line quickly. Make this the year that you’re ready to go fishing as soon as the fish are ready to be caught and you’ll enjoy that first trip even more. To Subscribe CALL 877-424-4594


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Lake of the Woods

April 2018

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Marketplace

Bison Motors Veteran Power Sports & Equipment O’Hair Automotive 414 E. Congress St. 916 Guthrie St. 22957 110th St. Nora Springs, IA 50458 De Soto, IA 50069 Van Wert, IA 50262 641-749-2660 515-834-3001 641-445-5687 veteranpowersports.com

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April 2018

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Auctions

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1886 Hwy 20 Lawton, IA 51030 712-944-5751 www.ssequip.com

April 2018

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Northeast Minnesota

Northern Minnesota

Northern Minnesota

Central Minnesota

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Western Iowa Outdoor Power 128 E 9th Glidden, IA 51443 712-659-0044

PARKS

POND MANAGEMENT

REAL ESTATE

Classifieds

DEER PROCESSING/ MEAT LOCKER Minden Meat Market Don’t Forget Us For Processing Your Deer! HUSH Program Participant. 315 Main St. - Minden, IA. 712-483-2836

FIREARMS DEALERS Daryl’s Gun Shop 1267A 240th St. State Center, IA 50247 641-483-2656 darylsguns.com

GOODS & SERVICES Lake or Pond? Aeration is your 1st step toward improved water quality. Algae Reduction, de-icing, attract wildlife, etc. Also - High efficiency water fall pumps 11,000 gph flow - only 3.6 amps!! CHECK OUT OUR GREAT PRICING ON TOP QUALITY POND PRODUCTS!!! www.fishpondaerator.com 608-254-2735 • Open every day!

We are the home of the Crappie Critter. We manufacture a complete line of crappie lures.We also have wood lures, hard plastic and buzz baits.

Rental cabins

rustic 1 bedroom to luxury 2 bedroom. Little Sioux Southwood Snyder Bend Reserve online at www.MyCountyParks.com

CasCade 5000 Floating POND FOUNTAIN! Aerator Now Available Factory Direct! FAST UPS shipping right to your door! www.fishpondaerator.com Call 7 days/week! (608) 254-2735 Complete with light & timer, 100 ft power cord, 1yr warranty! Pre-Assembled - Installs in Minutes! Elegance & Improved Water Quaility $698.95 “$ave Hundreds!”

Send Your Trophy Photos To info@iowasportsman.com Or log on to www.iowasportsman.com

River Bluff Wooded Acreage

6.98 all wooded acres on a dead end road with well share, electric, and phone. Great place for cabin or home. Very quiet and secluded property. Drone Video available. $33,900. Listing #1427

Rush Creek Realty De Soto, WI 888-942-6644 www.rushcreekrealty.com TAXIDERMY We help you make your dreams come true! Small classes and dedicated to bringing out your full creative potential with the latest and best techniques.

P.O. Box 26 Odessa, MO 64076 www.ozarkmountainlures.com April 2018

Hutton Valley School of Taxidermy, 2514 Victory Ln, St Charles, IA 50240. (641) 396-2760 huttontx@netins.net www.huttontaxidermy.com

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Iowa Sportsman - April 2018  
Iowa Sportsman - April 2018