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February 2016 ALSO INSIDE Go Girl: Caroline James Red Velvet Cream Cheese Brownies Are Your Relationships Toxic-Free?

MOORE IS BETTER Mayor, husband share what makes their marriage work


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BANK AHEAD

A lot of history has happened since Queensborough was founded in 1902 as First National Bank and Trust in Louisville, Georgia. The 19th century had just ended. It was a bold move to start an independent bank to serve a small farming community. Our promise was “great service and uncomplicated banking.” Over a century later those values still hold. We’ve changed our name but never our promise.

OF OUR TIME

We were ahead of our time then and we are still ahead of our time today. Now you can bank with us from anywhere. As a forward thinking bank, we embrace the technology that allows banking without borders and deposits without driving. It works for our customers and we work for them. But if you want to stop by, we have 24 branches in 15 cities across Georgia.

2 4 G E O R G I A L O C AT I O N S | www.QNBTRUST.com |

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

A LWAY S A


moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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table of CONTENTS

in this ISSUE Oh, February — a month filled with huge stuffed animals, boxes of chocolates, mushy cards and expensive flowers — is here once again. While it shouldn’t take a national holiday for your significant other to show how much he or she loves you, the sentiments expressed on Valentine’s Day — at times ad nauseum, I admit — go a long way every day of the year. Feb. 14, I think, simply reminds us how important those expressions of love truly are. So it’s only fitting that this month, we feature a couple who seems to have discovered the secrets to maintaining a long and happy marriage. For three decades, Bill and Jan Moore have been valentines. Since falling in love back in college — within minutes on their first date, according to Jan — they have gotten married, established successful careers and raised two beautiful daughters. Oh, yeah, and Jan made history in 2014 when she was elected as the first female mayor of Statesboro. Through it all, two key ingredients have remained in their relationship: their Linsay and her husband, Matthew love for each other and the fun they have together. To read more about Statesboro’s first family, turn to page 12. Our February Go Girl is Caroline James, a wife and mom who has miraculously found the strength and determination to keep moving forward following a life-altering injury in which she shattered one of the vertebra in her back. Although she continues to struggle with complications from the accident, she finds strength in Philippians 4:13, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me,” and she hopes her story will encourage others to never give up. Flip to page 5 to read her inspiring story. For more Valentine’s Day goodness, don’t miss Azure Rountree’s delicious recipe for Red Velvet Cream Cheese Brownies (page 7), Perla Middleton’s advice for ensuring your relationships remain healthy and toxic-free (page 22), and the perfect holiday date idea from the Averitt Center for the Arts and 40 East Grill (page 9). Here’s to appreciating all those people who have invested in a piece of your heart’s real estate!

Go Girl............................................... 5 The Art of Lawncare.......................... 6 Red Velvet Brownies.......................... 7 Downtown Wedding Walk.................. 8 Averitt Center.................................... 9 Parks and Recreation...................... 10 Bulloch County Schools.................. 11 Feature...................................... 12–13 Calendar.................................... 14–15 Selfie Conflict................................... 16 Outdoor Fun.................................... 17 Manly Valentine Gifts........................ 18 Healthy Home.................................. 22 Farmers Market Recipe................... 23 Kids Activity Page............................ 25 Games............................................ 26 Coupon Tips................................... 27

feature story

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Jan Melton jmelton@statesboroherald.com

ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kelly Dailey kdailey@statesboroherald.com

ADVERTISING TEAM

Ashlee Hooks Corbin • Pam Pollard • Stephanie Childs

CONTRIBUTORS

Ashlee Hooks Corbin acorbin@statesboroherald.com Erinn Cowart www.ninjalawns.com

Broni Gainous www.bullochrec.com

EDITOR/DESIGN

Linsay Cheney Rudd lrudd@statesboroherald.com

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Jim Healy jhealy@statesboroherald.com

PHOTOGRAPHER

Scott Bryant sbryant@statesboroherald.com

Special thanks to our cover couple, Jan and Bill Moore

Hayley Greene www.bulloch.k12.ga.us Brandi Harvey www.averittcenterforthearts.org Julie Lavender lavenders@bulloch.net Michael McBride msm0711@yahoo.com

Azure Rountree • Like “From the Kitchen of Azure Rountree” on Facebook

Thank you, Jan and Bill! © Statesboro Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced without permission of the publisher. Neither participating advertisers nor the publisher will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints or typographical errors. The publisher reserves the right to edit any submitted material. Statesboro Publishing is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or other material.


GOgirl! P

Caroline James

underwent physical and occupational therapy every day to re-learn how to do basic tasks — walk, go the bathroom, shower, pick things up, fold clothes, make a bed and set a table. Getting dressed was an ordeal of its own. “I had to learn to use those muscles again. You don’t realize how much you use them until you can’t,” she said. “I still do things in an altered way to compensate. Just knowing that it will not be a perfect day is mentally exhausting.” About two weeks later, Caroline was released to return home, where she underwent in-home therapy several days a week for a few months. Following that, she began physical therapy, which she continues to do two to three times a week. While she was away from home and throughout her recovery, her family and friends have been an integral support system. “My husband deserves the Husband and Daddy of the Year award,” Caroline said. “He played the role of mommy, daddy, maid, caretaker and a few others, all while working fulltime. He stayed with me in the hospital in Savannah as much as he could but still had to be here in Statesboro for our children.” Her parents, brothers and “sistersin-love” helped with the children and her rehabilitation and cooked meals for her family. Her co-workers at Georgia Southern University’s JiannPing Hsu College of Public Health supported her with calls, visits and care packages. In the hospital, she missed out on some important things, including the start of the school year and her twins’ birthday, but her friends again stepped up: Some of them organized a birthday party for Will and Sarah Kate, and others purchased supplies and took the kids for haircuts before the new school year began. But most of all, they provided moral support.

“I had some depression set in, especially being in Savannah by myself on some days,” Caroline said. “I went weeks without seeing my kids, which was far worse than any back pain I could imagine. My children were definitely a driving force to get better.” Then, less than three months after the accident, Caroline was dealt another life-altering blow when her father passed away in October. “This was extremely difficult in my recovery process because I was very much a daddy’s girl,” she said. “The stress weighing heavily on my physical body caused a few setbacks. ... Mentally, it was overwhelming, and each day is still a struggle.” Still, through it all, Caroline has held firm the belief that everything happens for a reason. It’s reminded her

to enjoy the small and simple things in life before they are taken away. She knows that things could have been much worse. “I thank God for my many blessings ... for giving me more days to kiss my husband and children and for allowing me more snuggle time with my babies, more wonderful laughs and tears with my most precious friends,” she said. Caroline credits God for giving her the strength and determination to move forward and knows that without him, none of her healing would be possible. She remembers Philippians 4:13 when she reflects on the past year, and she hopes her story inspires others, that they will see her determination and say “because of you, I didn’t give up.”

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

David and Caroline James, left, and their three children, Kinsley, 12, and twins Will and Sarah Kate, both 7, below

By Ashlee Hooks Corbin

hilippians 4:13 reads, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” The verse has long been one of Caroline James’ favorite scriptures, and it became a mantra of sorts for her as she faced some difficult situations in 2015. The year began with her father, Joe Collins, in the hospital. While visiting him there one day, Caroline’s mother, Linda, fell and tore the quadriceps tendon in her leg, which required extensive surgery to repair. While she recovered, Linda lived with Caroline and her husband of 12 years, David, and their three children: Kinsley, 12, and twins Will and Sarah Kate, both 7. Linda lived with them until early July, while Joe spent the majority of the year in and out of hospitals and at Willow Pond senior living community. Then, an accident on July 18 forever changed Caroline’s life. While she and David were riding their golf cart along a dirt road, Caroline turned to yell at friends in a golf cart behind them, lifting her body slightly from the seat. When the cart hit ruts in the road, she was thrown backwards through the front windshield of the golf cart and flipped over the front, landing face down in the dirt. The impact burst her 12th thoracic, or T12, vertebra, sending fragments into her spinal column, millimeters from her spinal cord. Following the accident, Caroline spent 10 days lying flat in a hospital bed in Savannah before undergoing a 10 ½-hour surgery on July 29. Doctors cut into her left side to clean out the spinal column and remove the vertebral fragments. They then removed a portion of her 10th rib and used it, along with rods and screws, to reconstruct the spinal disc. Immediately after, Caroline was fitted for a back brace that she had to wear for almost four months. She was then moved to a rehabilitation hospital on Aug. 4. There, she

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of the month:


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Fresh for February: Cheerful New Annuals

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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on’t let cloudy days get you down. Just in time for perhaps the coldest month of the year, I am excited to present to you some up-and-coming cultivars of blooms that bring sunshine on even the dreariest of days. These sure-fire winners are bursting with color and style and are the latest varieties to hit the market. Nemesia varieties are cool-season annuals that are characteristically known for their eye-catching snapdragon-shaped flowering habit and typically perform very well throughout areas of the country that experience milder winters, such as Georgia. Available in a wide spectrum of colors, nemesia has expanded the playing field with such newcomers as “Blueberry a la Mode,” with dainty clusters of light lavender blooms that expand outward into buttery yellow. It’s like a touch of sunshine! Also new this season is “Sunsatia Blood Orange,”

Erinn Cowart The Art of Lawncare

which sports vibrant light and dark hues that are true to it’s name. Most varieties of nemesia will do well in sunny areas with moist, well-drained soil. Try them in containers to get a full flush of color. Most people have probably heard of sweet peas, but few try their hand at planting them, since they are a bit tricky to grow properly. But if you are up to the challenge, go ahead and give them a shot! In our growing zone (zone 8), sweet peas are best planted in late fall, giving them time to develop before bursting out in late winter and

early spring. They are viney, branching plants, so they work very well with trellises or other structures. While previous types of sweet peas were typically weak-stemmed and delicate, many modern cultivars possess thicker stalks and larger blooms that give off an even more intense fragrance. Try “Fragrantissima” for a variety of pastel shades, or “Beaujolias” for deep burgundy blooms that are excellent for cutting. A well-loved cool-season annual, California poppies thrive in the moist, cool conditions of a mild winter. They are extremely easy to care for and will flourish in very poor soil, making it easy for them to care for themselves. Available in many

different colors, these poppies will serve you well in late winter to spring, beginning to fade once hot temperatures arrive. Simply pull them up when the blooms are spent, or perhaps leave a few to develop their seeds. Spreading the seeds around will allow a new crop of flowers to spring up next season. Check out newer varieties such as “Apricot Flambeau,” “Silver Almond” and “Milky White.” Experience the rich color and sweet smells of these lively flowering plants, and let them bring the sunshine to you! Erinn is part of the professional team at Ninja Lawns who seek to serve the Statesboro community and make a positive difference in the world around them. You can learn more and contact Ninja Lawns online at www.ninjalawns.com.

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If you are a direct sales consultant or representative and would like to advertise here, please call us at (912) 764-9031.


Spread a Little Love with Red Velvet Cream Cheese Brownies

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Red Velvet Cream Cheese Brownies 1 ½ cups cake flour ½ teaspoon salt 2 cups sugar 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cubed 1 4-ounce Baker’s unsweetened chocolate bar, broken into pieces 4 large eggs, beaten 1 1-ounce bottle red food coloring 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 4 ounces cream cheese, softened 2/3 cup powdered sugar 1 large egg white Heat the oven to 350 F. Spray a 9-by-13-inch pan with non-stick cooking spray. In a large mixing bowl, stir together cake flour, salt and sugar. Set aside. In a 3-quart pot over medium heat, melt butter and unsweetened chocolate. Once completely melted, remove from heat and pour over flour mixture in bowl. Stir until combined.

Azure Rountree Fun, Delicious and Festive

Quickly stir in eggs, then red food coloring and vanilla extract. Pour batter into the prepared pan. In a medium bowl with an electric mixer, beat together cream cheese and powdered sugar. Beat in egg white. Using a spatula, drizzle the cream cheese mixture over the red velvet mixture, making swirls with the cream cheese mixture using the tip of a knife. Bake on the third rack for around 30–35 minutes or until the center is done. Let cool completely, then cut into bars. Azure Rountree, a wife and mother of four beautiful kids, has a love of cooking and sharing recipes. She enjoys writing for cookbooks and working as an advocate for autism. Her newest cookbook, “Kid Friendly Recipes from the Kitchen of Azure Rountree,” is available for purchase locally at Colonial House of Flowers and the Averitt Center for the Arts. A portion of the proceeds from every book sold will go to benefit children with special needs.

To Put Your Finances On A Diet With A Debt Consolidation Loan From

8.9%

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% 9 8.

8.9%

8.9%

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

upid releases his arrow in February, spreading delicious sweetness everywhere you look. Whether it's your kids’ school party or for that very special valentine, the way to the heart is with Red Velvet Cream Cheese Brownies. Perfectly moist on the inside with a touch of sweetened cream cheese swirled on top, these brownies definitely say, “I love you!”

It’s Time!

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8.9%

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8.9%

APR=Annual Percentage Rate. All loans are subject to lending guidelines and applicant’s creditworthiness. CORE loans are not eligible for refinance. Proof of existing loan and payoff information must be provided at the time of application. Offer may expire at any time.


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Valentine’s Day a little early!

Love is in the air at the Averitt Center! We love holidays — Valentine’s Day is no exception. This year we are offering a special event! We have teamed up with 40 East Grill to offer dinner and a show! For only $108 you get two tickets to our professional series show A Tale of Two Cities AND dinner for two at The Hall (food by 40 East Grill). Celebrate an early Valentine’s Day date night downtown!

 Friday, February 12  Menu Portuguese Corn Bread House Salad Chicken Marsala Thyme Gouda Mash Potatoes

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

Sauteed Green Beans Show Sponsored by

Assorted Desserts

912.212.2787 | www.averittcenterforthearts.org

Downtown Wedding Walk set for Feb. 19

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reaming of the perfect wedding day is one thing, but planning it can be a stressful and chaotic undertaking. For brides who need a nudge in the right direction, the Downtown Statesboro Development Authority will host its annual Wedding Walk Expo on Friday, Feb. 19, from 5:30– 8:30 p.m. in the ballroom of First Baptist Church Statesboro. The event will showcase the best the area has to offer for brides-to-

Special to MOMents be, with more than 50 vendors on hand, including caterers, florists, hair and makeup artists, photographers, venue representatives and more. Attendants will also get a sneak peek at the latest bridal fashions during the evening’s fashion show, when local dress and tux shops and florists team up to showcase what’s hot this wedding season. As if that’s not enough, brides-to-be can also register to win the $1,250 grand prize to be awarded during the expo. Tickets to the event are $5 and may be purchased at the door.

February is National Heart Month! Drs. Stanley Shin • David Nabert • Abraham Lin • David Lariscy.

922 Northside Dr E,Statesboro, GA 30458

(912) 489-6246

statesborocardiology.com


Date Night Dinner and a Show with the Averitt Center and 40 East Grill

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Brandi Harvey cuisine and service in Statesboro. The Hall is one of the area’s favorite venues for events and receptions, and this dinner will offer all of the elegance and excellence you’ve come to expect from the downtown restaurant. Following dinner, walk over to enjoy a classic Dickens’ tale brought to life on stage. Justice, sacrifice, classes, love and duty are put to the test in “A Tale of Two Cities,” presented by

3D mammography.

the National Players. In the last few years, the National Players have brought worldclass performances to Statesboro that have left audiences raving, including “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Of Mice and Men,” and this excellent adaptation of “A Tale of Two Cities” will be no

exception. Set in the French Revolution, the show is full of themes of loyalty, family and political unrest. In a time when a nation was torn apart, where do loyalties lie, and who is really innocent? There are plenty of seats available for the show, but this special datenight dinner package is limited, so don’t wait! Get your tickets today, and plan to celebrate Valentine’s Day early with dinner and a show. Tickets are $54 per person or $108 per couple. and are available for purchase at the Averitt Center’s box office Tuesday thru Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m. until Tuesday, Feb. 9. For more information on this or any of the Averitt Center’s programs and events, visit www.averittcenterfor thearts.org or call (912) 212-2878.

Sharper images. Greater accuracy. Earlier detection. 3D mammography provides images so definitive and precise, they can reduce repeat screenings by up to 40 percent. They also increase early invasive cancer detection by 40 percent over 2D imaging alone, which may mean an even greater chance of survival. For more information, call 912-764-5656 or visit StatesboroImaging.com.

A department of East Georgia Regional Medical Center Appointments are on a first-come, first-served basis. An order from a physician or qualified healthcare provider is required. If the patient does not have a physician/provider, a list will be provided for the patient’s selection. All mammogram reports will be sent to the physician/provider and follow-ups are the responsibility of the patient. East Georgia Regional Medical Center is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff.

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

ickets are on sale now for a date night package just in time for Valentine’s Day. On Friday, Feb. 12, the Averitt Center for the Arts and 40 East Grill are partnering to offer the quintessential date night dinner and a show. It all starts in The Hall at 40 East with a delicious buffet dinner of Portuguese corn bread, salad, chicken marsala, thyme gouda mashed potatoes, sautéed green beans and dessert prepared by 40 East’s own head chef, Dustin Bailey. This menu, planned just for this package, will set the mood for a wonderful night out with your sweetheart. A cash bar will be available as well. 40 East has set the bar high for

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Statesboro-Bulloch County Parks & Recreation Department Monthly Events Adult Kickball League Meeting Feb. 1, 6:30 p.m. Honey Bowen Building

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

Spring Sports and Programs Registration Feb. 3–5, 2:30–5:30 p.m. | Honey Bowen Building, Portal Community Building, Brooklet Recreation Center and online Feb. 6, 9 a.m.–noon | Honey Bowen Building Feb. 11, 5:30–7:30 p.m. | Statesboro Mall

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Feb. 15–18, 10 a.m.–noon $50 | Mill Creek Tennis Complex Camp Adventure for Winter Break Feb. 15–19, 7:50 a.m.–6 p.m. Old Julia P. Bryant Elementary School Winter Break Fun Swim Feb. 15–19, 3–5 p.m. $5/person Splash in the Boro

Adults' Trip to Springtime Made in the South (ages 50+) Feb. 19, 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. $8, plus the cost of lunch at Johnny Harris Piano Lessons Feb. 19–March 11 Fridays, times vary $20/lesson or $65/four lessons Swim Lessons (ages 6 months–adults) Beginning in February Visit www.splashintheboro.com for dates/ times First Flight Open Disc Golf Tournament Feb. 20, 9 a.m. SBCPRD Disc Golf Course Lifeguard Courses (Session 1) Feb. 26 and March 4, 4–7 p.m. Feb. 27 and March 5, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Feb. 28, 1–6 p.m. $150 Splash in the Boro Youth Tennis Lessons (ages 9–12) Feb. 8–March 10 Level 3: Tuesdays/Thursdays, 4–5 p.m. Level 5: Mondays/Wednesdays, 4–5 p.m. $45 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Youth Tennis Lessons (ages 12–17) Feb. 9–March 10 Level 4: Tuesdays/Thursdays, 5–6 p.m. Level 5: Mondays/Wednesdays, 5–6 p.m. $45 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Youth Tennis Lessons (ages 5–8) Feb. 12–March 11 Fridays 4–5 p.m. (Level 1) | 5–6 p.m. (Level 2) $35 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Adult Tennis Lessons Feb. 12–March 11 Fridays, 6–7:15 p.m. $35 Mill Creek Tennis Complex Men's & Women's Tennis Leagues Feb. 15–May 5 Mondays/Thursdays, 6–8:30 p.m. $45 Mill Creek Tennis Complex High School Tennis League Feb. 16–May 3 Tuesdays, 6–8 p.m. $35 Mill Creek Tennis Complex

Parent & Tot Swim Monday–Friday, 6 a.m.–2 p.m. $2/person(free for ages 2 and younger) Splash in the Boro Evening Line Dancing (ages 16+) Mondays/Tuesdays, 5:30–7 p.m. $5/class Honey Bowen Building Family Fun Swim Saturdays, 10 a.m.–noon $3/swimmer or free with 2016 pass Splash in the Boro Lap Swim Monday–Friday, 6 a.m.–2 p.m. Mondays/Tuesdays/Thursdays, 7–8 p.m. Saturdays, 8 a.m.–noon $2/visit or $50/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro Aqua Fit (Shallow Water Aerobics) Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 8:30–9:30 a.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro Deep Aqua Fit (Deep Water Aerobics) Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays, 7:15–8:15 a.m. Tuesdays/Thursdays, 8:30–9:30 a.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro Bingo with the Lunch Bunch Tuesdays, 11–11:45 a.m. free (must be a member of the Lunch Bunch) Honey Bowen Building Learn to Play Bridge Tuesdays, 3–5 p.m. free Honey Bowen Building Ultimate H20 Circuit Tuesdays/Thursdays, 6:15–7 a.m. $5/visit or $50/10-class pass Splash in the Boro Arthritis Therapy Tuesdays/Thursdays, 1–1:45 p.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro Aqua Zumba Tuesdays/Thursdays, 7–8 p.m. $5/visit or $125/30-visit pass Splash in the Boro Sit Fit Tuesdays/Fridays, 9:45–10:30 a.m. $2/session Honey Bowen Building Silverliners Line Dancing Thursdays, 1:30–3 p.m. Beginners’ lesson at 1 p.m. $2/session Honey Bowen Building


Bulloch County Schools

GREAT TIPS FOR A HEALTHY HEART

Preparing students to find success & enhancing community value Serving Bulloch Country through 15 public school campuses

www.bulloch.k12.ga.us

Pre-K Registration for 2016–17 is March 1–11

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March 1–11 • Pre-K registration packets available — Pick up a registration packet at the Board of Education or at one of the district’s nine elementary schools or three high schools during regular office hours. A child must be 4 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2016, to be enrolled in pre-K. • Two-week registration period open — Registration packets and out-ofzone forms must be returned during regular school hours to the school at which your child is zoned to attend by 2 p.m. on Friday, March 11, to be eligible for pre-K lotteries. Incomplete applications and those received after the deadline will be placed on a waiting list. March 7–8 • Evening registration at the Board of Education (two days) — If you are unable to pick up and return your packet to a school during the day, evening registration for all schools is March 7–8, 5–7 p.m., at the Bulloch County Board of Education, 150 Williams Road. March 21–30 • Pre-K lotteries — Lotteries for the 416 available pre-K slots are held from the list of registered students. Lottery drawings are open to the public and will be held at various locations (see following schedule).

Required Documents • Establish identity — The parent or legal guardian who is registering the child must establish his or her identity with a valid driver’s license or other picture ID. Legal parental/guardian status of the child is established by providing one of the following: 1) birth certificate (must show name of parent/guardian); 2) magistrate court documents indicating custody; 3) power-of-attorney documents (military or civilian); 4) letter of placement from the Division of Family and Children Services; or 5) custody documents. • Establish residency — Residency is established by providing two of the following: 1) current month’s utility bill or document verifying utility services established for primary residence; 2) current month’s lease agreement or home purchase agreement; 3) previous year’s or most recent tax return; 4) current year’s DFCS documents; 5) current year’s Medicaid card; or 6) current week’s or month’s paycheck stub. • Establish proof of immunization/ dental health — Child’s Immunization Record (Form 3231) and Eye, Ear, Dental and Nutrition record (EEDN-Form 3300) are required. Forms are available from the Bulloch County Health Department ([855] 473-4374) or your child’s pediatrician. Forms may be provided later for students not yet 4 years old. • Child’s Social Security card Lottery Drawings • Brooklet Elementary — March 21 at 4 p.m. (also for Southeast Bulloch High attendance zone) • Portal Elementary — March 22 at 4 p.m. (also for Portal Middle High attendance zone) • Mill Creek Elementary — March 23 at 4 p.m. (also for Statesboro High attendance zone) • Julia P. Bryant Elementary — March 24 at 4 p.m. • Mattie Lively Elementary — March 24 at 5:30 p.m. • Langston Chapel Elementary — March 28 at 4 p.m. • Sallie Zetterower Elementary — March 28 at 5:30 p.m. • Stilson Elementary — March 29 at 4 p.m. • Nevils Elementary — March 30 at 4 p.m.

The Bulloch County Board of Education does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, physical handicap, religion or age in employment practices or in admission to or participation in any education programs or activities.

912.212.8500 • 150 Williams Road, Suite A Statesboro, GA 30458

Did you know that one American dies every seven minutes from heart disease or stroke? February is National Heart Month, and we as a group should find ways to take care of our hearts. How? By following these simple tips:

Eat healthy Dill, paprika, ginger — use herbs or garlic and red peppers to add more flavor to your meals, thus reducing your need for salt. You should also reduce the amount of fat you eat, especially saturated and trans fats, and make sure your menu contains fiber and lots of fruits and vegetables (4 to 10 servings per day).

Exercise Physical activity is good for your heart. Do you exercise enough? The Foundation recommends that adults do a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate (brisk walking, cycling, swimming) to high-intensity (aerobics, running, hockey) physical activity every week, for at least 10 minutes at a time. Combining exercise and a healthy diet also means you’ll be better able to control your weight; being overweight is a major risk factor for heart disease.

Limit your alcohol intake Consuming a lot of alcohol may contribute to increased blood pressure and result in the development of heart disease. So women, limit your intake to two glasses a day, and men, three glasses. Lastly, avoid stressful situations as much as possible or develop good stress relieving techniques. You should also stop smoking, if applicable. To learn more about the best ways to take care of your heart, visit www.heartandstroke.com.

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OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 7:30 AM-6:00 PM AND TUESDAY-FRIDAY 8:30 AM-5:30 PM 23702 Hwy 80 East • Statesboro • www.familyhealthcarecenter.com

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

re-kindergarten registration for the 2016–17 year will be open for two weeks, March 1–11. Only a child’s parents or legal guardians may register him or her for pre-K. The child does not need to attend registration. For the most up-to-date information about this year’s registration process, visit www.bulloch.k12.ga.us/prekindergarten, follow Bulloch County Schools on social media or stop by one of the schools. Bulloch County Schools now has 12 Georgia Pre-K Program sites. These state-funded sites are located at Bulloch County Schools’ nine elementary schools and three high schools. In total, there are 19 classrooms across the district, with space for 416 children. Pre-K classes are for the full school day and follow the same 180-day Bulloch County Schools calendar as K–12 classes.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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MOORE IS BETTER

For Mayor Jan Moore and husband Bill, plenty of passion, fun and laughter are the keys to a long, happy marriage

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o many, she’s the Honorable Mayor Moore. To others, she’s the dean to whom they turn when there’s a problem. To friends from long ago, she’s “Pitty Pat.” To two, she’s Mom, and to one, she’s been a valentine for over three decades. MOMents magazine caught up with Mr. and Mrs. Bill Moore to get a glimpse into the city’s “first family” — with a mayoral matriarch — and to find out the couple’s secrets to a long and happy marriage. When William K. Moore Jr. and Jan Thomas Johnston Moore moved from Tampa back to Jan’s hometown of Statesboro, a friend’s parting words

By Julie Lavender to her were, “You’ll be mayor someday.” “Nah,” Jan replied. Yet those words were indeed prophetic. Elected mayor of Statesboro in 2014, Jan made history as the first woman to serve in that capacity. But it wasn’t recognition she was seeking when she decided to run for mayor; she’s simply zealous about her hometown and was looking for an opportunity to, in her words, “make our great city extraordinary together” by working with and serving the citizens of Statesboro. Jan’s pride in her South Georgia town and her desire to work as a public servant could stem from a number of factors. Most likely, it’s a

combination of influences. For starters, her genes are thick with Bulloch County blood. Born Jan Thomas Johnston in 1962, the mayor is a fourth-generation Johnston. Just six years after her birth, Jan’s father, James Lane Johnston, was chosen as the first solicitor general for Bulloch County, a position that later became the post of district attorney for the Ogeechee Circuit. Her dad served in that position for more than 20 years. In 1991, he was appointed municipal court judge for the city of Statesboro, where he served until his retirement in 2009 — but before he became Judge Johnston, Jan’s name changed, too. “I didn’t know my real name until I

was 8,” she said, with a slight chuckle. “My mom’s name was also Jan, and she didn’t want to be forever known as ‘Big Jan.’ So, as a toddling walker, I acquired the nickname ‘Pitty Pat,’ and it stuck. Most of my friends thought it was my real name.” Famous long before she became mayor, her original stardom stemmed from a spot on “The Trooper Terry Show,” a children’s program filmed in Augusta, when she was just 8 years old. “Yeah, he (Trooper Terry) didn’t believe me when I said my name was Pitty Pat,” Jan said. “ ‘What’s your real name?’ he kept asking. I assured him it was Pitty Pat. My mom broke the news to me in the car later: ‘That’s not your real name. Your name is Jan.’ ” Still, she never shook the nickname, and even after becoming mayor, she told her friends, “I’ll always be Pitty Pat.” A 1980 graduate of Statesboro High School, the future mayor was a well-liked and active student. Even as a teenager, she was seizing opportunities that had formerly been reserved for members of the opposite sex, then as the first female on the school’s golf team. Following graduation, she attended the University of Georgia, where she received a Bachelor of Arts in economics. While at UGA, she met a handsome college student named William at a social event. Shortly thereafter, he asked her out. “Within 30 minutes of being on a date, I fell in love with him,” said Jan, with a huge grin on her face, gazing at her husband. With an equally large smile and a glimmer in his eyes, Bill responded, “I liked her — a lot.” Three years later, on Valentine’s Day


“We have a lot of passion — about things, each other, our kids. It doesn’t mean we don’t have our disagreements. We’re passionate about that, too, but we work it out. If you don’t have disagreements in 30 years, you’re not listening to one another.”

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Statesboro Mayor Jan Moore, on her relationship with her husband, Bill

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

in 1985, Bill proposed to Jan at the Sun Dial Restaurant in Atlanta. “You couldn’t find your purse,” he remembered. “I put my purse on the ledge,” Jan added. “It was one of those restaurants that turns slowly to view the skyline. I couldn’t find my purse when we got ready to leave.” After graduating from UGA, Jan worked in corporate sales and marketing for 15 years before she and Bill moved back to Statesboro in 2001. She enrolled at Georgia Southern University and obtained a master’s degree and an Education Specialist degree, both in school psychology. She went on to work in private practice with a clinical psychologist and in the Bryan County and Bulloch County school systems. As business editor, Jan also wrote for the Statesboro Herald for 10 years. And somehow, while building her stellar resume and during Bill’s exceptional work as manager of YatesAstro, the couple raised two beautiful and successful daughters, Cecilia and Virginia. Both Statesboro High graduates, Cecilia, 22, graduated from UGA with degrees in international affairs and environmental science and is currently a language student studying Mandarin at Nanjing University in China. Virginia, now 19, is a sophomore at Georgia Southern University. “You cannot overcommunicate with your children,” Jan said about parenting. “You have to let go, let them experience failure and success, encourage independence. But we talk through things a lot. “ ‘Every decision we make is about your safety,’ I tell my daughters.” With both Cecilia and Virginia spreading their wings and flying, Jan and Bill now have more time to share as a couple. “We have a lot of passion — about things, each other, our kids,” Jan said. “It doesn’t mean we don’t have our disagreements. We’re passionate about that, too, but we work it out. If you don’t have disagreements in 30 years, you’re not listening to one another.” Another one of the couple’s secrets to maintaining a long, happy marriage is taking time to simply enjoy life together. “We laugh a lot,” Jan said. “When

we first started dating, we said, ‘If we ever stop having fun, we’re going to stop going out.’ And we’re still having fun!” “Fun” may not be the word the mayor uses to describe every Statesboro City Council meeting, but she does take great pride in this town and her position and said she loves serving her community. “It’s indescribably rewarding,” she

said. “... I work with great people, and my family is very understanding. It’s a group effort, 24/7.” Jan doesn’t belabor her position as the first female mayor, as she was encouraged from the time she was young to pursue her dreams, whatever they were. Still, she said, “I have enjoyed watching our all-male council adjust to having a woman around. And now that they have, I am treated

like one of the guys.” With a hint of sarcasm, she added, “Be careful what you wish for.” “You will achieve more than you can ever imagine if you will just stick your neck out and ignore the naysayers,” she said. “Don’t allow yourself to get tangled in the weeds. Remember your purpose, and focus on achieving your intended result. That way, everyone is a winner.”


Coupon Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) free • 11 a.m.

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Blackwater Preserve Information Session Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) • 2 p.m.

6 Chinese New Year Celebration Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) • 10 a.m.

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Lifeguard Courses (Session 1) Splash in the Boro $150 • 4–7 p.m.

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“South Pacific” Emma Kelly Theater $20/adults, $10/youth • 7:30 p.m.

Wedding Walk Expo First Baptist Church ballroom $5 • 5:30–8:30 p.m.

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Chocolate Run 5K RAC Pavilion at GSU 8:30 a.m.

Holistic Health Series: Natural Skincare Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 2 p.m.

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SBCPRD Adults’ Trip to Springtime Made in the First Flight Open Disc South (ages 50+) Golf Tournament $8, plus lunch • 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. SBCPRD Disc Golf Course Downtown Statesboro $35 • 9 a.m.

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Planetarium Public Evening: Lifeguard Courses “Back to the Moon” (Session 1) GSU Planetarium • free every half-hour from 6–9:30 p.m. Splash in the Boro $150 • 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Brain Games “South Pacific” Statesboro Regional Library “South Pacific” Emma Kelly Theater (Community Room) Emma Kelly Theater $20/adults, $10/youth • 7:30 p.m. 5 p.m. $20/adults, $10/youth • 7:30 p.m.

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Movie Matinee: “Leap Year” Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 2 p.m.

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Job Search Workshop: The Cover Letter Craft Day: Made with Love Statesboro Regional Library Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Computer Lab) (Community Room) • 4 p.m. 1 p.m.

“A Tale of Two Cities” Emma Kelly Theater $28/adults, $10/youth 7:30 p.m.

Paint-N-Party! Averitt Center for the Arts $35 • 5:30–8 p.m.

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“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” matinee Emma Kelly Theater 10 a.m.

NOTES: Winter break for Bulloch County Schools is Feb. 15–19. The Statesboro-Bulloch County Parks and Recreation Department will host its Camp Adventure that week from 7:50 a.m.–6 p.m. each day at the old Julia P. Bryant Elementary School, as well as as a Winter Break Fun Swim each day from 3–5 p.m. at Splash in the Boro ($3/person).

Teen Music Night Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 5–6 p.m.

Vision Board Party Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 5 p.m.

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Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

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“South Pacific” Emma Kelly Theater $20/adults, $10/youth • 2 p.m.

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Paranormal Book Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 6 p.m.

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Lifeguard Courses (Session 1) Splash in the Boro $150 • 1–6 p.m.

Adult Coloring Class Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) • 6 p.m.

SBCPRD Spring Sports and Programs Registration Statesboro Mall 5:30–7:30 p.m.

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Empty Bowl Project GSU Russell Union Commons $10 for a hand-painted bowl filled with chili (vegetarian available) 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

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Winter Break for Bulloch County Schools

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Johnson & Davis present the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra GSU Performing Arts Center 7:30 p.m.

Homeschool Writing Club Statesboro Regional Library (Computer Lab) 3–4:30 p.m.

Teen Movie Night Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 5 p.m.

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Free Read Book Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 6:30–8 p.m.

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SBCPRD Spring Sports and SBCPRD Spring Sports and SBCPRD Spring Sports and SBCPRD Spring Sports and Programs Registration Honey Bowen Building • 9 a.m.–noon Programs Registration Programs Registration Programs Registration Honey Bowen Building, Portal Honey Bowen Building, Portal Honey Bowen Building, Portal 68th Annual Miss GSU Community Building, Brooklet Community Building, Brooklet Community Building, Brooklet Scholarship Pageant GSU Performing Arts Center Recreation Center and online Recreation Center and online Recreation Center and online free • 6 p.m. 2:30–5:30 p.m. 2:30–5:30 p.m. 2:30–5:30 p.m.

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Reading to Rover Statesboro Regional Library Beginners’ Cooking with (Children’s Department) • 5–6 p.m. Patrick White, Emma’s Coupon Club restaurant executive chef Statesboro Regional Library Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) (Community Room) free • 11 a.m. 5 p.m.

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Genealogy Workshop for Beginners Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) noon–2 p.m.

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Art Extravaganza Opening Annual showcase of K–12 student art GSU College of Education 2–4 p.m.

Book to Movie Club Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 4–6 p.m.

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Teen Game Night Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 5–7 p.m.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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Adult Kickball League Meeting Honey Bowen Building 6:30 p.m.

Coupon Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) free • 11 a.m.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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Coupon Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) free • 11 a.m.

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5

Blackwater Preserve Information Session Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) • 2 p.m.

6 Chinese New Year Celebration Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) • 10 a.m.

24

Lifeguard Courses (Session 1) Splash in the Boro $150 • 4–7 p.m.

26

“South Pacific” Emma Kelly Theater $20/adults, $10/youth • 7:30 p.m.

Wedding Walk Expo First Baptist Church ballroom $5 • 5:30–8:30 p.m.

27

Chocolate Run 5K RAC Pavilion at GSU 8:30 a.m.

Holistic Health Series: Natural Skincare Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 2 p.m.

20

SBCPRD Adults’ Trip to Springtime Made in the First Flight Open Disc South (ages 50+) Golf Tournament $8, plus lunch • 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. SBCPRD Disc Golf Course Downtown Statesboro $35 • 9 a.m.

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Planetarium Public Evening: Lifeguard Courses “Back to the Moon” (Session 1) GSU Planetarium • free every half-hour from 6–9:30 p.m. Splash in the Boro $150 • 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Brain Games “South Pacific” Statesboro Regional Library “South Pacific” Emma Kelly Theater (Community Room) Emma Kelly Theater $20/adults, $10/youth • 7:30 p.m. 5 p.m. $20/adults, $10/youth • 7:30 p.m.

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Movie Matinee: “Leap Year” Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 2 p.m.

13

Job Search Workshop: The Cover Letter Craft Day: Made with Love Statesboro Regional Library Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Computer Lab) (Community Room) • 4 p.m. 1 p.m.

“A Tale of Two Cities” Emma Kelly Theater $28/adults, $10/youth 7:30 p.m.

Paint-N-Party! Averitt Center for the Arts $35 • 5:30–8 p.m.

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“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” matinee Emma Kelly Theater 10 a.m.

NOTES: Winter break for Bulloch County Schools is Feb. 15–19. The Statesboro-Bulloch County Parks and Recreation Department will host its Camp Adventure that week from 7:50 a.m.–6 p.m. each day at the old Julia P. Bryant Elementary School, as well as as a Winter Break Fun Swim each day from 3–5 p.m. at Splash in the Boro ($3/person).

Teen Music Night Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 5–6 p.m.

Vision Board Party Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 5 p.m.

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Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

Winter Break Tennis Clinic (grades 3–5) Mill Creek Tennis Courts $50 • 10 a.m.–noon

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“South Pacific” Emma Kelly Theater $20/adults, $10/youth • 2 p.m.

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Paranormal Book Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 6 p.m.

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Lifeguard Courses (Session 1) Splash in the Boro $150 • 1–6 p.m.

Adult Coloring Class Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) • 6 p.m.

SBCPRD Spring Sports and Programs Registration Statesboro Mall 5:30–7:30 p.m.

11

Empty Bowl Project GSU Russell Union Commons $10 for a hand-painted bowl filled with chili (vegetarian available) 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

10

Winter Break for Bulloch County Schools

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Johnson & Davis present the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra GSU Performing Arts Center 7:30 p.m.

Homeschool Writing Club Statesboro Regional Library (Computer Lab) 3–4:30 p.m.

Teen Movie Night Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 5 p.m.

9

Free Read Book Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) 6:30–8 p.m.

4

SBCPRD Spring Sports and SBCPRD Spring Sports and SBCPRD Spring Sports and SBCPRD Spring Sports and Programs Registration Honey Bowen Building • 9 a.m.–noon Programs Registration Programs Registration Programs Registration Honey Bowen Building, Portal Honey Bowen Building, Portal Honey Bowen Building, Portal 68th Annual Miss GSU Community Building, Brooklet Community Building, Brooklet Community Building, Brooklet Scholarship Pageant GSU Performing Arts Center Recreation Center and online Recreation Center and online Recreation Center and online free • 6 p.m. 2:30–5:30 p.m. 2:30–5:30 p.m. 2:30–5:30 p.m.

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Reading to Rover Statesboro Regional Library Beginners’ Cooking with (Children’s Department) • 5–6 p.m. Patrick White, Emma’s Coupon Club restaurant executive chef Statesboro Regional Library Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) (Community Room) free • 11 a.m. 5 p.m.

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Genealogy Workshop for Beginners Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) noon–2 p.m.

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Art Extravaganza Opening Annual showcase of K–12 student art GSU College of Education 2–4 p.m.

Book to Movie Club Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 4–6 p.m.

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Teen Game Night Statesboro Regional Library (Upstairs Activity Room) 5–7 p.m.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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Adult Kickball League Meeting Honey Bowen Building 6:30 p.m.

Coupon Club Statesboro Regional Library (Community Room) free • 11 a.m.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

2016

expires 02/29/16

Are Selfies Hurting Your Relationship?

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selfie is a pretty simple photo: It’s you, standing alone, taking a photo. Take too many, though, and it may leave you standing alone permanently. This is according to a new study from Florida State University, which found that the number of selfies you post on Instagram may affect your friendships and romantic relationships. Specifically, the way you feel about your selfie could impact your body image satisfaction — but also how you treat your friends. The study, which looked at about 420 Instagram accounts for people ages 18 to 62 and counted the number of selfies they posted, found that people who responded well to their own selfies were often satisfied with their body images. But those who responded negatively to their selfies felt less satisfied with their bodies and had an increased risk of “ Instagramrelated conflict,” Fusion reported. That conflict could really hurt your close relationships, as the study found that too much of it led to increased relationship issues among couples and friends. “The moral of the story? Do yourself a favor, put black tape over your front-facing camera and resist the urge to snap a selfie,” Fusion recommended. “You’ll thank yourself later.” This isn’t the first time selfies have been linked to relationship strife. A 2013 study from the United Kingdom found that people who post selfies on Facebook are often seen as less intimate by people in their network — that is, those people have more

Deseret News shallow relationships and friendships, Time magazine reported. That study, done by the University of Birmingham, the University of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt University, looked at 508 Facebook users who were 24 years old, on average. The researchers asked the users to rank their emotional support for their friends, relatives, romantic partners and co-workers, then compared their answers to how often they took and posted selfies. But the news wasn’t all bad, Time reported. Posting too many selfies didn’t matter to best friends, who said they actually liked seeing their friends’ photos on social media. “Don’t want to seem superficial but just can’t break the selfie habit? The answer might be as simple as using a photo-messaging app, such as Snapchat, to give your best friends their selfie fix while keeping everyone else blissfully unaware,” Time suggested.


The Best Way to Pack a Backpack

P

Michael McBride Outdoor Fun

is the best place for it. If your pack does not have this sleeve, put the water in whatever container you like and back it in the back. Any heavy items such as camp pans, camera equipment or heavy tent poles should be packed here as well. Keeping heavy items along your back allows for a more balanced center of gravity, making the wearer more stable when walking. Electronics and fragile items are also protected in case of a fall when kept in the back or center of the pack. Continuing out from the back of the pack, pack lighter items toward the exterior. Make sure any items that won’t be used for the first few days are toward the bottom of the pack, and those to be used on the first day are at the top. My uppermost item is always my tent, as it is the first thing I set up when I reach my destination. Frequently used items, as well as things used along the trail, should be packed in the exterior pockets, if possible. Rain gear and a pack cover should be stored in an easily accessible pocket in case of a sudden downpour. The most accessible pocket is where I generally keep my

Backpackers enjoy the view from Blood Mountain, Georgia. trail necessities (knife, lighter, flashlight and a first aid kit). Last but not least, food and toiletries should be packed in the top or the lid of the pack. By packing these items higher up, food items won’t get crushed when you take off your pack and set it on the ground. Insects such as ants are less likely to make their way into your provisions when placed here, and snacks are easily accessible when the need arises. If you’re camping in an area where wild animals may get into the food, pack these items in a removable bag in the lid of the pack so that it may be removed and hung from

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a tree when not in use. Take your time when packing your pack. Proper placement of weight in the bag will decrease fatigue and the chance that you will lose your balance. If things feel off-center, make adjustments prior to heading out on the trail. The better the feel of the pack, the more you’ll be able to enjoy your hike, camping trip or outdoor excursion. Michael McBride is an experienced rock climber, caver and outdoor enthusiast. When not working as a veterinary technician, you will most likely find him in the woods!

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

acking a backpack. It sounds simple, doesn’t it? Get your backpack out, place camping or hiking gear in it and go. That works for a short hike, maybe an overnighter, perhaps. However, for a comfortable hike, and extended, multiday hikes, or for a heavy load, the way a pack is loaded can mean the difference between a pleasant trip and a painful excursion. Today’s typical backpack is generally a top-loading pack with a subcompartment along the bottom edge. Many include side pockets, a loadable top lid and accessory pockets within the main compartment. Despite the variety of brands and styles, most should be packed similarly to provide maximum comfort for the wearer. When packing your pack, start with the bottom compartment. This area is generally made for your sleeping bag or bed roll. Center the bag in the compartment with any buckles, zippers or strings facing the rear bottom of the compartment. This will insure these hard items don’t rub your lower back will and keep them from snagging in the compartment’s zipper when it’s closed. If your sleeping bag is smaller than the compartment, the extra space can be filled evenly with light, soft items, like a jacket or tarp. Next, fill the main compartment. Heavy and easily damaged items should be packed first. Many newer packs have a sleeve for a water bladder along the back of this compartment. Because water generally makes up the heaviest item in your pack, this

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Valentine’s Day Ideas for the Guy in Your Life FamilyShare

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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alentine’s Day isn’t really a holiday created for men. Honestly, how many gents are really looking forward to a night out in a fancy — and expensive — restaurant, crossing their fingers an enormous bouquet of red roses awaits them at a candlelit table for two? This year, make the day a little more masculine — and exciting — for the guy in your life by surprising him with one of these unexpected gifts:  A bouquet of long-stemmed roses — made of bacon. Say “I love you” with crispy, salty bacon that you’ve artfully twisted into roses. (For a tutorial, visit http://ourbestbites. com/2013/01/how-to-make-abacon-bouquet/.) With just a few simple steps, you can create a unique and delicious gift sure to make your

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man smile — because we all know the best way to a man’s heart is through his stomach.  A night of chick flicks full of sword fights and giants. They really exist. Love is the language of compromise — just like a romantic action movie. Snag a few of his favorite snacks, extra blankets and some popcorn for a Valentine’s Day movie night. Pick a film like “The Princess Bride” — the plot is romantic but has loads of action scenes to keep you both happy.  A big box of chocolates, with a twist. Ramp up the manliness of this traditional gift by giving him a box of chocolate-dipped jalapeños. You can make them yourself (find the recipe at www.justapinch.com/ recipes/dessert/chocolate/chocolatecovered-jalapenos.html) or purchase them from a company specializing in gourmet gifts.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com


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Are You in a Toxic Relationship?

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

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t’s February, the time of year notorious for Valentine’s Day, a holiday lovers enjoy and singles dread. So, I thought I would take a different approach in my column this month and talk about toxic people rather than products. It fascinates me that in an era in which we are so health conscious, we still allow toxic people into our lives. Toxic people can affect your life and health in many ways. You may be in the midst of a toxic relationship right now and not even be aware of it. Relationships are not limited to romantic couples; they include parents and children, bosses and employees, roommates, friends, neighbors, co-workers and schoolmates. Although the following list is by no means exhaustive, if you come into contact with an individual who exhibits any of these characteristics, I would consider them toxic: • Those with Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde syndrome. With these types of people, you just never know which version of them you will get. Their mood is constantly changing for no apparent reason, and it sucks energy from you in a negative way. Ruling out some sort of actual mental illness or catastrophic event in their life, these people seem innately unhappy

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and desperate for attention. • Those who like to gossip. Yes, discussing the latest “who done it” by the office water cooler has become an acceptable norm, but remember this: He who gossips with you will gossip about you. How many times have you told someone something in confidence, only to hear it out of the mouth of someone else? That kind of negativity and mistrust only breeds discontent relationships. • Those who manipulate or control you. There are countless ways a person may manipulate and control another. These people talk down to you and do not listen to your ideas. With them, it’s their way or the highway, and you find yourself having to justify everything you say and do. They do not take your feelings into consideration, and they often twist things you say so that you appear to be the one in the wrong.

This type of individual can make you you feel worthless, and you in turn become dependent on them. If you identify yourself in this situation, run to the nearest exit! • Those who ignore you. These individuals avoid confrontation and any kind of unpleasant exchange and instead punish you by placing you in what I call “radio silence mode.” When they’re angry or upset, they refuse to communicate with you — no texts, no calls, no video chats, no social media posts. You may begin to believe you are the only one at fault, and you find yourself trying your hardest to avoid disagreements for fear of again receiving the silent treatment. To assess your current relationships, ask yourself these questions: • Do I feel happy and energized when I am around this person? Do I put forth my best self when we are together? Do they motivate me to become a better person? • Do I feel drained and exhausted after spending time with this person? Do I have to mentally prepare myself to be around him or her? Would I rather not be around them? If you answered positively to the first set of questions, then you get the green, toxic-free light. The relationships in your life are healthy. On the other hand, if you relate more to the second set of questions, it may be time to consider distancing yourself from the people in your life who make you feel that way. These toxic individuals are not

always our partners, friends or neighbors. They may be people of authority with whom we must interact daily. Still, set boundaries regarding what you will and will not tolerate, and make clear your expectations in those relationships. These types of relationships can bring about not only headaches, both literally and figuratively, but also some other serious health issues. In a long-term study that followed more than 10,000 subjects for about 12 years, researchers discovered that those who were in negative relationships were at greater risk of developing heart problems, including a fatal cardiac event, than their counterparts whose close relationships were healthy. The behavior you allow will be the behavior that continues in your relationships. Is is worth risking your sanity and health to keep toxic individuals in your life? If not, perhaps a cleansing of your relationships and your soul is in order this Valentine’s Day. Perla Middleton is a lifestyle and wellness coach and is committed to helping clients make their homes a healthier place to raise their families. As a ToxicFree coach, she helps take the guesswork out of toxic-free living by stressing the importance of selfeducation, teaching others to become their own advocates, and inspiring individuals to do their research and learn how to find the best products in the organic, toxic-free and natural arenas. Contact her at dnp1515@ gmail.com.

TWO OFFICE LOCATIONS STATESBORO OFFICE

106 Briarwood Rd • Statesboro, GA (912) 871-5000

Tristia Knight, FNP

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www.candlerinternalmedicine.com

METTER OFFICE

380A Cedar Street • Metter, GA (912) 685-3992

We provide a full range of primary care services for adults including preventive care and yearly physicals.


CREATING GREAT

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23

STATESBORO MAINSTREET FARMERS MARKET

This time of year can be cold and dreary. Why not brighten up your meal with a winter salad? Use this recipe with its cane syrup vinaigrette as a canvas for adding other winter-friendly ingredients such as toasted pecans, candied ginger, citrus, strong cheeses, apples, or lightly roasted winter squash or root vegetables. If you are not a bourbon person, you can substitute apple cider. Or, keep it quick and simple. You can save the extra dressing and use for another salad within seven days.

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Cane Syrup Vinaigrette ¼ cup cane syrup from Market ¼ cup apple cider vinegar 1-1/2 tbsp. bourbon or apple cider 1 tsp. grated onion from Market ½ tsp. salt

½ tsp. ground pepper ¼ tsp. hot sauce ½ cup Georgia Olive Oil from Market Arugula or any salad greens from Market

Whisk syrup, apple cider vinegar, bourbon, onion, salt, pepper, and hot sauce in a medium bowl. Drizzle oil slowly and whisk continuously to emulsify. Toss with greens and other ingredients.

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

SHOP FRESH


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Color in this picture to create your own masterpiece.

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MOMENTS GAMES

SUDOKU ADVANCED

ADVANCED

SUDOKU INTERMEDIATE

1. Manuscripts (abbr.) 2. Netherlands river 3. Italian island 4. One’s own being 5. More adroit 6. Balkan country 7. Psychologist B.F. 8. Investment group Goldman ___ 9. Double curve 10. The plane of a figure 12. Ocean 14. Public presses 19. Civil Rights activist Parks 23. Cooking container 24. Arctic native 25. Founder of Babism 26. Bashkortostan capital 27. Bulky grayish-brown eagle 28. Louse egg 29. About sight 34. ___/Tuck: TV drama 35. Black tropical American cuckoo 36. Chest muscle (slang) 37. Expression of disappointment 39. One who assists 40. Antilles island 41. Served food 42. Egyptian Sun god 44. Performed successfully 45. Cavalry-sword 46. Abba __, Israeli politician 47. Jonas __, cured polio 48. The Muse of history 51. Express pleasure 52. Turkish leader titles 53. Castro country 54. Nobleman 58. ___ Lanka

CROSSWORD

CLUES DOWN

1. Women (French) 5. Hyrax 8. Distress signal 11. Trade 13. Large northern deer 14. The 3 Wise Men 15. Marten of N Asian forests 16. Hoover’s agency 17. Received an A 18. 2nd Islamic month 20. Light brown 21. Clarified butter used in Indian cookery 22. Frankness 25. Argentina’s capital 30. Citizen of Kenya or Zimbabwe 31. Noah’s boat 32. Family of languages in So. Africa 33. Inappropriate 38. Scientific workplace 41. Hungriness 43. Say to talk about an annoying topic 45. Sing and play for somebody 47. Strike buster 49. A citizen of Thailand 50. Civil Rights group 55. Honest Company’s Jessica 56. ‘__ death do us part 57. Malarias 59. Claim against another’s property 60. Mined metal-bearing mineral 61. Dashery 62. Capacity unit 63. Primary color 64. Indian dress

ANSWERS

FINISHED ALREADY? HOW ABOUT MORE OF A CHALLENGE?

CLUES ACROSS

MOMENTS

Want to find the answers to the puzzles? Check the bottom of this page.

INTERMEDIATE

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

SUDOKU

To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

CROSSWORD

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27

CouponTips

D

By Jill Cataldo

Jenny, “upcycling” is the new term for creating new products out of something that would normally be thrown away, and you’re right — there are many ways to reuse and create new things out of product packaging. I’ll admit this is an area I haven’t explored as much as I’d like, but I am always looking for new ways to reuse interesting items, too. Here are some ideas for turning old items into new: • Pop-up baby wipes containers: These snap-lidded containers are useful for so many things! Even though my kids have been out of diapers for quite a few years, we still have some of these around the house being used with new

purposes. My kids store loose crayons in them. • Pods detergent containers: These fishbowl-shaped plastic containers with a lid may have previously housed laundry detergent capsules, but once they’re empty, use them to store plastic grocery bags. Just stuff them inside, and when you need one, pull it out from the top. • Plastic coffee grounds containers: If you enjoy camping, you’ll want to reuse the round, plastic coffee tubs with a handle built into one side: They provide great watertight storage for a roll of toilet paper. You can cut a slot in the side to pull the sheets through, and it will stay more protected than simply carrying an open roll to and from the latrine. • Empty breath mint containers: If you buy the type of breath mints that come in a clear plastic box, reuse the box to hold small quantities of salt, pepper or other spices for tailgating or camping. • Jug-style detergent containers with a squeezable spout on the side: Once these are empty, I wash them out and use them to

store water for washing my hands while camping, picnicking or tailgating. (Can you tell our family loves the outdoors?). Be sure that you never store drinking water in a container that previously held detergent. If you’ve got an empty detergent bottle with a handle on it but no spout, you can turn it into a garden scoop by rinsing it out, capping the bottle and cutting the bottom of the bottle off. Then, use it to scoop potting soil, fertilizer, birdseed — you name it! • 2-liter bottles: Because these bottles are so easy to cut, they make easy one-use funnels for garage or outdoor projects. Just cut the top of the bottle off, then invert. Toss it out, or recycle it again when you’re through using it. • CD/DVD spindles: If you buy blank CD-R or DVD-R discs, the 50-count plastic spindle case they come in makes a great take-towork container for a bagel, croissant or doughnut. • If you enjoy using your fireplace, wood-burning stove or an outdoor fire pit, I came up with a great way to reuse three items

to make free, easy fire-starters. To make them, start saving paper egg cartons, dryer lint and candle stumps or old wax melts. Fill each compartment of an egg carton with pieces of dryer lint. Then, pour melted wax over the lint. (I have a wax melt lamp that uses scented wax blocks or pellets. When the wax melts lose their scent, I use the lamp to liquefy them, then pour them over the lint.) When the wax cools, the fire-starters are ready! Simply break off one compartment of the carton and use it to start a fire. (This project always reminds me why we’re advised not to let lint build up in the dryer, because it’s extremely flammable — which you’ll see the first time you light one of these fire-starters!) What upcycling ideas do you have for discarded products or packaging? Email me at jill@ctw features.com. Jill Cataldo, a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three, never passes up a good deal. Learn more about super-couponing at her website, www.jillcataldo.com.

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moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

ear Jill, I want to recycle and reuse product packaging, and I thought you would have some ideas where to get started with this. I am particularly interested in making crafts or other items out of some of the product packages and bottles that seem too nice to waste. — Jenny F.


28

Hope is here.

moments | February 2016 | www.statesboromoments.com

Weight-loss Surgery Free Monthly Information Sessions Tuesday, February 16 Tuesday, March 15 Tuesday, April 19 Starts at 5 p.m. Memorial Physicians’ Office 23630 Highway 80 East, Unit B Statesboro, Georgia 30461 912-764-3948

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Join us for one of our free information sessions. All sessions start at 5 p.m. and are held at the Memorial Physicians’ Office in Statesboro. Meet members of the Memorial Health Bariatrics team, learn about the types of weight-loss surgery we offer, and have your questions answered. For more information, call 912-350-DIET (3438) or visit bariatrics.memorialhealth.com to register online and receive our free e-newsletter. There is no cost to attend.

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MOMents Magazine February 2016