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March 2017

ALSO INSIDE Go Girls: Chris O'Malley & Carolyn Couch Bulloch County Births Baked Green Grits Learning to Live with Confidence

The joy of gain, the heartache of loss Meca Williams-Johnson is familiar with both


moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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in this ISSUE

table of CONTENTS

Officially, the first day of spring is March 20, but based on recent temperatures and that telltale yellow powder that's been covering my car for the past few weeks, it looks like Mother Nature got an early start this year. The older I get, the more I appreciate this time of year, so I'm not exactly angry with her. Still, I can't help but wonder if she's got plans to roll in summertime earlier than usual, too. The last thing we need around here is an extra month of mosquitos! Our cover mom this month is Meca Williams-Johnson, an associate professor at Georgia Southern University who is also known for her work with husband Francys Johnson, a local attorney, reverend and president of the Georgia NAACP. She is no stranger to change, but when she faced the devastating loss of her second child in December 2011, Linsay and her husband, Matthew there was nothing she could do to change the overwhelming heartache to come. While Meca acknowledges the many blessings in her life, the road to healing after such a devastating loss required an abundance of courage, strength and, most of all, faith. To read her story, turn to page 14. This month's Go Girls are Carolyn Couch and Chris O'Malley, two women who rallied their church and the community around their mission to provide an ultrasound machine for Choices of the Heart Crisis Pregnancy Center in Statesboro. Through fundraisers, donations and the generous help of an international Catholic organization, the women were able to see that dream come to fruition. You can read more about Carolyn and Chris' work on the next page. Also inside, Azure Rountree shares her recipe for Baked Green Cheese Grits (page 7), perfect for celebrating Dr. Suess' birthday and St. Patrick's Day this month! Lawncare expert Erinn Cowart suggests four types of plants to try that are easy to grow from seeds (page 8), and Michelle Smith Lank offers some advice on how to recognize — and stop — helicopter parenting (page 12). Here's to leprechauns, wildflowers and freshly pedicured toes! ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Jan Melton • jmelton@statesboroherald.com

Go Girl..........................................5 Ty's Counselor Corner...................6 Baked Green Cheese Grits...........7 The Art of Lawncare......................8 Bulloch County Schools................9 Parks and Recreation..................10 Quality Child Care.......................12 Bulloch County Births..................13 Feature........................................14 Calendar......................................16 Averitt Center..............................18 Painful Periods............................22 First Friday: Green Grits..............23 The Lowdown on Cellulite............24 Farmers Market Recipe...............27 Kids Activity Page.......................28 Games........................................31

feature story

ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kelly Dailey • kdailey@statesboroherald.com

ADVERTISING TEAM

Special thanks to cover mom Meca WilliamsJohnson and sons Thurgood and Langston

Ashlee Hooks Corbin • Pam Pollard • Stephanie Childs

CONTRIBUTORS

Ashlee Hooks Corbin acorbin@statesboroherald.com Erinn Cowart www.ninjalawns.com Broni Gainous www.bullochrec.com Hayley Greene www.bulloch.k12.ga.us

EDITOR/DESIGNER

Linsay Cheney Rudd lrudd@statesboroherald.com

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Jim Healy jhealy@statesboroherald.com

PHOTOGRAPHER

Scott Bryant sbryant@statesboroherald.com

Ashley Whittemore www.averittcenterforthearts.org Ty Johnson refocus123@gmail.com Michelle Smith Lank www.kidsworld1statesboro.com Julie Lavender lavenders@bulloch.net Azure Rountree • Like "From the Kitchen of Azure Rountree" on Facebook

Thank you, Meca! © Statesboro Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced without permission of the publisher. Neither participating advertisers nor the publisher will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publisher reserves the right to edit any submitted material. Statesboro Publishing is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or other material.

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GOgirls! I

of the month:

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Chris O'Malley & Carolyn Couch

Ashlee Hooks Corbin

a great friendship. Carolyn has served on the board of directors for Choices of the Heart for about four years. She loves that Choices strives to meet multiple layers of need, with the primary goal of saving lives and sharing the Gospel with scared, pregnant girls. "The other layers are emotional and usually very complex," Carolyn said. "(Director) Allison (Waters) handles the big day-to-day decisions while running the center, and (Client Services Director) Kristen (Burke) handles the big emotional situations with girls in a crisis. There is also a wonderful team of volunteers. All of these beautiful ladies share the love of Christ every day with clients, whether it be face-toface counseling, teaching a class or on the phone." Another goal of the organization has been to become a medical facility, which would allow them to perform ultrasounds for pregnant girls. Sometimes an ultrasound can become the tipping point for a woman who is considering abortion. "An ultrasound is literally providing her with a window to her womb. Ultrasounds save precious lives. It's a no-brainer!" Carolyn said. "When the young mother sees her baby's heartbeat, she is more likely to choose to give life to her sweet baby, either by raising her child or offering the beautiful gift of adoption." To make this dream a reality, the women turned to the international Catholic organization Knights of Columbus, which has an established Ultrasound Initiative. When a local chapter raises half of the funding needed to purchase a machine for a qualified center, the national chapter matches that amount. In this case, $12,500 was needed from each chapter. The only stipulation is that the pregnancy center must be pro-life. Carolyn reached out to Joe Jennings, a local member of the Knights of Columbus, who jumped on board and soon got all of St. Matthew's to

join them. "Promoting life is a core value of our Catholic faith," Chris said. "This became a parish-wide goal to put an ultrasound machine at Choices of the Heart Crisis Pregnancy Center." The St. Matthew's Knights of Columbus hosted a BBQ event in the fall, and the Council of Catholic Women hosted a "Sound Choices for the New Year" wine event and silent auction. It was fourth wine event hosted by St. Matthew's, with previous earnings going to help local organizations including Safe Haven and ACTS (Area Christians Together in Service). "While the Knights of Columbus and the Council of Catholic Women took the lead on these two events, it was

a parish-wide and really communitywide effort, as we had fabulous donations from the community to help with the auction items," Chris said. "We all just really pulled together because we value life and want to help young women choose life and support their needs after their baby is born." The event raised just over $6,414 through ticket sales, donations, raffle tickets and the auction. The Knights' BBQ earned $3,000, and St. Matthew's donated an additional $7,500. In speaking on their dedication to the ministries of both Choices of the Heart and St. Matthew's, Carolyn perhaps said it best: "Something we all need to ask ourselves is this: What if Mary had said no?"

Know an outstanding local lady? Nominate her for a chance to be our next Cover Mom or Go Girl!

Nomination forms can be found at statesboromoments.com.

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

n every political season, the topic of abortion becomes a factor in the decisions of voters. It is a topic that is debated about, argued about and prayed about. But the decision to have an abortion is often just as debated and sometimes even prayed about by a woman. Many times, in considering abortion, one small thing could tip her to one decision or the other. Choices of the Heart Pregnancy Crisis Center in Statesboro works to be a part of those decisions by helping women and girls who find themselves unexpectedly pregnant make the decision to choose life. This month's Go Girls, Carolyn Couch and Chris O'Malley, have joined forces with Choices of the Heart, along with St. Matthew's Catholic Church in Statesboro, to help young moms-tobe make tough decisions. Carolyn, 57, is a self-proclaimed "cradle Catholic"— she was born Catholic and attended Catholic schools, including college — and is the new patient coordinator at Wall Orthodontics, where she has worked for more than six years. She is the wife of Bulloch County Manager Tom Couch and mother to Hannah, 25; Patrick, 24; and Molly, 22. She and Tom are both originally from Michigan and ended up in Statesboro by way of Atlanta in 2013. Chris, 54, has worked as the professional relations coordinator for East Georgia Center for Oral and Facial Surgery since 2008. She is married to Dr. John O'Malley, director of the Regents' Engineering Transfer Program and co-op programs for the College of Engineering and Information Technology at Georgia Southern University. They are parents to Sarah, 27; Jack, 25; and Patrick, 23. Chris and her family have been members of St. Matthew's since moving to Statesboro in 2005. The Couch family was the first to introduce themselves to the O'Malleys, creating the start of


6

Learning to Live with Confidence

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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et's talk about living with confidence. People often go through life feeling intimidated by others, consumed with thoughts that others are smarter, more fortunate or more attractive. The truth is, there will always be features and qualities in others that you admire. However, it's never OK to put yourself down to allow others to feel more important, nor is it OK for others to put you down to make themselves feel important. Remember, it's great to celebrate their strengths, but it's just as important to celebrate who you are and the wonderful things that you offer. You must first know that you are great! Timothy Ferriss once said, "If you are insecure, guess what? The rest of the world is, too. Do not overestimate the competition and underestimate yourself.You are better than you think." Remember that confidence is the

Ty Johnson Ty's Counselor Corner

fuel that will send you soaring high. It's the reassurance that you have what it takes to reach your desired end. Ask yourself: What has stifled my belief system? What has made me believe that amazing things only happen for others, not for me? Oftentimes, seeds of doubt are planted early in life, and over time, disappointing situations arise, which continue to water those seeds, causing them to grow. Today, take those weeds of doubt and pull them up by the roots. Don't

spend another day in the city of "I can't"; pack your bags and move to the city of "I can and I will!" Initially, you may not have all the tools you need, but once you put your feet into motion, step by step, all of the resources will fall into place. This is still a new year; the only thing that will open new opportunities is a new mindset, which starts with you. Network, connect and branch out! What changes are you going to make in your personal and professional life to help better yourself? Take note of your personal gifts and talents and maximize them. Remember, it will work — if you work it! The following are some steps to take to begin living with more confidence. 1. Learn to wear a smile, even when you don't feel like it. 2. Stand up straight. Shoulders back and chin up! 3. Challenge your thoughts and train your brain to think positive.

4. Interact and network with other positive people. Shadow someone that you admire. We often mimic the behaviors of those around us. 5. Don't focus on past failures. Learn from them and move forward. 6. Challenge your fears and negative self-talk. 7. Read or verbally rehearse something motivational before going to bed. 8. Listen to motivational music or speakers throughout the day. 9. Try something new — a hobby, hairstyle, wardrobe, recipe, sport, exercise, etc. 10. Have a vision plan for your life and work toward your goals. Ty Johnson, counselor and retention coordinator for Ogeechee Technical College, is cofounder of Refocus Counseling and Consulting Services LLC, a program that teaches people how to focus on the positive. Email her at refocus123@gmail.com.

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Feeling Lucky with Baked Green Grits

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Baked Green Cheese Grits 3 cups chicken broth 1 cup Jim Dandy Quick Grits 1 stick (½ cup) margarine, cubed Green food coloring 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese 2 large eggs, beaten 1 teaspoon bottled minced garlic ½ cup shredded Parmesan cheese

Azure Rountree Fun, Delicious and Festive

Pepper (to taste) Non-stick cooking spray Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray an 8-by-8-inch or 2-quart glass baking dish with cooking spray and set aside. Over medium heat, bring the chicken broth to a boil, then add the grits. Stir and cover. Turn heat to low and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, add the margarine and stir until melted. Stir in the desired amount of green food coloring. Add the cheddar cheese and stir until melted. Stir in the eggs until blended, then the minced garlic and pepper until combined. Pour into the baking dish and top with parmesan cheese. Bake, covered, on the third (middle) rack for 25 minutes. Azure Rountree, a wife and mother of four beautiful kids, has a love of cooking and sharing recipes. She enjoys writing for cookbooks and working as an advocate for autism. Her newest cookbook, "Kid Friendly Recipes from the Kitchen of Azure Rountree," is available for purchase locally at the Averitt Center for the Arts' Rosengart Gallery. A portion of the proceeds from every book sold will go to benefit children with special needs.

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

reen is at every turn this March, with shamrocks galore and children hoping to find a little leprechaun. These Baked Green Cheese Grits make the month even more fun and festive and bring a touch of Ireland to your family table. With creamy, buttery, cheesy grits with a touch of garlic, topped with shredded parmesan, this dish will have everyone feeling lucky this St. Patrick's Day! This is a great make-ahead recipe because the grits taste just as delicious reheated. Also, serve this dish to your kiddos for Dr. Seuss week and watch them squeal with delight!

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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There’s a Future in Books... and a book in your future Technology - knowledge that deals with the creation and use of technical means. What does that mean? Well the library offers an amazing array of technology. Did you know we have a 3-D printer? We also have a new vinyl cutter for banners; a silhouette cameo cutter and a heat press, great for ironons (no charge for either– you supply the materials). The cooler objects we have are Go-pro cameras, a green screen kit for background replacement (you could create an epic video montage) and chrome book laptops. The library hosts a Maker’s Mond day for 10-116 year ollds

twice a month where you could create digital art, video game design and participate in our break out kits. Our STEAM products include Soda Can Robugs, Snap Circuits, Plugable digital microscopes, Little Bit Kits (electronic building blocks), Kinex, Magna Tiles and the ever popular Lego Wall. Don’t be afraid of Technology, stop by your library today and embrace it. By Darlene Alessi “The Science of Today is the Technology of Tomorrow” Edwardd Telller

Statesboro Regional Public Libraries Claxton Metter

Pembroke Richmond Hill

Statesboro Swainsboro

Statesboro-Bulloch County Library 124 S. Main St. Statesboro, GA 30458 Monday-Thursday 9-8, Friday-Saturday 9-6

Easy Seeds to Grow

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will admit it: I'm not a gardener who loves to grow plants from seeds. Take me to a garden center or nursery and I'm totally in my element, able to see, touch and get a feel for what I really want to invest my money in. But seeds? Sometimes they seem like a lot of work for something that may not be successful or exactly what I expected. However, this aspect of gardening is not to be underestimated! Oftentimes, seeds give you more bang for your buck, and they are a lot less messy to plant. So, if you are up for trying something new, the following are four seed types that are very successful and will make you seem like you've been gardening this way for ages! Cleome's purple, pink, fushia and white spiked blooms resemble dozens of butterflies lighting on top of this plant's beautiful foliage. So easy to grow, you won't even have to cover the seeds with dirt after you sprinkle them on the soil. Simply fertilize appropriately to avoid weak stems, and as with any plants with sharp thorns, make sure to plant away from high-traffic areas. Cleome, or Spider Flower, typically self-sows after one season and will start to sprout in one to two weeks. You will fall in love with Cosmos, a sweet, cheery cottage flower that is super easy to start from seed. Long stems with vibrant colors make it ideal for cutting, and it needs very little to no fertilizing. It often reseeds itself after blooming during the warm months, so you get a lot of return on your investment with this one, about one to three weeks after planting. If you like the perennial Delphinium,

Erinn Cowart The Art of Lawncare

then you'll be excited to try its annual cousin Larkspur. It is a stunning and appropriate cool-season plant for the Deep South, blooming during the early spring. Once planted, Larkspur self-sows for many years to come and just needs thinning out as it grows. Sprinkle seeds in full sun with well-drained soil and watch its blue, white and pink blooms come to life in about three to four weeks. For that difficult, dry zone in your landscaping, Moss Rose is the answer you've been searching for, and it's so easy to grow! This succulent variety does not disappoint with its neverending blooms that keep coming no matter the heat, drought or stress. Plant seeds an inch deep in soil for stunning groundcover with summer and fall blooms. Before you know it, you'll be a pro at starting blooms from seeds, and maybe you'll discover a passion and talent that you never knew you had. Happy planting, y'all! Erinn is part of the professional team at Ninja Lawns who seek to serve the Statesboro community and make a positive difference in the world around them. You can learn more and contact Ninja Lawns online at www.ninjalawns.com.


Bulloch County Schools Preparing students to find success & enhancing community value Serving Bulloch Country through 15 public school campuses

www.bulloch.k12.ga.us

THANK YOU!

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Best OBGYN 2016

Schools Open, Families Welcome Family Engagement Coordinators Help Parents and Guardians Stay Involved

Resource centers Each of our elementary and middle schools is equipped with a resource center that is open during school hours. A family engagement coordinator or other school staff member can assist you. The centers offer educational manipulatives; educational games; flash cards; workbooks; books to assist your child in reading, math and other content areas; parenting books; and more. Family engagement events Our elementary and middle

schools frequently host family nights throughout the school year. These themed nights offer parents and guardians fun, easy ways to share in their child's learning and provide ideas of how to reinforce learning at home. Many education partners in the community, including Georgia Southern University, Ogeechee Technical College, the Center for Wildlife Education at GS, the Statesboro-Bulloch County Parks and Recreation Department and more, help enhance these family learning experiences. Check with your child's school for upcoming family nights in fitness, STEM, language arts, science, math and more. Family engagement coordinators • Joyce Simmons (Portal Elementary School, Portal Middle High School and Mill Creek Elementary School) — jsimmons@bullochschools.org • Leslie Andujar (Langston Chapel Elementary School, Langston Chapel Middle School and Sallie Zetterower Elementary School) — ljgrant@ bulloch.k12.ga.us • Sherry Jordan (Southeast Bulloch Middle School, Brooklet Elementary School, Nevils Elementary School and Stilson Elementary School) — sjordan@bullochschools.org • Leslie Wiggins (Julia P. Bryant Elementary School, Mattie Lively Elementary School and William James Middle School) — lwiggins@bulloch schools.org • Maria Rea (migrant liaison for all schools) — mrea@bullochschools.org

The Bulloch County Board of Education does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, physical handicap, religion or age in employment practices or in admission to or participation in any education programs or activities.

912.212.8500 • 150 Williams Road, Suite A Statesboro, GA 30458

please call today for an appointment

912-681-3111

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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goal of Bulloch County Schools is to increase our engagement with parents, guardians and the community. One way that we assist parents and guardians is with a team of family engagement coordinators, who help bridge the gap between home and school. Parent and guardian involvement is crucial for children throughout their pre-kindergarten through 12th-grade experience. Bulloch County Schools encourages families to remain actively involved. When parents and guardians are actively engaged in their child's education and well informed about how to achieve success, it positively affects student achievement. Through federal Title I funds, Bulloch County Schools is able to provide programs and resources to assist families.


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Statesboro-Bulloch County Parks & Recreation Department Monthly Events ASA Fastpitch Tournament (8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 & under) March 4 $300 Mill Creek Park

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Pathways Basketball Training Camp March 6, March 7–30 Tuesdays/Thursdays 6- to 8-year-olds: 5:30–6:30 p.m. 9- to 11-year-olds: 6:30–7:30 p.m. 12- to 15-year-olds: 7:30–8:30 p.m. $80 Lead-Off Classic One-Pitch Adult Softball Tournament March 10 $175 Mill Creek Park Archery for the Family March 10–31 (register by March 2) Fridays, 6:30–8 p.m. $30 for first registrant, $10 for each additional GS Shooting Sports Education Center Doyle Baseball/Softball Clinic (ages 6–17) March 11, 1–6 p.m.

$65 Mill Creek Park Neal Dunn Memorial Trail Ride March 11 (Call [912] 489-9059 to register by March 10) Register at 9 a.m.; ride at 10 a.m. $20 (includes lunch) Saddle Trails in Twin City Junior Golf School (ages 5–17) March 13 – April 12 Mondays/Wednesdays, 6–7 p.m. $65 GS Golf Course Early Bird Classic Youth Baseball Tournament (8, 9, 10 and under machine pitch) March 18 $175 Mill Creek Park Adult Athletic Managers Meeting March 20 Adults 50+ softball: 6 p.m. Open/industrial/church softball: 6:45 p.m. Women's and coed softball: 6:45 p.m. Honey Bowen Building

Battle in the Boro One-Pitch Adult Softball Tournament March 24 $175 Mill Creek Park Local Track Meet March 25, 8 a.m. free Statesboro High School Lifeguard Course: Session 5 (ages 15+) March 3 and March 10, 4–7 p.m. March 4 and March 11, 10 a.m.– 6 p.m. March 5, 1–6 p.m. $150 Splash in the Boro Lifeguard Course: Session 6 (ages 15+) March 17 and March 24, 4–7 p.m. March 18 and March 25, 10 a.m.– 6 p.m. March 19, 1–6 p.m. $150 Splash in the Boro Lifeguard Recertification (ages 15+) March 10, 4–7 p.m.

March 11, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $75 Splash in the Boro Youth Tennis Lessons (ages 5–8) March 24–April 14 Fridays Level 1 (Beginner): 4–5 p.m. Level 2 (Beginner/Intermediate: 5– 6 p.m. $35 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Youth Tennis Lessons (ages 9–12) March 20–April 13 Level 3 (Beginner/Intermediate): Tuesdays/Thursdays, 4–5 p.m. Level 5 (Advanced): Mondays, 4– 6 p.m. $45 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Youth Tennis Lessons (ages 12–17) March 21–April 13 Level 4 (Beginner/Intermediate): Tuesdays/Thursdays, 5–6 p.m. Level 5 (Advanced): Wednesdays, 4– 6 p.m. $45 Mill Creek Tennis Complex


Adult Tennis Lessons (ages 18+) March 22–April 12 Wednesdays, 6:15–7:30 p.m. $35 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Tumbling March 20–May 3 Mondays/Wednesdays 3- to 5-year-olds: 4–4:45 p.m. 6- to 12-year-olds: 5–6 p.m. $65 Honey Bowen Building Horseback Riding Lessons (ages 5–18) March 20–May 5 Monday–Friday, times vary (choose day and 45-minute time slot) $150/six-week session Fletcher Memorial Park

Lap Swim Mondays/Tuesdays/Thursdays, 7– 8 p.m. Monday–Friday, 6 a.m.–2 p.m. Saturdays, 8 a.m.–noon $2/visit or $50/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro

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Parent and Tot Swim Monday–Friday, 6 a.m.–2 p.m. $2/person (free for ages 2 and younger) Splash in the Boro

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Learn to Play Bridge Tuesdays, 3–5 p.m. free Honey Bowen Building

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Ultimate H20 Circuit Tuesdays/Thursdays, 6:15–7 a.m. $5/visit or $150/10-class pass Splash in the Boro Sit Fit Tuesdays/Fridays, 9:45–10:30 a.m. $2/session Honey Bowen Building Aqua Zumba Tuesdays/Thursdays, 7–8 p.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro

Evening Line Dancing (ages 16+) Mondays/Tuesdays, 5:30–7 p.m. $5/class Honey Bowen Building

Arthritis Therapy Tuesdays/Thursdays, 1–1:45 p.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro

Aqua Fit (Shallow Water Aerobics) Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 8:30–9:30 a.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro

Silverliners Line Dancing Thursdays, 1:30–3 p.m. Beginners' lesson at 1 p.m. $2/session Honey Bowen Building

Deep Aqua Fit (Deep Water Aerobics) Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 7:15–8:15 a.m.

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Stirrup Some Fun Session 1 March 21–April 11 Tuesdays, 5:30–8 p.m. $80 for Bulloch County residents $90 for out-of-county residents Fletcher Memorial Park

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Tuesdays/Thursdays, 8:30– 9:30 a.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro


12

Are You a Helicopter Parent? Here's How to Stop

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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he term "elicopter parent" is used to describe parents who tend to hover over their children, ready to swoop in and solve all their problems for them. Studies suggest that this kind of coddling is as unhealthy for children as it is exhausting for parents — yet many moms and dads continue to wait on their kids hand and foot and micromanage their lives to unbelievable extremes. Parents can be quickly sucked in to this hovering/swooping behavior as soon as their toddler whimpers over the least little thing. They want the crusts cut off their sandwiches (but they eat them at Grandma's), they can't hang up their jacket at home (but they do it at preschool), they want you to put on their socks (when they are fully capable of doing it themselves) — and parents give in to the whining. When we do things for our children that they can do on their own,

Michelle Smith Lank Quality Child Care

what does that do to their self-confidence? When we call their preschool teacher because another kid cut in front of them in line, when we step into the middle of a toy negotiation at the sand box in the park, when we "help" them with their gradeschool science project that ends up looking like a college student made it, when we yell at the coach because our kid is still sitting on the bench, it chips away at a child's belief in their own ability to handle these everyday situations. Studies show that parents who provide too

Music Instruct ion at the Averi t t Research has shown that learning a musical instrument makes kids smarter! Many studies have shown that when children are actively engaged in music, they do better in school, have higher grades and better test scores.

MUSIC IS A SMART CHOICE! The Averitt Center for the Arts offers private classes in violin, piano, voice, guitar, trombone, flute, & more! As well as the Statesboro Youth Chorale for Pre-K through High School, and the Statesboro Chamber Orchestra for youth and adults.

Call Tony to sign up! 212-2787

912.212.2787 | www.averittcenterforthearts.org

much guidance and not enough independence run the risk of their children becoming depressed and anxious. If you recognize yourself in any of these situations, it's time to back off. Think back to your own childhood. Chances are your parents didn't hover nearly as much as you do. You probably played in the backyard unattended and made your own snacks; your parents most likely missed a few of your school functions or sporting events, and you turned out just fine. Today, it's a whole new world out there. Thanks to cyberspace and media in general, parenting advice is available 24/7. You can read about every scary thing that could possibly happen to your child. You can also research every illness, so there is endless opportunity for fear. The rules for setting your little one on the path to lifelong success are more confusing than ever. Society is different, technology is different, education is different, expectations are different, and the future will be different. Your children's lives will be very different from your own. Even if you have a successful life, raising your child exactly the way you were raised does not guarantee him success. Understandably, you only want the best for your child, but you're not sure you know how best to prepare him or her for the future. Does that sound about right? Quality parenting does not mean constant hovering and worrying. One of the best tools you can give your child is self-sufficiency. Give them the space to try things on their own, without your interference. Let them make mistakes. Show them strategies for decision-making and problem-solving, and allow them to deal with the consequences of their decisions. These are universal, lifelong skills that will serve them well at any age and in a multitude of situations. Landing the helicopter Now that you recognize some of the traits of a helicopter parent, here a few suggestions to help you break the habit.

• Ask your child's other caregivers what tasks he does when you're not around, and then hold him to the same standards at home. • Write a resume for your child. On a piece of paper, write "Abby is 3. Here are some really cool things she can do all by herself." Then list some of her abilities, like picking up her toys, putting her clean clothes away and clearing her plate, and put a star next to each. Every time your child masters a new task, add it to the list with another star. She'll be so proud that she'll be more likely to do things for herself instead of asking you to wait on her all the time. • Practice some basic playground skills with your child like kicking a ball, climbing the monkey bars or going down the slide. When you see your child can do these things safely, you'll be more comfortable sitting back on the playground bench instead of hovering. Your child will feel more confident in his abilities as well. • Make a small photo album with pictures of your child doing all the things she needs to do in the morning before school, after school and before bed. Even if she can't read, she can follow along and accomplish the routine things she needs to do each day independently. • Give yourself a break. Make time each day to park yourself in a chair and have a cup of coffee. If your child calls for you and it isn't an emergency, say, "I'm drinking coffee right now." If he really needs you, he'll come to you, and if you do this often enough, he may stop asking for help so often and figure things out for himself. • Count to 10 before liftoff. As long as your child is not in danger, count to 10 before responding to his cry of "Help me!" or "I can't!" You may find yit's not necessary to come to the rescue, or your child may find he can do whatever it is that needs to be done all by himself. Michelle Smith Lank is the owner and director of Kid's World Learning Center, a three-star Quality Rated and National Association for the Education of Young Children accredited child care program in Statesboro.


Bulloch County's Babies

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Compiled from information supplied to Moments by East Georgia Regional Medical Center • Natalia was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Lee and Courtney Michele Monk of Glennville Sept. 8. • Matthias was born to Mr. and Mrs. Devon Allen Myers of Hinesville Sept. 8. The mother is the former Maria Valentina Rivero Casillo. • Kamani was born to Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Ramal and Napreisha Dashae Spann of Statesboro Sept. 8. • Angelica was born to Carol Ann Donaldson of Twin City Sept. 9. • Kinley was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jason Douglas and Taylor Marie Morgan of Sylvania Sept. 9. • Isaac was born to Sarah Paredes of Statesboro Sept. 9. • Aubree was born to Alyssa Natalie Lopez and William Thomas Thigpen of Rincon Sept. 9. • Jeyce was born to Artisha Arnice Williams and Jeffery Martin Vaughn of Millen Sept. 9. • David was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ben Anthony and Mary Elizabeth Gilberth of Statesboro Sept. 10. • Elizabeth was born to Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Preston Holland of Statesboro Sept. 10. The mother is the former Kara McLaughlin. • Kylan was born to Destiny La'Keyria Jones and Artrevius Markel Jackson of Glennville Sept. 10. • Axton was born to Mr. and Mrs. Alex James Farlow of Metter Sept. 11. The mother is the former Shannon Powell. • Samantha was born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Matthew and Morgan

Jeanett Agnew of Statesboro Sept. 12. • Camden was born to Mr. and Mrs. Chad Michael Bass of Statesboro Sept. 12. The mother is the former Mary Rahn. • Kensley was born to Alexis Brianna Monroe and Courtney Dentea Prigeon of Metter Sept. 12. • Khalecie was born to Suzanne Louise Cox and Matthew Allen Reiser of Sylvania Sept. 12. • Kalem was born to Mr. and Mrs. Miguel Ramon and Chante' Dorothea Salgado of Reidsville Sept. 12. • Josey was born to Mr. and Mrs. Shane David Scott of Statesboro Sept. 12. The mother is the former Vivian Thompson. • Emery was born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lawrence Stanfield of Glennville Sept. 12. The mother is the former Katie Tippins. • Rylee was born to Shjammesia Vakoria Williams of Millen Sept. 12. • Kylie Rae was born to Diyeshia Shadon Artis of Metter Sept. 13. • Athena Jean was born to Mr. and Mrs. Scott Allen Campbell of Garfield Sept. 13. The mother is the former Erica Jean Beckworth. • Jamel was born to Natasha Latrail Staton of Glennville Sept. 13. • Jah'Mere Roderick A'Keem was born to Shantoria Montrell Carter of Garfield Sept. 14. • Tylan Amir Khimon was born to Victoria Lesha Hankerson and Charlton Andre Engles of Statesboro Sept. 14. • Benjamin Payne was born to Mr.

and Mrs. Robert Paul Phillips of Claxton Sept. 14. The mother is the former Melissa Dianne Taylor. • Everly Claire was born to Mr. and Mrs. David Richard Pylant Jr. of Portal Sept. 14. The mother is the former Shana Dawn McCullough. • Jacob Andrew was born to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Isaac Roberts of Statesboro Sept. 14. The mother is the former Jolie Allison Gonzalez-Daniels. • Jayse Ryenne was born to Sharday Wyneisha Oglesby and Jeremy Randall Chavers of Statesboro Sept. 15. • Destiny Marie was born to Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel J. David of Swainsboro Sept. 15. The mother is the former Lashawna Marie Droober. • Wyatt Alexander was born to Courtney Renee Tinsley of Claxton Sept. 15. • Chelsi Leigh was born to Tierra Shalai Newkirk and Christopher Lamar Young of Statesboro Sept. 15. • Caoimhe Selene was born to Heather Victoria Lee and Andrew Jacob Boback of Glennville Sept. 16. • Lamarielle Denise was born to Eva Louise Hagins and Thernell Lamar Mills Jr. of Statesboro Sept. 19. • Eli Arthur was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Arthur Tyson of Register Sept. 19. The mother is the former Lindsay Marie Franklin. • Howard Lance was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jamie Levone Porter of Brooklet Sept. 19. The mother is the former Erica Cermain Lanier.

KID’S WORLD LEARNING CENTER WELCOMES YOUR NEW BUNDLE OF JOY!

367 SAVANNAH AVE. • STATESBORO • 912-764-4298 • WWW.KIDSWORLD1STATESBORO.COM

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

• Maxwell was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Michael and Tiffany Lynn Harding of Statesboro Sept. 2. • Riley was born to Latrice NyShae' Smith and Reginald Antonio Richardson of Midville Sept. 2. • Lillianna was born to Chelsea Alita Justice and Elliott Travis Smith of Portal Sept. 3. • Henry was born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas James and Joanie Juanita Turner of Statesboro Sept. 4. • Nala was born to Mr. and Mrs. Cody Lawton Abraham of Statesboro Sept. 5. The mother is the former Pherneicia Long. • Kamilah was born to D'Shaundra Renae Rollins and Vincent Dwayne Colley of Millen Sept. 6. • Mireya was born to Vanessa Natosha Mack and Brandy Delaine Foy of Millen Sept. 7. • Aveigha was born to Alexis Ann Gibbons of Sylvania Sept. 7. • Alayia was born to Allisa Camecia Johnson of Swainsboro Sept. 7. • Kaiden was born to Tiffany Renea Riccio and Dustin Casey Marsh of Statesboro Sept. 7. • Calvin was born to Haley Lawton German and Harley Calvin McGahee of Guyton Sept. 7. • William was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Burns Muse of Vidalia Sept. 7. The mother is the former Caroline Haaland. • Abbygail was born to Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Eric and Amber Colyn Taylor of Portal Sept. 7.


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The joy of gain, the heartache of loss

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Meca Williams-Johnson is familiar with both

W

ith a PhD in educational psychology and as an associate professor in the College of Education at Georgia Southern University, Meca Williams-Johnson is familiar with helping doctoral and other upperlevel students enact positive changes

Julie Lavender in the education field through her research classes. As an NAACP member since college and the wife of local attorney, pastor and Georgia NAACP President Francys Johnson, Meca's had firsthand experience with creating and supporting an atmosphere of healthy dialogue and positive change for the

good of others in the local community and beyond. In a ministry partnership role as the wife of a pastor, Meca encourages changes that she hopes and prays will affect eternity. In short, Meca is used to being a catalyst for both small and large changes. But when she encountered

a devastating heartache that no mother should ever have to face, she found that there was nothing she could do to change the outcome. Meca and Francys' second child, Frederick Douglas Caleb Johnson, died at 6 months old after contracting respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV. The pain was numbing and almost unbearable. "You have so many hopes and dreams for your baby," Meca said. "You think about what his life will be like, what he'll do when he grows up. So much promise." Sweet Frederick entered the world at only 26 weeks, weighing just 2 pounds. With the care of doctors and nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah, Frederick left the hospital after 100 days to join his parents and 3-year-old big brother, Thurgood, at home. Around Thanksgiving, just three months after leaving the hospital, Frederick caught a cold. Meca took him to the doctor in Savannah several times to address his illness. "He was coughing so much," she said. "On December 14, I'd taken him back to the doctor. He didn't have a fever. We left the office and stopped for a bite. I fed him; he ate. Moments later, I didn't think he was breathing. I jumped in the car and drove back to the hospital — we'd just left minutes before. I thought maybe he'd fallen asleep, but he seemed unresponsive." On a respirator for four days, Frederick passed away Dec. 18, 2011. Meca said the following weeks seemed surreal, like she was just going through the motions to get through each day. "I tried my best to keep a daily routine for Thurgood," she said. "I talked to him, but he didn't fully understand what was going on. Francys was my rock." For Meca, the moment of finality came when she handed Frederick's body to the undertaker. "All I could think about was that this would be the first time I wouldn't be with this baby. To me, that was shattering," she said. "My knees actually buckled. I couldn't stand." Some of Meca's coping mechanisms involved throwing herself into her work, spending time with Thurgood, working out and doing other


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health, but she still ached emotionally, as did Francys. "Some of Francys' questions came a little later, like, 'How could I pray for others so often and yet not save my son?' We had to deal with our own limitations," she said. Meca doesn't pinpoint a particular defining moment in her journey to healing; instead, she recalls it was a combination of many things. An important part of that combination of things, however, was finding ways to help others. Meca became active with the March of Dimes organization, participating in the Shamrock Run in March of the year following Frederick's death and every year since. She donates toiletries and necessities to the Ronald McDonald House in Savannah that provides for families with children in the hospital, and her family donated monitors to the NICU that allow siblings to view newborns with their parents. Meca said she also tries to warn

parents about the dangers of RSV and has helped several local families with sick children. She said it helped her a great deal to share her experience with her students as well. "They were a captive audience," she chuckled. "I was able to help them see real life, not just textbook research." Words that Meca held onto for months following Frederick's death were shared at the funeral, words said to Winnie the Pooh by Christopher Robin: "Always remember: You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think." Though she admits some of her acceptance came after a great deal of arguing with the Lord, she said her faith is stronger now than before. "I even trust him more, in a strangely odd way," she said. "It's hurt me, and I don't think I will ever get over it, but when you can say, 'It is well with my soul,' you've accepted a lot. "I can say, 'I trust you, Lord, that

you know much more on how to give good things to me. You know better a purpose that I am unaware of.' Just letting go and trusting — having that kind of trust is miraculous. "I don't have an answer to the question, 'How could a God so big, so loving, so wise allow this?' " she continued. "But my peace came when I said, 'I don't like it. I don't feel good. I will never stop hurting. But I trust you, God.' And I was able to get up and say, 'What's next?' " Meca is readying for the 2017 March of Dimes Shamrock Run and plans to continue inspiring college students, supporting her husband and taking care of Thurgood and Langston. And though she brags on Francys often, saying, "He's not just exciting but thrilling; not just smart but brilliant. He's passionate about what he believes in and courageous to make a change," she also says, "But as the wife, I believe I'm the glue that holds all the good stuff together."

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

healthy things. Still, the grief and sadness persisted, as did a problem with high blood pressure. "With Thurgood and Langston (now 3), my blood pressure was back to normal about six weeks after their birth. But with Frederick, I was still having high blood pressure problems," she said. In an effort to care for both Meca's physical and mental health as best as possible, her doctor asked her if she had ever thought of harming herself, to which she honestly replied, "I'm not going to harm myself, but I do feel like dying. "I just wanted to see Frederick," she explained. "It just hurt me so bad." Support from her husband and other family members, medical attention and medication helped Meca recover physically. Within three months, her blood pressure settled, and within six months, she no longer needed the medication. Physically, Meca was regaining her


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Adult Athletic Managers' Meeting Adults 50+ softball: 6 p.m. Open/industrial/church softball: Continuo Collective of 6:45 p.m. Women's and coed softball: 6:45 p.m. the South Emma Kelly Theater Honey Bowen Building $15 • 7 p.m. "Rosie Revere, Engineer" Asian Drama Fan Club reading and craft Anime & Manga Club (ages 15+) (ages 7–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. (ages 12–18) Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Reading to Rover (for new Crazy 8 Math Club Toddler Time (ages 2–4) and developing readers) (grades K–2) Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m.

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11 "Always ... Patsy Cline" "Always ... Patsy Cline" Emma Kelly Theater • 8 p.m. Emma Kelly Theater Dinner at R.J.'s from 5 –7:30 p.m. $20 • 7:30 p.m.

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Computer Basics: Microsoft Word Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

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Genealogy for Kids: History of April Fools 52 Weeks of Giving (ages 8–14) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m.

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Family Fun Day with Mango Languages: Irish Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Knitting & Crocheting Club Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Video Game Club (ages 12–18) Statesboro Regional Library • 3–5 p.m.

Sip & Sketch: Pastels (adults) Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Local Track Meet Statesboro High School free • 8 a.m.

25 Pink Power Run RAC Pavilion at GSU • 8 a.m.

52 Weeks of Giving Lego Club (ages 5–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Computer Basics: Creating Email Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

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Computer Basics: DIY: Scented Bath Soak Uploading (resumes/ Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. pictures) Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Homeschool Geography 52 Weeks of Giving Club (all ages) Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m.

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Genealogy Talk: Genealogy for Kids: Irish Irish Heritage Kids' Art Night (age 8–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. Folklore (ages 8–14) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Maker's Monday Kids' Afterschool Club DIY: Spring Wreath Toddler Time (ages 2–4) (ages 6–10) (ages 10–16) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m.

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Special Needs Sensory Penny Social Raffle and Storytime Bake Sale (all ages) Adulting 101: College Statesboro Regional Library • 6–8 p.m. Tickets are 5 cents each; benefits Prep Friends of the Library Open House for Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4–7 p.m. Families of Special Knitting & Crocheting Club Needs Children Homeschool Art Day Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 6–8 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Tasting Statesboro the United Way benefit OTC Natural Resources Building $15 • 5:30 p.m.

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"ANNIE the Musical" PAC at GSU Genealogy Organization $32/adults, $16/youth • 7:30 p.m. Anime & Manga Club Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. (ages 12–18) Kids' Book to Movie Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Creative Writing with Teen Advisory Group TAG Club: "The Borrowers" Paint-N-Party Toddler Time (ages 2–4) Betty Franklin Meeting (ages 12–18) (ages 8–12) Averitt Center for the Arts Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 3–5 p.m. $35/person • 5:30–8 p.m.

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Genealogy How-To: First Friday: Green Grits Heritage Quest Cultural Clays sporting Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. Downtown • 5:30–8 p.m. clay fundraiser tournament Happy Birthday Dr. Suess! Kids' Chess Club (all ages) for the Averitt Center OTC's Got Talent! Statesboro Regional Library • 3 p.m. Baygall Sporting Clays • 9 a.m. Storytime and Fun OTC Auditorium • 11 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4:30 p.m. Computer Basics: Show-N-Tell: Natural Board Game Club Free Read Book Club Beginners/How to Use Skin and Hair Care Statesboro Regional Library • 6:30 p.m. Google Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. (ages 12–18) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Creative Writing with Video Game Club Toddler Time (ages 2–4) Betty Franklin 52 Weeks of Giving (ages 8–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 3–5 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 1–3 p.m.

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Chess Club (all ages) Teen Cooking (ages 12–16) Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Youth Chorale Maker's Monday Crazy 8 Math Club Spring Showcase $10/adults, $5/youth Toddler Time (ages 2–4) (ages 10–16) (grades 3–5) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Emma Kelly Theater • 7 p.m.

NOTES:

March2017

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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Adult Athletic Managers' Meeting Adults 50+ softball: 6 p.m. Open/industrial/church softball: Continuo Collective of 6:45 p.m. Women's and coed softball: 6:45 p.m. the South Emma Kelly Theater Honey Bowen Building $15 • 7 p.m. "Rosie Revere, Engineer" Asian Drama Fan Club reading and craft Anime & Manga Club (ages 15+) (ages 7–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. (ages 12–18) Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Reading to Rover (for new Crazy 8 Math Club Toddler Time (ages 2–4) and developing readers) (grades K–2) Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m.

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11 "Always ... Patsy Cline" "Always ... Patsy Cline" Emma Kelly Theater • 8 p.m. Emma Kelly Theater Dinner at R.J.'s from 5 –7:30 p.m. $20 • 7:30 p.m.

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Computer Basics: Microsoft Word Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

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Genealogy for Kids: History of April Fools 52 Weeks of Giving (ages 8–14) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m.

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Family Fun Day with Mango Languages: Irish Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Knitting & Crocheting Club Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Video Game Club (ages 12–18) Statesboro Regional Library • 3–5 p.m.

Sip & Sketch: Pastels (adults) Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Local Track Meet Statesboro High School free • 8 a.m.

25 Pink Power Run RAC Pavilion at GSU • 8 a.m.

52 Weeks of Giving Lego Club (ages 5–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Computer Basics: Creating Email Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

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Computer Basics: DIY: Scented Bath Soak Uploading (resumes/ Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. pictures) Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Homeschool Geography 52 Weeks of Giving Club (all ages) Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m.

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Genealogy Talk: Genealogy for Kids: Irish Irish Heritage Kids' Art Night (age 8–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. Folklore (ages 8–14) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Maker's Monday Kids' Afterschool Club DIY: Spring Wreath Toddler Time (ages 2–4) (ages 6–10) (ages 10–16) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m.

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Special Needs Sensory Penny Social Raffle and Storytime Bake Sale (all ages) Adulting 101: College Statesboro Regional Library • 6–8 p.m. Tickets are 5 cents each; benefits Prep Friends of the Library Open House for Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4–7 p.m. Families of Special Knitting & Crocheting Club Needs Children Homeschool Art Day Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 6–8 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m.

Tasting Statesboro the United Way benefit OTC Natural Resources Building $15 • 5:30 p.m.

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"ANNIE the Musical" PAC at GSU Genealogy Organization $32/adults, $16/youth • 7:30 p.m. Anime & Manga Club Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. (ages 12–18) Kids' Book to Movie Statesboro Regional Library • 5 p.m. Creative Writing with Teen Advisory Group TAG Club: "The Borrowers" Paint-N-Party Toddler Time (ages 2–4) Betty Franklin Meeting (ages 12–18) (ages 8–12) Averitt Center for the Arts Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 3–5 p.m. $35/person • 5:30–8 p.m.

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Genealogy How-To: First Friday: Green Grits Heritage Quest Cultural Clays sporting Statesboro Regional Library • 6 p.m. Downtown • 5:30–8 p.m. clay fundraiser tournament Happy Birthday Dr. Suess! Kids' Chess Club (all ages) for the Averitt Center OTC's Got Talent! Statesboro Regional Library • 3 p.m. Baygall Sporting Clays • 9 a.m. Storytime and Fun OTC Auditorium • 11 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4:30 p.m. Computer Basics: Show-N-Tell: Natural Board Game Club Free Read Book Club Beginners/How to Use Skin and Hair Care Statesboro Regional Library • 6:30 p.m. Google Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. (ages 12–18) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 2 p.m. Creative Writing with Video Game Club Toddler Time (ages 2–4) Betty Franklin 52 Weeks of Giving (ages 8–12) Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 3–5 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 1–3 p.m.

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Chess Club (all ages) Teen Cooking (ages 12–16) Statesboro Regional Library • 4 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Youth Chorale Maker's Monday Crazy 8 Math Club Spring Showcase $10/adults, $5/youth Toddler Time (ages 2–4) (ages 10–16) (grades 3–5) Statesboro Regional Library • 5:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 4:30 p.m. Statesboro Regional Library • 10:30 a.m. Emma Kelly Theater • 7 p.m.

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March2017

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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NATURAL WAYS TO BEAT SEASONAL ALLERGIES The arrival of warmer weather changes the landscape completely. Animals come out of hiding and hibernation while trees and flowers bloom anew. The spring season can be an exciting time for naturalists and lovers of the great outdoors because they can immerse themselves in the sights, sounds and smells of nature. But for many people, spring also marks the start of allergy season and spending time outdoors can become downright uncomfortable for them. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology says nasal allergies affect approximately 50 million people in the United States. Allergic diseases, including asthma, are the fifth most prevalent chronic diseases among people of all ages and the third most common in children. Allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, can occur in spring, summer and/or early fall. People who experience hay fever often can attribute their symptoms to sensitivity to pollens from trees, grasses, weeds, or airborne mold spores. No two allergy sufferers are alike, so medications that may work for one person may be only mildly effective for another. Many medications can cause side effects, which may be just as frustrating as the initial allergy symptoms. Treatments may target sneezing and itching but fail to clear up congestion. Drowsiness, dry mouth and nasal irritation may be side effects of common allergy drugs. People who want to avoid allergy medication can look to natural remedies to alleviate their symptoms. Whether used alone or in concert with traditional medicine, these remedies may make spending time outdoors more pleasant. • Try probiotics. Probiotics, those friendly bacteria that reside in the digestive system, can do more than just treat an upset stomach. Naturopathic doctors say that probiotics also can influence the immune system and may help strengthen its response to common allergens. Since probiotics are good for replenishing healthy bacteria in the body anyway, many people may want to keep taking them once their allergy symptoms have come and gone. • Use neti pots or saline sprays. A small amount of saltwater can rinse away allergens, such as pollen, that get lodged in the nose. These rinses also can help clear up congestion and flush out any other irritants. • Load up on omega-3s. A German study published in the journal Allergy found that participants who ate foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids were less likely to suffer allergy symptoms than those who didn’t regularly eat these foods. Omega-3s can help fight inflammation. Drinking more fluids and using spices in cooking can help flush out allergens as well. • Don’t forget vitamin C. Vitamin C is an immune-system booster and may help prevent the formation of histamine in the body, a substance responsible for many allergy symptoms.

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March Music Madness

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usic, like nothing else, reaches into our lives and affects everything we see, everything we touch, each person we encounter and each goal we pursue. Sentimental movie scenes would not produce the same effect without sweeping melodies. If not for the soft organ playing in background, wedding guests would not wipe tears away from their eyes as the bride walked slowly down the aisle. Music has the power to change a person's mood, sharpen their thoughts and help them relive memories of special moments. At the Averitt Center for the Arts, we recognize music is vital to the well-being and full development of children, adolescents and adults, and that music is essential in creating thoughtful and vibrant communities. On March 26, some of the area's most talented youth will take to the Emma Kelly stage for the Statesboro Youth Chorale's annual Spring Showcase. This performance gives students the opportunity to share with the community what they have learned over the past several months and allows many of the children to perform in front of a live audience for the first time. As the only facility in the Statesboro area to offer vocal lessons for toddler-aged children, the Averitt Center is fortunate that its youth chorale is led by the very talented Dr. Tamara Watson-Harper. The bubbly and energetic director believes that exposing children to an audience at a young age is the best way to instill in them confidence and free them of insecurities. "Performing is extremely personal because the singer is sharing something that is truly unique to their person — they're sharing a quality that nobody else in the world could mimic," Watson-Harper said. "Performing with others takes a great deal of discipline and dedication, and we are looking forward for the opportunity to show our community how hard these children have worked over the last several months."

Ashley Whittemore

Watson-Harper also said that, to her, music is not just an art form; it's a way of experiencing the world, and a way for today's youth, who are living in a digital world, to find a physical connection with their families, the people that surround them and their community. "Music is a positive form of expression that can benefit a child in many aspects of life," she said. "You gain self-confidence by mastering difficult skills, which allows for better social skills and can improve a child's overall school performance." In addition to the SYC, the Averitt Center offers youth programs in guitar, strings and wind instruments. Private lessons are also available for any age youth. For more information about private lessons or other programs offered, go to averitt centerforthearts.org. The Spring Showcase is the climax of the chorale season, which promises a night of great entertainment and fun for the whole family! The performance starts at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 26. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for youth. To purchase tickets, call (912) 212-2787 or visit the box office Tuesday–Friday from noon–5:30 p.m.


COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY DENTISTRY

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

F. E. Thomas, DMD, Alicia Bryant-Thomas, DMD, & Dr. Chad Thomas, DMD


moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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Pre-Kindergarten: March 1 - 24 Kindergarten: May 1 - 5

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RICKY LANE D E N T I S T R Y

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

elcome to the dental office of Ricky Lane, DDS in Statesboro, Georgia! Dr. Ricky Lane and his team, are committed to providing you with outstanding, comprehensive dental care. We welcome new patients of all ages to our comfortable, friendly dental office. We focus on getting to know you personally and providing you with individualized dental care that meets your unique needs. Our dental team takes pride in the relationships we’ve built with our patients, and we look forward to adding you to our dental family!

Painful Periods: 7 Signs Something Is Wrong

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rom the moment she gets that very first drop of menstrual blood, a woman learns that 25 percent of being a female is spent pretending everything is fine, when really she'd rather curl up in bed with a warm rice bag. But, some pain should not be endured. How do you know if your menstrual pain is just a normal part of being a woman, or if your body is trying to tell you something is wrong? These seven guidelines can help you catch dangerous symptoms early on.

1.

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Pelvic pain that lingers past menstruation. If you experience constant backaches or pelvic pain long after your menstrual cycle is over, it could be a sign that you have endometriosis, according to Everyday Health. Endometriosis happens when the uterine lining is outside of the uterus and connected to things like your fallopian tubes, bladder and ovaries. It usually creates a lot of pain and can affect your fertility. According to the Endometriosis Foundation of America, the disorder affects more than 176 million women between the ages of 12 and 60 worldwide. And what's worse, many women live with the symptoms of endometriosis for years because of misdiagnosis, or because they think their symptoms aren't a concern.

2.

Pain that brings on nausea or vomiting. Most women have some sort of pain during menstruation, but cramps generally should not be completely debilitating. If they are keeping you homebound and you're missing work or school, this intense pain may also indicate you have endometriosis.

3.

Sudden severe cramping (that's different than the norm). You should note any quick changes in your menstrual

FamilyShare cycle, especially if you suddenly have more pain.

4.

Pooping pains. If you have irritable bowel syndrome, you can probably ignore this symptom. Otherwise, going to the bathroom shouldn't leave you in tears. This, too, can be a sign of endometriosis.

5.

Burning when you urinate. You've likely heard how a burning sensation when you pee can indicate a urinary tract infection, but it can also mean a few even scarier things. Cervical cancer, for example, causes the cervix to swell, which compresses the bladder. As a result, you might have a lot of pain or a hard time emptying your bladder. Painful peeing is also a symptom of an infection in your reproductive organs called pelvic inflammatory disease, or PID. Although it generally comes from STDs that are not treated, it can also come from infection when an IUD is inserted. If not treated, PID can eventually lead to blockage in your fallopian tubes, ectopic pregnancies, infertility and pelvic and abdominal pain that doesn't go away, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

6.

Pain after sex. Nothing kills the mood more than pain while you're trying to be intimate. Aside from being annoying, this could also indicate that you have PID or endometriosis.

7.

Sharp pelvic pain. If suddenly you have sharp pelvic pain, it could be a sign of a uterine fibroid. Many women have fibroids and don't even know it, according to the Mayo Clinic. Fibroids aren't usually dangerous, but when they get too large, they can create a lot of pain and possibly anemia from heavy blood loss.


S ummer

Enjoy Green Grits in Design Tips Downtown Statesboro

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Special to Moments made by Statesboro's own Freeman's Mill. This exciting event will also include the third annual Downtown Statesboro Paw-walk dog contest. Dress your dogs in the most creative and green costumes and bring them along with you for a night of fun! The contest will be judged and sponsored by Paws N Claws of Southern, an organization at Georgia Southern University that works with the Humane Society to protect and advocate for animals in the Statesboro community. For more information, contact Main Street Statesboro at (912) 764-7227 or visit mainstreet@statesborodown town.com. Richard James, MD Mary Alice Allcott,NP Toni Lynn Herring, PA-C Brandon Rowland, PA-C

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hen choosing a rug, there’s a lot more to consider than just color. Thinking about what you need in advance can ensure you choose the right rug for you. Think pile. Maintenance is an important consideration when it comes to picking a rug, and pile depth is crucial to that. For areas with high foot traffic, maintenance will be much easier if you choose a harder rug with shallow pile. If the rug is for your dining room or kitchen, a shallow-pile rug will be much easier to keep clean in case of spills. Think about how you need the rug to function and what sort of use it’s going to get to make

sure you choose the best one. Think size. A well-chosen rug can completely change the feel of a room, but getting the wrong size can overwhelm a space and make it look small. A rug shouldn’t be a substitute for a carpet, and you don’t need it to cover every inch of floor space. Picking the right size requires you to think about the area it needs to cover. Plan your room, arrange the furniture, and then measure out the space you want to cover. Think placement. Placement is even more important than size and is a vital aspect of the styling of your room. A rug clearly needs to fit in with the layout of the furniture and complement the look of the room. While rugs in hallways might simply serve to protect the carpet underneath, rugs in bedrooms and bathrooms should be placed where they will best serve a purpose, such as to provide a place to walk on cold wooden floors or tiles. It is fairly simple to position a rectangular carpet well — just ensure the edges run parallel with the walls. Think color. The color obviously needs to complement the scheme you already have, but that doesn’t mean you have to match everything perfectly. A rug is a separate feature in itself, so it should stand out from the floor coloring underneath. Texture is also part of this. A deep, rich color might look good in contrast to a light floor; likewise, a lighter color might sit well on dark wood flooring. If you have kept your flooring neutral, rugs can be a great way to add a pop of color to liven up a room. Think shape. Rectangular rugs are, of course, the most common, and the simplest to position in a room. But choosing a less traditional shape can again emphasize the rug as a key feature of a room and add to a classy design. A modern layout with lots of clear, straight lines might actually benefit from a circular rug, something a bit different from the norm, to give the room a new perspective. Think style. Style is often the first thing you think about when it comes to rugs, and it’s definitely one of the most important. That said, it’s worth it to consider the above aspects before turning to style; otherwise, you might end up buying a great-looking rug that just doesn’t suit your room. Rugs should complement a room rather than match it perfectly, which is why going for a vibrant pattern can often be a really stylish choice. Still, the style of your rug should suit your own tastes and is your choice alone. Good luck with choosing the perfect rug for your room! And remember, the perfect decorating decision is the one you love!

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Furniture Center 8-18 W. Main St. 912-764-6576 1-888-764-6576

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

oin the Downtown Statesboro Development Authority at the Green Grits festival on Friday, March 3, from 5:30–8 p.m. for an evening full of fun, games and all things green. This St. Patrick's Day-themed annual festival will take place on and around the courthouse lawn, with green food, green drinks and green dogs all along Main Street. The purpose of the event is to create a night of entertainment for families, community members and their furry loved ones. There will be a variety of vendors selling food, homemade jewelry, clothing items and much more. And of course, the event would not be complete without green grits specially

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Don’t Miss Our Delicious N Segment S t On O New

These 6 Things Cause Cellulite — and 3 of Them You Can Control FamilyShare

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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f you have cellulite, or "cottage cheese skin" as many call it, you're not alone; the majority of women have it. And to throw a disclaimer out right at the beginning, you should know that there is nothing dangerous, or wrong, about cellulite. Society — not any scientific research — has created the dialogue that cellulite is undesirable. If you have it and it doesn't bother you, fantastic. But if you dread when spring — and swimsuit season — rolls around because of the cellulite on your thighs, it's helpful to know what it is and what you can do about it.

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All body types can get it Cellulite is common — very common — and it doesn't really discriminate by weight. Yes, gaining weight can make cellulite look more noticeable, but thin people are also plagued by it. "I even treat Victoria's Secret models," Shira Ein-Dor, owner of the American Cellulite Reduction Center, told Health.com. "They're very lean, they work out and eat well, they do everything right but they still have cellulite." There is still a lot we don't know about cellulite. But so far, this is what scientists have figured out.

What affects cellulite? Hormones. Cellulite usually gets worse (or appears) as you mature. Any change in your hormones can affect it, so sometimes it appears during puberty, while pregnant or just as you get older. Genetics. Hate to break it to you, but some people are simply more prone to getting cellulite than others. Diet. What you eat isn't wholly responsible for your cellulite, but it can definitely increase or decrease it. We'll talk about what you should and shouldn't eat a little later. Activity level. It's a myth that only people who are out of shape get cellulite, but exercise and toning can making it less visible. Tight clothing. Tight clothing around your thighs can limit your blood flow, which scientists have discovered affects cellulite. Being a woman. Cellulite is totally sexist. Only 10 percent of men but 90 percent of women have it, according to Scientific American.

1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

So what can be done? No miracle product or procedure has completely

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eradicated cellulite, but the following have been shown to help — and not help.

Richard F. Marz, DDS

"Cellulite is always underneath where the elastics go, and if you draw an invisible line where the cellulite is, you will see where the panty lines are," osteopathic physician Lionel Bissoon told Scientific American. "I tell people the most important preventive thing you can do, if you can't afford treatment, is change your [style of] underwear." What doesn't work • Creams. Most creams just address the fat aspect of cellulite, and any results that may come are only temporary. According to the Mayo Clinic, no studies have shown that these creams alone can improve the cellulite. • Liposuction. Liposuction can remove the fat, but it won't get rid of cellulite, and in some cases, it could even make it worse, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Marz and his staff strive to care for each patient according to their needs and wants. They have the technology in place to provide modern, conservative and comfortable dentistry. Services We Offer: • Effective Scheduling to minimize wait time • Comprehensive Dental Health Evaluation and Counsel • Digital Imaging as an Aid to Cavity Detection for early and objective diagnosis • Conservative Decay Removal

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1130 Brampton Ave. Statesboro, GA • 912-764-3724 Monday-Thursday 8 am - 5 pm www.thestatesborodentist.com

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

What works • Eating the right food. Too much fat, salt and carbohydrates can enhance your cellulite. Foods like fruits, vegetables and other foods high in fiber can help reduce it. Try incorporating more of these 15 delicious, fiber-rich foods into your diet: split peas, lentils, black beans, lima beans, artichokes, peas, broccoli, brussels sprouts, raspberries, blackberries, avocados, pears and bran flakes, whole wheat pasta, and oatmeal. • Getting plenty of cardio. Cardio helps keep your fat under control, and excess fat can make your cellulite worse. Besides that, cardio has a whole world of amazing benefits. There really is no replacement for it. • Loosening (but tightening) up with yoga. Running and biking isn't enough. You have to strength train to tighten your skin. Stretching and strengthening the areas where cellulite occurs can help, according to David McDaniel, director of the Institute for Anti-Aging and assistant professor of clinical dermatology at Eastern Virginia Medical School. "Firming and toning those muscles will in turn tighten the skin, giving the illusion that cellulite is less noticeable," McDaniel told Health.com. There are lots of other ways to strength train, but yoga also cuts down on stress, which can cause you, among other things, to eat those foods you're trying to avoid. • Change your underwear. If your underwear is tight, it's time to change that.

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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CREATING GREAT

Shop for fresh ingredients!

WITHH THE

MOMENTS

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StateSboro MainStreet FarMerS Market

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1 lb carrots from Market, peeled and trimmed or cut into slices

1 tbsp. brown sugar

1 lb parsnips, peeled and cut into slices

2 tbsp. cane syrup from Market

½ sweet onion, from Market, chopped.

3 tbsp. chopped fresh mint, from Market

2 tbsp. Georgia olive oil from Market

¼ cup sliced almonds, toasted

Salt and Pepper

2 tbsp. butter from Market, melted

Toss carrots, parsnips, and onion with olive oil, melted butter, salt and pepper, and brown sugar. If using oven, preheat to 400 degrees. Place in grill pack or a shallow, oven-proof pan. Grill or roast for 30-40 minutes, until vegetables caramelize. Toss vegetables with cane syrup, mint, and almonds.

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March 25, 2017

8 am sign in • 9 am start Statesboro High School Ages 7-14 by Dec 31, 2017 • Free Event

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Carrot and Parsnip Grill Pack

Carrots are a favorite late winter or early spring vegetable. They can be made even more complex in flavor when combined with parsnips, another winter root vegetable that looks like a large, white carrot. This recipe can be done in a grill pack, made from folded-over heavy duty aluminum foil, or in a 400 degree oven. Parsnips are occasionally available at the Market. Otherwise, they can be found at other markets locally.


Color in this picture to create your own masterpiece.

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moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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Andrea Hendley Director

• Developmentally Appropriate Program • Low Student to Teacher Ratio • Georgia Funded Pre-Kindergarten • 6 Weeks to 9 Years of Age • Open 6:30am-6:30pm Monday-Friday

22 Joe Kennedy Blvd • (912) 681-1100


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625 Gentilly Rd, Statesboro, GA S T A S T A T E S B O R O

M A G A Z I N E

W I NN ER 2017

Call (912) 681-1923 or visit our website www.thegardensstatesboro.com

728 GA-119, Springfield, GA www.lakeviewmanorcommunity.com

1532 Fair Rd, Statesboro, GA Call (912) 681-2686 or visit our website www.southernmanorcompanioncare.com

Southern Manor...

Statesboro’s favorite place to retire since 1988.

1532 Fair Rd, Statesboro, GA Call (912) 681-2686 or visit our website www.southernmanorstatesboro.com

We boast being the region’s only community to offer a National Board Certified Assisted Living Executive Director as well as a National Board Certified Adult Nurse Practitioner to meet the needs our families, residents, and employees. With 45 private rooms in addition to a large spacious sun room, lobby and lifestyle center, our Residents and Families will agree we are the very finest in retirement living.

Four families. Four locations. All to serve you and your family better.

Voted “Best in the Boro” Five Years Running!

If you are trying to make the decision between in-home care or a senior living community, we invite you to come and tour whichever location is closest to you. While you are visiting, be sure to ask about our Companion Care services to see what is the best fit for your loved one.

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

Call (912) 754-3214 or visit our website


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刀䔀䜀䤀匀吀䔀刀 吀伀䐀䄀夀 䄀吀 䌀刀䤀⸀䜀匀⼀䌀刀䤀匀唀䴀䴀䔀刀䌀䄀䴀倀

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

匀栀漀漀琀椀渀最 匀瀀漀爀琀猀 䤀渀琀爀漀搀甀挀椀渀最 椀渀搀椀瘀椀搀甀愀氀猀 琀漀 琀栀攀 爀攀眀愀爀搀猀 愀渀搀 爀攀猀瀀漀渀猀椀戀椀氀椀琀椀攀猀 漀昀 猀栀漀漀琀椀渀最 椀猀 琀栀攀 洀椀猀猀椀漀渀 漀昀 琀栀攀  愀渀搀  䜀攀漀爀最椀愀 匀漀甀琀栀攀爀渀 匀栀漀漀琀椀渀最 匀瀀漀爀琀猀 䔀搀甀挀愀琀椀漀渀 䌀攀渀琀攀爀⸀ 圀攀  漀û攀爀 愀 瘀愀爀椀攀琀礀 漀昀 瀀爀漀最爀愀洀猀 昀漀爀 愀氀氀 愀最攀猀 愀渀搀 猀欀椀氀氀 氀攀瘀攀氀猀Ⰰ 昀漀爀  戀漀琀栀 愀爀挀栀攀爀礀 愀渀搀 ǻ爀攀愀爀洀猀⸀ 伀甀爀 挀攀爀琀椀ǻ攀搀 椀渀猀琀爀甀挀琀漀爀猀 眀椀氀氀 甀猀攀  戀漀琀栀 攀搀甀挀愀琀椀漀渀愀氀 愀渀搀 栀愀渀搀猀ⴀ漀渀 琀爀愀椀渀椀渀最 琀漀 栀攀氀瀀 礀漀甀爀 挀栀椀氀搀  搀攀瘀攀氀漀瀀 猀欀椀氀氀猀 琀栀愀琀 眀椀氀氀 氀愀猀琀 愀 氀椀昀攀琀椀洀攀⸀

匀眀椀洀 䰀攀猀猀漀渀猀 匀甀洀洀攀爀 椀猀 琀栀攀 琀椀洀攀 昀漀爀 昀甀渀 椀渀 琀栀攀 猀甀渀Ⰰ 愀渀搀 眀栀攀琀栀攀爀 椀琀✀猀 戀礀 琀栀攀  瀀漀漀氀Ⰰ 琀栀攀 氀愀欀攀Ⰰ 漀爀 琀栀攀 戀攀愀挀栀Ⰰ 欀渀漀眀椀渀最 栀漀眀 琀漀 猀眀椀洀 椀猀  椀洀瀀漀爀琀愀渀琀 昀漀爀 攀瘀攀爀礀漀渀攀⸀ 伀甀爀 猀眀椀洀 瀀爀漀最爀愀洀猀 愀爀攀 搀攀猀椀最渀攀搀 琀漀  琀攀愀挀栀 椀渀搀椀瘀椀搀甀愀氀猀 漀昀 愀氀氀 愀最攀猀 愀渀搀 愀氀氀 猀欀椀氀氀 氀攀瘀攀氀猀 椀渀 愀 昀甀渀 愀渀搀  猀愀昀攀 攀渀瘀椀爀漀渀洀攀渀琀⸀ 倀愀爀琀椀挀椀瀀愀渀琀猀 眀椀氀氀 戀攀 琀愀甀最栀琀 猀眀椀洀洀椀渀最 愀渀搀  眀愀琀攀爀 猀愀昀攀琀礀 猀欀椀氀氀猀 戀礀 漀甀爀 攀砀瀀攀爀椀攀渀挀攀搀 椀渀猀琀爀甀挀琀漀爀猀 猀漀 礀漀甀 漀爀  礀漀甀爀 挀栀椀氀搀 眀椀氀氀 戀攀 愀琀 攀愀猀攀 椀渀 愀渀搀 愀爀漀甀渀搀 琀栀攀 眀愀琀攀爀⸀

䜀漀氀昀 䌀愀洀瀀 䜀漀氀昀 椀猀 愀 昀甀渀Ⰰ 猀漀挀椀愀氀 愀渀搀 椀渀挀氀甀猀椀瘀攀 猀瀀漀爀琀 昀漀爀 戀漀琀栀 戀漀礀猀 愀渀搀  最椀爀氀猀⸀ 䰀攀琀 漀甀爀 倀䜀䄀 倀爀漀昀攀猀猀椀漀渀愀氀猀 琀攀愀挀栀 礀漀甀爀 挀栀椀氀搀 最漀氀昀  琀栀爀漀甀最栀 愀 瘀愀爀椀攀琀礀 漀昀 昀甀渀 愀挀琀椀瘀椀琀椀攀猀 琀栀愀琀 眀椀氀氀 搀攀瘀攀氀漀瀀 琀栀攀 猀欀椀氀氀猀  渀攀攀搀攀搀 昀漀爀 愀 氀椀昀攀琀椀洀攀 漀昀 猀甀挀挀攀猀猀 漀渀 愀渀搀 漀û 琀栀攀 挀漀甀爀猀攀⸀  䤀渀猀琀爀甀挀琀椀漀渀 眀椀氀氀 昀漀挀甀猀 漀渀 最爀漀眀椀渀最 琀栀攀 挀漀爀攀 挀漀洀瀀攀琀攀渀挀椀攀猀 漀昀  琀栀攀 最愀洀攀Ⰰ 眀栀椀氀攀 愀氀猀漀 搀攀瘀攀氀漀瀀椀渀最 最漀氀昀ⴀ猀瀀攀挀椀ǻ挀 猀欀椀氀氀猀 愀渀搀  ǻ琀渀攀猀猀 琀栀爀漀甀最栀 昀甀渀 愀挀琀椀瘀椀琀椀攀猀 猀甀挀栀 愀猀 愀爀挀栀攀爀礀Ⰰ 猀眀椀洀洀椀渀最Ⰰ  琀攀愀洀ⴀ瀀氀愀礀 愀渀搀 瀀愀爀攀渀琀⼀挀栀椀氀搀 攀瘀攀渀琀猀⸀ 琀攀

䘀漀爀 洀漀爀攀 椀渀昀漀爀洀愀琀椀漀渀Ⰰ 挀愀氀氀 ⠀㤀㄀㈀⤀ 㐀㜀㠀ⴀ㔀㐀㌀㘀Ⰰ 漀爀 瘀椀猀椀琀 挀爀椀⸀最猀⼀挀爀椀猀甀洀洀攀爀挀愀洀瀀


MOMENTS GAMES

CLUES DOWN

SUDOKU ADVANCED

CROSSWORD

ADVANCED

ANSWERS

1. "Dark Knight" actor 2. S. African plants 3. Castle in County Offaly, Ireland 4. White (French) 5. Morsel 6. Semitic language 7. Areas outside cities 8. Crackling 9. Cub 10. Landmark house in Los Angeles 11. Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist 12. Mineral 13. Late night host Myers 21. Pull along 23. Not good 25. British Air Aces 26. Upset 27. Maltreatment 28. Nocturnal, cat-like animal 29. Hollyhocks 32. Shelter 33. Finished 34. Discharge 36. "X-Men" actor McKellen 37. Beloved dish __ and cheese 38. Holds coffee 40. Languish 41. Quenches 43. Electric fish 44. Consume 46. Type of school 47. Erase 49. Educate 50. "Transformers" actress Fox 51. Spiritual leader 52. Every one 53. Site of the Taj Mahal 54. Welsh village 57. Weapon 58. Geological times 59. S. Asian crops 61. Soviet Socialist Republic 62. Witness

SUDOKU INTERMEDIATE

CLUES ACROSS 1. "ER" actress Leslie 5. Hebrew name for Babylon 10. Newts 14. Leaf angle 15. Dravidian language 16. Ridge on nematodes 17. Monetary unit 18. Determined the tare 19. Unfreeze 20. Merits 22. World's oldest broadcasting organization 23. Vacation spot 24. December 25 27. Ottoman military command 30. Resin-like substance secreted by insects 31. A.C. Comics female supervillain 32. Insect linked to honey 35. Opinion 37. In the middle of 38. Basketballer Yao 39. Remove lid 40. Pressure wound therapy 41. Fabric 42. Witnessed 43. Defunct European economic organization 44. "Hotel California" rockers 45. When you expect to arrive 46. "Sleepless in Seattle" actress Ryan 47. Danish airline 48. Insecticide 49. Scientific instrument 52. Type of seal 55. Israeli city __ Aviv 56. Cavalry sword 60. Ottoman title 61. Gurus 63. Cold wind 64. Predatory reptile (abbr.) 65. New Jersey is one 66. Divulge a secret 67. Finely chopped mixture 68. Actress Zellweger 69. Romanian city

MOMENTS

FINISHED ALREADY? HOW ABOUT MORE OF A CHALLENGE?

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

INTERMEDIATE

Want to find the answers to the puzzles? Check the bottom of this page.

CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

31


32

Hope is here.

moments | March 2017 | www.statesboromoments.com

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