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IN THIS ISSUE

American Products and Services for American Cattlemen

Vol. 45 • No. 12 • December 2018

COLUMNS

6 PUBLISHER STATEMENT

8 INDUSTRY NEWS

Trending news from around the cattle industry.

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CHOOSE A STOCK TRAILER WITH PURPOSE AND DUE DILIGENCE

This article talks about the different variations of livestock trailers and which one is best suited for your needs.

STRATEGIES 34 CROSSBREEDING

Crossbreeding has become a hot topic across the different livestock industries. While hardly a new idea, genetic technologies can now reveal specifically why this breeding approach is beneficial.

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WINTER FEED SUPPLEMENT REQUIREMENTS

Winter feed is typically the single biggest cost for beef producers and has a major influence on the profitability of the business. Harvested forages are at least three times more expensive than grazed feeds, so it is important that producers supplement their herds properly when grass supply runs low.

SPONSORED FEATURES

22 ARROWQUIP

Arrowquip provides simple ways to reduce loss and improve the efficiency of loading your livestock for transport.

28 RIO NUTRITION

A look at Riomax® 3-in-1 Fall and Winter Combo Tub.

ABOUT THE ARTIST Theresa Nadine Theresa Nadine Sample (Prairie Western Rustic Art) resides at Rosecliff Quarter Horses with her spouse Keith and daughter Harley Jean. The farm is just outside Bruno, Saskatchewan on The Canadian Prairies. When Theresa is not painting she works part time at INC Cattle Company, Breeders of Purebred Speckled Park Cattle and Commercial Cattle. Theresa previously worked at Heartland Livestock in Yorkton SK on the Heiferside. Since Theresa has started painting full time last winter she has developed a very strong customer base in the US and has many valued and repeat customers.Theresa would like to thank all of her family, friends and valued customers near and far.

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PUBLISHER STATEMENT

The Ever Evolving Auction Ring I have always enjoyed attending a cattle auction and am old enough to remember going to the Omaha Stockyard to see our “Fat Cattle” sell. The history and evolution of the Cow Calf Industry’s marketing structure is woven into our country’s background and is worth a brief reminder of how it developed. Prior to the industrial revolution the majority of ranchers and farmers relied on the cattle drive to get stock to the major transportation hubs. Producers took advantage of the railroads and waterway shipping that had popped up across America’s Heartland and Great Plains. Soon auction facilities developed rapidly in major cities like Chicago, Omaha, and Kansas City; as well as many other cities with shipping capability. These terminal markets were some of the first to establish daily prices and became the central marketing focus for producers and packers. Following the 1940’s the explosion of the U.S. population caused a tremendous increase in demand and corresponding production as we entered one of our greatest times of prosperity. The rapid increase in demand led to newer, larger packing facilities which located away from the stockyards of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This shift from larger stockyards led to the eventual development of local auctions who worked closely with their surrounding producers. These local auctions

American Products and Services for American Cattlemen

Vol. 45 • No. 12 • December 2018 Group Publisher/COO Patrick McKinney Field Editors Bruce Derksen Michael Cox Jaclyn Krymowski Art Director Brandon Peterson Graphic Designer Teri Marsh Advertising Account Executives Lori Seibert Kathy Davidson Mary Gatliff Irene Smith Wendy Mills Sherry Gilbert Pegge Hutchinson Joyce Kenney Ed Junker Kendra Sassman Office Manager Dawn Busse Office Administrator Donna Mobley

dominated the landscape of rural America for decades and even though the number of these facilities has drastically reduced they still play an important role in the cattle market yet today. Over the last decade personalization of the marketing process has advanced through the use of technology. Remote auctions are now common allowing buyers

Livestock Media Group 4685 Merle Hay Rd • Suite 200 Des Moines, IA 50322 877-424-4594 www.americancattlemen.com

from all over the world to participate in live auctions. Technology has also benefited private treaty sales between buyers and sellers. Once limited by distance, remote auctions and online marketplaces now connect buyers and sellers from across the World. This has resulted in larger market availability, as well as, the ability to create unique terms for each sale. The American livestock and auction industry have continued to find better and more productive ways to market their prodigy and we are 100% sure that new developments will continue to foster improvement in the years ahead. Best Regards, Gale McKinney American Cattlemen

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©Twin Rivers Media, LLC, 2018. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recorded or otherwise without the prior written permission of Twin Rivers Media, LLC, 2018. The information and advertising set forth herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Twin Rivers Media, LLC, 2018 (“Publisher”) however, does not warrant complete accuracy of such information and assumes no responsibility for any consequences arising from the use thereof or reliance thereon. Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any advertisement or space reservation at any time without notice and for any reason. Publisher shall not be liable for any costs or damages if for any reason it fails to publish an advertisement. Advertisers are solely responsible for the content of their respective advertisements appearing in this publication and Publisher is not responsible or liable in any manner for inaccuracies, false statements or any material in such advertisement infringing upon the intellectual property rights of others. Advertisements appearing in this publication are not necessarily the views or opinions expressed by Publisher.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

NCBA meets on Product labels

Two-thirds of the facilities already overseen by USDA are “processing-only” facilities where harvesting of animals does not take place. “Ensuring lab-grown fake meat products are subject to strong, daily inspection by USDA’s trained professionals is essential,” she said. “The health of consumers is on the line, and USDA is far better suited to ensure the safety of lab-grown products.” Kester will focus his comments on how USDA oversight provides protects consumers against false and misleading marketing claims. “USDA can be trusted to enforce truthful, transparent labeling of the products under its jurisdiction,” he said. “Beef producers’ welcome competition, but product labels and marketing must be based on sound science, not the misleading claims of anti-animal agriculture activists.”

Open trade strategy a success

and open trade between the United States, Mexico, and Canada has been tremendously successful for our producers, and we’re pleased that we’ll be able to maintain our existing market access while seeing other U.S. producers get a better deal than they’ve gotten in the past. Hopefully Congress will approve this new deal early next year and provide American producers with the certainty we need to continue selling our products to our partners to the north and south.”

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) will highlight the food safety and product labeling expertise of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) during a two-day public meeting on labgrown fake meat. The public meeting, hosted jointly by USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), takes place October 23-24. The meeting agenda lists a wide range of topics for consideration, including potential production hazards, food labeling, and marketing claims. NCBA President Kevin Kester and President-Elect Jennifer Houston are scheduled to deliver remarks during the open comment periods of the session. Houston will explain why USDA is well-positioned to apply current food safety processes to lab-grown fake meat products.

Kevin Kester, a fifth-generation California rancher and President of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, today released the following statement in response to news that negotiators have reached agreement on a new U.S.-MexicoCanada trade agreement: “This new agreement is great news for American cattle producers, and another sign that President Trump’s overall trade strategy is working. Over the past quarter century, free

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Galileo satellites to bring boost to Case IH AFS RTK+ users

Inclusion of Galileo satellite network to increase available satellites for signal provision / Case IH AFS RTK+ network users to benefit from reduced likelihood of signal loss in situations such as working under trees / Availability in first markets from January 2019

Case IH is enhancing the robustness of its RTK+ correction signal network by adding the European Galileo system to the compatible satellites with which it works, to maximise levels of signal reception and reliability for farmers using Case IH RTK+-guided auto-steering and related technologies. Real time kinematic (RTK) systems typically depend on signals from the American GPS or Russian GLONASS satellite networks, both designed primarily for non-civilian use. To give European Case IH users a reliable alternative when using RTK+-guided steering systems with their sub-1.5cm repeatable accuracy, Case IH AFS RTK+ now also uses the Galileo network, a European system focused on civilian use. The addition of Galileo to the global GNSS constellation helps minimise the risk of signal failure, a key driver for the integration of its signals into the Case IH AFS RTK+ signal system. European satellite network independence is a principal objective, but Case IH AFS RTK+ is also designed to be compatible with existing and planned 10

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GNSS satellites and inter-operable with GPS and GLONASS. Galileo builds on the capabilities of EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service), the first pan-European satellite navigation system, with improved positioning and timing information. As a result, consistency of signal coverage is enhanced, and a robust and reliable signal for accurate pass-to-pass repeatability is ensured. This benefits farmers by minimising downtime from waiting for lost signal to be regained, and ensures consistently high efficiency of use of seed, fertiliser and crop protection products through parallel passes with minimal overlap, thereby maximising crop potential. “The use of GNSS technology is opening up new productivity levels and opportunities in European agriculture, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations while making the sector more efficient, economically competitive and environmentally sustainable,” says Maxime Rocaboy, Product Marketing Manager AFS technology at Case IH. “E n h a nc e d RT K+ ac c u r ac y through incorporation of signals from the Galileo satellite system is a core way in which we can help Case IH tractor and combine users be innovative and competitive as they seek to help develop a sustainable agriculture to feed an ever-increasing world population in an environmentally responsible way.”

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J

ust imagine waking up one morning, deciding you need a stock trailer, driving to the nearest lot with 300 trailers spread over 15 acres and before you can even get out of your truck, two slick suited salespeople are heading your way looking to take advantage. Sounds like the opening scene in a horror movie to me.

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Before you find yourself in this predicament, come up with a plan and decide on a few things. What are you going to be using the trailer for? Your choice will vary greatly depending on whether your answer is- hauling show

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SELECTING A TRAILER

horses, grass cattle, pasture bulls, hogs, sheep, feed or equipment. Will you be making long crosscountry hauls or just occasional quick jaunts to the local veterinarian?

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First, your budget will dictate additional questions. New or used, bumper hitch or fifth wheel, steel or aluminum, plus what kind of truck will you be pulling it with? Don’t forget or disregard

the cost of registration, insurance and warranty, as it all adds up. Be certain the combined trailer and cargo weight will not exceed what your vehicle can handle. Steel and aluminum trailers

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both have pros and cons. A new aluminum trailer will likely hit your pocketbook harder on purchase day, but will stand up to the elements better, pull easier and give more worry- free longevity. Decide on slatted or solid walls and rooftops. In the colder northern areas, you will likely need solid walls and roof,

best choice. If you decide to buy new, there are still many available options to choose from such as steel, aluminum, wood, or rubber planked flooring and matting. Roof height,

door positioning and available safety latches and locks should be considered. Attempt to purchase locally as dealers in your area will be familiar with what is working well for other nearby producers.

it is extremely important to do a thorough check on any used trailer you are considering buying. over the course of time, rust and corosion on a steel trailer will attack welds, joints and supports and leave it vulnerable. protecting against the elements, while the heat will be a greater nemesis in more southern areas, thus slatted walls and possibly a bow-top tarped roof may be the

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SELECTING A TRAILER ports and leave it vulnerable. Check all visible welds, especially where walls and floors meet, probing any visible rust spots with a pocket knife looking for possible issues. Inspect gates and latch conditions for bent or

If your decision is to purchase second hand or used, more work and diligence is ahead for you. Check the serial numbers and chain of ownership. Many stock trailers are stolen throughout the country yearly, and if you make the mistake of purchasing one, you could potentially be out both

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the money paid, and the trailer if it is recovered and returned to the original owner. It is extremely important to do a thorough check on any used trailer you are considering buying. Over the course of time, rust and corrosion on a steel trailer will attack welds, joints and sup-

If you decide to buy new, there are still many available options to choose from such as steel, aluminum, wood, or rubber planked flooring and matting. Roof height, door positioning and available safety latches and locks should be considered. replaced metal signifying potential chronic troubles. Crawl underneath and view the underside for corrosion and cracks of floor crossbeams, supports, shackles

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and bolts plus springs and axles. While underneath, it is the perfect time to check for loose exposed electrical wires and harness. Arrange a test drive with your own truck, listening for any odd or unusual noises, taking note of how the trailer pulls and brakes evenly with proper pressure. Watch for extensive bouncing and swaying and check that all the lights function. It is always a good idea to get your intended purchase inspected at a reputable trailer dealer. When scouting a trailer, do so with purpose of mind. Don’t be distracted and find yourself discussing the price of feed or the status of your favorite NCAA football team with the seller, when you should really be crawling underneath searching for warning signs of corrosion and rust. Consider using a checklist to help keep you focused and on track. When you begin your search with a well defined and narrowed goal, you’ll be

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able to step out of your truck with confidence at that 15 acre- 300 trailer lot, or at your neighbor’s yard 20 minutes down the road. Face the slick suited salespeople

or your neighbor with the proper mindset and know that with your knowledge and due diligence, you will make a sound decision for your operation.

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PARTNERING WITH PRODUCERS FOR SUCCESS

LOW-STRESS CATTLE LOADING

SIMPLE WAYS TO REDUCE LOSS AND IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY OF LOADING YOUR LIVESTOCK FOR TRANSPORT. By Dana Charban

Loading cattle for transport is a high-stress situation, which can result in unnecessary loss and bruising that can cost you when cattle make it to the sale barn all too easily. No matter how large or small your operation is, a proper load-out facility is an essential element of your handling system. A well-designed load-out will allow you to load cattle into the trailer efficiently, while limiting the likelihood of injury and minimizing cattle stress. 22

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Here are five recommendations for an effective load-out facility: 1. CHOOSE THE RIGHT KIND OF LOADING CHUTE FOR YOUR NEEDS. A loading chute is one of the most important investments for your handling system, perhaps only second to your cattle chute. As such, there are a number of things to consider when looking at the loading chutes which are available. These key features include: - Sheeting height. The sides of your loading ramp should be

sheeted to keep cattle moving into the trailer without distraction. Lower sheeting on ramps may cause cattle to baulk, and can dramatically increase stress. - Vision slot. This is an easily overlooked element that is very important to controlling cattle movement through the loading chute. A vision slot allows you to monitor cattle, and assist them into the trailer, as necessary. - Portable or Stationary. If you work cattle in multiple pastures, www.americancattlemen.com


a portable loading ramp may be an effective solution for your needs. However, if you are always working cattle in the same system, a stationary loading ramp may prove to be a more cost-effective option. 2. ADDITIONAL CATTLE HANDLING EQUIPMENT A load-out facility incorporates far more than just a loading chute and a trailer. For an effective loadout, you must also consider a cattle tub that is large enough to effectively fill your trailer, adjustable cattle alleys to keep cattle from turning back, anti-backing bars, sorting alleys, handler pass-through areas, and strategically placed alley gates to control cattle flow. These additional pieces are very important to cattle flow through your system as a whole, and can make-or-break the load-out experience for your livestock. 3. FLOORING IS ESSENTIAL – IN THE LOADING CHUTE AND THE TRAILER. Cattle are very particular when it comes to flooring. To keep cattle moving efficiently, flooring that provides good traction when moving up or down the ramp will assist in keeping cattle calm as they enter or exit the truck. Additionally, flooring in the truck can also greatly minimize stress. Consider a loading chute with rib-checkered steel and rubber mats for the back of the truck, as they are known to provide cattle with the traction they need to walk confidently. 4. REMEMBER THE TRAILERS YOU’RE WORKING WITH, AND LOAD THEM EFFECTIVELY. Not all livestock trailers are www.americancattlemen.com

made equal. When transporting cattle, you want them to have enough space around and above them, but not too much. This is a delicate balance which requires consideration based on the number and size of the cattle you are transporting. Additionally, trailers come in many different heights, so it is important to create a load-out facility which can accommodate and work well with trailers of different heights. 5. REMEMBER, STRESS CAN START LONG BEFORE CATTLE ENTER THE HANDLING FACILITY. You can have the greatest loadout system and trailer in the world,

but if your cattle are stressed out in the corrals, you have an uphill battle on your hands (pun intended). Lowstress cattle handling is important in every part of the ranch, and will help to keep your cattle docile when they are presented with more stressful situations. Simple and effective low-stress cattle handling practices include limiting noise, acclimating cattle to new locations and situations, applying pressure properly, and keeping control. BONUS TIP. Ensure that you line your trailer up properly when you back it into position. Offset trailers can lead to cattle injuries, bruising, and stress! Implementing low-stress animal handling techniques doesn’t have to be complicated. With the right information and equipment, optimizing your cattle handling operation can be simple! Arrowquip is proud to offer a lineup of products designed specifically around the principles of low-stress cattle handling. For more low-stress cattle handling practices and livestock management tips, visit arrowquip.com or contact them at info@arrowquip.com or 1-866-383-7827.

10 WAYS TO MINIMIZE TRANSPORT BRUISES 1. Avoid mixing new groups of cattle together during transport. 2. Do not overload or under-load trucks with cattle. 3. Trucks should be tall enough that cattle do not hit their backs. They should have non-slip floors and bruise-free paneling. 4. Vehicles should be maintained for a smoother ride. 5. Drive with care. Roads that haven’t been maintained well or are uneven can lead to increased bruises. High speeds also increase bruising. 6. Avoid routes with multiple starts and stops.

7. Guillotine-type doors at the rear of a trailer can cause injury and bruising, especially in the back and rump zones. 8. Cattle should be loaded and unloaded using proper handling techniques. 9. Cattle in the doghouse portion of the trailer will have the most bruising. Avoid using this area if possible. 10. Unload cattle in a timely fashion, but don’t rush. The longer they wait in the truck, the more likely they are to be bruised. However, cattle that are unloaded too quickly are more likely to be injured in the process.

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BUSINESS PROFILE

RIOMAX 3-IN-1 FALL AND WINTER COMBO TUB ®

By Steve Weisman

L

et’s paint a picture of what fall looks like for ranchers across this continent. Lots going on. Fall roundup. Cows coming home from summer pastures. Calves being weaned. Fall shots. Harvest getting wrapped up. Pasture quality declining as the grass cures out.

Then of course, along with the beautiful crisp autumn mornings comes the sure reminder that the harshness of winter is just around the corner. What that means for ranchers is that they must adapt to the current conditions, and also the preparation for the coming months to get their cattle into the best body condition possible before winter. If the cattle are not in the best body condition going into winter, then it becomes a “catch-up game” and nobody likes to play that kind of game. Trevor Greenfield, founder and owner of Rio Nutrition (https://rionutrition.net), says, “No one likes playing the catchup game because it’s hard to play and worse yet extremely cost prohibitive. If the cattle go into winter in good body condition, the battle is half won!”

Riomax® 3-in-1 Protein, Digestion, Mineral Tubs

Greenfield notes that it is important to choose the right tools in the toolbox to ensure “we are getting the job done at the right price. With that said, we want to introduce Riomax® 3 in 1 combo tub which includes all the natural protein, your digestion package and all your minerals – everything is in there. There is no need to feed any free choice minerals.” This enables the rancher to put out a single tub that will do the following:

• Help the cattle better utilize the forage that they are on • Provide the cattle adequate protein supplementation using direct-fed all-natural protein as well as indirect-fed protein coming from the power of Nutrizorb™. Nutrizorb™ is a 16-component digestion powerhouse made up of yeast, MOS, enzymes and probiotics, and it increases the TDN value of your forages significantly • Provide boosted levels of a complete mineral pack, including 100% rumen-bypass trace minerals Imagine for a moment… Jake, a tall, weathered rancher, donned in wellworn Wrangler jeans, a western shirt and a sweat-stained hat, walking into a feed store. He asks Bob, the cheeryfaced guy behind the counter for protein tubs – no different to what the industry has used for the past 40 years. There’s a brief yet potent silence. Now the easy-going character behind the counter does not respond as usual. He proposes something quite different. He clearly explains how the Riomax® tubs, while lower in protein, are infused with Nutrizorb™, which in turn is the catalyst to unlocking the forages to deliver far more protein out of the cow’s diet than a protein tub could ever provide. He uses a well-oiled phrase that the Rio team members have said for years – “Get more out of what you’ve already got.” Nutrizorb™

uses cutting edge yeast, enzyme and probiotic technology to help that cow better digest and break down those forages. “It’s a game changer, and this science just plain works” says Bob from the relative comfort of the forklift seat. He loads Jake and Jake drives away feeling good. He’s going to be paying the same or less per day than he used to, but he’s getting a whole lot more bang for his buck. Greenfield adds, “We’re not changing the forages or the cow. Instead, we are changing the way the cow uses the forages.” With the power of Nutrizorb™, the Riomax® 3-in-1 combo tub essentially unlocks the protein, the energy and the nutrients. In the actual words of Professor Alfredo DiCostanzo at the University of Minnesota in his research of the efficacy of Nutrizorb™, “Nutrizorb™ helps ranchers get more out of less.” His studies show Nutrizorb™ increasing the TDN (total digestible nutrients) by 3 percentage points across the board, something he had never witnessed in over 20 years of research work. Bottom line is with the Riomax®

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BUSINESS PROFILE

3 in 1 combo tub, ranchers are finding that they are getting more nutrient uptake. Cows are running more efficient, which is leading to these tangible measurables: • Increased weaning weights • Lower input costs • Hay and forage savings – cows are typically satisfied with less • Increased carrying capacity – better land base utilization To quote one of Rio Nutrition’s South Dakota dealers, “Your tubs are more expensive upfront than one of the leading brands of lick tubs, but when you do the math, Riomax® tubs cost my customers considerably less to feed.” This helps ranchers get the most possible out of their resources, while giving the cows the absolute highest chance of reproductive success. Doing all of that at a lower cost per head per day than all the traditional tub options on the market. Greenfield explains, “When ranchers ask about Riomax® being more upfront, our dealers explain that Riomax® tubs are way more concentrated, which simply means there are way more feedings per tub, is all. In fact, Riomax® lasts up to three times longer than other brands on the market. And that means less fuel and less wear and tear on equipment and less labor!” A lot of folks have had bad experience in the past with high consumption on lick tubs, which is a risk the rancher faces. At Rio Nutrition, we want to do everything we can to eliminate those risks. “With the COSTGUARD Guarantee Program, we offer a consumption guarantee on the Riomax® lick tubs. It gives ranchers complete peace of mind and enables them to forecast

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their actual input costs. If the situation is such that consumption is higher than the recommended intake on the tag, we will provide ranchers with FREE product to compensate the overconsumption. As a result, Rio takes the risk completely off of your shoulders, and off of the dealer’s shoulders!”

through a dealer network. Greenfield says, “We want to assure you as the rancher that nothing is changing besides our route to market…our science, our quality, our passion and our integrity, none of that changes.” Greenfield’s goal has been to develop a dealer model that works for both ranchers and dealers. Greenfield explains, “Our marketing team will continue to reach out to ranchers. From there, our Customer Care Team, a group of very knowledgeable, down-home, caring individuals becomes involved. When ranchers call in, surprise…they don’t have to press 1 for English, they get a real genuine person”. The Customer Care Team has a meaningful conversation with the rancher to understand their specific

Introducing Riomax® dealer network

For the past 16 years, Rio Nutrition team members have worked hard to build a business that covers all the United States and Canada, and a strong brand that is recognized by results-driven ranchers across this continent. With the growth of the company, however, Rio Nutrition has established a dealer network Greenfield explains, “In order to uphold and maintain an excellent customer experience, we really needed to develop a strong dealer network. The product is right there local now, so ranchers can run to town and grab a few tubs at a time at their convenience. They love it. It also ensures that a rancher’s feed dollar is kept local.” Greenfield is pleasantly surprised at the overwhelmingly positive response from our rancher customers. “We went to the rancher customers and asked them who they would recommend for potential dealers. They helped us connect with dealerships that align to our values. This helped us establish so many dealers in a short space of time… and it’s just like a hand in a glove!” He notes that they already has over 100 dealer locations.

The Dealer Model

So, over the last few months, Rio Nutrition has shifted to going through dealers, with a goal to work 100 percent

needs, the pain points and what the conditions are for that particular area of country. From there, they will make recommendations; go over pricing and cost-to-feed so that the rancher has all of the information needed.” By doing this, the rancher has a complete understanding and can go to the dealer to get the right product. The goal is for everybody to be successful. Greenfield concludes, “We want it to be a win – win – win situation. Good for the rancher, first off, good for the dealer and good for the Riomax® brand. Everybody is a winner.” So, as a personal touch from Greenfield, he invites ranchers that are looking for ways to cut input costs while boosting performance this fall/ winter to please get in touch with our team. “We absolutely can help you! Give us a call to find your nearest dealer – and if by chance there are no dealers in your area yet, we will still take care of you! And for potential dealers reading this article, do give us a call on 844-375-9080.” www.americancattlemen.com


The SKIDRIL G20D Ultra-Driver easy, fast post driver Weighing less than 40 pounds and requiring no hoses, cables or external power source the G20 is the tool if you’ve got fence to mend or build. The gas powered G20 can drive T-Post, ground rods and round steel post up to 3”. Its even fun!

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CATTLEMEN’S SHOWRING

CATTLEMEN’S SHOWRING WE WANT YOUR

PICTURES!

Show us You CATTL r E!

Welcome to the Cattlemen’s Showring, a place for our readers to show off their cattle pictures. Each month we will take photos from Facebook or ones sent directly to us and feature them in this page. If you have any past, current, or future livestock photos with family, friends, or yourself included please send them our way. We will put them on Facebook as well as the new Cattlemen’s Showring. Send pictures to our Facebook inbox @americancattlemen or email them to us at info@twinriversmedia.com

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C

rossbreeding has become a hot topic across the different livestock industries. While hardly a new idea, genetic technologies can now reveal specifically why this breeding approach is beneficial. When done correctly, it is an excellent way to increase the more low-heritability traits in your herd faster than straight breeding alone.

There are two main categories in which crossbreds have an advantage to their straightbred counterparts. The first is heterosis or hybrid vigor, terms that anyone who knows livestock breeding is familiar with. This term is used to describe the added www.americancattlemen.com

enhancement in all around strength, health and production that crossbred animals display. Hybrid vigor has variation depending on the breeding. Generally speaking, the greater the difference between breeds the greater hybrid vigor you can expect to see in

the resulting offspring. Another component of crossbreeding is that it allows breed complementation. For example, a breed that is economically advantaged in your area may be lacking in health traits. Adding in another breed that may have lower market value but can add productive life to your herd may create an animal that is ultimately more profitable.

Selecting the cross

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CROSSBREEDING STRATEGIES

Photo courtesy of DeBruycker Charolais

disposal to support a crossbreeding system. Some of these include the number of breeding females in the herd, how many breeding pastures you have, expendable labor and management, coupled with your production and marketing system. Another article to keep in mind is the availability of high-quality breeding bulls in the breeds you’d like to cross with. Universities say that the best way to find the percentage of heterosis in a particular cross is calculated as follows: % Heterosis = [(crossbred average – straightbred average) ÷ straightbred average] x100 In beef cattle, heterosis can be categorized by three types – individual, maternal and paternal. Individual is the advantage a single crossbred animal has over another purebred individual on a specific trait. This type of heterosis is measured in particular traits such as survivability, growth and carcass. Maternal heterosis is the advantage a crossbred dam has over another purebred female on traits such as fertility, maternal abilities and growth. Finally, paternal heterosis is the advantage a crossbred sire has over a straightbred one in a commercial breeding scenario. One research project conducted at the USDA Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) found that crossbred calves had an 8.5% advantage over their straightbred herdmates in total pounds weaned per cow exposed for breeding. This was at-

tributed to the crossbred calves having greater survivability, especially in the first two weeks of life. On the cow end, the study concluded that mature crossbred cows had greater longevity to the straightbreds. By the study’s conclusion, 24% of the original crossbred females were still in the herd and only 11% of the purebreds remained.

Different methods

After you’ve narrowed down on your goals and what breeds would make the most appropriate cross, you can think about how to best implement a crossbreeding strategy. Two and three or more breed crosses can be both used either terminally or as part of permanent breeding program generating replacement animals. The two-breed backcross rotation is the simplest approach you

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CROSSBREEDING STRATEGIES

can take. It is when cows of breed A are sired by a bull of breed B resulting in an A/B calf crop. This type of breeding works best between breeds that are more similar in terms of size, birthweight and maternal abilities. This way, there is a minimal risk of dystocia and breeding issues down the road and helps maintain consistency in the resulting calf crop. This method is most often used for a terminal calf crop, but it can be a springboard for a three-breed cross if you retain the replacements and intend to continue outcrossing. If you don’t in-

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tend to outcross with anymore breeds, keeping to only a two-breed rotation with your replacements will result in an inconsistent herd down the road. One of the major advantages of this method is that it doesn’t require any additional breeding pastures. In another variation of this this method, some operations will simply rotate the breed of their sire every four to six years. This is also friendly for limited breeding pastures. While this has only a moderate hybrid vigor, it is a very low labor-intensive system that makes it easy to avoid

inbreeding. In a three-way cross, the different groups of cows would be designated to one breed. So, if your females are breed A you would have a group breed by breed B, one by breed C and another by breed D. The resulting composite replacements would go on to be breed by the bull in which they are not related. Therefore, your A/B offspring will be bred by C, you’re A/C offspring by B and so forth. It does take a significant amount of managing to maintain this type of program, but it does have several

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long-term advantages. This is type of rotation is also successful with the terminal calf crop it will produce. If you’ve run the numbers and think crossbreeding makes sense of you, take the different parts and discern how to arrange them into a customized breeding plan most appropriate for your ranch. It can be helpful to check with your local university extension agents and everyone involved in your breeding program to decide on the specifics in your best interest. Photo courtesy of DeBruycker Charolais

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Eliminates Burrowing Rodents Pressurized Exhaust Rodent Control (PERC)

H&M Gopher Control Mfg. & Sales

Toll-Free 855-667-5181 • Office 530-667-5181 • Cell 530-640-3981 www.hmgophercontrol.com NO explosives NO poison bait www.americancattlemen.com

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W

inter feed is typically the single biggest cost for beef producers and has a major influence on the profitability of the business. Harvested forages are at least three times more expensive than grazed feeds, so it is important that producers supplement their herds properly when grass supply runs low.

Nutritional requirements

For the typical 1200 lb cow, Oklahoma State University research suggests that mid-gestation cows require 50% total digestible nutrient value feeds (TDN) and 7.1% Crude Protein (CP). Late gestation cows require 54% TDN and 7.9% CP, while early lactation cows will need 59% TDN and 10.5% CP feedstuffs. The only way to establish if hay quality meets these standards is to send samples for forage analysis. Results are typically returned within and week and allow producers to confidently feed the correct quantity of hay and/or additional supplement. Knowing the feed quality of your hay is crucial to ensuring the herd is not only properly fed, but properly nourished, and there is www.americancattlemen.com

a difference between the two. Intakes are generally limited based on NDF levels of the feed. Having a large stockpile of rounds may not

be consumed at 2.5% DM bodyweight. If forage quality is excellent, it may make financial sense to ration out the high-quality forage to meet nutritional needs, and then ‘top-up’ the diet with lower quality ‘filler’ feeds to keep the animal feeling fully fed. The aim is to feed to requirement, not feed to fill, particularly with dry cows. Lactating cows require up to 50% more intake than

Regardless of what type of feed is used during the winter, reducing wastage will have a significant impact on the cost of bringing animals through to the Spring. necessarily be adequate for winter if it’s just a collection of very stemmy, high NDF feed. Cows can only eat 1.5% of body weight in NDF daily, so if poor quality, high NDF hay is fed, the cow will feel full, but she will not have sufficient nutrient intake to meet her demands. More supplementation will be required if poor quality hay is the base of the ration. Higher quality forages, typically above 8% crude protein will

dry cows, while lower BCS cows will also require additional energy intakes. Where possible, group animals according to age and BCS and feed higher quality, more energy dense early-harvested forages to heifers and thin cows. Supplementation with small grains can be cost effective if cows are continued grazing through winter on corn stalks or deferred grasses. Grain intake should be limited December 2018

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WINTER FEED SUPPLEMENTS

to less than .5% of cow liveweight to minimize risk of acidosis and bloat. Alternatively, if roughage availability is limited, a 20% standard ‘range cube’ can be introduced.

Outside influences

Climate challenges will also play a role in the amount of supplement required over winter. Poor weather can increase passage rate as

cows burn more forage to help stay warm. Energy requirement can increase by 3% per degree for wind chills starting at 59 F. Providing wind-break shelter and a ‘dry-lie’ at all times can reduce the effects of difficult weather and help maintain BCS.

Extended grazing

Forage quality in stockpiled forages can be surprisingly high and it’s recommended to test some samples before grazing once frosts set-in. Bermudagrass stockpiled from early Fall can have 55%-60% total digestible nutrients, which

* Continued on page 48

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WINTER FEED SUPPLEMENTS

combined with a high protein cube, can offer superior nutrition to a lot of hay. Stockpiled forage can be offered a little every day to help maintain quality feed in the diet. Although it is too late in this year’s season to introduce stockpiled forages unless it has been planned for months in advance, producers should consider ways to extend their grazing season next year. Apart from stockpiled grazing on the home ranch, custom grazing neighboring land in late winter/ early spring of crops such as wheat can offer advantages to both beef and row crop farmers. Consulting with local extension officers to learn more about other producers custom grazing can pay dividends in future in terms of lowering hay requirements. Damaged crops harvested in after weather-stress and/or by-products should be considered for use during winter depending on your local area conditions. These feeds should be economically compared to hay on a dry matter basis. Depending on hay availability and quality, by-products can pencil-out 48

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favorably in many cases and improve animal performance.

Waste

Regardless of what type of feed is used during the winter, reducing wastage will have a significant impact on the cost of bringing animals through to the Spring. Storage and feeding-out methods will effect wastage and losses of 15% to

30% are not uncommon. For example, as the outside 6 inches of standard sized rounds contain 30% of the total forage in the bale, it is common for poorly stored bales to have significant losses before they are even fed out. Feed losses can be minimized by daily feeding, using electric wire to limit access to large quantities of feed and using feed bunkers, rings or trailers.

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BREEDERS DIRECTORY 56

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MARKETPLACE

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MARKETPLACE

PEEGEE Ranch ARVADA, WY

Wyoming’s Premier Source of Sussex Cattle If you are looking for outcross genetics to improve docility and feed efficiency, using Sussex bulls might work for you!

SELLING BULLS ANNUALLY BY PRIVATE TREATY For more information, contact: (307) 736-2327 or (307) 736-2461

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Feeders designed for strength & minimum waste

MODEL 9015

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Dry-Cast Feed Bunks Large Commercial and Individual Feedlots Standard Features Include: ◆ Steam-cured, acid-resistant concrete, reinforced with wire mesh for added strength. ◆ Round bottom provides easy access to livestock with less waste and no sore tongues from scraping a flat surface. ◆ Waste stays at bottom of the bunk, making it easy to clean. ◆ No leakage between sections with tight, overlapping joints. ◆ 30" inner diameter allows for plenty of capacity. ◆ Economical – initial low cost is the only cost. ◆ Delivery includes set-up.

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MARKETPLACE

• Easy to load and unload • Easy self contained hook

and pin connection

• Holds up to 32 panels • Available in 6’,8’,10’,

and 12’ foot lengths

• Rancher Series Hydraulic Chutes • Manual Chutes • Adjustable Alleys • Sweep Tubs

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MARKETPLACE

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MARKETPLACE

The AUTO EASY FEEDER comes in 4', 8', and 16'

Contact us today for more information!

The AUTO EASY FEEDER is a PROGRAMMABLE FEEDER, which dispenses different types and sizes of bulk feed, textured-type feed and all size cubes.

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Charlies’ Cowdogs NEW RELEASE

How to Train & Handle the Cowdog CORRAL DESIGN BOOK $55 - 2nd edition 40 different layouts plus details of loading ramp, gates, chutes and crowd pen. 22 photos. CATTLE HANDLING VIDEO VHS $59. DVD $68 with additional Spanish video and picture cd.

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Gateway Pipe & Supply Inc. Send check or money order to: Grandin Livestock Systems Inc., 3504 North Shields, Fort Collins, CO 80524

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CLASSIFIEDS

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS NEW HOLL AND BALE WAGONS: I sell a n d bu y S elf- P r opelle d & Pull-type two/three wide models — ­ H/9880, H/9870, BW38, BW28, 1095, 1089, 1085, 1079, 1078, 1075, 1069, 1068, 1049, 1048, 1037, 1036, 1033, 1032, & other models, parts, and tires. Can finance/trade/deliver. Call Jim Wilhite 208-880-2889 anytime. www.balewagon.com

Registered Angus Since 2009 Featuring Herd Bull SAV Density 1307 Hebron Road St. Marys, WV 26170

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REAL ESTATE 35 Acres just southeast of Adrian in Madison School district in MI. Sandy soil and 40X60 Pole Barn with electric. Located on a paved road! Priced to sell, Call Quick! $164,900 Call Larry at Faust Real Estate, LLC 517-270-3645

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&10 hours on high • True 1,000 Lumen • LCD Screen Displays Battery Level If you spray it they will come

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Lowry Equipment, Inc. 840 S. Front St. Montezuma, IA 50171 641-623-3837 www.lowryequipmentinc.com Lindley Farm Equipment 415 East Main St. Cordell, OK 73632 www.lindleyinc.com

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Ravenscraft Implement, Inc. 223 South Main Whitewater, KS 67154 316-799-2710 www.ravenscraftimpl.com

Robinson Implement 2002 Street F24 Irwin, IA 51446 800-448-0807 www.robinsonimplement.com

Old HWY 6 Tractor & Equipment Pocahontas Equipment Co., LLC. 1400 W. ELM Avenue 25958 McPherson Avenue Pocahontas, IA 50574 Council Bluffs, IA 51503 712 -335-4522 712-566-2262 www.pocahontasequipment.com www.oldsixtractor.com

December 2018

Capital City Equipment 5611 NW 2nd Street Des Moines, IA 50313 515-635-0161 www.capitalcityequipment.com

Sundown Equipment Hwy 92 - 202 Lucy Street Bevington, IA 50033 515-462-3800 Toll Free: 866-962-3800 www.sundownequipment.com

Bobcat of Ames 2005 E Lincoln Way Ames, IA 50010 515-956-3560 www.bobcatofames.com

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HD Equipment, Inc. 2289 Hwy 30 Grand Mound, IA 52751 563-847-1895 www.hdequipmentinc.com

K & R Truck Sales 840 Interchange Dr Holland, MI 49423 616-392-8377 www.kandrtrucksales.com Grand Rapids, MI 49548 616-241-4656

Wendorff Welding & Fabrication 780 Main Street Walnut Grove, MN 56180 507-859-2113

Decorah Chevrolet Cadillac Division of Kar Auto Group 1815 State Hwy 9 E Decorah, IA 52101 563-382-3619 www.karautogroup.com

Kraus Snowplow Sales & Service W211 Keil Rd New Holstein, WI 53061 920-894-2488 www.kraussnowplows.com

Kalamazoo, MI 49048 269-345-2183 Muskegon, MI 49444 231-733-2157 Lansing, MI 48906 517-487-5908 www.wmitrucks.com

KnM Services Inc. 2850 WCF and N Drive Waterloo, IA 50703 Phone: 319-287-5118 rick@knmservice.com

Tri Tank Corp. 115 Farrell Rd. Syracuse, NY 13209 351-451-8663 www.tritank.com

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Ken Borth Auto Plaza 301 11 th St. SW Spencer, IA 51301 712-262-2306 www.kenborthautoplaza

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DEALER SHOWCASE

Competitive Edge Motorsports

7327 County Rd 14 NE Miltona, MN 56354 320-766-2612 www.competitiveedgemotorsports.com New dealer for Central Boiler Pudenz Repair 13496 Noble Ave Carroll, IA 51401 712-790-0122 www.pudenzrepair.com Energy Wise Outdoor Furnaces 417 South Cannon street Paullina, Iowa 51046 712 949 2386 www.energywisefurnaces.com CR Wood Furnaces 11635 Highway 10 Glyndon, MN 56547 218-498-2851 www.crwoodfurnaces.com

Lytton Farm Equipment 200 2nd and Main Lytton, IA 50561 712-466-2211 www.lyttonfarmequipment.com

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Edgeller and Harper Farm Equipment 4973 W. Hwy 60 West Plains, MO 65775 417-855-7061 www.edgellerandharper.net

Fraley Implement 422 E. US Hwy 52 Rushville, IN 46173 765-932-4133 www.fraleyimplement.com

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DEALER SHOWCASE

Arentsen Farm Sales & Service 6875 Albers Rd Albers, IL 62215 618-248-5005 www.arentsenfarmsales.com

Mendenhall Farms 29060 Cadiz Dennison Rd Dennison, OH 44621 740-229-0080 or 740-922-4947

Tractor Excellence for over 35 years

Hatton Vermeer Sales, LLC. Kermit Miskell & Sons, LTD Butte Implement Company 4005 State Rd. E. 1210 George W. Carver Ave. East Hwy 12 Auxvasse, MO 65231 Story City, IA 50248 Butte, NE 68722 573-387-4711 515-733-2273 402-775-2464 ww.hattonvermeersales.com www.kermitmiskellandsonsltd.com www.butteimplement.com

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Strupp Implement, Inc. 118 W, Washington St. Slinger, WI 53086 262-644-6600 www.struppimplement.com

Hendricks Farmers Lumber Seibert Co-op Feed & supply 219 South Main St 325 Lincoln St Hendricks, MN 56136 Burlington, CO 80807 507-275-3359 719-346-0213 507-828-6190(cell) www.arrowheadfeed.com mark@hendricksfarmerslumber.com

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American Cattlemen December 2018  
American Cattlemen December 2018