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LOGAN TUURA DESIGN PORTFOLIO

ARCHITECTURE | URBAN DESIGN


CONTENTS URBAN DESIGN

Uptown Nashville Finalist - 2014 ULI Hines Urban Design Competition Entry

The Right Fit 2013 ULI Hines Urban Design Competition Entry

Midtown High Midtown, Atlanta, GA Spring 2013

Georgia State Dormitories Downtown Atlanta, GA Fall 2012

Photography

Sketches and Models

ARCHITECTURE

VISUAL ARTS


Artesano Honorable Mention - 2012 ULI Hines Urban Design Competition Entry

Savannah Sea Level Rise Adaptation Savannah, GA Fall 2013

Brookwood Alliance Plan Atlanta, GA Spring 2010

InterWoven Honorable Mention - 2009 Bridge to the Future Design Competition

Boulevard Aquatic Center Atlanta, GA Spring 2009

Ceramics Research Center Roswell, GA Fall 2008

Logan Tuura logan.tuura@gmail.com www.logantuura.com Master of Architecture Master of City and Regional Planning Georgia Institute of Technology


UPTOWN NASHVILLE 2014 Urban Land Institute Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition Entry Finalist Site:

Sulfur Dells, Nashville, TN

Team Members:

Audrey Plummer, Blair Revercomb, Dawn Riley, Logan Tuura, Yigong Zhang

Transform:

Sulfur Dell into a thriving urban neighborhood that highlights its locational advantages to create a resilient and healthy community.

Opportunities:

“Uptown Nashville� seeks to rebuild the current district identity to create a new and improved Sulphur Dell District. With the stadium development and other existing and proposed amenities acting as a catalyst, Uptown Nashville intends to leverage existing and future amenities to foster the creation of a healthy, diverse, and profitable community.

Addressing Main Issues:

By addressing water quality and control issues with natural, environmentally friendly interventions (with the added goal of creating more public green space) Uptown Nashville will improve water quality, address environmental and health concerns, and improve resiliency in ways that add value for residents. Uptown Nashville seeks to provide affordable and flexible spaces for living, working and creating. By offering small spaces with adaptive uses, Uptown Nashville positions itself as a vibrant and less expensive alternative. Through the use of smaller typologies and pricing strategies, Uptown Nashville anticipates capturing market share spillover from downtown and suburban neighbors.


BIG PROBLEMS

SMALL INTERVENTIONS BIG IMPACT

LARGE % FIRMS UNDER 10 EMPLOYEES

SMALL SPACES

Smaller firms generally need smaller spaces that are more affordable

UNDER 10

SMALL GREEN

10-200 TOTAL ~37000 FIRMS

BIG STORMWATER PROBLEMS

Combined stormwater / sewer district overflow during rainfall and dump contaminated water into the Cumberland River

-Roof gardens -Green energy -Sustainable interventions -Incremental stormwater cleansing -Bike lanes -Passive lighting strategies -Natural ventilation

PLACES with numerous local businesses and varied types of businesses are more economically resilient and healthy. PEOPLE with the means to improve their economic status are more likely to live healthier lives. PLACES that collect, handle and clean stormwater naturally, on-site promote a healthier local and larger ecosystem. PLACES that employ sustainable building, transportation and energy practices encourage healthier behaviors in their residents.

Sustainability: Encourage Green Living. Reduce Carbon Footprint.

SMALL BLUE

# #

-Localized water collection -Incremental stormwater cleansing -Divert stormwater from combined sewer

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UPTOWN NASHVILLE

-Shared space -Live-Work space -Affordable space

Balance: Big Office Space Supports Small Office Space. Creates Healthy, Resilient Economy.

OVER 200

#

-Office space -Living space -Creative space -Startup space

Allowing for both small living and working spaces and making small sustainable interventions can create a healthy and resilient Nashville.

Combined Stormwater/ Sewer Districts Site Boundary Sewer Outfall

Stormwater: Collect It. Clean It. Return It To The Ecosystem

Stormwater Cleansing Brownfield

Clean Environment

Leverage Existing Amenities

Increase Density


Spaces for Work, Leisure, and Recreation Meet in the Two Stormwater Parks

Section: Diverse Typologies

Craftsman Live+Work Units

Diverse Spaces and Units -Luxury Apartments -Flexible Office/Meeting Space -Affordable Housing Units -Street Vendor Space -Live+Work Units Shared Commercial Kitchen Space


Re-entergising the community: Beer Garden and Cafe Near the Entrance to the Sounds Ballball Park

UPTOWN NASHVILLE

Section: Stormwater Strategies


Uptown Nashville Masterplan


THE RIGHT FIT 2013 Urban Land Institute Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition Entry Site:

East Downtown Minneapolis, MN

Team Members:

John Hightower, Audrey Plummer, Christina Span, Patrick Terranova, Logan Tuura

Design Problem:

Propose a development strategy that replaces the current surface parking lots occupying the blocks surrounding the site of the future Minnesota Viking’s stadium.

Transform:

East Downtown into the nation’s premier health district.

Opportunities:

The site has the opportunity to develop a unique IDENTITY by replacing the surface parking with something distinctive and attractive. A fitting urban design can spur development and boost the LOCAL ECONOMY of Downtown East. Downtown East’s future must continue a legacy of superior HEALTH AND WELLNESS for all citizens. Enhancing the trend of PHYSICAL FITNESS in Minneapolis must be accounted for and designed into the redevelopment of Downtown East. Attention must also be paid to the environment’s effect on design as well as the design’s effect on the ENVIRONMENT. To take advantage of these opportunities, several tactics and strategies were employed.

The Right Fit: Vision


THE RIGHT FIT

TACTICS

STRATEGIES

BRAND A driving mission of The Right Fit development is to offer the opportunity-laden site an enhanced, unique, and appealing character.

$

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The Fit Loop

Adult Fitness Parklets

Beer + Cheer

Tactical Urbanism

Incubator/ Flex Space

Digital Billboards

Healthy Eats

Seed + Feed

Community Health

Climb Time

Bike Sharing

Transit

District Energy

Tree Plantings

Heated Sidewalks

CATALYZE THE LOCAL ECONOMY In providing a great sense of place with a diverse interactivity of uses, the streets will be enlivened with new business activity.

HEAL First and foremost, The Right Fit aims to integrate life with Hennepin County Medical Center, pop-up clinics, healthy restaurants, and numerous community gardens.

ACTIVATE Fitness opportunities are to include the Fit Loop, adult fitness parklets, rock climbing walls, an open sloping lawn for sledding, snowboarding, and skiing at The Hill, and bike-share programs.

SUSTAIN To

keep The Right Fit active year-round, sidewalks are heated, awnings protect from snow, and indoor facilities are used. Environmental measures include use of a district energy system, water capture and re-use, and tree plantings.

The Site Section Folds along the Path of the Fit Loop Section along the Fit Loop Path


The Public Plaza Provides Spaces for Activity Both Day and Night and Through the Year

Master Plan


THE RIGHT FIT

Bird’s Eye View Showing the Fit Loop Path that Runs through the Project

Continuation of the Site Section


Masterplan


ARTESANO 2012 Urban Land Institute Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition Entry Honorable Mention Site:

Houston, TX

Team Members:

Jessica Florez-Gomez, Ryan Hagerty, Audrey Plummer, Christina Span, Logan Tuura

Design Problem:

Propose a development to occupy a 16.3 acre site which has an existing USPS office and warehouse.

Challenges:

Surrounded by interstates and railroad tracks, the site is ISOLATED. Houston is one of the youngest, FASTEST GROWING, and most diverse metropolitan areas in the nation, but this diversity is not reflected in its corporate culture. The - site lacks its own IDENTITY and does not embrace its NATURAL ASSETS. Located in the FLOOD-PRONE area, the site requires creative environmental responses to encourage private investment.

Strategies:

By- connecting streets, continuing the grid, tieing in to public transit, and integrating the site with Buffalo Bayou, Artesano will benefit from added CONNECTIONS to its surroundings. By- introducing a light-industry and craftsman focus, while providing mixed-income housing, Artesano will stimulate ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DIVERSITY. By- rehabilitating the warehouse into flexible space for light craft manufacturing, art production, cultural entertainment, and markets, this neighborhood will foster an IDENTITY OF CREATIVE ENERGY. Through riverfront development and purposeful location of programmed public space, Artesano ACTIVATES THE WATERFRONT. By- reusing a significant portion of the existing structure and recycling building materials, Artesano reduces its ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. Artesano also sets the standard for innovative STORMWATER MANAGEMENT and water conservation.


ARTESANO

1. GREEN ROOF 2. AIR CONDITIONING UNITS CONDENSED WATER 3. GRAY WATER 4. BIOSWALE 5. POROUS PAYMENT 6. WATER RUNOFF TO BE SHED AWAY FROM THE BAYOU 7. RAIN GARDEN 8. UNDERGROUND CISTERN 9. FILTERED WATER PUMPED TO WATER TOWER 10. FILTERED WATER TO BE USED FOR SITE IRRIGATION 11. SOLAR PANELS

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CLEANER BAYOU

Section: Sustainable Strategies Bird’s Eye Diagram

Water run-off redirected away from the river

Artisan workshops form connection to existing industry Flexible program serves as catalyst for the area

I-10

Economic Diversity

I-45 Reuse of existing warehouse respects historic legacy of site

Public Space provides “Stage” for the Arts Residential and Transit opportunities for UHD students Activate Waterfront

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Activate Public Space

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Expansion of existing Washington Avenue retail

The Making of Artesano

The Making of Artesano

Landmark existing USPS building, designed by Wilson, Morris, Crain, and Anderson, completed in 1962

Removal of office tower and warehouse facade to align building with new subdivision of site.


Rehabilitation of the Warehouse Structure Creates a Unique Sense of Place and Opportunities for Public Art

Removal of a section of the building, retaining existing structure to allow Bayou Boulevard to run through structure, creating space that celebrates the historical legacy of the site and creates a sense of place.

Rehabilitation of the warehouse west of Bayou Boulevard to accommodate artisan studios, shared workspaces, and specialized retail. The warehouse east of Bayou Boulevard provides flexible gallery and community gathering spaces.

Complete build-out of space to include specialized retail, artisan lofts, and affordable housing. Adaptive reuse of the warehouse minimizes environmental impact, improves functionality, and activates the site.


SAVANNAH SEA LEVEL RISE ADAPTATION Fall 2013 Site:

100 acre lowland site directly east of the Savannah, GA Historic District

Team Members:

Kevin Adams, Sharene Cadet, Logan Tuura

Design Problem:

Create a strategy to adapt to potential sea level rise that addresses stormsurge, stormwater, and the current conditions of the site.

Current Conditions:

The site is characterized by many issues relating to its current condition. PRESIDENT STREET bisects the site, and is a hurricane evacuation route. In the center of the site is the location of former historic rice fields, currently WETLANDS, which are located below sea level. The HISTORIC DISTRICT of Savannah is located directly west of the site, while PUBLIC HOUSING PROPERTIES are located in several locations within the site. A CEMETERY and the historic SAVANNAH GOLF CLUB, which contains fortifications from the Civil War, are located on the eastern edge of the site.

Public Properties

Impervious Surface

Topography


Wetlands

Stormsurge

Sea Level Rise at 0 ft, 3ft, 6ft, and 9ft


SAVANNAH SEA LEVEL RISE ADAPTATION

ISSUES

STRATEGY INFORMANTS

Manmade: Public Housing President Street Existing Urban Framework Natural Sea Level Rise Storm Surge Wetlands

The current topography forms a distinct line where the high ground meets the wetlands, which is shown through current stormsurge projections and the location of the wetlands. The line is also the extent of the ocean from 1’ to 9’ of sea level rise. As sea level rises, islands form within the cove, either requiring defense or bioremediation.

STRATEGY: ADAPT TO SEA LEVEL RISE Use the existing topography to create a WATERFRONT COVE Redirect PRESIDENT STREET to higher ground along the waterfront, creating a boulevard that can continue to serve as an evacuation route Locate Development on the higher ground on the MAINLAND Dredge the LOWLANDS to create a waterfront Develop (and defend from seal level rise) or use bioremediation for ISLANDS formed by Sea Level Rise Practice sustainable STORMWATER strategies for stormwater runoff

TACTICS Create Cove Using Existing Topography and by Dredging the Lowlands

Redirect President Street Along Waterfront

Locate Development Along Waterfront

Armor and Defend Islands that Contain Development from Sea Level Rise


Independence Day Celebration at the Waterfront Amphitheater

Utilize Bioremediation on Islands as they are Submerged at different sea levels

Utilize the Existing Topography for Treatment and Filtration of Stormwater

Create Green Boulevards with Filter Strips, Tree Wells, and Canals

At the Parcel Level, Use Rain Gardens, Native Plants, and Pervious Surfaces


SAVANNAH SEA LEVEL RISE ADAPTATION

Multiple boulevards separate new wards and disperse traffic to connect into the existing historical grid of Savannah.

3 different types of urban block structure: ModiďŹ ed Ward, Canal Block Structure, and a Hybrid Block Structure between the two

Section Perspective of the Canals Along the Waterfront Cove

The historic Savannah ward is modified to fit into the existing urban framework, with boulevards dividing each ward, while still providing a central park space that development orients toward.

The modified ward can also utilize wide green alleys in order to filtrate stormwater runoff. The alleys utilize pervious surfaces, tree wells, swales, and filtration strips.

Opposing Page: Masterplan


BROOKWOOD ALLIANCE PLAN Spring 2010 Site:

Peachtree Street north of Atlanta, GA from I-85 to Peachtree Battle

Studio:

This was a group studio project that worked closely with the Brookwood Alliance to create a plan to satisfy the needs of the community.

Urban Design Initiatives:

Create a walkable and bikeable environment along Peachtree Street that accommodates future transit and improves traffic congestion. Protect surrounding low density residential zones from overburdening high intensity development, while still allowing high density development along the street.

Concept:

The Brookwood Alliance Plan is separated into two main parts: Street Design and Development.

Existing Conditions

Ideal Conditions

Street Design The street design creates a walkable environment along Peachtree street by extending the 80’ right of way to 120’ to allow for 15’ sidewalks, a 5’ bike path separated from the road by a 5’ tree buffer to separate traffic and pedestrians. The existing six lane road is changed to 4 lanes with a median and two outside lanes for parallel parking, buses, or to accommodate future streetcars. The street design has an ideal condition, and a design methodology to implement the street design with the existing conditions. By eliminating certain parts of the design to conform with existing right of ways (The diagrams to the right), the street design can fit into the existing conditions, but still allow for future improvements.

Transition from 120’ Right-of-Way to 80’ Right-of-Way 120’-100’ 120’

100’


Accommodation to Limited Right of Way

100’-90’

Accommodation to Limited Right of Way

90’

90’-80’

Ideal Street Design

80’


Development

BROOKWOOD ALLIANCE PLAN

The development strategy of the Brookwood Alliance Plan seeks to push high density commercial development towards the street to protect the single family residential zones that are adjacent to the commercial zones. The existing development regulations feature wide lower height buildings that block light and air from Peachtree Street and the surrounding residential areas. A strategy using slender vertical development is used to allow for light and air to reach the street and residential areas and to also maintain the current floor area ratios. Low to medium rise building bases create a consistent row of buildings along the street to allow for a vibrant street life and human-like scale. The strategy also includes a Single-Family Protection Zone which includes setbacks and limits building heights within 100’ of residential zones. It also includes the Vertical Development Zone I, a lower intensity zone for commercial development, and the Vertical Development Zone II, a higher intensity zone for commercial development that is farther away from single family residential zones and closer to the Beltline and potential future transit. These three zones seek to allow for higher densities close to the street while respecting the environment of the single family home.

Map of Development Zones

Wide, Shorter Development to Slender Vertical Development


Section: Vertical Development Zone I

Aerial View Showing Existing Conditions on Peachtree Corridor

Elevation Showing Existing Conditions Elevation Showing Future Conditions with the Brookwood Alliance Plan

Section: Vertical Development Zone II

Aerial View Showing Future Conditions with the Brookwood Alliance Plan


MIDTOWN HIGH Fine Arts Charter High School Spring 2013 Site:

Corner of Peachtree Street and North Avenue in Midtown, Atlanta, GA To activate the urban nature of the site, active and public programs are pushed to the street edge, with most of the program located at the street corner to reinforce the street wall and dense urban condition of the site.

Program:

Gallery Library Gym/Theater Cafeteria/Kitchen Music Drama Digital Studio Analog Studio 16 Classrooms Offices

Design:

The design employs a strategy of emphasizing circulation to solve site, program and academic challenges. Separated programmatic volumes allow more public functions to occur on lower floors, and more private/secure functions to occur above. A wide continuous circulation path connects all programs together featuring a multiple large staircases in the atrium as well as establishing connections from Peachtree Street, Juniper Street, and the bus drop off. A fine arts charter school has unique academic challenges to foster creativity and interdisciplinary educational experiences for all of the students. The design helps foster these important aspects by encouraging the mixing of students between grades and classes through the use of the large atrium stairs. The stairs feature many areas and places for gathering, socializing, and studying. With these design aspects, among others, students at the Midtown Charter School for the Arts can advance their education and creativity through many aspects of the design.

The Stairs of the Atrium Foster an Environment for Learning, and Socializing


Students Greet the Sunrise


MIDTOWN HIGH

Context: Midtown Atlanta

Circulation

Programmatic Volumes

Circulation Flows Through the Building Circulation Links Program

Reinforcing the Street Wall and Urban Conditions


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Grading Plan

Active Uses Located on the Street

Structural Framing System

Private, Public, and Public/Private


West Elevation

MIDTOWN HIGH

North-South Section Through Classrooms, Gym, and Roof Garden

North-South Section Through Library, Gallery, and Bus Drop Off

East-West Section Through Studios, Gym/Theater, and Cafeteria


South Elevation

East-West Section Through Shared Learning Spaces, Atrium, and Library


MIDTOWN HIGH

Students Greet the Sunrise Ground Floor

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Floors 3-5

Typical Classroom Wall Section

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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10. Library 11. Analog Studio 12. Digital Studio 13. Shared Learning Space 14. Classroom 15. Roof Garden 16. Music 17. Drama

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Program: 1. Gym/Theater 2. Stage 3. Offices 4. Loading 5. Gallery Prep 6. Gallery 7. Bus Drop Off 8. Front Entrance 9. Kitchen/Cafeteria

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Insulated Translucent Panel Postentioned Concrete Slab


GEORGIA STATE DORMITORIES Mixed-Use Dormitories for Georgia State University Fall 2012 Sites:

2 different sites on opposing sides of Peachtree Street, each located at either of the two southern entrances for the Peachtree Center MARTA station.

Program (for each tower):

MARTA Station Entrance Ground Floor Retail 40 Double dorm rooms for 80 Students Common areas for dorm at street level and throughout the upper dorm floors Office space

Thresholds

The entrances to each MARTA station represent an important threshold into the urban landscape of downtown Atlanta. Users experience drastic changes in environment and conditions through this threshold: underground to above ground, dark to light, and closed to open.

Relationship of Two Buildings

As views are an important aspect of these thresholds, the building form creates specific views from each MARTA station, with views in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading users to view the surrounding landscape or the other tower. These viewing lines help create the relationship between the two buildings, both in form and in space.

Organizing Principles

The project brings two unique and distinctive programs together into the same building: residences (dorms) and office space. The main conceptual design tool seeks to both separate and unify the two programs through a central, solid space containing the circulation - the wedge.

MARTA Entrance Section Through Both Buildings


Situation Plan

Site Plan

MARTA Entrance


GEORGIA STATE DORMITORIES

2nd Floor: The Wedge Divides the Space

3rd Floor: The Wedge Narrows

East Building Mixed-Use Dormitories for Georgia State University In the east site, offices are separated from dorms by the wedge through plan. While they are physically separated from each other, they are united through common circulation within the central wedge space. The building form is guided by this wedge. As height increases, the wedge narrows and eventually ends, where the building forms begin to completely separate from each other.

North Elevation

4th Floor: Programs Separate From the Exterior


6th Floor: The Wedge Diminishes in Size

8th Floor: Two Separate Towers Develop

10th Floor: Office Separates from Dorms

East Site Section Showing the Threshold of the MARTA Entrance


GEORGIA STATE DORMITORIES

West Building Mixed-Use Dormitories for Georgia State University In the west site, offices are separated from dorms by the wedge through section in response to the conditions of the small site. The centralized wedge brings the two programs together through shared common space and circulation. The form of the building is referenced from the form of the east building. The plan of the east building provides an index for the section of the west building. The separation of the solid forms containing the office and the dorms is excentuated through the end of the wedge, where in section, each solid volume comes to a point, similar to the east building in plan. 3rd Floor: Office Plan

2nd Floor: Retail and Lobby Space

South Elevation


11th Floor: Dorm Plan

9th Floor: Shared Space Created

8th Floor: The Unification of Circulation

West Site Section: Retail (Floors 1-2), Office (Floors 3-8), Common (Floors 9-10) Dorms, (Floors 11-18)


INTERWOVEN Volkswagen Bridge to the Future Student Design Competition Honorable Mention Fall 2009 Site: New Volkswagen Manufacturing Facility Chattanooga, TN

Connect:

Chattanooga, Volkswagen, Employees, Trainees, Visitors.

InterWoven:

The visitors, trainees, and employees enter by walking under the bridge, which extends over the parking lot, and they continue walking through it to reach a weaving system of slots, structure, and main decking. The narrow slots weave above and below the main deck and in and out of the landscape, giving the users who walk on them close views of the test track, the surrounding mountains, and the Volkswagen facility. The main deck of the bridge is made of translucent recycled glass, allowing users to view and experience the movement of the slots above and below them. The translucent material provides a contrast to the rigid, coarse, solid concrete that makes up the slots. The lightness of the path and covering allows views of the continuing interplay between the recycled steel structure, the main path, and the slots. Site Plan

Shadows: Spring


Perspective Showing the Interweaving of Slots

Summer

Fall

Winter


INTERWOVEN

Main Circulation

Plan

Slot Circulation

Gathering Areas

North Elevation During Morning Shift Change

Drop Off

Entrance

Security Creek

Maintenance Road


Section Perspective

Test Track

Building Entrance


BOULEVARD AQUATIC CENTER Site:

2 acre site on Edgewood Avenue in Atlanta, which contains a concrete water treatment center which could not be demolished.

Program:

4,000 sq. ft. Lap Pool and Diving Pool 4,000 sq. ft Water Garden 4,000 sq. ft. Retention Pond 4,000 sq. ft. Media Center/Lecture Hall

Concepts:

The Boulevard Aquatic Center establishes a clear relationship with the urban environment by locating the masses of the building to the street corners and creating a plaza. The natural environment also enters between the building masses to connect to nature. The pool area also utilizes the existing topography, where the lap pool extends from the high point of a hill, while the diving pool is located at a level 15 feet below, allowing users to enter each pool directly at street level. The dual-levels also produce unique experiences for swimmers as the pools can be viewed as both below ground and above ground. L-shaped Building Forms

Forms Pulled Apart Towards Street

Form in Section

Infiltration of City and Nature

Program

DIVING POOL

LAP POOL

Topography and Water

Swimmer Movement


BOULEVARD AQUATIC CENTER

Early Process Section Isometric

Media Room


Site Plan

Retention Pond Above

Diver’s Perspective

Laboratories

Diving Pool


Section Perspective of the Lap Pool and Diving Pool

BOULEVARD AQUATIC CENTER

Diving Pool and Lap Pool Section


Sequence of Transverse Sections

Strong Vertical columns reinforce the feeling of monumentality.


CERAMICS RESEARCH CENTER

Program: 1. Entry 2. Gallery 3. Offices 4. Computer Labs 5. Studio 6. Kilns 7. Roof Garden

Fall 2008 Site:

6. 6.

Roswell, GA Site of dam on Vickery Creek and former textile mill during the Civil War.

Program:

Entry Gallery Offices Computer Labs Studio Kilns

3.

First Floor

Concept:

Relating to the art of ceramics, the base of the form is comprised of a slab of concrete that folds and turns in relation to the creek, creating spaces within itself. A second folding form of steel beams folds around the concrete layer, creating spaces both within itself and with the concrete.

Section Through the Studio Space and Dam

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2. Second Floor

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7. Third Floor

Circulation


Relation to the Site

CERAMICS RESEARCH CENTER

Steel and Concrete Ribbons Fold in and Around the Site

Bird’s Eye View


Site Plan


VISUAL ARTS Photography Sketches Models

Irregularity and Regularity in Philip Johnson’s Penzoil Place


Details and Perspective in Mies van der Rohe’s Dominion Centre

Corner Detail in Mies van der Rohe’s Dominion Centre

View from Entrance in Philip Johnson’s St. Basil’s Chapel


PHOTOGRAPHY

Differing Portmans: Mariott Marquis and Peachtree Center


Georgia Pacific Building: Geometric Stepping

Georgia Pacific Building: Geometric Slicing


PHOTOGRAPHY

Dada Exercise


Dada Exercise

Dada Exercise

Order and Disorder: Damaged Trust Company of Georgia Building


SKETCHES AND MODELS

Early Freehand Process Perspective Showing the Entrance to the Bridge for VW

Series of Freehand Perspectives From Undergraduate 1st Year

Pencil on Mylar Layered Over Textured Perspective Showing Light Conditions in the Lap Pool

Freehand Perspective of a 2nd Year Dorm Project


Early Freehand Perspective of the Entire Bridge

Model of a Site From a Short one Week Project that shows the Layered and Containing Qualities of the Topography and Landscape

Process Freehand Perspective of the Entrance to the Bridge


Logan Tuura Portfolio  

2014 Portfolio of Graduate and Undergraduate Works in Architecture and Urban Design

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