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FARMERS CONFERENCE

Booker T. Washington

George Washington Carver

Founder

Renowned Scientist

Thomas M. Campbell First Cooperative Extension Agent

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"A Tuskegee Tradition Since 1892"

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"A Tuskegee Tradition Since

“Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs”

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Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center at Tuskegee University - Tuskegee, AL

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2017 Merit Farm Family Award

The Cornelius Joe Family The Joe’s Black Angus Farm Newburn, Alabama Sponsored by:


The first Farmers Conference was held at Tuskegee University on February 23, 1892. Its purpose was to convene farmers in an educationally stimulating environment that would arouse public sentiment and create an interest in the common, mundane and practical affairs of life. The morning was spent identifying problems associated with farming and the afternoon portion of the conference focused on their solutions. Today, this conference has evolved into a two day event that focuses on the problems and solutions for small-scales farmers, land owners, and their communities in managing change in agriculture. Participants are engaged in intense courses of instructions, problem- solving and interactive demonstrations. Additionally, the conference provides an opportunity for small-scale farmers to network with colleagues and university educators. From its inception, the Tuskegee University’s Farmers Conference has retained the following objectives: (1) to share up-to-date information relevant to small-scale farmers and landowners involved in production of traditional and alternative agricultural products; (2) to create awareness about family health, nutritional challenges, and existing resources for rural families; (3) to provide research-based information in a consumer adaptable format; and (4) to strengthen networks and partnerships that address problems of small-scale farmers and rural communities with respect to local, national and global markets. 125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs

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THE TUSKEGEE NEGRO CONFERENCE of BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

Preface THE TUSKEGEE NEGRO CONFERENCE Booker T. Washington spent his first months at Tuskegee in 1881 traveling throughout the rural counties to see the living conditions of the people he would be serving. He later related: I must confess that what I saw during my first month of travel and investigation left me with a very heavy heart. The work to be done to lift these people up seemed almost beyond accomplishing.1 Reflecting back almost 20 years later, Washington described how he would “uplift” the people: The Negro has within him immense power for self-uplifting, but for years it will be necessary to guide him and stimulate his energies. The recognition of this power led us to organise…what is known as the Tuskegee Negro Conference, —a gathering that meets every February, and is composed of about eight hundred representatives, coloured men and women, from all sections of the Black Belt. They come in ox-carts, mule-carts, buggies, on muleback and horseback, on foot, by railroad. Some travel all night in order to be present. The matters considered at the conference are those that the coloured people have it in their power to control, —such as the evils of the mortgage system, the one-room cabin, buying on credit, the importance of owning a home and of putting money in the bank, how to build school-houses and prolong the school term, and to improve their moral and religious condition.2

Showing some of the teams of farmers attending the Annual Tuskegee Negro Conference

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


125 YEARS AGO The First Annual Tuskegee Negro Conference February 23, 1892 Attendance: According to Booker T. Washington: “About the first of January, 1892, I sent out invitations to about 75 of the common, hard-working farmers, as well as to mechanics, ministers and teachers, asking them to assemble at Tuskegee on the 23rd of February and spend the day in talking over their present condition, their helps and hindrances, and to see if it were possible to suggest any means by which the rank and file of the people might be able to benefit themselves….In answer to this invitation we were surprised to find that nearly 400 men and women of all kinds and conditions came.”3

Venue: The Porter Hall Chapel, 1892 – 1896

Porter Hall was the first building on campus. Named for Mr. A. H. Porter, a donor, it was constructed in 1882 partly by student labor. “In this building, which has three stories and a basement, all the operations of the school were for a time conducted. In the basement were a kitchen, dining-room, laundry, and commissary. The first story was devoted to academic and industrial class-rooms; in the second was an assembly-room, where devotions and public exercises for the whole school were held, while the third was given up to dormitories [for women].”4

Porter Hall

Conference Declarations:

We, some of the representatives of the colored people living in the Black Belt—the heart of the South—thinking it might prove of interest and of value to our friends throughout the country, as well as beneficial to ourselves, have met together in conference to present facts and express opinions as to our industrial, moral and educational condition and to exchange views as to how our own efforts and the kindly help fullness of our friends may best contribute to our elevation. First—Set at liberty, with no inheritance, but our bodies without training, in self dependence, and thrown at once into commercial, civil and political relations with our former owners, we consider it a matter of great thankfulness that our condition is as good as it is, and that so large a degree of harmony exist between us and our white neighbors. Second—Industrially considered, most of our people are dependent upon agriculture. The majority of them live upon rented lands, mortgage their crops for food on which to live from year to year, and usually at the beginning of each year are more or less in debt for the supplies of the previous year. Third—Not only is our own material progress hindered by the mortgage system, but also that of our white friends. It is a system that tempts us to buy much that we would do without if cash were required and it tends to lead those who advance

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the provisions and lend the money to extravagant prices and ruinous rates of interest. Fourth—In a moral and religious sense, while we admit that there is much laxness in morals and superstition in religion, yet we feel that much progress has been made, that there is a growing public sentiment in favor of purity and that the people are fast coming to make their religion less of superstition and emotion and more a matter of daily living. Fifth—As to our educational condition, it is to be noted that our country schools are in session an average of only three and one-half months each year; that the Gulf States are as yet unable to provide school houses and as a result, the schools are held almost out of doors, or, at best in such rude quarters as the poverty of the people is able to provide; that the teachers are poorly paid and often, very poorly fitted for their work, and, as a result of these things, both parents and scholars take but little interest in the schools, often but few children attend and these, with great irregularity. Sixth—That in view of our general condition, we would suggest the following remedies: 1. That as far as possible, we aim to raise at home our own meat and bread. 2. That as fast as possible we buy land, even though a very few acres at a time. 3. That a larger number of our young people be taught trades and that they be urged to prepare themselves to enter as largely as possible all the various avocations of life. 4. That we especially try to broaden the field of labor for our women. 5. That we make every sacrifice and practice every form of economy that we may purchase land and free ourselves from our burdensome habit of living in debt. 6. That we urge our ministers and teachers to give more attention to the material condition and home life of the people. 7. That we urge that our people do not wait for the State to provide schoolhouses and lengthen the time of the schools, but that they themselves supplement the funds of the State both in lengthening the time of the schools and in building schoolhouses. 8. That we urge patrons to give earnest attention to the mental and moral fitness of those who teach their schools. 9. That we urge the doing away with sectarian prejudice in the management of the schools. Seventh—As the judgment of this conference we would further declare that we put on record our seep sense of gratitude to the good people of all sections for their assistance and that we are glad to recognize a growing interest on the part of the best white people of the South in the education of the negro. Eighth—That we appreciate the spirit of friendliness and fairness shown us by the Southern white people in matters of business and in all lines of material development. Ninth—That we believe our generous friends of the country can best aid in our elevation by continuing to give their help where it will result in producing strong Christian leaders who will live among the masses as object lessons, showing them how to direct their own efforts toward the general uplifting of the people. Tenth—That we believe that we can become prosperous, intelligent and independent where we are and we discourage any efforts at wholesale emigration and recognizing that our home is to be in the South, we urge that all strive in every way to cultivate the good feeling and friendship of those about us in all that relates to our material elevation.5

The Jesup Wagon/Movable School

Thomas Monroe Campbell

Campbell is author of the book, The Movable School Goes to the Negro Farmer

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


Conference Comment:

The aim of Principal Washington is to bring together for a quiet conference, not the politicians and those usually termed the “leading colored people,” but representatives of the masses – the bone and sinew of the race – the common, hard working farmers with a few of the best ministers and teachers. In the Conference, two ends will be kept in view: First, to find out the actual industrial, moral and educational condition of the masses. Second, to get as much light as possible on what is the most effective way for the young men and women whom the Tuskegee Institute and other institutions are educating to use their education in helping the masses of the colored people to lift themselves up.6

Conference Delegates

A Quartet of “Sisters”

CONFERENCE ATTENDEES

Delegates Assembling for the Farmers Conference

This old woman was a regular attendant at the Tuskegee Negro Conference and idolizingly watched Mr. Washington during the whole four hours that he would preside over one of the Conference sessions

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THE CONFERENCE HYMN

Sung in conjunction with the Invocation and Reading of Scripture to open the Tuskegee Negro Conference

Am I a Soldier of the Cross? Am I a soldier of the cross, A follower of the Lamb, And shall I fear to own His cause, Or blush to speak His Name? Must I be carried to the skies On flowery beds of ease, While others fought to win the prize, And sailed through bloody seas? Are there no foes for me to face? Must I not stem the flood? Is this vile world a friend to grace, To help me on to God? Sure I must fight if I would reign; Increase my courage, Lord. I’ll bear the toil, endure the pain, Supported by Thy Word. Thy saints in all this glorious war Shall conquer, though they die; They see the triumph from afar, By faith’s discerning eye When that illustrious day shall rise, And all Thy armies shine In robes of victory through skies, The glory shall be Thine.

Words written in 1709 by Isaac Watts (1674-1748) Music composed in 1762 by Thomas A. Arne (1710-1778)

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


Notes 1. Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery, 1901, (reprint, New York: Penguin Books, 1986), p. 118. 2. Booker T. Washington, “The Future of the American Negro,” (1899), in The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 5, L. R. Harlan and R. W. Smock, eds. pp. 347-348. 3. Booker T. Washington, “The Story of My Life,” (1900), in The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 1, Harlan, L. R., ed pp. 135-136. 4. Porter Hall information. Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, Tuskegee Institute the First Fifty Years, Tuskegee Institute Press, 1931, p. 20; and Warren Logan, “Resources and Material Equipment,” in Tuskegee and Its People: Their Ideals and Achievements, Booker T. Washington, ed., New York: Negro Universities Press, 1969 [Originally, D. Appleton and Co., 1905], pp. 37-38. 5. “Colored People Of the Black Belt Pass Resolutions of Interest to Their Race.” The Daily Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, February 24, 1892, p.1 6. “A Circular Announcing the Tuskegee Negro Conference,” in The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 3, L. R. Harlan, ed., p. 209.

Photo Credits

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Cover: “Booker T Washington.” Library of Congress USZ62-5512. “Showing some of the teams of farmers attending the Annual Tuskegee Negro Conference,” in Booker T. Washington: Builder of a Civilization, by Emmett J. Scott and Lyman Beecher Stowe New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1916, p. 58. “Porter Hall.” L. Albert Scipio, II, Pre-War Days at Tuskegee. Historical Essay on Tuskegee Institute (1881-1943). Roman Publications, Silver Spring, MD, 1987, p. 30. “Conference Delegates and A Quartet of ‘Sisters’.” Max Bennett Thrasher, Tuskegee: Its Story and Its Work, Negro Universities Press, New York, 1969 [Originally, Small, Maynard & Company, Boston. 1901]. “Delegates Assembling for the Farmers Conference.” Max Bennett Thrasher, Tuskegee: Its Story and Its Work, Negro Universities Press, New York, 1969. “This old woman was a regular attendant at the Tuskegee Negro Conference.” Max Bennett Thrasher, Tuskegee: Its Story and Its Work, Negro Universities Press, New York, 1969.

Draft Compiled by Robert Zabawa, February 2007

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SCHEDULE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2017

Pre Conference Activity 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tuskegee University Cooperative Extension State Advisory Council Meeting (Ballroom C) Thomas S. Harris, Facilitator Retired Associate Administrator, Tuskegee University Cooperative Extension 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuskegee Legacy Museum Tour Jontyle Robinson, Facilitator Curator Tuskegee University Legacy Museum 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Networking Dinner and Conference Overview (Ballroom C)

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017 7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Registration (Conference Registration Desk)

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breakfast Forum (Ballroom A) Lawrence Haygood, Jr., Facilitator Economic Development Specialist Tuskegee University Celebrating the 125th Anniversary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Zabawa Tuskegee University Musical: “Of Fathers and Sons” Sponsored and coordinated by the Black Belt Human Resources Development Center 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exhibits and Health Fair (Continuing Education Foyer) 9:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Break 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 Noon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Concurrent Sessions Culinary Creativity for Healthy Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meeting Rooms F & G LeVershuan Williams, County Agent Tuskegee University Managing Feral Swine and other Nuisance Wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meeting Rooms D & E Chris Joe, District Conservationist, USDA, NRCS Chris Jarowoski, Regional Extension Agent II - Forestry, Wildlife & Natural Resources

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


SCHEDULE Forestry and Natural Resources Management Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farm Tour Ronald C Smith, Forester Tuskegee University Making Small Scale Livestock Operations Sustainable through Improvement and Diversification..(Meeting Room B) Uma Karki, Facilitator Tuskegee University Developing a Sustainable Year-round Pasture and Grazing System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uma Karki Tuskegee University Putting Numbers Together – Pasture-based Livestock with Honeybees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lila Karki Tuskegee University Adding Honey Bees to the Pasture-based Livestock Operation for Additional Income . . . . . . . . . . . Gregory Scott Selma, AL 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Opening Luncheon (Ballroom) Shaurice Carr, Facilitator Community Relations Developer Montgomery, Alabama “Water: It’s Worth It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Allison Jenkins, Coordinator Water Programs Alabama Soil and Water Conservation Committee

Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) – Changing Communities One Project at a Time Mike Roden, Executive Director Alabama Association of RC& D Councils 1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Break 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plenary Session (Auditorium) Miles Robinson, Facilitator Strike Force Director Tuskegee University Risk Management and the Limited Resource Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Alston, Associate Administrator Risk Management Agency, USDA Small Farmers and Rural Alabama Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nichelle Nix, Director Governor’s Office of Minority Affairs State of Alabama 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmer to Farmer Forum (Auditorium) Andrew Williams, Facilitator CEO and Outreach Consultant Deep South Foods Network

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SCHEDULE Outreach and Advocacy for Small Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolyn Parker, Director USDA Office of Advocacy and Outreach Food Safety and the New FSMA Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristen L. Woods, SE Regional Extension Associate Produce Safety Alliance Janice Hall Alabama Cooperative Extension System Livestock Updates for the Limited Resource Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nate Jaeger, Director ALFA Livestock Committee Forestry and natural Resources and your Small Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freddie Davis Consultant Forester River City Services Small Farmers, Lessons Learned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Russell and Jewel Bean Tuskegee University

4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visit with Exhibitors with Exhibitors (Auditorium Foyer) 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T. M. Campbell Award Banquet (Ballroom) Gwendolyn Lewis, Facilitator Program Specialist USDA Forest Service Commemorative Tribute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mortimer Neufville, President and Executive Director 1890 Land Grant Universities Foundation

T.M. Campbell Award Recipients The Honorable Terri Sewell, U. S. Representative for Alabama, 7th Congressional District The Honorable Billy Beasley, District 82, Alabama State Senate The Lowndes County Commission, Hayneville, Alabama

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2017 7:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration Conference Registration Desk 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breakfast Buffet (Ballroom) Robert Zabawa, Facilitator Tuskegee University

Video Presentation and Discussion “Mabele Na Biso” (Our land): From Land Ownership to Self Determination and Sustainable Land Development. – The Case of Isangi a Community in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. . . . . . . . Samuel Yagase, Founder of the NGO GOVA 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exhibits and Health Fair

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


SCHEDULE 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plenary Session (Auditorium) Raymon Shange, Facilitator, Cooperative Extension Tuskegee University Digital Agriculture and the Limited Resource Producer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Innovative Solutions John Deere, Inc.

USDA AGENCY UPDATES 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 Noon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Concurrent Educational Workshops Challenges and Opportunities in Small Ruminant Production System . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Meeting Rooms D & E) Sandra Solaiman, Facilitator Tuskegee University Murray Terrell, Cargill Feeds Montgomery, Alabama Nar Gurung Tuskegee University Ralph Noble, Professor North Carolina A&T University Angela McKenzie –Jakes, Extension Specialist Florida A&M University Clauses of a Timber Sale and Forestry Contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Meeting Rooms F & G) Jerry Bettis, Extension Forester Tuskegee University Healthy Foods, Healthy Economics – The REACH Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Meeting Room A) Pamela Trammell, Community Development Specialist Central Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission Natilee McGruder, Director River Region Food Policy Council Aquaculture Opportunities and Enterprises for Limited Resource Producers . . . . . . . . . . . . (Meeting Room B) Richard Whittington, Facilitator Tuskegee University Delorias Lenard, Facilitator USDA APHIS Commercial Aquaculture Health Program Standards (CAPHS) Categories of Participation, I Establishments, 2 Zone 3 Compartments

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2017 MERIT FARM FAMILY AWA

generation on the family farm that began with his late father and continues to this day.

Hale County, Alabama nestled in the western portion of Alabama’s Black Belt region, is the home of The Joe’s Black Angus Farm of Newburn, Alabama. The Joe’s Angus Farm is an intensively managed Black Angus farm owned and operated by Mr. Cornelius Joe, the 2017 Merit Farm Family recipient. Mr. Joe grew up on the farm and recently retired after 37 years as an agribusiness instructor with the Tuscaloosa County School System.

Today, Joe’s Black Angus Farm has evolved into a herd of 38 brood cows, two herd bulls, two young bulls and a nice number of calves. The farm is operating on over 200 acres of owned and leased properties situated on black belt soils. This farming operation is managed mainly by Cornelius Joe with help from his children and other family members as needed. Joe is an advocate of soil health and believes that the cornerstone of any productive farming operation is the health of the soil. He believes an annual soil test and following the suggested recommendations is one of the simplest, yet most effective,

As an educator, he has shaped and molded the lives of hundreds of students by exposing them to the positive values found in agriculture and the rewarding career possibilities in this broad and challenging field. He is proud of his classroom accomplishments, having equipped his students with invaluable life skills and being able to witness these students mature into productive citizens. His decision to become an agribusiness educator was largely influenced by his high school teacher and his desire was to return the same passion of agribusiness to young minds that crossed his path. A lifelong farmer, Mr. Joe represents the second

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


ARDEE tools any farmer can utilize in ensuring the success and continued sustainability of any operation. Joe equates the importance of a soil test for your land to the importance of receiving an annual physical for the human body. He grows, cuts, and bales his own hay to support the needs of the livestock. Joe believes in John Deere equipment and realizes the importance of purchasing quality equipment which makes operating a farm run smoothly. Mr. Joe is a longtime supporter of USDA Programs and Cooperative Extension at Tuskegee University. His third son, Christopher, is a District Conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service and has somewhat followed in his father’s agribusiness footsteps. Christopher introduced his father to programs such as the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the Conservation Stewardship Program, both administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, to assist in implementing conservation practices to benefit the overall operation of the farm. He also uses Cooperative Extension for the latest on agribusiness related topics.

Mr. Joe attends several local Extension workshops and seminars and enjoys an open relationship with the Extension agents and local farmers in his area. He also serves as a mentor to those in farming, looking to get into farming and just being an example of how to be successful. The future for his farming operation is to improve and slowly expand the herd to the potential that exists. Mr. Joe is a graduate of Alabama A&M University where he received his B.S. (1977) and Masters (1981) in Agribusiness Education and an AA as well. He is married to Leola, with whom he has four children, Cornelius II, Timothy, Christopher, and Jacqueline, as well as four grandchildren- Caleb, Victoria, Abigail, and Gabrielle. Mr. Joe expresses his thanks to Tuskegee University and others that have had a hand in the awarding of this prestigious honor and for providing him quality assistance that has allowed him to build a quality Black Angus Cattle herd and maintain a profitable enterprise.

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SCHEDULE Review of Relevant Diseases of Catfish and Shrimp . . . Delorias Lenard, Walter Roberts, and Richard Whittington Status of past updates and activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard Whittington Creation of Aquaculture Animal Health Teams at Tuskegee University as required by CAPHS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas C Graham and Richard Whittington Tuskegee University Fish Farm Health Surveillance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kathleen H. Hartman USDA, APHIS

Gaining Access to International Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathleen H. Hartman USDA, APHIS

Questions/Answers/Survey Risk Management and Sustainable Small Farm Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Auditorium) Miles D. Robinson, Sr., Facilitator Tuskegee University John Willoughby, Marketing Specialist Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries Desmond Mortley, Tuskegee University Barrett Vaughan, Tuskegee University Franklin Quarcoo, Tuskegee University Lila Karki, Tuskegee University 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Merit Farm Family Awards Luncheon (Ballroom) Kamilah Grant, Facilitator Tuskegee University Celebrating the 125th Anniversary Part II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Zabawa Tuskegee University

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


2017 Merit Farm Family Awardee The Cornelius Joe Family, The Joe’s Black Angus Farm Newburn, Alabama

Keynote Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Honorable John McMillian, Commissioner Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries Awards and Closing Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walter A. Hill, Dean College of Agriculture, Environment and Nutrition Sciences Tuskegee University 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuskegee University Forest Demonstration Committee Meeting (Meeting Rooms D & E) Ronald C. Smith, Facilitator Tuskegee University

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Tomorrow’s Agricultural Professionals (TAPS) II Friday, February 17, 2017

DATE/TIME

ACTIVITY

LOCATION

PRESENTER(S)

7:45 AM

Travel to Tuskegee University

8:30 AM

TAPS Registration/Check-In

8:30-9:00 AM

Program Orientation and Overview

KCC

Lakiah Clark

9:00-9:30 AM

Overview of Summer Programs and CAENS Degree Programs at TU

KCC

TBD

9:30-10:30 AM

Full STEAM Ahead How can you impact the world?

KCC

TBD

10:30-10:45 AM

BREAK

10:45-11:00AM

Transition to Next Activity

11:00AM-12:15 PM

Agricultural Issues Discussion Contest

KCC

Tuskegee University GWC MANRRS Chapter

11:00AM-12:15 PM

Station A: Cattle Reproductive Management

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm

Olga Bolden-Tiller/ Carmen Holcombe & Bolden-Tiller Lab

Station B: The Drone Zone

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm

James Cooper

Station C: Post-Harvest Activity

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm

Lucy Baah

Station D: Goat Activity

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm

Russell Johson/Nar Gurung

Station E: Out of this World - Geospatial/GIS

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm

Joseph Quansah/ Soulemayne Fall/ Gamal Al Efandi

GWC Ag Station F: Who was TM Campbell/GWC Legacy Experiment (Scavenger Hunt) Station Farm

Raymon Shange

Station G: Sustainable Gardening

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm

Raymon Shange

12:15-1:15 PM

LUNCH

Box Lunches at GWCAES Farm

1:30-1:45PM

Transition to Next Session

1:45-2:45 PM

Stations A-G Repeat

2:45-3:00PM

Transition to Next Activity

3:00 PM

Recognition of Contest Winners

3:15PM

Adjourn

GWC Ag Experiment Station Farm TBD

Optional: Campus Tour*

*Schools wishing to take part in a campus tour must RSVP with program director at check-in on 2/17/17

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


125th ANNUAL FARMERS CONFERENCE AWARDEES Esmeralda Dickson Esmeralda Dickson is State Statistician of the Mississippi Field Office, National Agricultural Statistics Service. She received her B. S. degree from Southern University and Master’s from Tuskegee University.

Alex Jones Alex A. Jones is an advocate for higher institutions and was Senior Advisor to the Under Secretary for USDA Rural Development (RD) under President Obama Administration. He has broad experience in economic and rural development, delivery of federal and private sector solutions to complex agricultural program issues. He was RD liaison for Community and Technical, Tribal, Hispanic Colleges, 1890 Institutions, and HBCUs, in the United States. Prior to his work at USDA, Mr. Jones served as Vice President for Advanced Technology and Graphics, Inc. in Maryland, Executive Assistant to Chairman of the Board at Farm Credit Administration in Virginia, Regional Coordinator for thirteen southwest states under RD and as Acting Associate Administrator for Rural Housing Service. Mr. Jones holds graduate and post-graduate degrees from the Oklahoma University of Science and Arts and Southeastern University. He and his wife live in Silver Springs, MD and have two children.

Victor Khan Victor Khan is a plant scientist at Tuskegee University’s College of Agriculture, Environment and Nutrition Sciences. He has worked extensively on the use of tunnel houses (hoop houses) for gardening and commercial crop production, which helps to extend plants’ growing season. Mr. Khan designed and implemented a unique hoop house that is now used by farmers, schools and churches. He is a long time collaborator with area RC&D councils and USDA on tunnel kits to help producers.

Mortimer H. Neufville Mortimer “Mort” H. Neufville, a native of Jamaica, has dedicated his professional life to reaching out and engaging learners on a global basis. He served as executive vice president of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. In this position, he developed a Food System Leadership Institute to train future university, government and industry leaders in change. Neufville, also developed many grants for the training of leaders, funding of national annual engagement, and outreach scholarship awards programs. Dr. Neufville is a nationally and internationally recognized advocate for engagement, cooperative extension, distance education and adult and continuing education. He has led a distinguished career as a scientist and director of national and international research programs. 125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs

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Dr. Neufville received his bachelor’s and Honorary Doctor of Science degree from Tuskegee University and Ph. D. from the University of Florida.

Alice S. Paris Alice S. Paris has over 47 years of experience in the rural development field. She served as the Membership Services Director at the Federation of Southern Cooperatives before her retirement. In that role she has assisted numerous community and cooperative groups to obtain funding for critical community needs. Mrs. Paris also worked as program director of a public policy project at Tuskegee University that supported asset-building coalitions in the stated affected by Hurricane Katrina. She has also served as chair for the Booker T. Washington Economic Summit for a number of years. A native of Virginia Beach, Virginia, Mrs. Paris received her B.A. degree from Hampton University and Her M.A. degree from Antioch University. She has served as the vice-president of the board of directors of Alabama Arise and the Arise Citizens Policy Project. She is currently the chairman of the Arise Legislative Committee. Mrs. Paris is married to George M. Paris and they reside in Tuskegee, Alabama. They are the parents of two children and two grandchildren.

George M. Paris George M. Paris’ professional career has been in three parts since graduating from Tuskegee University and service in the military. 1) He worked with the Federation of Southern Cooperatives providing marketing assistance to farmers in Louisiana, Florida and South Carolina. 2) At Tuskegee University he served as Research Farm Manager where he assisted scientist with on farm agricultural experiments. 3) At the Alabama State Department of Agriculture and Industries, Mr. Paris helped position Alabama farmers to take advantage of the benefits of Plasticulture and direct marketing opportunities. Mr. Paris serves as chair for the Tuskegee University State Extension Advisory Council, participates in and has presented at the Professional Agriculture Workers Conference (PAWC) and Annual Farmers Conference. He is married to Alice Somerville Paris and they have two children and two grandchildren.

James M. Perry James M. Perry, of Bullock County, Alabama, was educated in the Bullock County School System and has always been an active community leader. He recently completed a distinguished 24 year public service career, having served as County Commissioner of District One in Bullock County. Perry is well respected for his sincere devotion to the improvement of Bullock County. Mr. Perry, a lifelong farmer, was the 1985 recipient of the Merit Farm Family Award presented during the Annual Farmers Conference at Tuskegee University. Although he no longer produces crow crops, he still manages his cattle and hay operation and is still a mentor for area producers. James believes in soil health and practices simple but sustainable farm management. Married to his bride of 44 years, James and Susie are proud parents and grandparents and are thankful for a rewarding life on the farm. They are grateful to Tuskegee University Cooperative Extension for a lifetime of rewarding advice, support, and opportunities.

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


William E. Puckett William E. Puckett serves as executive director of the State Soil and Water Conservation Committee (SWCC) and the Alabama Agricultural and Conservation Development Commission. Prior to his present position, he was State Conservationist. The purpose of SWCC is to serve, lead and assist citizens in wisely using and conserving natural resources. He leads the committee’s programs which include working with farmers whose farms are categorized as Animal Feeding Operations/Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and the Alabama Watershed Assessment.

The Honorable Henry “Hank” Sanders Senator Hank Sanders was born in Baldwin County, Alabama the second of 13 children. He is a graduate of Douglasville High School, Talladega College and Harvard Law School. In 1971, he began Chestnut, Sanders, Sanders, and Pettaway, P.C., law firm. His law practice has been one of service helping poor and Black people save their lands, protecting Constitutional rights of citizens, incorporating new towns and building strong sensitive governmental institutions. Sanders was first elected to the Alabama State Senate in 1983 and has championed issues pertaining to education, children, health, women, removing sales tax from food and has served as Chairman of the Finance and Taxation Education Committee. He is also an accomplished author having written a novel, Death of a Fat Man, in 2004 and working on another book, The Gift of Struggle. He is married to Faya Ora Rose Touré, formerly Rose M. Sanders and they have three children by birth, four by foster relationship, and many others by heart.

Ronald Shumack Dr. Ronald L. Schumack’s career includes holding various positions at Auburn University including County Agent, Extension Specialist, Professor, Department Head, Associate Dean and Interim Dean, College of Agriculture. He has served as executive secretary for the Alabama Agricultural Land Grant Alliance (AALGA), which includes Tuskegee University, Alabama A&M University and Auburn University. As a representative for the Council for Agriculture, Research, Extension and Teaching (CARET), Dr. Shumack was an advocate for Tuskegee University and at the state level for more equitable funding. Dr. Shumack owns and operates a 545 acre farm in Conecuh County focusing on hay and timber management. He also serves on a number of boards such as the Bank of Evergreen, Alabama Rural Rehabilitation Corporation and the Conecuh County Farmers Federation. He is a graduate of Auburn University with a B.S. and Master’s degree in Agriculture and Ph.D. from Michigan State University in Horticulture.

Frank Taylor Frank Taylor is the director of the Winston County Self Help Cooperative (WCSHC), in Mississippi. The Cooperative was chartered in 1988 and through his leadership has grown from four (4) participants to 56. The members work to empower and combat unemployment through asset-based development. Training programs are designed around the strengths and natural resources of the county. With monies from member’s dues and grant awards the WCSHC provides a forum where small and underserved landowners pool their resources to purchase equipment, feed, animals, and other farm tools and products. They also use funding to provide education and enrichment programs to the county’s youth. 125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs

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Frank Taylor was born and raised in Winston County, and attended Kentucky State University on a football scholarship. In 2004, he was awarded the Mississippi Small Farmer of the Year award by the National Organization of Black Professional National Resources Conservation Service Employees.

Faya Ora Rose Touré Faya Ora Rose Touré, formerly known as Rose Sanders and a native of Salisbury, North Carolina, is a Johnson C. Smith and Harvard-educated Civil Rights activist and litigation attorney who has worked on some of the highest profile civil rights cases to come before the courts. Touré is founder of the National Voting Rights Museum in Selma, Alabama, and a founding partner in the law firm of Chestnut, Sanders, Sanders, Pettaway & Campbell, LLC. Touré is intensely passionate about her activism and legal work and the needs of the black community. She has founded learning and cultural centers, political and legal organizations, and community initiatives that have benefited Alabamians for three decades. She is married to Senator Henry “Hank” Sanders and they have three children and four foster children.

T. M. CAMPBELL AWARDEES The Honorable William M. “Billy” Beasley Senator Billy Beasley was elected to the Senate in 2010 representing District 82 (Barbour, Bullock, Henry, Houston, Lee, Macon and Russell Counties), after having served in the House of Representative, District 84 since 1998. Beasley is a native of Clayton, Alabama, married to Rebecca Parish Beasley. They have five children and 12 grandchildren. He is president of Pratts Station, LLC, and co-owner of Clayton Drug Company and Clio Drug Company. Senator Beasley is a graduate of Clayton High School and Auburn University with a B. S. degree from the School of Pharmacy. He is a veteran having served in the U. S. Army Medical Service Corp.

The Honorable Terri Sewell Congresswoman Terri Sewell is represents Alabama’s 7th Congressional District. She is one of the first women elected to Congress from Alabama in here own right and is the first black woman to ever serve in the Alabama Congressional delegation. Sewell is an outspoken advocate for jobs creation, workforce development, skills training and for providing resources and economic opportunities for her constituents in the 7th Congressional District. Sewell’s Congressional Gold Medal bill to honor the Foot Soilders of the Voting Rights Movement was signed by President Obama on Mrch 7, 2015, the 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday. Congresswoman Sewell, a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, is an honors graduate of Princeton and Oxford Universities and received her law degree from Harvard Law School.

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125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs


Lowndes County Commission The Lowndes County Commission consist of Carnell McAlpine, Chairman; W. Dickson Farrior, Vice Chairman; Robert Harris, Joey Barganier, Joshua Simmons, Jacqueline Jones Thomas, Administrator; and David Butts, Engineer.

SPEAKERS The Honorable John McMillian Commissioner John McMillan serves as Commissioner for the State of Alabama’s Department of Agriculture and Industries. His longstanding commitment to public service, preserving the environment, and economic development make him a natural fit for the challenges he embraces as the department’s commissioner. He has a legacy of perseverance and purpose. For six generations, his family has worked the land and enjoyed the natural resources of Alabama. Commissioner McMillan’s life’s work has focused on agri-business, forest products, wildlife protection, natural resource management and the protection of private property rights. Some of his accomplishments include being able to play a major role in rebuilding Gulf State Park after Hurricane Frederick, passing legislation to protect Alabama’s wildlife and fisheries resources, and being responsible for the $449 million dollar offshore oil and gas leases which led to the establishment of the Alabama Trust Fund. Commissioner McMillan met his wife Kathryn in high school and they have two sons and two grandchildren.

Samuel Bayombe Yagase Samuel Bayombe Yagase is a key player in mobilizing rural communities for local development mainly in Tolaw, Isangi Territory, Orientale Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). He is the founder of the NGO GOVA (Group of Village Organizations for SelfDevelopment ) that works on promoting local initiatives and leadership. He is very committed to improving matters related to local governance in the DRC.  Yagase is interested in fighting against injustice (especially traditional customs that discriminate against women) and fighting for the promotion of human rights. He works on promoting dialogue and collaboration between the two medicines (Traditional and Modern). He is the initiator of the Solidarity Fund for the fight against sleeping sickness in Isangi. For Samuel, development aid has virtually failed. It is in the process of reviewing, with his group, the perception of aid by paying more attention to local assets, helping the population to be the masters of its situation by mastering its agenda that Samuel sees lasting solutions for change in the DRC.

125th Annual Farmers Conference: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Opportunity, Serving the Needs

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SPONSORS

National Institute for Food and Agriculture, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, USDA Mid-South Resource, Conservation & Development Council, USDA ARD, Inc., 1890 Center of Excellence Farm Service Agency, USDA Small Farm Technical Assistance and Outreach Program, Tuskegee University Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program, Tuskegee University

DIAMOND CLUB SPONSOR Alabama Ag Credit DuPont Pioneer

BRONZE CLUB SPONSOR First South Farm Credit

PARTNERS

Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA Alabama Cooperative Extension System Alabama Department of Environmental Management Alabama Farmers Federation Alabama Farmer’s Market Authority Alabama Forestry Commission Farm Service Agency, USDA Federation of Southern Cooperatives Forest Service, USDA Southern Rural Development Council

TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY

College of Agriculture, Environment and Nutrition Sciences Cooperative Extension Program

COMMITTEE

Ntam Baharanyi, Chair Walter A. Hill, Co-Chair USDA-RD/Ronnie Davis, Honorary Chair USDA-NRCS/William Puckett, Honorary Chair USDA-FSA/Daniel Robinson, Honorary Chair William A. Hodge, Miles Robinson, Tasha Hargrove, Raymon Shange Program Chairs

Published by the Tuskegee University Cooperative Extension Program, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Walter A. Hill, Administrator. The Cooperative Extension Program offers educational programs and materials to all people without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, veteran status, or disability. It is also an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. Tuskegee University is accredited with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate, master’s, doctorate, and professional degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Tuskegee University.

125th Annual Farmers Conference  

The program booklet for the 125th Annual Farmers Conference at Tuskegee University on February 16 - 17, 2017.

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