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American ÂŽ

In This Issue Vol. 44 No. 5 • May 2018

Columns

6 Publisher Statement 8 Industry News

Trending news from around the dairy world.

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Industry Features

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May 2018

By Michael Cox for American Dairymen Magazine

It may seem unlikely that the green pond scum often found floating in water troughs on warm summer days could one day be a mainstream feed supplement source for dairy cows, but that day may be coming closer than we think. Researchers across the globe have found success with microalgae supplements in beef, swine and poultry sectors and are now turning their attention to microalgae use in the dairy industry.

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Social Media and the Dairy Industry

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The Pesky Truth

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Different A.I. techniques and methods for fertility

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Algae Supplements; Coming Soon to a Dairy Farm Near You?

By Bruce Derksen for American Dairymen Magazine

There is no getting around it, social media is a fact of life. It is becoming a language unto itself throughout all of society, filled with texts, pictures, videos, blogs and chatting with two hundred and eighty word responses. It is an optional tool that dairy producers can use positively, negatively, or not at all.

By Aly McClure for American Dairymen

As we move into the warmer months, we must realize the inevitable is coming sooner rather than later. Flies and pests of all types will be making their debut. If you have struggled with pest control in the past, this is the year to take control. Exposure to insects and mites causes lowered feed conversion resulting in lowered milk production.

By Jaclyn Krymowski for American Dairymen

The A.I. procedure is very standard across the dairy industry and is often the exact same protocol from farm to farm. This simple procedure hangs very heavily on both method and skill of the technician. Various studies have proven that the slightest change in technique can have a heavy positive or negative impact on fertility outcomes. Technicians who struggle to maintain consistent pregnancy rate may benefit from exploring the different procedure options.

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Publisher Statement

Social Media – Bringing Back the Memories

As I sit in my office writing this month’s column there is snow falling outside. Many of us have been affected by Mother Nature’s bi-polar attitude. I pray she goes and seeks the needed help so we can get into spring and maybe even summer. There will be better days ahead. As you are all aware, and if you aren’t you must be living under a rock, social media has basically taken over our lives. It is everywhere. Don’t get me wrong, I am guilty of it consuming me as well, but it is hard to think about life without it now. I recently had a conversation with my wife and friends about the days before social media, it is hard to think back that far and what we did with all our time. Some days I wish we could go back to that time, and then others I really enjoy being that connected. As I said, I am a frequent user of many different social media outlets; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat. They all serve their place in their special ways. Facebook is nice to reconnect and follow family, friends and colleagues that you may not see on a regular basis. I use Twitter to follow and stay up to date on all my interests from the dairy industry, to my favorite sports teams, and even politics. I am not a huge user of Instagram but my wife created an account for us to store photos. Snapchat is just there for some amusement and humor. With a 10 and six year old there is plenty of that to share from our house. Speaking of my 6 year old and Facebook, one of my favorite things about Facebook is when past memories pop up. I had one pop up the other day and caught myself chuckling at my desk. It was from two years ago when he was drinking his daily chocolate milk. He took a drink and ran up to me with his head back and said, “Look at my mustache.” I acknowledged him and he ran off. Few minutes later I walk in the kitchen and see chocolate milk all over the counter and floor. Of course my first response is to get upset and to start yelling at him. He starts to cry, which of course alters my response to being somewhat compassionate while still upset at the mess. I asked him what happened and why he spilled all over. He replied, “Well I wanted to give myself a beard like you, but I couldn’t get the milk to stay on my face.” My response changes again to laughter and humor. We go and grab the rag and start cleaning it up and I document the even on Facebook to share with the world. From all of us at American Dairymen, we want to thank you for your loyalty throughout the years. It is greatly appreciated and noticed each month when the issue is produced. We hope and pray for continued safety as many of you are preparing for planting and finalizing calving season. I am thankful every day for all that you for us. Best Regards, Dustin Hector Publisher – American Dairymen

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American ®

Products and Services

for American Dairymen

Vol. 44 No. 5 • May 2018

President/CEO Gale McKinney VP/CFO Audra McKinney Group Publisher/COO Patrick McKinney Publisher Dustin Hector Associate Publisher Lissa Baker Office Manager Dawn Busse Art Director Brandon Peterson Graphic Designer Teri Marsh Advertising Account Executives Kathy Davidson Mary Gatliff Lori Seibert Irene Smith Wendy Mills Joyce Kenney Ed Junker Kendra Sassman Circulation Coordinator Shawna Nelson Subscription Sales Falon Geis Contributing Writers Bruce Derksen, Michael Cox, Jaclyn Krymowski, Aly McClure

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©Twin Rivers Media, LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recorded or otherwise without the prior written permission of Twin Rivers Media, LLC, 2018. The information and advertising set forth herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Twin Rivers Media, LLC, 2018 (“Publisher”) however, does not warrant complete accuracy of such information and assumes no responsibility for any consequences arising from the use thereof or reliance thereon. Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement or space reservation at any time without notice and for any reason. Publisher shall not be liable for any costs or damages if for any reason it fails to publish an advertisement. Advertisers are solely responsible for the content of their respective advertisements appearing in this publication and Publisher is not responsible or liable in any manner for inaccuracies, false statements or any material in such advertisement infringing upon the intellectual property rights of others. Advertisements appearing in this publication are not necessarily the views or opinions expressed by Publisher.

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Industry News

GlobalVetLINK Wins Software Company of 2018 Article and photo provided by GlobalVetLINK At the Technology Association of Iowa’s (TAI) 13th Annual LWBJ Prometheus Awards, GlobalVetLINK took the honor of the 2018 Software Company of the Year award. The Prometheus Awards recognize innovative companies and individuals impacting Iowa’s $11 billion technology industry which employs over 88,000 workers. Brian Waller, President of the Technology Association of Iowa, shared, “The Prometheus Awards is the most prestigious recognition for Iowa’s technology industry and brings together leaders from the tech community to celebrate the year’s most momentous innovations.” Waller said in a press release, “The 2018 award winners epitomize the great talent, companies and communities in Iowa and further solidify Iowa’s reputation as a technology state.” In 1999, GlobalVetLINK (GVL ®) was founded to streamline communication in the animal health industry with a web-based software solution; however GlobalVetLINK’s vision quickly expanded to be the world’s most trusted, secured and

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independent repository of animal health data. Investing in an improved platform and broadening the company’s product portfolio over the past five years, GVL is focused on building a system that will allow the company to better serve the animal health industry with plenty of room for technological growth. “GlobalVetLINK is humbled to stand in the company of fellow Prometheus finalists and winners, as well as those companies helping grow innovation through technology in the Silicon Prairie,” said Cliff Smith, GlobalVetLINK CEO. “It is an honor to be a part of a team that is knowledgeable and driven to serve the animal health industry and to have our customers, as well as our peers recognize the great work our team is doing.” GlobalVetLINK now has six Prometheus Awards, including: • 2018 Software Company of the Year • 2017 Technology Company of the Year Small/Medium • 2017 Ag Technology Company of the Year

• 2014 Technology Company of the Year Small/Medium • 2009 Software Company of the Year • 2007 Garage Entrepreneur of the Year (Kevin Maher) In a press release announcing the 2018 finalists, TAI shared this year’s finalists represent the most diverse and competitive pool to date. GlobalVetLINK offers complete Herd Health Management Solutions for the food animal industry, simplifying management of Veterinary Feed Directives (VFDs), Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (CVIs), veterinary prescriptions, as well as diagnostic results and analysis through its online platform. Patent-pending GVL SmartEngine™ technology helps ensure animal health documents are accurate, complete and compliant. Learn more about working for GlobalVetLINK at www.globalvetlink. com.

About GlobalVetLINK

Globa lVetL I N K (GV L ®) wa s founded in 2001 and is the nation’s leader in providing easy-to-use, web-based animal health solutions for food and companion animal health practitioners. GVL’s intuitive online certification solutions enable users to quickly and accurately create professional health records, including Veterinary Feed Directives (VFDs), Certificates of Veterinary Inspec t ion (C V Is), Veter ina r y Prescriptions, diagnostic results and history, Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) test certificates and more. The GVL system uniquely connects veterinarians, producers and animal owners, feed distributors, animal diagnostic laboratories, industry partners, and government officials to improve overall animal wellness and safety. GlobalVetLINK services support animal health practitioners to establish protocols that will help improve their business in all aspects including saving money and time. For more information, go to globalvetlink.com.

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Industry News

Shade Haven Rolls Out the SH600

Article and photos courtesy of Shade Haven, LLC Shade Haven, LLC, designer and manufacturer of mobile shade structures for agricultural and commercial applications, is proud to introduce its newest model, the SH600. The new model offers a smaller, more affordable option for farms with smaller herds of cattle as well as goats, sheep, chickens, alpacas and other livestock. “We are thrilled to offer a third portable shade option to livestock farmers and rotational graziers

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around the globe,” said Shade Haven CEO Peter Bergquist. The SH600 is a smaller version of the company’s f lagship model, t he SH1200. It is const r uc ted w it h a heav y- dut y steel f rame and knitted polypropylene shade canopy t hat collapses for easy transpor t w ith a tr uck, tractor or four-wheeler. When open, the shade st r uc t u re prov ide s 600 square feet of shade, idea l for herds of 20 to 30 cattle.

Adding mobile shade for past ured a nd rotat iona l ly gra zed animals reduces the risk of heat stress, increases milk production and fertility, and allows farmers to control the distribution of nutrients throughout the pasture. In business since 2012, the company’s Shade Haven structures have become an integral part of grass-based livestock operations throughout the U.S. and the world. The company has also broadened its market to serve events and industry applications, providing shade protection at events, festivals, trade shows and construction sites. “This is the second model introduced this year, along with various new accessories,” noted Bergquist. “As demand for our portable shade structures continues, we expect to offer even more options and new products for both livestock and people.” Discover more about this innovative mobile shade manufacturer at www.shadehaven.net.

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Algae Supplements

Algae supplements; coming soon to a dairy farm near you? By Michael Cox for American Dairymen Magazine

I

t may seem unlikely that the green pond scum often found floating in water troughs on warm summer days could one day be a mainstream feed supplement source for dairy cows, but that day may be coming closer than we think. Researchers across the globe have found success with microalgae supplements in beef, swine and poultry sectors and are now turning their attention to microalgae use in the dairy industry.

Microalgae is a highly nutritious feedstuff, that contains large amounts of lipids, proteins, vitamins and minerals. The protein content of some algae can reach 70 percent, making it a superior protein supplement source

compared to 40 percent protein soybeans. Feed-grade algae is typically grown in 8 inch deep, nutrient rich ponds, before being harvested and dried before feeding. The growing process is quite fast, as algae can double their biomass on

a daily basis. A single hectare of algae pond can produce up to 50 ton of algae feed per annum. This high level of production can offer a year-round feed supply of lipids and proteins from a much smaller area of land than would be needed to grow crops providing the same amount of nutrients.

Human benefits

Part of the reason behind the interest in researching algae products is the enormous benefits to human health that can be gained from consuming animal products * Continued on page 14

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Algae Supplements

raised on algae supplements. Livestock supplemented with algae produce higher levels of Omega 3 fatty acids in milk and meat products, than found in animals raised on more traditional diets. Increasing Omega 3 fatty acids in the foods we eat is a worthy goal for the food industry. Omega 3 fatty acids are a form of essential long chain fatty acids and can help alleviate health issues such as blood pressure, asthma and diabetes. However, a large proportion of the population fail to meet their recommended daily intake of long chain fatty acids. In the United Kingdom, approximately one third of the adult population does not consume enough daily long-chain fatty acids. Based on this finding, scientists with the State research body, AFBI, recently carried out a study to see if algae supplements fed to dairy cows would transfer increased levels of long-chain fatty acids to the cow’s milk. The study involved feeding a range of algae supplements; from a control group of cows receiving 0g/day, to a high supplement group receiving 225g/day. Milk samples were collected weekly from the cow groups and tested for long chain fatty acid levels. The results showed a strong and positive relationship between algae supplementation and long chain fatty acid content in milk, with the ‘high supplement’ cows producing milk with 18 times more Omega 3 content than the control group. Such positive results could lead to the development of ‘high-health’ dairy products in the future. These niche products would presumably command a higher market price premium and potentially, a bonus payment could be made to dairymen producing such ‘high-health’ milk. * Continued on page 16

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Algae Supplements

Animal benefits

A u s t r a l i a h a s b e en to t he foref ront i n pioneer i ng a lgae feed supplements for livestock. While most of the work to date has focused on the sw ine and poultry sectors, scientists with the University of Tasmania carried out a lgae feed tr ia ls on dair y cows during 2017. The trial was the first of it’s kind in the world and looked at the relationship between ‘Spirulina’ algae supplementation and body condition score of pasture based dairy cows. Spirulina is an edible, single cell algae that is commercially available worldwide. The study found algae supplemented cows were 16

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8-11% fat ter than non-supplemented cows on a similar diet. It is believed that the algae acts as a high-lipid source in the cows diet. Lipids are typically 2.5 times more energy dense than carbohydrates and proteins. For early-lactation, high-producing dairy cows, algae may help to reduce the negative energ y balance and associated body condition score loss. Further research by Kulpys et al, found that a 200g/cow/day supplementation of Spirulina to pasture only dairy cows resulted in an increase of 6kg milk output per cow.

Potential issues

Although the benefits of algae

feedstuf fs appear to be many, care must be taken to limit the amount of fat in the diet. Dietary fat of over 10 percent in dairy cow rations can have negative effects on rumen fermentation function. Poor rumen function can then lead to depressed volatile fatty acid production, milk yield and milk fat content. Although algae products have been available for several years, it is still early days in research and development of a robust algae supplementation feeding program for dairy cows. However, based on initial results, the future looks very bright for the humble ‘pond scum’ algae. www.americandairymen.com


Social Media

Social Media

and the Dairy Industry By Bruce Derksen for American Dairymen

T

here is no getting around it, social media is a fact of life. It is becoming a language unto itself throughout all of society, filled with texts, pictures, videos, blogs and chatting with two hundred and eighty word responses. It is an optional tool that dairy producers can use positively, negatively, or not at all. They can try their best to ignore it, but it has a life of its own and will grow even larger in the future. The thought of becoming fluent in this language can be a scary proposition, but there is something to be said for eventually leaving the safety of the kiddy pool and wading into the deeper end.

Our society is enthralled with being entertained. If you can catch and hold someone’s attention for even a minute, you can spread a positive message with those on the receiving end beginning to learn, if they so desire. There is a huge amount of fake news and alternative facts about agriculture in general and specifically the dairy industry. With the * Continued on page 20

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Social Media

public having legitimate questions this can be a dangerous concoction. We need to be a part of giving them the truthful answers to their concerns before those that take pleasure, or honestly believe in falsehoods, spread them to the curious and uninformed.

and communities dotted the countryside and larger numbers of the public had a connection to agriculture. More people either grew up on these farms, lived in these communities, or at minimum had an uncle and aunt, grandparents

or friends that they visited on the farm. The world is becoming more environmentally conscious and although some may believe that milk originates in a store, they can quickly research the subject.

The world is becoming more environmentally conscious and although some may believe that milk originates in a store, they can quickly research the subject. Remember the fa ke news and alternative facts? Use the tools available to us. So, if you are already fluent in this new and expanding language or have gathered up the courage to cautiously wade into the social media world, remember that the average person has very little idea of the realities of the dairy industry. In the recent past, small farms * Continued on page 22

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Social Media

Remember t he fa ke news and alternative facts? Use the tools available to us. Some blog, communicate on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter sharing snippets of their farming lives. They say a picture is worth a thousand words so pick up your cellphone and share a picture of some baby calves instead of that cute kitten. Make a video of your

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cow herd frolicking in the pasture on the first day of spring after the boredom of a long cold winter. Communicate with the public and answer their questions, but be prepared. We may not immediately know all the answers. Research and seek advice rather than spread even more falsehoods and alternative facts. Present your information in a respectful and down to earth

way. Even though it seems trite, mind your grammar and spelling in your communications. There is not much that can turn people away quicker from your truthful and well -meaning responses than posts that are riddled with spelling and grammatical errors. And lastly, remember who you are attempting to reach with your videos, pictures and tweets. While

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your frustration may be with those that attack the dairy industry, they are not really your target audience. No matter the quality of your “feel good” videos and pictures, there is little chance of changing this group’s rigid views, but you can potentially reach what is popularly referred to as the “moveable middle” of the public. They are t he fence sit ters who become

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genuinely curious or interested in agriculture and can be influenced with the positive realities of our industry. Don’t show them only the highlights though, but give them some of your sorrows and disappointments as well. Present the ups and downs of your day to day farming life. Assure them that dairy farmers are real people too. S o d on’t b e a f r a id of t he

language of social media. When you read or hear something about the dairy industry that you know is false, don’t just grit your teeth and swear under your breath, but be a part of the positive answer to the fake news and alternative facts by exploring what you can do via social media to get the true message to the uninformed and curious world.

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The Pesky Truth

The Pesky Truth

“You can’t control pests if you aren’t controlling your facility. Your first line of defense is always a clean barn.” By Aly McClure for American Dairymen

A

s we move into the warmer months, we must realize the inevitable is coming sooner rather than later. Flies and pests of all types will be making their debut. If you have struggled with pest control in the past, this is the year to take control. Exposure to insects and mites causes lowered feed conversion resulting in lowered milk production. They can also put cattle at risk for developing pathogenic microorganisms that can cause hide damage and blood loss. Effective pest control begins with a clean facility and then is complimented by chemicals and parasites usage. As I have said before, you cannot disinfect filth.

The stress on the animal caused by pests can be enough to delay reproduction and stagnate your milking herd. We are in the game of ef f iciently producing milk. Therefore we need to take the measures that help us continue to do just that. Providing a comfortable environment for your cattle not only helps keep your milk production where it needs to be, but * Continued on page 26

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The Pesky Truth

it is also the right thing to do. Our animals are our livelihood, but they are also under our care, being responsible in the way that we treat them is not only good for the individual bottom line but is also good for the agriculture industry as a whole. We are one team with the same goal - to efficiently and ethically produced food, clothing, and by-products for the use and enjoyment of consumers. Because of overuse of pesticides in the recent past, pest populations have developed resistance to them and inadvertently destroyed 26

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natural enemies. Today, dairies should c aref ully consider t he development of Integrated Pest

By using a combination of pest controls, you will have greater chances of success. But, failure to control pests not only affects your cattle, it can also cause health concerns for the public either through your product or in the shared environment.

Management (IPMs) programs. Depending on your location and operat ion t y pe (convent iona l, organic, grass-fed, etc.) you may have different pest concerns but, in general, they should all look very similar. Developing an IPM is also useful for preventative measures should you ever face a negative exposure event. By having the IPM already in place, it allows you to prove that your dairy is taking modern steps for improvement within your facility. When creat ing an ef fect ive IPM, there are several aspects of www.americandairymen.com


habitat. •You can take multiple approaches to reducing the population, combining them is a very effective option. Traps, repellants, parasites, and chemicals. Using parasites is an interesting and effective measure for controlling pest populations. Most every insect pest has a parasite enemy that will attack them. Insect parasites are generally host-specific wasps or fly’s. Most are so small you will not be able to see them and won’t cause an issue in an already pesky environment. An effective way to quickly reduce populations, an adult parasite can lay hundreds of eggs in hundreds of hosts. The parasitic larva lives in/on their chosen host and kills them only once that have reached maturity. There are many resources on the

internet that can be used to create your IPM, using standards specific to your operation. You can also go the route of hiring an IPM coordinator to develop and initiate your plan. By using a combination of pest controls, you w ill have greater chances of success. But, failure to control pests not only affects your cattle, it can also cause health concerns for the public either through your product or in the shared environment. While we will never fully eliminate pests, nor do we want to, it is possible to reduce their presence to provide a comfortable environment for your cows. The last thing we want to do is draw negative attention to our operations, that is easily preventable, in an already agriculture negative world.

consideration to include in your policy as standard procedure. •Sanitation standards to reduce pest friendly feeding environments. •Sealing up open points in facilities using things like caulk, mortar or screens to reduce opportunities for pest entry. •By keeping things like dumpsters away from direct contact with facilities. •Reducing or eliminating habitats by keeping old equipment, storage facilities, parlors, etc. clean. Keeping grass trim and tidy also helps to reduce mice/snake www.americandairymen.com

May 2018

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A.I. Techniques

Different A.I. techniques

and methods for fertility

Photo courtesy of Genex http://crinetsupport.blogspot.com/2017/

By Jaclyn Krymowski for American Dairymen

T

he A.I. procedure is very standard across the dairy industry and is often the exact same protocol from farm to farm. This simple procedure hangs very heavily on both method and skill of the technician. Various studies have proven that the slightest change in technique can have a heavy positive or negative impact on fertility outcomes. Technicians who struggle to maintain consistent pregnancy rate may benefit from exploring the different procedure options.

There a re t h re e ba sic A .I. methods used across the various livestock species. These are the direct vaginal method, the recto vaginal method, and the speculum method. Based on the size and structure of the bovine reproductive tract, two methods are 28

May 2018

accepted as proper methods for insemination in beef cattle.

Comparing methods in cattle

In the dairy and beef industries, the most commonly practiced A.I. method is the recto vaginal,

largely due to its practicality and being believed to be the safest for the animal. It uses manipulation of the reproductive tract, primarily the cervix, through rectal palpation. The technician must have a thorough understanding of reproductive anatomy with the skill to penetrate the cervical os and properly deposit the semen using only blind palpation. The size of cattle and durability of their cervix make this method an industry standard. It requires little equipment other than an A.I. rod and a sleeve and takes only a short amount of time to learn. * Continued on page 30

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A.I. Techniques

The speculum method is a much lesser used methodology among cattlemen, though it may have some benefits that could lead to its rise in the future. This method is widely practiced in small ruminants, namely goats, due to their smaller size which prevents the technician from being able to physically manipulate the reproductive tract through the rectum. It entails placing a speculum (or spectrum) into the vagina pushed up to the

cervix and deposited. The French company, IMV Technologies, has developed a tool called AlphaVision to enhance the speculum method in cattle. This device comes with a camera and digital screen to help the technician see the cervical os with the speculum. The technician

only needs to go t hrough t he rectum to hold the cer v ix and ensure proper placement of the gun on the anterior side. Some advantages to using a speculum in cattle include being able to visualize any abnormalities in the vagina or cervix and to

The technician must h av e a t h o r o u g h u n d e r s ta n d i n g o f reproductive anatomy with the skill to penetrate the cervical os and properly deposit the semen using only blind palpation. posterior end of the cervix. Viewing the cervical os through the speculum, the rod is pushed through the * Continued on page 32

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A.I. Techniques

Other techniques to enhance success

Fixed time A.I. (FTAI) is a tool that not only makes breeding by group more convenience; but it’s also helpful to resolve some fertility issues with problematic individuals. For heifers, following a CIDR protocol is often best to synchronize these young virgin animals. For mature cows, injectable prostaglandins, such as a pre-synch or ovsynch program are most effective. Often, these programs will work as well as visual or electronic estrous detection and can save valuable time at the same time. 32

May 2018

A not her A .I. strateg y of ten overlooked is semen placement. Proper semen plac ement is a crucial piece of a successful A.I. technique. A 1989 study published in the Journal of Reproduction Fe r t i l i z a t i o n t r a c k e d s e m e n placement by inseminating cows w it h dye a nd e x a m i n i ng t he

reproductive tracts of the animals’ post-mortem. Technicians who had a nonreturn rate above 78% placed semen directly in the uterine body over 85% of the time, whereas those with a nonreturn rate below 70% only deposited semen directly into the uterine body 34% of the time. Another study in 1984 conducted at the Pennsylvania State University was published in the Journal of Animal Science. This study used radiology to monitor rod tip placement in a live animal. It found that only 39% of inseminations had the rod tip placed in the uterine body, with 25% of placements being still in the cervix. As a result, only 40% of the semen was placed in either the uterine body or distributed equally between left and right horns. Neither study found a signif icant dif ference between professional technicians and owner technicians. Rather, placement was dependent upon an individual’s skill and ability to locate rod tip position in the reproductive tract. www.americandairymen.com

Photo courtesy of Genex http://crinetsupport.blogspot.com/2017/

confirm heats by seeing the cervical mucus. A speculum also offers fewer difficulties getting the gun through the cervix since seeing the os prevents the tip from getting caught in the fornix. The physical handling of the cervix is also much more minimal, which can eliminate potential injury to the lining of the rectum or uterus due to overly rough handling.


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Become Self- Employed with the high income of hoof trimming. We build stateof-the-art, fully automatic hydraulic layover chutes, furnish tools, equipment, oneon-one training from the best hoof trimmers in the industry. Financing available to qualified buyers. Since 1969. Call Bill at 806-798-9684 US Patent #5,669,332

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American Dairymen May 2018  
American Dairymen May 2018