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/J.11e L:;!inceton Review.

11 Practice Tests for the ®

&PSAT® 2013 Edition The Staff of The Princeton Review

PrincetonReview.com

Random House, Inc. New York


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Contents Foreword ...................... . ................................... ...................

v11

Part I: Orientation......................................................................

1

SAT Basics...........................................................................

3

2

Scoring................................................................................

11

3

What's on the SAT? An Insider's Guide.......................................

17

Part II: SAT Practice Tests .........................................................

37

4

Practice Test 1 .. ....................................................................

39

5

Practice Test 1: Answers and Explanations..................................

97

6

Practice Test 2 ......................................................................

121

7

Practice Test 2: Answers and Explanations.................................

1 77

8

Practice Test 3 ......................................................................

203

9

Practice Test 3: Answers and Explanations.................................

25 9

10

Practice Test 4 ................ ......................................................

2 85

11

Practice Test 4: Answers and Explanations .... .............................

3 43

12

Practice Test 5 ......................................................................

367

13

Practice Test 5 : Answers and Explanations.................................

425

14

Practice Test 6 ......................................................................

449

15

Practice Test 6 : Answers and Explanations.................................

505

16

Practice Test 7 ......................................................................

527

17

Practice Test 7 : Answers and Explanations.................................

5 83

18

Practice Test 8 ......................................................................

60 9

19

Practice Test 8: Answers and Explanations.................................

667

20

Practice Test 9 ......................................................................

6 95

21

Practice Test 9: Answers and Explanations.................................

753

22

Practice Test 1 0.....................................................................

77 9

23

Practice Test 1 0 : Answers and Explanations................................

833

Part Ill: PSAT Practice Test........................................................

855

24

Practice Test 1 1 .....................................................................

857

25

Practice Test 1 1 : Answers and Explanations................................

895

Paying for College 1 0 1 ............................................................

91 1


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Foreword Congratulations! By picking up·this book, you've taken a big step toward earn­ ing the highest SAT score that you can achieve. The Princeton Review was founded in 1981; our first class had 19 New York students. By 1990, we had become the most popular SAT course in the coun­ try, and we remain so today. Students take our courses, work with our tutors, and read our books because we don't waste their time and because we raise their scores more than anyone else. We created the practice tests in this book after analyzing tens of thousands of SAT questions and scrutinizing the test writers' strategies in fine detail. Our most experienced and analytical teachers gathered to review every question to ensure that these tests adhere to the length, style, and most importantly, the content that you will see on test day. Many tests in this book have been taken by thousands of Princeton Review students. We continually evaluate the data on each question .to ensure validity and to refine the level of difficulty within each test to match that of the SAT even more closely. We monitor the real test to· make certain that you are practicing what you really need to know for a higher score on the SAT; If you've used earlier edi­ tions of this book, you'll see that there were vast changes between the 2009 and 2010 editions, and we continue in this edition to refine the material for a genuine testing experience. Hence, these practice tests are just like what you'll see on test day. If you work through the tests and evaluate your performance with our compre­ hensive explanations, you'll develop the skills that you need to score higher on the SAT. Just as we have strived to give you the most accurate testing experi­ ence possible, you will get the most out of your efforts if you mimic the test setting as closely as you can. Take an entire test using the time limits for each section. You can use any questions 'you skip during the timed, test for extra practice before you move on to the next test. Review the detailed explanations questions to brush up on essential SAT skills. As you prepare, remember that the SAT measures nothing except for how well you can take an SAT. •

It doesn't measure the stuff that �atters. It measures neither intelligence nor the depth and breadth of what you're learning in high school. It doesn't predirt college grades as well as your high school grades do, and many schools are hesitant to use the score from your 25-minute essay in their application decisions at all. CoUeges know there is more to you as a student-and as.·a per­ son-than what y�u do at a single four-hour test administration op a random Saturday morning. ·

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•

It under-predicts the colle ge performance of women, minori­ ties, and disadvantaged students. Historically, women have done

better than men in college but worse on the SAT. For a test that is used to help predict performance in college for students across the country, that's a pretty poor record.

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Of course, this doesn't mean that you shouldn't take the SAT. Although almost every college will accept the ACT (the other admittance test) and some liberal arts schools have made the SAT optional, most selective colleges still require SAT scores. What the test's extensive flaws do mean is that you should view your SAT score as nothing more than a measure of how well you take the SAT . Make sure you give yourself enough study time so that your hard work will make a difference. Do your research and find out what score you need to get into the school of your dreams. Based on that, determine how, much you should prepare-and get to work! Good luck on the SAT and with the college admissions process. Sincerely, .

The Staffofthe Princeton Review

viii


Where Does the SAT Come From? The SAT is published by Educational Testing Service (ETS). ETS is a farge com­ pany that sells not only the SAT, but also about 500 other tests, including ones for CIA agents, golf pros, travel agents, firefighters, and barbers. ETS is located outside of Princeton, New Jersey, on a beautiful 400-acre estate that used to be a hunting club. The buildings where the SAT is written are surrounded by woods and hills. There is a swimming pool, a goose pond, a baseball dia�ond., lighted tennis courts, jogging trails, an expensive house for the company's president, and a private hotel where rooms cost more than $200 a night.

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You may have been told that ET S is a government agency or that it's part of Princeton University. It is neither. ET S is just a private company that makes a lot of money writing and selling tests. The organization that hires ETS to write the SAT is called the College Entrance Examination Board or the College Board.

What Does the SAT Measure?

If you are like many high school students, you think of the SAT as a test of how smart you are. If you score 800 on the Critical Reading section, you probably think of yourself as a genius. If you score 200, you probably think of yourself as an idiot. You may even think of an SAT score as a permanent label, like your Social Security number. ETS encourages you to think this way by telling you that the test measures your ability to reason and by claiming that you cannot significantly improve your score through special preparation (a strange claim from a company that sells its own preparation materials!).

Nothing could be further from the truth. The SAT isn't a test of how smart you are; more than anything else, it's a test of how good you are at taking the SAT. Can you learn to be better at taking the SAT? Of course you can. That's what this book is all about. You can improve your SAT score in exactly the same way you would improve your grade in chemistry: by learning the material you are going to be tested on and familiarizing yourself with the test format. Let's get to know the test.

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Score Choice!

This is maybe the one nice thing that ETS has ever done for you. Don't let it go to your head, though, they are doing it to compete with the ACT which has always given students this privilege. As of March 2009, you can now choose which SAT (by test date) and which SAT Subject Scores (by individual test) you want to sent on to colleges. Previously, col足 leges would see your whole record. Now they just see what they need to (i.e., your best score). Score Choice is optional and you have to specify by checking a box that you'd like to use it. If you don't check the box, all your scores will be sent automatically.

How Important Are SAT Scores? The SAT is an important factor when you apply to colleges, but it is not the only factor. A rule of thumb: The larger the college, the more important the SAT score . . Small liberal arts colleges will heavily weigh your extracurricular activities, inter足 view, essays, and recommendations. Large state universities, however, often admit students based on formulas consisting mostly of just two ingredients: test scores and grade-point averages.

Personal

Small Liberal Arts Colleges

Large State Universities

Even at a small liberal arts college, however, SAT scores can be a deciding factor. If your scores fall below a school's usual range, admissions officers will look very criti足 cally at other elements in your application. For most college applicants, their SAT scores are the equivalent of a first impression. If your scores are good, an admis足 sions officer will be more likely to give you the benefit of the doubt in other areas.

SAT Basics

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Essay at Scoring Level 5 I believe that the opinion of the majority isn't always right. Just because many people believe something is right, does not make it right. The examples of the Nazis in World War II, The Scarlet Letter, and Lord of the Flies show tr is to be true.

One example in which the opinion of the majority was not a good guide is the Nazis in Germany during World War II. This group was following the ord1::rs of

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Adolf Hitler, who they thought was right. The Nazis did terrible things, such as kill innocent people, force people out of their homes and into conce11tration camps. and rape and pillage. If they had been individuals, certainly they would not have done these things. However, since they were following the majority, they committed deeds that were not right.

Another example of the majority not being a good guide is in the novel The .Scarlet Letter. In this story, the young woman Hester Prynne is susp1�cted of committing adultery. The townspeople decide that she should be punii:;hed, so she is made an outcast and must wear the letter "/\' on her clothes S>O that people will know that she committed adultery. The majority did not come up with the right conclusion and punished an innocent woman. This showi; that the majority is not always right.

A -Anal example that the majority can be a poor guide is in the Lord of the Flies. In this novel, a group of boys becomes stranded on an island. Ae, a group.

they elect a leader to follow. Everyone has to follow this decision of the ma­

jority, but it eventually turns out to be a bad decision, causin� a split in the group. Chaos follows. Had the boys not decided to go with the decision of the majority, they might have been happy and peaceful from the beginning. Clearly, the opinion of the majority was not the best guide in this situation.

The examples above show that the opinion of the majority can be a pc or guide. If people would sometimes act as individuals and not part of a herd, they

could make better decisions.

Evaluation for Essay at Scoring Level 5 ETS says that an essay receiving a score of 5 is "effective." Overall, this essay is well done: It has a clear thesis, good organization, and relevant examples. But what would need to improve for this writer to score a 6?

For starters, the writer's vocabulary and use of language is not as skilled as it could be. The writer presents his ideas in a very straightforward manner, using less varied kinds of sentences than did the writer who scored a 6. The other place 24

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where this essay could be improved is in the development of the examples. The writer chose to tise three different examples and provides some discussion of each. However, the examples. all seem to say the same thing: When you follow the majority, bad things happen. This is a more simplistic view of the issue than we saw in the first essay and therefore doesn't demonstrate quite the level of "in­ sightfulness" that graders are looking for in a top paper. The writer of this essay may benefit next time by citing only two examples but discussing them in more detail. Better transitions between the examples would also make for a smoother progression of ideas. If your essays look a lot like this one, remember: A 5 is a very good score on the SAT essay! Only around 10 percent of essays get this score, so if you receive this score, you will ? e ahead of many other students. Let's take a look at an essay that received a score of 4.

Essay at Scoring Level 4 I believe that the opinion of the majority is generally not right. It is as true

t

today as it was in 1492-strong and intelligent ru ers are needed to avoid mob rule. We are all slaves to our biases and prejudices and, in matters of - importance, it takes clear, unbiased thinkers to overpower the majority. This theory can be proved by examining The Constitution of the United States and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.

First, when America's Founding Fathers set forth to create the Constitution,

they were very aware of the dangers of majority rule. Because of their stud­ ies, they knew that a well run republic can't be a true democracy. Therefore,

they created the "Electoral College" who would chose the President. Instead· of being chosen directly by the people, the President is technically elected by a group of electors who were in turn chosen by their states. This was a victory for the Anti-Federalists who wanted to guarantee that each state had an equal voice and big states wouldn't dominate policies because of their numbers. This was challenged after the election of 2000 in which Al Gore won the popular vote and George W. Bush won the Electoral Vote. Whether you

like Bush or not, you can agree that if the election was decided by majority,

the entire South and Midwest would be dominated by Northeast and West States. Thus, the Framers built a safeguard against majority rule into the Constitution because it is a poor guide.

Second, the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain shows . that the majority is not always right. Huck travels with an escaped slave

named Jim. The majority of Southerners (Huck's contemporaries) would have

thought that Huck should report Jim. But, Huck was a strong individual and

knew that slavery was wrong and Jim was a wise man who he could learn a lot

from. Thus, Huck showed that the majority is often a poor guide.

What's on the SAT? An Insider's Guide

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3

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The sentence in lines 22-27 ("Since . . . freeway") conveys the author's (A) dislike of popular stereotypes (B) uncertainty about a source (C) distaste for a particular meal (D) appreciation for the surrounding scenery (E) concern for a lack of nutritional value

18.

The statement in lines 32-33 ("What I . . . imagined") functions primarily to (A) provide a lengthy aside in order to give context for an earlier discovery (B) indicate an important and unforeseen issue with the author's methodology (C) express dismay at the lack of a suitable information for a book (D) foreshadow the eventual resolution of an apparent flaw in the author's plan (E) suggest that some of the author's findings are not as trustworthy as initially supposed

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17.

19.

20.

In context, the reference to a "glass of water" (line 37) primarily serves to (A) emphasize the author's increasing awareness of the complications of a project (B) suggest that few people appreciate the difficulty of writing about food (C) describe specific research methods used by the author (D) convey the author's success in tracing a particular food chain (E) indicate the importance of a rigorous methodology for collecting information In line 43, the "greater difficulty" is best understood as the (A) absence of evidence to support the author's claims (B) problems caused by the environmental practices of food producers (C) confusion caused by the intentionally deceptive labels on food products (D) likelihood of becoming sidetracked by secondary pursuits (E) hardship of traveling through unfamiliar territory

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21.

The list of "tributaries, inlets, and channels" (line 44) primarily serves to (A) emphasize the many areas unrelated to the author's goal (B) specify a way to navigate a convoluted topic (C) illustrate the complexities of a particular undertaking (D) enumerate the similarities between research and streams (E) hint at the strengths of the subject chosen

22.

In line 46, "splendid" most nearly means (A) perplexing (B) optimistic (C) accessible (D) attractive (E) absolute

23.

The author views the "side trip" (line 53) primarily as (A) offering a useful diversion from work on a complex problem (B) illustrating the flow of information from one group to another (C) adding to his loss of focus on community food sources (D) contributing an important component of a process under investigation (E) increasing the availability of resources to a greater number of people

24.

The author presents the final sentence (lines 62-64) as (A) a commentary infused with hope (B) a lesson drawn from personal experience (C) an admonition filled with grim foreboding (D) a challenge to recent scholarship (E) an afterthought laced with irony

25.

The primary purpose of the passage is to report on the (A) various ways in which com is used in industrial farming techniques (B) author's theory about the industrialization of food in North America (C) amount of energy required to process most food currently consumed (D) thought processes of a researcher contemplating issues in food production (E) significance of research studies in altering our perceptions of food

ST O P

If you finish before time is called, you may check you r work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test. Practice Test 3

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SECTION S Time 25 minutes 35 Questions -

Turn to Section 5 of you r answer sheet to answer the q uestions in this section. Directions: For each question in this section, select the best answer from among the choices given and fill in the c01responding circle on the answer sheet.

The following sentences test correctness and effectiveness of expression. Part of each sentence or the entire sentence is underlined; beneath each sentence are five ways of phrasing the underlined material. Choice A repeats the original phrasil!g; the other four choices are different. If you think the original phrasing produces a better sentence than any of the alternatives, select choice A; if not, select one of the other choices. In making your selection, follow the requirements of standard written English; that is, pay attention to grammar, choice of words, sentence construction, and punctuation. Your selection should result in the most effective sentence-clear and precise, without awkwardness or ambiguity.

2. Written by John Patrick Shanley in 2004, the Pulitzer Prize was awarded in 2005 to the play Doubt: A Parable for its challenging themes. (A) the Pulitzer Prize was awarded in 2005 to the play Doubt: A Parable for its challenging themes (B) the Pulitzer Prize, awarded to the play Doubt: A Parable in 2005 for its challengi111g themes (C) the play Doubt: A Parable's challenging themes were the reason it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 (D) its challenging themes got the play Doubt: A Parable the award of the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 (E) the play Doubt: A Parable was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 for its challenging themes

EXAMPLE: 3. Throughout the twisting streets that she can see from her apartment curve an extended row of ruin1;<1 old buildings.

Bobby Flay baked his first cake and he was thirteen years old then. (A) and he was thirteen years old then (B) when he was thirteen (C) at age thirteen years old (D) upon the reaching of thirteen years (E) at the time when he was thirteen

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1. During the early 1980s, after performing i n numerous local talent shows, my cousin. who had demonstrated her talent on the television show "Star Search." (A) cousin, who had ciemonstrated (B) cousin, the demonstrator of (C) cousin demonstrating (D) cousin demonstrated (E) cousin, as a result of demonstrating

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(A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

curve an extended row of ruined old. buildings curves an extended row of ruined old buildings curves ruined old buildings in an extended row there curves ruined old buildings in an extended row there curve an extended row of ruined old buildings

4. The Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, codifies laws that guarantee equal access for people who have physical or mental impairments.

(A) codifies laws that guarantee equal access (B) it codifies laws, and it guarantees equal access (C) the laws codificed by it are for guaranteed equal access (D) codifying laws that guarantee equal access (E) which codify laws that guarantee equal access

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5. A class of fresh fac�d. eager kindergartners arriving eai;;h September by school bus to begin learning in the public school system. (A) A class of fresh faced, eager kindergartners arriving each September by school bus . (B) A class of fresh faced, eager kindergartners from school buses, each September they arrive (C) When each September a class of fresh faced, eager kindergartners arrives by school bus (D) Each September a class of fresh faced, eager kindergartners arrives by school bus (E) A class of fresh faced, eager kindergartners who arrive by school bus each year 6. Once considered to be a vast and insignificant jungle, biQlogists, who treasurn its diverse wildlife and rich foliag�. � intrigy�d by th� Amazon rainfQr�st.

(A) biologists, who treasure its diverse wildlife and rich foliage, are intrigued by the Amazon rainforest (B) diverse wildlife and rich foliage are treasured by biologists now intrigued by the Amazon rainforest (C) diverse wildlife and rich foliage are treasured by biologists, who are intrigued by the Amazon rainforest (D) it intrigues biologists, who treasure the diverse wildlife and rich foliage of the Amazon rainforest (E) the Amazon rainforest intrigues biologists, who treasure its diverse wildlife and rich foliage 7. With their protest lyrics and their unapologetic stories of working-class life often avoided in popular music, B ob Dyl!lll' s timeless sQngs are often r�gard�d as the poetry of the people. (A) Bob Dylan's timeless songs are often regarded (B) Bob Dylan has recorded timeless songs that are often regarded (C) the timeless songs of Bob Dylan often regarded (D) people often regard the timeless songs of Bob Dylan (E) people often regard that Bob Dylan's timeless songs are 8. To predict a definite outcome of a financial investment is assuming a nearly impossible task. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

investment is assuming investment is to assume investment assumes investment, it assumes investment, therefore assuming

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9. By running an additional performance, the drama club members raised a w:ofit larg�r in ticket sales than if they added th� 11rofits frQm bake sales, QIJI washes, raffle s, and dona.tiQns.

(A) profit larger in ticket sales than if they added the

profits from bake sales, car washes, raffles, and donations (B) profit larger in ticket sales than adding the profits from bake sales, car washes, raffles, and donations (C) larger profit from ticket sales than the total profits from bake sales, car washes, raffles, and donations (D) larger profit from ticket sales than from bake sales, car washes, raffles, and donations added together (E) larger profit from sales of tickets than the adding of profits from bake sales, car washes, raffles, and donations 10. There is an unpredictable connection between an arti:;t and the source of her inspiration, when at its height can be reyefatmy !llld at its de11ths, demoralizing. (A) when at its height can be revelatory and at its depths, demoralizing (B) when at their height can be revelatory and at their depths, demoralizing (C) who at heights is revelatory and at depths, demoralizing (D) which at its height can be revelatory and at its depths, demoralizing ) while at their height is revelatory and at their depths (E is demoralizing 11. The locksmith disliked his apprentice not so much for his lack of interest in key cutting, but because he regarded every locked door with fear !llld !ll1Xiety. (A) but because he regarded every locked door with fear and anxiety (B) but because of his regarding every locked door with fear and anxiety (C) but for being fearful and anxious in regarding every locked door (D) as for himregarding every locked door fearfully and anxiously (E) as for his fearful and anxious regard for every locked door

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Practice Test 3

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5

The following sentences test your ability to recognize grammar and usage errors. Each sentence contains either a single error or no error at all. No sentence contains more than one error. The error, if there is one, is underlined and lettered. If the sentence contains an error, select the one underlined part that must be changed to make the sentence correct. If the sentence is correct, select choice E. In choosing answers, follow the requirements of standard written English. EXAMPLE:

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15. The writings of economist and humanist Karl A Marx influenced many 20th century theorists of B postmodemism, a philosophy that deconstructed

c

traditional beliefs and aims to reconside·r social values -Dand morals. No error E

The other players and her significantly improved B C A the game plan created by the coaches. No error E D

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16. Because biology labs focus on hands-on learning and promote skills needed for solving ci:munon A problems is why they have been generally required by D B C

12. After receiving our degrees i n English literature, my roommate and I developed the skills to analyze complex A B novels more deep than we could

c

in high school. No error D E

13. Before taking his cat to the vet, David moved the A furniture and vacuuming the carpet, causing the cat to B C run away and hiss �· No error D E

14. Once the week of final exams arrived, Brian needed to -A-

read several history chapters, to study and prepare B himself for a biology test, and he should revise his C D paper on Shakespeare. No error E

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medical and health-related programs. No error E

17. On the shelf in the garage are a collection of tools A freely available to any woodworkers who desire to add C B details to their creations. No error D E

18. At the annual dessert festival, carefully crafted pastries A

are presented in elegant displays, drawing people from B near and far to take part in this yearly event. No error E D C

19. The only student to be awarded a community service A

medal, the senior class president has accumulated more B

hours of service than any other student when he helped

c

build homes in Guatemala last summer. No error D E

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20. When Star Wars had their 20th anniversary, many A B fans worldwide sought to collect new pieces of movie C D memorabilia. No error E

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21. Incompatible with newer programs and deemed useless, A B the company's software has been updated unsuccessful C D for modem consumers. No error E

22. Though originally unpopular among taxpayers, the . A housing fee increase was implemented in order to build B more safer playgrounds for the community. No error D E C

23. Since J. S. Bach's compositions were performed in A B numerous cities in Germany during his lifetime, his

c

music did not gain recognition until centuries after his D death. No error E

24. After many years of dedicated training, some martial A

artists are so skilled in reacting at any stimulus that they B can quickly retaliate if attacked; this skill makes them

c

extremely dangerous opponents. No error D E

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25. Most of the paintings throughout this gallery A appear to be uncared for, and if you examine one B closely, you will see .that the paint has faded and

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their frames have cracked. No error D E

26. A person who uses hand tools to accomplish only A such tasks as hanging pictures and fixing window shades 路 B need not purchase the most cutting-edge power tools C D developed for professionals. No error E

27. In addition to possessing a deep knowledge of world A history, diplomats must have practice in dealing with B foreign cultures if he or she is to begin to build strong C D relationships with foreign leaders. No error E

28. Janet sent Howard to Richard's camp for the summer, A never dreaming that three weeks would go by before B C hearing from Howard. No error D E

29. In spite of the fact that handwriting on rare books usually . A causes a decrease in sale price, the value of autographed B books lli actually greater than books that have not been C D signed. No error E

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Practice Test 3

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Directions: The following passage is an early draft of an essay. Some parts of the passage need to be rewritten.

Read the passage and select the best answers for the questions that follow. Some questions are about particular sentences or parts of sentences and ask you to improve sentence structure or word choice. Other questions ask you to consider organization and development. In choosing answers, follow the requirements of standard written English. Questions 30-35 are based on the following passage.

(1) People who live on the East and West Coasts often assume that the Midwest has nothing interesting in it. (2) They are wrong. (3) One example is Branson, Missouri. (4) Branson, Missouri is a tiny town in the Ozark Mountains on the border of Missouri and Arkansas. (5) Branson is a tourist town, like ski towns and beach resorts, it is visited by hundreds of thousands of people every year during the months when its shows are in season. (6) People come to Branson for affordable family fun. (7) Branson might seem overly commercial or even tacky. (8) There are hundreds of stores and outlets and places that sell not only regular merchandise but also unique and even strange local crafts and tourist items. (9) Huge billboards­ surrounding hotels, motels, and tour buses, which are everywhere and full of tourists-advertise shows, shops, and malls. (10) Visitors often come in search of country music and old-fashioned music that is hard to find on the radio nowadays. (11) But the critics don't understand everything there is to know about Branson. (12) There are many recreations and natural attractions in this area, like golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains. (13) People really don't know what the place has to offer. (14) Some of America's most famous and beloved entertainers, such as the Osmonds, perform regularly in this location. (15) It also features performers most famous for their work there, like Shoji Tabuchi, a performer from Japan who has been delighting audiences in Branson for fourteen years. (16) And, it's safer and more reasonably priced than Las Vegas or Nashville with some of the same assets.

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31. In context, which of the following is the best revision of sentence 5 (reproduced below) ? Branson is a tourist town, like ski towns and beach resorts, it is visited by hundreds of thousands ofpeople every year during the months when its shows are in season. (A) Branson is a tourist town, like those near ski or beach resorts: each year, hundreru. of thousands of travelers visit during the months when its shows are in season. (B) Branson is a tourist town like ski and beach resorts; it is visited by hundreds of thousa111ds of people every year during the months when its shows are in season. (C) Like the ones near ski and beach resorts, Branson is a tourist town, visited by hundrecll; of thousands of seasonal travelers during the months when their shows are in it. (D) Visited by hundreds of thousands of travelers during the months when its shows are in season, every year Branson is like a tourist town near beach or ski resorts. (E) Branson is a tourist town: hundreds of thousands of travelers like those who visit ski 01r beach resorts visit Branson during the months each year when its shows are in season. 32. Which of the following additions would most improve the first paragraph (sentences 1 -6) ? (A) Listing mundane tourist attractions available on the East Coast (B) Providing an overview of live performances that Branson offers (C) Explaining the settlement of the Ozarks and the founding of Branson (D) Placing sentence 6 immediately after sentence 2 (E) Deleting sentence 2

30. What is the primary purpose of sentence 1 ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

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To present a commonly held view. To describe the geography of a region. To fntroduce an idea that the author will contest. To provide an example of bias. To express the writer's beliefs.

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33. Of the following, which is the best version of sentence (reproduced below) ?

9

35. In context, which of the following is the best revision for the underlined part of sentence 1 6 (reproduced below) ? And. it 's safer and more reasonably priced than Las Vegas or Nashville with some of the same assets.

Huge billboards-surrounding hotels, motels, and tQur buses, which are everywhere and full of tourists­ advertising shows, shops, and malls.

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5

(A) Huge billboards surrounding hotels, motels, and tour buses, which are everywhere and full of tourists, advertise shows, shops, and malls. (B) The streets are lined with hotels, motels, and tour buses whose occupants take in huge billboards that are everywhere advertising shows, shops, and malls. (C) The streets are lined with hotels, motels, and tour buses full of tourists, as well as huge billboards . advertising shows, shops, and malls to the visitors. (D) Huge billboards advertise shows, shops, and malls and surround hotels, motels, and tour buses, which are everywhere filled with tourists taking it in. (E) The streets are lined: hotels, motels, and tour buses are everywhere, and their occupants take in huge billboards advertising shows, shops, and malls.

(A) (As it is now) (B) And, even though it is safer and more reasonably priced than Las Vegas or NashVille, it has (C) And, because it is safer and more reasonably priced than Las Vegas or Nashville, it has (D) However, it is safer and more reasonably priced than Las Vegas or Nashville, and it also has Lastly, Branson is safer and more reasonably priced (E) than either Las Vegas or Nashville, but has

34. In context, which version of sentences 12 and 1 3 (reproduced below) best combines them into a single sentence? There are many recreations and natural attractions in this area, like golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains. People really don 't know what the place has to offer. (A) You might not realize that this area offers a range of recreati<ďż˝ns activities and natural attractions, including golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains. (B) People unfamiliar with Branson might not realize that this area offers a range of recreational activities and natural attractions, including golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains. (C) People might not realize that golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains might all be found in Branson if they were to visit. (D) People unfamiliar with Branson do not know that golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains can all be found in the Branson area if they were to visit. (E) You might not realize, if unfamiliar with Branson, the range of recreational and natural resources available in the city, golf courses, lakes, rivers, caverns, and mountains being just a few. â&#x20AC;˘

ST O P

If you fin ish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. Do not turn to any other section in the test.

Practice Test 3

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2 29


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6

6

6

6

SECTION 6 Time - 25 minutes 18 Questions Turn to Section 6 of you r answer sheet to answer the q uestions in this secti1on. Directions: This section contains two types of questions. You have 25 minutes to complete both types. For questions 1 -8, solve each problem and decide which is the best of the choices given. Fill in the corresponding circle on the answer sheet. You may use any available space for scratchwork. ,

1 . The use of a calculator is permitted. 2. All numbers used are real numbers. 3. Figures that accompany problems in this test are intended to provide information useful in solving the problems. They are drawn as accurately as possible EXCEPT when it is stated in a specific problem that the fi is not drawn to scale. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

gure

4. Unless otherwise specified, the domain of any function/is assumed to be the set of all real numbers x for whichj{x) is a real number.

G CJw � ED: EJ � Arix ,� h b

A = nr2 C = 21t r

A =

.

lw

b

A = l bh 2

l

·

V = lwh

V = n r 2h

The number of degrees of arc in a circle is 360.

.

a . c 2 = a 2 + b2

·

x

{3

·

s

Special Right Triangles

The sum of the measures in degrees of the angles of a triangle is 1 80. 1. Which of the following is NOT a factor of 92 - 9 ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

230

I

6 8 12 18 32

2. A chef prepares a multicourse meal at a dient's home. For this service, she charges a base price of $ 1 50, and adds an additional $20 for each course 01rdered. If a client orders c courses, which of the following represents the total charge, in dollars, for the meal? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

1 70c 150 + c 1 50c + 20 150 + 20c 1 70 + 20c

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6

6

6 B

I.---

ďż˝ C

-------.

A

E

D

3. In the figure above, CDE is an isosceles triangle and ABCE is a rectangle. If AD = 1 6 and DE = 4, what is the area of rectangle ABCE ? (A)

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(B)

(C) (D) (E)

48 56

64

72 80

6 YEAR

RESIDENTS

2000

550

200 1

725

2002

950

2003

1 1 25

2004

1 350

5. The chart above shows the number of residents of the Sunny Forest housing development from 2000 to 2004. Starting in 2000, the number of residents increased a constant amount every 2 years. If the number of residents continued to increase at this rate, how many residents were there in 2006 ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

1 525 1 700 1 750 1 800 1 875

a+b+c=4 d+e=5

4. What is the value of ae + ce + bd + be + cd + ad ? (A)

(B)

(C) (D) (E)

6 9 14 20 34

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Practice Test 3

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231


路6

6路

6.

6

y

CAPITAL CITIES SURVEY Apia, Samoa .

23%

Brasilia, Brazil Colombo, Sri Lanka

41% 1-----

::::J 52%

Dakar, Senegal 6. If the figure above shows the graph of y = of the following could be the graph of y (A)

=

Yerevan, Armenia

lg(x)I , which g(x) ?

Zagreb, Croatia

y

39% 1-----'

37%

20%

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7. For each of six capital cities, the graph above shows the percent of 500 people who said they would be interested in' winning a trip to that city. According to the information in the graph, which of the following statements must be true?

(B)

y

---=+---+-X

(C)

y

I. All people who were interested in Zagreb were also interested in Brasilia. II. More than half of the people said they were interested in Colombo. III. No person said he or she was interested in more than one city. I only II only III only I and III only II and III only

(A) (B) (C) (D)

(E)

(D)

y

(E)

y

2

8. If as = b , what does a6 equal in terms of b ? (A) (B) (C) (D)

(E)

232

I

b2 12 b5 b6

blO bl 5

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6

6

6

6 Directions: For Student-Produced Response questions on which you have answered questions 21-28.

29-38, use the grids at the bottom of the answer sheet page

Each of the remaining 10 questions requires you to solve the problem and enter your answer by marking the circles in the special grid, as shown in the examples below. You may use any available space for scratch work. Answer: Write answer in boxes.

7

Answer:

12 Fraction line

CD CD CD CD (2) . (2) CZ> @@@@ ®®®® CID CID CID e CID CID CID CID <J) <J) CD 0 CID CID CID CID CID CID CID CID

Grid in result.

Mark no more than one circle in any column. Because the answer document will be rnachine­ scored, you will receive credit only if the circles are filled in correctly. Although not required, it is suggested that you write your answer in the boxes at the top of the columns to help you fill in the circles accurately. Some problems may have more than one correct answer. In such cases, grid only one answer.

Answer: 201 Either position is correct.

2.5

Decimal point

CD (2) @ ®

CD CD e CD CD e CD • (2) CZ> • (2) CZ> (2) @@@ @@@@ ® ® ® C4>1 �Y4>�

��

Note: You may start your answers in any column, space permitting. Columns not needed should be left blank.

Decimal Answers: ·If you obtain a decimal answer with more digits than the grid can accommodate, it may be either rounded or truncated, but it must fill the entire grid. For example, if you obtain an answer such as 0.6666 .. ., you should record your result as .666 or .667. A less accurate value such as .66 or .67 will be scored as incorrect.

Acceptable ways to grid

1

are:

No question has a negative answer. Mixed numbers such as

03.5 or 7/2.

(If

interpreted as

3

must be gridded as is gridded, it will be

n, not 3 .! .) 2 2

521,346.98 9. In the .xy-coordinate plane, point (2, 9) is on the line whose equation is y = 4x + b. What is the value of b ?

10. If the number above is modified by switching the order of the digit 3 and the digit 4, then the resulting number will be how much more than the original number?

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' P ractice Test 3

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6

6.

13. If 0 < 5q

R

p

6

6 -

4 < 2, what is one possible val111e for q ?

s

T

11. In the figure above, figure PQRT is a parallelogram and triangle RST is equilateral. If angle P is 1 1 0 degrees, what is the degree measure of angle PTS ? (Disregard the degree symbol when gridding your answer.) 路

14. In the xy-plane, a circle has its center at the origin. If the shortest line segment that can be drawn from a point on the circle to the point (0, -9) has a length of 3, and point (0, -9) is outside the circle, what is the radius of the circle? 路

12. In the figure above,

234

I

allb . What is the value of d ?

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6

6

6

6 y (-8.5, 0)

30 ft

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17. A landscaper plants

15.

16.

flowers in a 30-foot flower bed. as represented by the figure above. If a flower is planted at each end and also planted every 3 feet along the flower bed, how many flowers will the farmer plant altogether in the flower bed?

The graph of a quadratic function is shown in the figure above. What is the value of m ?

feet at an average speed of 10 feet per minute. It then walked the next 5 feet at an average speed of 20 feet per minute. What was the average speed, in feet per minute, of the turtle for the 10 feet?

18. A turtle walked 5

Jessica prepares rock samples of 3 different weights for science experiment. She has 15 rocks that weigh 50 pounds each, x rocks that weigh 70 pounds each, and 6 rocks that weigh 1 10 pounds each. If the median weight of all of the rocks is 70 pounds, and x is a positive integer, what is the least possible value of x ?

a

ST O P

If you finish before time is cal led, you may check your work on this section onl y. Do not turn to any other section i n the test.

Practice Test 3

j

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7

(I)

(I)

7

(I)

7

7

SECTION 7 Time 25 minutes 24 Questions -

Turn to Section 7 of you r answer sheet to answer the q uestions in this sectio n .

For each question in this section, se�ect the best answer from among the choices given and fill in the corrnsponding circl� on the answer sheet.

Directions:

Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five words or sets of words labeled A through E. Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the sentence, � fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.

3.

The band has never won widespread acclaim because its output, sadly, is -------, with the ------- songs lost among the many banal ones. (A) amendable . . remarkable (B) mixed . . profound (C) enthralling . . vapid (D) flippant . . superior (E) obnoxious . . memorable

4.

Most of Edgar Allan Poe's stories have a ------- tone because their plots are often shaded by dark and gloomy circumstances with dismal endings. (A) doleful (B) fortuitous (C) metaphorical (D) provocative (E) scintillating

5.

"The greatest wealth is contentment with 2: little" is ------- of this philosophical camp, a fundamental principle accepted by most of its members. . (A) an eccentricity (B) an acronym (C) a maxim (D) a prospectus (E) a contrivance

Example:

Desiring to ------- his taunting friends, Mitch gave them taffy in hopes it would keep their mouths shut. (A) eliminate (B) satisfy (C) overcome (D) ridicule (E) silence

@@©@•

1.

To address her teacher's criticisms, Calla chose to ------­ her research paper by adding more detailed footnotes. (A) promote (B) improvise (C) amend (D) reiterate (E) professionalize

2.

The candidate thought his ------- popularity would guarantee a victory, but after losing the election, he realized how ------- the support for his campaign had really been. (A) interested . . incidental (B) conventional . . neglected (C) positive . . experimental (D) conscientious . . suspicious (E) extensive . . narrow

236

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7

7

7

7

Each passage below is followed by questions based on its content. Answer the questions on the basis of what is stated or implied in each passage and in any introductory material that may be provided.

Directions:

Questions 6-9 are based on the following passages.

7.

The author of Passage 2 suggests that the "line of reasoning" discussed in line 9, Passage 1 arises because people (A) are unaware of the behavioral characteristics of cats (B) believe that cats are unlike any other animals (C) assume they know IJ10re than they actually do (D) find cats less enjoyable to own than other pets (E) frequently ignore important information about their animals

8.

Passage 2, unlike Passage 1, refers to (A) explanations for the behavior of cats (B) the current state of scientific knowledge (C) dogs' tendency to comply with their owner's wishes (D) the beliefs of dog owners about their pets' intelligence (E) the connection between intelligence and certain types of behavior

9.

Which of the following is implied in both passages but explicitly stated in neither? (A) Some pet owners base their choice of pet on its self-sufficiency. (B) Cats are likely more intelligent than is assumed. (C) Cats usually pay closer attention to their masters than do dogs. (D) People often determine intelligence by assessing conduct. (E) Cat owners lavish too much attention upon their pets.

Passage 1

Line

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5

The notion that cats are more intelligent than dogs originates in human presumption. From our observations of other humans, we infer that independence and reluctance to follow orders correlate with intelligence. So, when we see dogs slavishly obeying their owner's commands, we leap to the conclusion that dogs must lack intelligence. By comparison, cats, with their Olympian detachment and cool disregard of their owner's wishes, seem dignified, and therefore smart. Following this line of reasoning, we might be tempted to conclude that pigs are particularly dim-witted, since they spend most of their days wallowing in mud and filth.

JO

Passage 2

15

20

25

Are cats more intelligent than dogs? The typical cat owner would probably answer with a resounding YES! Such people usually dismiss dogs as servile lackeys, while praising cats for their noble sense of self-determination. This thinking presupposes a complete understanding of the nature of animal intelligence and how it relates to human intelligence - a level of understanding that we have not yet acquired. Intelligence is often assumed to be associated with certain behavioral characteristics. Cat-lover's theories about the braininess of their pets revolve around the belief that cats have too much self-respect to obey their owner's whims. Dogs, with their constant need to please their masters, are obviously less intelligent. Or are they? 6.

The authors would most likely agree on which of the following points? (A) People are fascinated by the subject of animal intelligence. (B) Theories about cats have created false impressions in the minds of their owners. (C) People view the topic of animal intelligence from an overly narrow perspective. (D) Cats are not the only animals that are highly intelligent. (E) Dogs are significantly more intelligent than cats.

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Practice Test 3

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2 37


7

7

Questions 10-17 are based on the following passage.

45

The following passage is takenfrom a novel set in 1 905 in

New York City. Una Golden, the main character, has moved

to New Yorkfrom Panama, Pennsylvania, and enrolled in a commercial school.

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Line

5

JO

15

20

25

30

35

40

Whiteside and Schleusner's College of Commerce, where Una learned the art of business, occupied only five shabby rooms of crepuscular windows and perpetually dusty corners in a converted (but not sanctified) old dwelling house on West Eighteen.th Street. The faculty was considered competent enough, and among them they ground out instruction in shorthand, typewriting, book-keeping, English grammar, spelling, composition, and commercial geography. Once or twice a week, language-masters from a linguistics mill down the street were had in to chatter the more vulgar phrases of French, German, and Spanish. Most of the girls in the school learned nothing but shorthand and typewriting, but to these Una added English grammar, spelling, and letter-composition. After breakfast at the little flat which she had taken with her mother, she fled to the school. She drove into her books, she delighted in the pleasure of her weary teachers when she snapped out a quick answer to questions, or typed a page correctly, or wa:s able to remember the shorthand symbol for a difficult word like "psychologize." Panama, Pennsylvania, had never regarded Una as a particularly capable young woman. Dozens of others were more masterful at trimming the Christmas tree, preparing for the annual picnic of the Needlework Coterie, arranging a surprise donation party for the pastor, even spring house­ cleaning. But she had been well spoken of as a marketer, a cook, a neighbor who' would take care of your baby while you went visiting-because these tasks had seemed worthwhile to her. She was more practical than either Panama or herself believed. All these years she had, withoutknowing that she was philosophizing, without knowing that there was a world­ wide inquiry into a woman's place, been trying to find work that needed her. And now, something had freed her-she had become a feminist, demanding the world and all the fullness thereof as her field of labor. Where Una found her new vision of the world, it cannot be said. Certainly not in the lectures of her teachers, humorless and unvisioned grinds, who droned that by divine edict letters must end with a "yours truly" one space to the left of the middle of the page; who sniffed at card-ledgers as new­ fangled nonsense, and, at their most inspired, croaked out such platitudes as: "Look out for the pennies and the pounds will look out for themselves," or "The man who fails is the man who watches the clock." .

.238

I

7

7 50

55

Nor was her new understanding to be found in the books over which Una labored-the flat, maroon-covered, dusty, commercial geography, the arid book of phrases and rules-of­ the-thumb called "Fish's Commercial English," the manual of touch-typewriting, or the shorthand primer that, with its grotesque symbols and numbered exercises and yellow pages dog-eared by many owners, looked like an old-fashioned grammar headachily perused in some divinity-school library. Least of all did her new sensibility come from the other girls of the commercial college. They seemed alternately third-rate stenographers and very haughty urbanites who knew all about "fellows" and "shows" and "glad rags." Except for good-natured Miss Moynihan, and the old1ish, anxious, industrious Miss Ingalls, who,_ like Una, came from a small town, Una saw the girls of the school only in �' mass. 10. In line 5,

(A) (B) (C)

(D)

(E)

11.

the "faculty" is described as mysterious cultured adequate antiquated . wise

The use of the word "fled" in line 15 mos1: directly suggests that Una is (A) irritated by the slow pace of instruction (B) proud of her ability to outshine her classmates (C) anxious to free herself from her mother's influence (D) eager to immerse herself in learning (E) delighted by the prospect of landing a high-paying job

12.

The sentence in lines 22-26 ("Dozens . . . house­ cleaning") is best understood as a list of (A) skills that every young women should master (B) anecdotes about a painful period in Una's life (C) duties that Una views as beneath a person of her social status (D) amusements that distract women from their oppression (E) activities that Una shows little interest in

13.

The primary purpose of the third paragraph is to show Una's (A) evolving understanding of her own abilities (B) increasing disenchantment with her living situation (C) changing relationship with her childhood friends (D) growing nostalgia for the town she gr.�w up in (E) continuing anxiety !ibout her lack of marketable skills

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7

7

7

The description in lines 37-44 ("Certainly not . . . clock") serves to suggest that Una found her lectures to be (A) hilarious (B) tedious (C) captivating (D) malicious (E) profound

16.

The author's use of the word "inspired" (line 4 1 ) is best described as (A) excessive (B) metaphorical (C) ironic (D) tolerant (E) defensive

15.

In line 40, "sniffed" most nearly means (A) whistled (B) sampled (C) wept (D) inhaled (E) scoffed

17.

In the last paragraph, the author suggests that Una views the girls as (A) particularly memorable (B) embarrassingly inappropriate (C) surprisingly sophisticated (D) regrettably underhanded (E) largely indistinguishable

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Practice Test 3

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7

7

Questions 18-24 are based on the following passage.

IS\ \Ill

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240

J

11 Practice Tests for the SAT & PSAT

7

7

18.

The first paragraph reveals which of the following about Vidigal? (A) Its children do not have access to educational opportunities. (B) Its citizens have learned from the favela's history. (C) Its residents suffer from exploitative working conditions. (D) It is unlike any of the commu�ties that surround it. (E) It provides a dramatic view of the Atlantic Ocean.

19.

The last sentence of the opening paragraph (lines 8- 10) principally serves to (A) emphasize an interesting discrepancy (B) introduce an idea to be explored (C) provide an explanation for Vidigal's location (D) contrast Vidigal's size with its closeness and unity (E) illustrate the need for a democratic system

20.

The author mentions the "new shirts" (lim� 27) primarily in order to (A) clarify the beneficial actions of a politician (B) illustrate the relatively minor actions of an individual (C) undermine a description presented earlier (D) offer evidence that small expressions may have large effects (E) praise the ability of the soccer team to get new uniforms

A favela is a slum neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. The following passage discusses the political activism of citizens in one favela.

The favela of Vidigal is situated at the base of towering cliffs that overlook the Atlantic Ocean. The population of the favela is fairly homogenous: most residents work Line . in the service sector, and ortly about 30 percent of them 5 have completed primary school. With somewhere in the neighborhood of 6,500 inhabitants, it is one of the largest favelas in Rio de Janeiro. Despite its size, Vidigal is an unusually close-knit and cohesive community. The unique past of the favela has taught its residents the value of unity 1 0 and organization. The defining moment in Vidigal's political history . occurred in October of 1977. Vidigal had the unfortunate luck of being located between two of Rio de Janeiro's wealthiest neighborhoods. One of Rio de Janeiro's most expensive 1 5 resorts was literally around the corner from the favela, and developers wished to extirpate Vidigal and use the land for the construction of luxury condominiums. On October 25th, government emissaries, with a contingent of military police in tow, arrived in the favela and announced that the first group 20 of houses would be torn down. Most residents of Vidigal acquiesced to the government's demands, relocating to a new neighborhood in Santa Cruz, a favela hours away from their jobs and families. But some members of the community decided to stay and fight. At the 25 time, the representative in charge of Vidigal's district was Paolo Duque, a petty politician who made token gestures­ such as new shirts for the local soccer team-to the favela in order to maintain votes, while neglecting to bring abo�t any real change in the living conditions in the slum. The 30 concerned residents of Vidigal journeyed to Duque's office and pleaded for help. Duque was unresponsive, saying that his hands -were tied, at least until the next election. His message to the community was clear: With no votes' at stake, no help would be forthcoming. Instead of giving up, the leaders of Vidigal sought out a 35 new form of political action. First, members of the community contacted various· prominent social organizations in Rio de Janeiro, including the Brazilian Bar Association, the Catholic Church, and the Brazilian Institute of Architects, and enlisted 40 their support and political expertise. Next, community leaders rallied the remaining population of Vidigal to the cause, giving a political voice to people who for years had none. Facing an organized, unified, and passionate neighborhood organization with connections to strong social institutions, 45 the governor of Rio de Janeiro had no choice but to cancel the · proposed demolition. In later years, the residents of Vidigal succeeded in lobbying for an independent electrical supply, paved roads, a rudimentary sewage system, and a medical clinic. Each of 50 these civil projects resulted from the lobbying of an active and unified citizenry, a citizenry that had rejected a corrupt political system for an empowering one.

IS� \Ill

21. In lines 3 1 -32, the attitude of Paolo Duque: can best be described as (A) paternalistic (B) belligerent (C) morose (D) benevolent (E) apathetic

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7

7

22. On the basis of information provided later in the passage, the word "fight" (line 24) best conveys (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

avoiding politics embracing change finding support attacking the government slandering the representatives

23. In lines 24-34, the author's portrayal of Paolo Duque is best described as (A) a cautionary tale (B) an unwarranted attack (C) an emotional plea (D) a frank assessment (E) a familiar complaint

7

7 24. The "new form of political action" (line 36) is best understood as a strategy of (A)

abiding by and agreeing to the government's regulations (B) organizing a voting community with strong political participation (C) aligning community groups with influential social institutions (D) electing educated leaders to represent the neighborhood (E) presenting a compelling story to the national press organizations

Practice Test 3

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0 0 0

8

0 0 0

8

8

SECTION S Time 20 minutes 16 Questions -

Turn to Section 8 of you r answer sheet to answer the questions i n this sectio,n . Directions: For this section, solve each problem and decide which is the best of the choices given. Fill in the corresponding circle

on the answer sheet. You may use any available space for scratchwork. r

1 . The use of a calculator is permitted. 2. All numbers used are real numbers. 3. Figures that accompany problems in this test are intended to provide information useful in solving the problems. They are drawn as accurately as possible EXCEPT when it is stated in a specific problem that the figure is not dmwn to scale. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated. 4. Unless otherwise specified, the domain of any function/ is assumed to be the set of all real numbers x for whic:hj{x) is a real number.

r

j G Ow 6 LJ: E} � AY4· ·� b

..s

A = n r2

8

C = 21t r

A =

lw

b

- l bh A -

l

- 1wh V-

2 The number of degrees of arc in a circle is 360 .

.aa

a c 2 = a 2 + b2

V = 1t r 2h ·

.

s

x {3

Special Right Tri�angles

·

The sum of the measures in degrees of the angles of a triangle is 1 80.

1. If 6a + 3b

=

32 and b

=

4, then what is the value of 3a ?

2. Points Q, R, and S lie on XZ in such a way that Q is the

midpoint of XZ , R is the midpoint of XQ and S is the -

(A) (B)

(C)

(D)

(E)

5 9 10 12 20

midpoint of QZ. If QS (A) (B)

(C)

(D)

(E)

242

I

-

=

4, what is length .RZ ?

8 12 16 20 24

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Neil:T

PAGE

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8

0 0 0

0 0 0

8

3. Set A consists of all even numbers between l 0 and 20, inclusive. Set B consists of all multiples of 3 between 7 and 19, inclusive. If set C consists of all the numbers that appear both in set A and set B, how many members does set C have?

8

y

0

-"-+--+--+--+-+�1--+--++- X

c

(A) 1\vo (B) Five (C) Seven (D) Eight (E) Ten

(4, - 1 )

D

E (4, -7) 5. In the figure above CE is the diameter of a circle with center D (not shown). Which of the following are the coordinates of one point on the circumference of the circle?

(A) (B)

( I , -1) (4, -4) (7, -4)

(D) (E)

(5, -5) (7, -7)

(C)

y = cx 4. In the equation above, c is a constant. When y = 9, then x = 4. Wheny = 36, what does x equal?

(A) (B)

(C)

(D) (E)

8 10 13 16 81

60%

6.

The circle graph above shows the inventory of movie genres in a certain DVD rental store. What is the ratio of the number of romance movies to the number of comedy movies? (A) (B)

(C)

(D) (E)

1 l 1 1 l

to 2 to 3 to 4 to 6 to 9

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Practice Test 3

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243


SECTI O N 2 1.

D

Because Ellie doubted Tom's story, the blank means something like "with doubt" (D) skeptically

comes closest to this meaning. 2.

C

Start with the second blank. Hector is willing to explore new possibilities, which is different from how the more narrow-minded scientists feel about it. A good word for the second blank is "reject." Only (B) and (C) are appropriately negative Eliminate (A), (D), and (E) Because Hector is eag,�r to

explore new possibilities, "new" is a good word for the first blank, and only (C) matches both bfa.nks.

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3.

B

The phrase near the second blank, hejust as quickly indicates that we need a word for the first bl.ank that means "quick." Only (B) swift and (D) hasty have a meaning close to "quick." Despite indicates that the second blank will mean the opposite of rise, so "fell" is be a good word for the blank. Be­ tween (B) yielded and (D) ascended only (B) fits the meaning of both blanks.

4.

B

We know that Kai's pain was dull rather than whatever goes in the blank, so we need a word ithat means something like "sharp." Only (B) acute means "sharp."

5.

D

The colon indicates that the description following the punctuation is the meaning of the blank. We need a word that means "firmly sticking to one's principles," and (D) tenacity means "the q ual­ ity of keeping a firm hold on something." These answers have some tough vocab, so look up any unfamiliar words.

6.

A

The word but indicates that the second part of the sentence will mean the opposite of Procnuti­

nation. The opposite of putting things off is "immediate" action. Eliminate any words that don't mean "immediate," leaving only (A) prompt. 7.

A

The · word and indicates that the first blank will mean something close to stinginess. Eliminate (E)--;--all the other wotds describe someone mean or stingy. The second blank must be a word that describes his contrasting public image and his private behavior, so "go against" is a good meaning

for the blank. Both (A) belie and (E) contradict fit this meaning, but only· (A) matches the meanilng of both blanks. 8.

C

Because the department handles urgent situations these are tasks which must be performed with

great "urgency," or great speed. Only (C) alacrity fits this meaning. 9.

A

The main idea of Passage 1 is that Einstein's theories affected the works of artists and writers. 1his is paraphrased in (A). The opposite of (B) is true: Einstein debunked, or disproved Absolute Rest. (C), (D), and (E) are not mentioned in the passage.

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10.

C

The passage is about the startling parallels between the Renaissance and the twentieth century and sums up by stating that the twentieth century was not so differentfrom the world ofShakespeare, thus making (C) the only answer supported by the passage. Realism (A) is not mentioned in the passage. While both eras saw great advances in science the advances themselves were not necessarily similar, as in (B). There was trade expansion in the Renaissance, but not necessarily capitalism as in (D). There is no evidence that the advances were centered mainly in Europe as in (E). Remember, even an inference question must be supported by text in the passage.

11.

C

Both passages mention Einstein's influence on the twentieth century. While both passages are generally about science and art, �A) is too strong: art and science are somewhat linked in Passage l, but not at all in Passage 2. There is no evidence in either passage for (B).

12.

B

Neither passage mentions the nineteenth century, but finding the main ideas of each passage will show how each would make a relevant use of the nineteenth century. Passage 1 is about how the twentieth century is one of upheaval and major changes, though it doesn't give any examples of life before the change. Passage 2 is about startlingparallels between the twenti�th century and another era. (B) is the best answer: contrasts would show the differences between the nineteenth and twen­ tieth centuries, while links between the nineteenth century and anotherperiod does for the nineteenth century what Passage 2 did for the twentieth.

13.

C

The first paragraph discusses how America proudly professed democracy but acted against that belie£ (C) is correct, because it addresses this contradictory practice that goes against the ideals ofdemoc­

racy. (A) h;ls a trap answer in its mention of disease. The nations feelings about segregation (B) are not mentioned in the passage. (D) may be true, but it doesn't address the issue of believing one thing and doing the opposite. (E) segregation was not an illusion and the answer does not address the split of belief and action needed to explain the schizophrenic personality. 14.

D

As with question 13, this contradiction is the difference between what is professed and actual ac­ tions of the nation: the passage states segregation and discrimination are strange paradoxes in a nation

founded on theprinciple that all men are created equal, and this is paraphrased well in (D). (A) is not true-Dr. King is the author of the passage. The Supreme Court mentioned in (B) is in the passage, but doesn't relate to the disturbed consciences asked about in the question. (C) is not mentioned in the passage, and many people may be offended if the SAT considered this a true or correct answer. (E) is also not mentioned in the passage. 15.

B

The Supreme Courts decision outlawed segregation in schools. (A) is the opposite, while (C), (D), and (E) are not mentioned in the passage. (B) is a good paraphrase of the desegregation schools.

16.

D

Go back to the passage and use the context to come up with a word to replace deny. In the passage, segregation is described as inherently unequal and "does not allow" a child to have equal protec­

tion of the law. The correct answer should be something like "does not allow." While many of the answers do address certain meanings of deny only (D) withhold from matches the context of the passage. Practice Test 5: Answers and Explanations

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17.

E

The main idea of the third paragraph is that the issues involved in segregation

as

the same as those

all over the world and that the racial crisis. . . is a part ofthe larger world crisis. This is best reflected in (E), that this struggle is not an isolated occurrence since it is something addressed around the world. There is no evidence in the passage for any of the other answers. 18.

A

From the passage, the new order is based on democratic equality, while the older order is based on subordination, or keeping people down. (A) best reflects this, stating that the older order .is less

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democratic and believes certain groups shďż˝ uld be controlled by others. (B) and (C) are extreme, due to their use of only. (D) is much too specific, and not supported by the passage. (E) contradicts the passage: those of the older order are the traditionalists. 19.

B

The crisis mentioned in line 41 is explained in the rest of the paragraph: it is the paradox of the

principles ofAmerican democracy dashing with the actions of people who would repress freedom's growth. This is paraphrased in (B) the conflict between the ideals. . . and realities. This also fits in with the main idea of the passage as a whole. (A) and (C) are contradicted by lines 41-43. (D) and (E) are not mentioned at all in the passage. 20.

B

Go back to the passage and use the context to come up with a word to replace resistance. In the passage the principles ofAmerican democracy came up against people who wanted the opposite, to

repress freedom. (A) and (B) are both dose, but in context, (A) denial offorces either means that those forces themselves were denied, or perhaps they just ignored what was going on, whkh does not fit with brutal. (B) opposition fits better, because it shows direct action of the part of the forces. 21.

B

The passage states in lines 57-59 that the uneducated whites were in a state of confusion thai: led them to commit acts ofmeanness and violence. This is paraphrased in (B). None of the other answers are mentioned in the passage.

22.

E

The author brings up Lincoln and the castigation of the Supreme Court to support the idea at the beginning of the paragraph: that there are characteristics that come to theforefront in any periG>d of

social transition. Therefore, these are two instances that have similarities, paraphrased best in (E). The rest of the answers are unsupported by evidence in the passage. 23.

A

The point of Toynbee's A Study of History is that African Americans have something to give that

Western civilization . . . desperately needs to survive. This is best paraphrased in (A). (B) is the opposite of what's stated in the passage. (C), (D), and (E) are unsupported in the passage.

24.

D

There is no line reference, so go through the answers one by one to see if it is supported by the passage as a whole. (A) actually is the opposite of Lincoln's stance on emancipation. In (B) the connection is unsupported by the passage. (C) is too strong due to the use of. never and (E) is also extreme in its implication that all public officials share the qualities listed. Only (D) is supported: the passage discusses how the Supreme Court's decision caused resistance by older orders of people who believed in segregation, not just of schools but as a general principle.

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WHAT·s IN A FINANCIAL AID PACKAGE? A typical financial aid package contains money-from the school, federal gov­ ernment, or state-in �arious forms: grants, scholarships, work-study programs, and loans.

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Let's look at the non-loan options first. Non-loan options incbide grants, scholar­ ships, and work-study programs. The crucial thing about them is that they involve monetary assistance that you won't be · asked to pay back. They are as close as you'll get to "free money.�

G rants Grants are basically gifts. They are funds given to you by the federal government, state agencies, or individual c<?lleges. They are usually need-based, and you are not required to pay them back. One of the most important grants is the Pell Grant. Pell Grants are provided by the federal government but administered through individual schools. Under the 2009 stimulus package, the maximum award one can receive through the Pell Grant is $4,800 dollars a year. You apply for a Pell Grant by filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Remember that acronym because you'll be seeing it again. Complet­ ing the FAFSA is the first step in applying for any fe�eral aid. The FAFSA can be found online at www. fafsa.ed.gov. There are several other major federal grant programs that hand out grants ranging from $100 to $4,000 dollars annually. Some of these grants are given to students entering a specific field of study and others are need-based, but all of them amount to money that you never have to pay back. Check out the FAFSA website for com­ plete information about qualifying and applying for government grants. The Chick a n d S o p h i e_ Major M e m o r i a l Duck C a l l i n g Contest, h e l d a n n u a l l y b y the Chamber

The federal government isn't the only source of grant money. State governments and specific schools also offer grants. Use the Internet, your guidance counselor, and your library to see what non-federal grants you might be eligible for.

of Com merce of Stuggart, Arkansas, g ives out a

$ 1 ,500 s c h o l a rs h i p to

any h i g h school senior who can m a ster h a i l ing, feed i n g , comeback, a n d mating d u c k c a l l s .

Scholarships

.

Like grants, you never have to pay a scholarship back. But the requirements and terms of a scholarship might vary wildly. Most scholarships are merit- or need­ based, but they can be based on almost anything. There are scholarships based on academic performance, athletic achievements, musical or artistic talent, religious affiliation; ethnicity, and so on. ·

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