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S A CR A M E N T O CO M M E R CI A L R E A L E S TAT E , DE V E L O P M E N T, A N D CU LT U R E

06

What exactly is a “creative office space?”

ISSUE ONE

MADE BY THE TURTON TEAM

15

A new way of marketing real estate!

28

The next big urban frontier: Old Sacramento.

TURTON SPRIN G 2017


Heller Pacific

LIVEWORKPLAY R & 16th, Sacramento, CA 95811

Creative Office 1,500 SF - 50,000 SF

creative office space . cool retail . apartments . r street corridor. industrial heritage . on-site parking . light rail access . versatile floor plans . bocce ball . massage suites . you name it, we got it! NOW LEASING | OCCUPANCY Q2 2018 O F F I C E L E A S I N G : T UR T ON CO M M E RCI A L - 916 . 573. 3 3 0 0 - T UR T ONCO M .CO M


INTERIOR RENDERINGS: MARK WALLACE & TANIA BARRERA, MILES TREASTER & ASSOCIATES


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CONTENTS

Ever wanted your very own Turton icosahedron? Today’s your lucky day! Cut out the shape, fold on the lines, and tape the flaps to the inside.

MARCH 2017

16

03

Sacramento’s groovy underground How basements could be the next big thing.

A Word from Ken Before we begin.

Know the value of your history? Bemoan historic buildings no longer - here are the monetary beneftits of owning one.

06

What defines creative office? The space type everyone is talking about

10

The rise of the Sacramento art scene Using your building as a canvas.

15

A new kind of commercial real estate branding The importance of beer, beans, and bikes in leasing space.

T U R T O N C O M M E R C IA L R E A L E S TAT E

04

20

Trouble sleeping? Read this! 4 rather boring items you should know about leasing space to public agencies.

24

The midtown-downtown invisible wall Can these two submarkets merge and redefine themselves as the GRID?

28

Something Old Something New Old Sacramento may be downtown’s next frontier.

32

About Turton Learn about the team!


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A WORD FROM

KEN

Demand for space in the Grid has never been greater. The “Grid,” the urban core comprised of Midtown, Downtown and East Sacramento submarkets, sports the lowest vacancy rates and highest absorption rates in the City. Midtown Sacramento is leading the charge with a vacancy rate below 5% when accounting for space intentionally held vacant. The R St. Corridor is close behind and now vacancy is plummeting Downtown. Absorption in the “Class A” Downtown market has increased by almost 230% in the last 12 months versus the five-year average. Why? Are these numbers directly attributable to the new Golden 1 Center? The answer is essentially “No.” While the Golden 1 Center has certainly increased the velocity of demand in the urban core it is not the driving force behind this steady urban migration. Midtown has maintained an effective vacancy rate of less than 5% for the last decade without an entertainment and sports arena. The R St. Corridor renaissance began 10 years ago going back to the mixed-use residential over retail project at 14th and R Street (think Ace of Spades). The foundation of this steady and growing urban demand is actually directly tied to the work experience itself. Simply stated, today’s business professional wants more

24 09 L S T RE E T, S T E 20 0 S ACR A M E N TO, C A 95 816 TURTONCOM.COM 916 . 5 73 . 3 3 0 0

KEN TURTON PRESIDENT

916.573.3300 K ENTURTON@TURTONCOM.COM

AARON MARCHAND VICE PRESIDENT

916.573.3305 A ARONMARCHAND@TURTONCOM.COM

SCOTT KINGSTON VICE PRESIDENT

916.573.3309 SCOT TKINGS TON@TURTONCOM.COM

BROOKE BUTLER

VP - OPERATIONS & MARKETING 916.573.3301 BROOK EBUTLER@TURTONCOM.COM

out of their work experience than sitting behind a desk for 8 to 10 hours a day within the sterile confines of generic tilted concrete walls, 2 x 4 ceiling tiles and a window line viewing a large parking lot.

JON LANG

SENIOR DIRECTOR

They want to be surrounded by walkable amenities, enveloped by mature landscapes and immersed in a culture that embraces diversity, creativity and collaboration. They want to be able to walk to a third-generation pub or café and talk to the proprietor about the good old days over a local brew or warm cuppa joe. They want to be able to live within blocks of where they work and to transform their lifestyle from one hour commutes to boots, bikes and public transportation. In the Silicon Valley huge high-tech corporations invest hundreds of millions of dollars in massive campuses that include multiple eateries, coffee shops, reading parks, exercise facilities and even spas in an effort to enhance the work experience of their employees. Business located in the Sacramento Region are now recognizing the recruiting and retention benefits of an enhanced work experience and by locating their business in the urban core they surround their employees with an authentic cultural envelope that far exceeds anything that can be reproduced synthetically (even in the Silicon Valley). And guess what? When you locate to the urban core it’s included with the package. This urban core experience provides every single employer with a significant employee recruiting and retention advantage. It is difficult to articulate in a few words what makes the urban core so desirable, but if you want to love going to work again then I encourage you to thumb through the following pages, learn more about this very special world and then call us to help you find your perfect space.

916.573.3302 JONL ANG@TURTONCOM.COM

JOHN MUDGETT SENIOR DIRECTOR

916.573.3306 JOHNMUDGET T@TURTONCOM.COM

JOSIE JERDE SENIOR DIRECTOR

916.8 49.1514 JOSIE JERDE@TURTONCOM.COM

TYLER JERDE SENIOR DIRECTOR

916.990.49 49 T YLER JERDE@TURTONCOM.COM

PATRICK STELMACH DIRECTOR

916.573.3314 PATRICKS TELMACH@TURTONCOM.COM

COREY LAU

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 916.573.330 4 CORE YL AU@TURTONCOM.COM KEN TURTON - PRESIDENT


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Do y ou f ind c harm in older s p a ces ? 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 HIGH

D O Y O U K N O W THE VALUE OF YOUR

HISTORY?

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 47.48 LOW

PATRICK STELMACH - DIRECTOR

Many property owners bemoan the implications of historic building designations - but do they know of the tax incentitives? The oldest properties can be remarkably profitable investments to own – whether it’s an office building, residential apartments, retail, or mixed use – with the proper application of historic tax credits. Residents, visitors, shoppers and tenants are drawn to places, like Midtown, for their historic charm and special character – distinctly unique architecture and authentic experience that cannot be replicated anywhere else. This unwavering demand enhances property values, but moreover, creates an impetus for renovating and maximizing the value and income of the historic property, like turning a stodgy building into a “creative office” environment or converting a turn-of-the-century warehouse into loft housing. However, the significant cost often impedes most property owners from undertaking such projects. The Federal Historic Tax Credit program offsets your cost by 10% or 20% and provides you the opportunity to restore withering blight into high caliber income-producing assets. Whereas an income tax deduction lowers the amount of income subject to taxation, the tax credit lowers the amount of taxes you owe by 20% of the amount you spent in a rehabilitation of your certified historic structure. The California Office of Historic Preservation and the National Park Service certiThe Warehouse Artist Lofts (WAL) are a landmark redevlopment on up-and-coming R Street. The spaces are leased out exclusively to artists. Interested? Join the waiting list. Photo by Nicholas Wray

2017 322.83

fies your building as “historic” when it is listed individually in the National Register of Historic Places, OR is located in a registered historic district and contributes to the historic significance of that district. Your building’s location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association add to the district’s sense of time and place and historical development. If you own a building that’s not eligible for certification, but it was built before 1936, you can still take advantage of the tax credit for 10% of the amount spent to rehabilitate the property. Turton Commercial Real Estate is proud to have sold and/or leased over 30 historic commercial properties in the Sacramento Urban Core. Most recently, Turton Commercial sold the “800 Block” on behalf of the City of Sacramento, and as part of the redevelopment of the Bel-Vue / American Cash Apartments, CFY Development will utilized historic tax credits to finance the rehabilitation of 22 residential units for a mixed use project, with community recreation space, resident services and retail. Turton Commercial has a number of listings for sale that are prime “value-add” opportunities for revitalization and adaptive reuse, including 1011 10th Street – the Landmark Bank / American Trust Company Building. This property is a historic landmark currently listed on the City of Sacramento’s Register of Historic and Cultural Resources, and the prospective developer/ investor could reposition the property for office and/or retail tenants and apply for the 20% rehabilitation tax credit. Mid-Century Modern enthusiasts listen up! Your building could be historic, too. Typically, a building is eligible to be nomination to the Register of Historic Places if it was built 50 years ago or earlier. The criteria for designation include your building’s association with historic events, important figures, physical characteristics, and/or master architect. Tax credits can be complicated, and there are many myths about preservation and the effects of registering your property or neighborhood district. However, case studies across the nation have conclusively demonstrated that “historic” designation and the creation of historic districts actually increases property values. Rehabilitating our historic treasures is especially important to Sacramento’s continued revitalization and economic growth.

Historic building sales in last 5 years Price Per SF - Source: CoStar

Sacramento has many successful historical tax credit projects. Here are six: •

The Cannery at Alhambra (Fulcrum Properties) – creative office spaces are available for lease

Warehouse Artist Lofts (WAL) on R Street (CFY Development)

Maydestone Apartments on 15th Street (D&S Development)

Hall of Justice on 6th Street (Sutter Capital Group)

Railway Express Agency Building on I Street (Otto Construction)

Winters House on H Street (Patrick and Vickie Cosentino)

SOME WORDS FROM OUR FRIENDS

“There are quantifiable benefits of preserving historic buildings – to the community, the environment, and the developer’s bottom line. Rehabilitating an existing building conserves the existing materials and the energy it took to produce them and construct the building.” - Ali Youssefi, CFY Development

KEY TEAM MEMBERS NEEDED FOR HISTORIC TAX CREDIT PROJECT: •

Architect with a track record of historic tax credit success

Historian who has both experience with the ‘three part NPS process’ as well as a good relationship with the state preservation office;

Accountant that can insure IRS compliance.

- Mike Malinowski, Applied Architecture


TURTON CO

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AL REA

m e g Hi n w o t n w do

S T AT E LE

able!

vail A s t i d e x Cr a T c i r o st

1011 10th Street $3,995,000 | 30,000 SF | Downtown, Sacramento Historic Landmark Property a stroll away from the Golden 1 Center, Convention Center, & State Capitol Turton Commercial - 916.573.3314 - Turtoncom.com


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What kinds of spac es get your crea ti ve jui ces flowi ng?

W H AT D E F I N E S A

CREATIVE OFFICE? AARON MARCHAND - VICE PRESIDENT

A Aaron Marchand has worked with many notable urban developers, including Mike Heller, Mark Friedman, AKT properties, Scott Rasmussen, Johan Otto, the Scurfield family, and D&S Development. He’s also been involved in the continued lease-up of several prominent urban projects including MARRS, ICE Blocks, 1811 12th Street, 1001 K Street, and the Ebner Hotel redevelopment project. What are they all asking about? Creative office space. But what makes a workplace a “creative space?”

From left to right: Office space at 2700 J Street, exposed piping in a suite at 1600 H, reception space in the MARRS Building, and the 4th floor mezzanine in Ice Blocks overlooking R Street.

BROOKE: Creative office has been a popular term in commercial real estate. How would you define creative office? AARON: The definition of creative office space has grown over the past couple of years. A creative office embraces an open environment and utilizes raw elements like natural light, original brickwork, wood paneling, exposed beams, aluminum ducts, unique finishes with the goal to use these elements to inspire creativity and to develop an environment that promotes team work, collaboration and synergy between employees and employers. It provides a unique space that inspires imagination and innovation; the space itself is an original and inventive work environment. What types of layouts and amenities are often associated with creative office? In terms of layout, definitely an open concept, open co-working space with huddle rooms. You can still have the traditional offices and conference rooms but develop a third space away from the desk you sit at on a day-to-day basis. Perhaps this is a game area to relieve stress or a lounge area to focus your thoughts in a non-traditional way. And then amenities associated with creative office…definitely nearby restaurants, bars, coffee shops. On-site amenities would be open couches and seating areas, bike lockers, storage, showers, maybe outdoor seating areas that are pet friendly. Providing an enjoyable space for all parts of the work day. Creative office has been largely popularized by companies like

Google and Facebook. What types of tenants do you see seeking creative office space in Sacramento? The tech industry has definitely set a tone for the creative office environment, but we are seeing all industries embrace the creative office concept, motivated mainly from a recruitment and retention standpoint. It is typical for tech and consulting firms to embrace this type of environment but now we are seeing lobbyist, non-profits, and law firms as well. Interesting you mention law firms because you would probably associate them with traditional office use. What type of advantages are they trying to gain with creative office space? Well, firstly, law firms are trying to find every advantage they can get to recruit the best and brightest law school graduates. These are young professionals that are willing to work the long hours mandated by their profession so long as they can truly enjoy the environment in which they work. Creative office space in the urban core satisfies this objective better than any other. Second, law firms must make a profit just like any other business. Attorneys need private areas for client meetings,


specific phone calls and depositions, but 85% of the time a work station is quite sufficient. By maximizing the design and efficiency of their work space a law firm can achieve a much more collaborative and enjoyable environment while also reducing unnecessary leasing costs. How would you forecast the creative office requirement in Sacramento? It will grow. However, we won’t see firms getting rid of private offices all together. The creative office environment has traditional offices, traditional cubicles, and staff areas, but at the same time has other areas to brainstorm, whether that is a smaller or larger conference room, phone rooms, huddle rooms…that “other” space where people can get together to values are averaged

POPULAR

OPEN OFFICE

OPINION

AN IN-OFFICE SURVEY Bet you’d never guess this space is in Old Sacramento! BKWLD is a web design firm with an ultra-modern office in a historic part of town. It features open office (top) and breakout spaces (bottom).

5.56

GAME ROOM

7.11

2.50 WE GAVE FOLKS IN OUR OFFICE 25 POINTS TO DISTRIBUTE AMONGST THE FOLLOWING FIVE TRAITS YOU’D EXPECT TO SEE IN A CREATIVE SPACE

LARGE WINDOWS

4.38 7.44 BREAKOUT AREA

EXPOSED/RAW STRUCTURE

work on projects. This could be in a public format, at an open table or a bean bag circle, or in a private setting where you can make phone calls or have private conversations. What are the benefits of creative office for landlords? The primary economic benefit of collaborative environments for Landlords is more open, less built out space which is re-leasable with minimal cost should a tenant grow out of it and vacate. Additionally, tenants and landlords now work together to create space that maximizes the economic efficiency for both parties while simultaneously creating highly desirable, multi-generational work environments. The tenants have happier employees and improved growth and profitability while landlords get better tenants and reduced capitalized expenses down the road. If tenants are looking for creative office, which buildings would you direct them to? I would target areas versus specific buildings. Midtown is always tried and true. It has the mature landscape, multi-generational businesses, and 80% of the best restaurants, bars, and cafés in the urban core. R Street has the rugged, authentic, Class A warehouse vibe with a lot of art and culture. Downtown is on it’s way there, but many of the older buildings are either being held intentionally vacant or have landlords unwilling to move forward without an anchor tenant. If I had to name a specific project it would be very difficult to identify a more attractive creative space option than Ice Blocks. Huge windows, massive exposed beams, Class A industrial feel, and a completely blank canvas within which to design your space, define your culture, and clarify your brand - all surrounded by the best amenities in the urban core. I also think Old Sacramento is highly underrated. It provides some of the best space, amenities and location at much less cost. Well, thank you Aaron, for giving us a glimpse into Creative Office. I am definitely going to pitch a bean-bag circle at our next company meeting.


now on broadway for sale: 2421-2429 17th street Turton Commercial - 916.573.3305 - Turtoncom.com

8,500 sf - 2 parcels

$2,000,000

investment or owner-user


YO U R

BLANK

C AN VA S 914 2nd Street Sacramento, CA 95814 $2, 395 ,0 0 0 | 2 7 ,9 0 0 S F Turton Commercial Real Estate 916.573.3300 turtoncom.com


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How doe s ar t c hange a pub li c s pa ce?

TH E R I S E O F THE {PUBLIC] SACRAM ENTO

ART SCENE

TONI BUDWORTH, OWNER, BIRKENSTOCK MIDTOWN “Midtown feels very European to me; small owner operated shops in a very walkable community.”

JOHN MUDGETT - SENIOR DIRECTOR

Sacramento’s Renaissance includes its own artistic explosion. The growing art scene in Sacramento’s central city has evolved significantly over the last several years. New and engaging art venues have made Sacramento’s Downtown a destination and have worked to transform its landscape. This transformation has been well documented not only by local journalists, but also by residents active on social media. Second Saturday, The Mural Festival, #ArtHotel, #ArtStreet, Verge Center and the Crocker have all encouraged residents to explore Downtown in a new way. A local journalist for the Sacramento Bee, Nate Miller, has painstakingly documented and categorized over 430 murals (and counting) and incorporated them into an interactive Sacramento map. His efforts have garnered the attention of a larger audience, including the New York Times, who are paying attention to our City’s new narrative: Sacramento is a dynamic, creative and vibrant city. Last year, the Sacramento Mural Festival hosted a weeklong event that brought 12 world class muralists to Sacramento’s central city. These artists added color, excitement and celebration to blank walls. Local onlookers toured the murals and watched their creation. It was art fully engaged by the local community and it was a wild success. The event and the murals were so well received that over 40 murals will be included for this year’s event. Art in Sacramento is multisensory. Prescient art collectives such as M5 Collective, are working on their second and third acts, transforming the city through experiences such as #ArtHotel and #ArtStreet. Visitors can experience art that is multi-faceted and multi-dimensional as they tour life-size installations from local artists. These events color outside the lines of the traditional “art gallery” without the hushes or formalities and allow total freedom by both artist and visitor. Sacramento’s local artists are garnering notoriety of their own. Gale Hart, Micah Crandall Bear, Jose Di Grigorio and Tim Collom are not only selling out at local shows but are being supported on a regional, national and international level. Their works are featured throughout Downtown and yet they all work to keep art accessible and approachable. Verge Center for the Arts recognized the need for contemporary art and art resources

to the Sacramento region through a combination of exhibitions, low or no cost artist workspace, and educational programming. Their 37 low to no cost art studios are full. Prolific infill developers are taking note. Mike Heller is well known for infusing art and architecture into a nondescript industrial warehouse. The MARRS building is now considered the epicenter of the growing Second Saturday art experience. The building is occupied at top-of-the-market rents with some of Midtown’s hottest tenants. Ali Youssefi and CADA renovated and transformed the historic Lawrence Warehouse and incorporated artwork from some of the region’s most accomplished and talented artists, including some of WAL’s own residents. The 116 rental units are 100% occupied with a long waiting list as well. Mark Friedman and the Kings’ investor group have incorporated over $10 Million in world class art into the Downtown Commons and successfully created a place for “neighbors, families and visitors gather to share experiences yearround” (Vivek Ranadive). Building owners are getting involved in the movement as well by supporting local artists and commissioning murals, art installations, architectural elements as a way to differentiate and embellish their commercial spaces. The results are often swift. Incorporating art into commercial spaces often results in a reduction of vacancy and higher rents. Sacramento has always had a hidden artistic character - now that art is coming out into public spaces and making an already-charming city into a gorgeous one.

John proudly shows off one of his favorite murals in Sacramento. It was painted by local artists Shaun Burner and Miguel Perez on the soon-to-open Midtown Cantina in Jazz Alley.

FLOWCHART:

SHOULD YOU HAVE A MURAL PAINTED ON YOUR BUILDING? S TA RT H E R E

No

Own a building?

Yes

Like art?

No

Like happy tenants? No

Yes

Commission a mural

Turton can change that

Yes


70,000 SF O F F I C E / R E TA I L 1 0 0 PA R K I N G S TA L L S

73 0 I

ST

RE

ET

FOR SALE R A R E L A N D M A R K S T RU C T U R E 1 B LO C K F RO M GO L DE N 1 CE NTER

Turton Commercial - 916.573.3300 - Turtoncom.com


T H E P E R FECT LOCAT ION TO

CREAT E YO UR NEX T SPAC E

731 K F OR SALE

16,900 RSF CALL FOR OFFERS DUE FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2017

TURTON COMMERCIAL - 916.573.3300 - TURTONCOM.COM


WP building

THE MISSING piece OFFICE / RETAIL

-

in-line + end-cap

-

2,295-8,908 sf

1025 19th Street, sacramento, ca 95811

TURTON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 916.573.3306 TURTONCOM.COM

J STREET

Everywhere the magenta touches is activated space.

1 9 TH S T R E E T

The WP Building’s potential? Through the roof.

2 0 TH S T R E E T


MIDTOWN | DOWNTOWN CLASS A RETAIL / OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 1,005 - 1,321 SF TURTON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 916.573.3305 TURTONCOM.COM

FULCRUM

1600

H


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O f f i c e l if e c an be mu c h m ore tha n TP S rep orts a nd mi s s i ng red s t apl ers.

“62% of Millennials (born 1980-19951) prefer to live in the type of mixed-use communities found in urban centers where they live in close proximity to a mix of shopping, restaurants and offices. They currently live in urban areas at a higher rate than any other generation.2” Pricewaterhouse Coopers, “NextGen: A Global Generational Study” 2 Nielsen, “Millennials - Breaking the Myths” 1

A NEW KIND OF COMME RCIA L RE A L E S TATE

BRANDING BROOKE BUTLER (MSc Marketing) - VP OF OPERATIONS & MARKETING

It’s being done with residential projects, but lifestyle branding has yet to go big in the commercial realm.

HOW MIDTOWN ARE YOU? Start at zero. Add or subtract points for each answer.

1. YOUR GO-TO COFFEE PLACE IS: A) Old Soul, Temple, Identity, or Insight. (+20) B) Starbucks or Peet’s. (+5) C) Breakroom joe. (-1) D) McCafe. (-15) 2. AFTER WORK, YOU WANT: A) To hit on the Mermaid at Dive Bar. (-10) B) A pitcher of hefeweizen on the LowBrau deck. (+25) C) To race your friend home on your bikes. (+10) D) Some damn peace and quiet. (-20) 3. IT’S LUNCHTIME. HOW DO YOU GET TO IT? A) Via bike purchased on Craigslist. (+15) B) By leisurely stroll beneath the tree canopy. (+10) C) Car. Who has time for walking? (-40) D) Stalking your prey with a slingbow for several days. (-20) CONTINUED ON PAGE 21

On a sunny weekend I was sitting on a Midtown roof sipping on a Ruhstaller with my old college buddies. Our conversation swayed from politics to pop culture, and landed on the topic of Midtown. With sudden clarity I stated “I think I’m a city-person. When did this happen?” I grew up on the rural outskirts of Sacramento riding horses, never dreaming I would desire the urban, inner city lifestyle. I can pinpoint the moment when my mindset began to change. It started when I became employed at Turton Commercial almost five years ago where I was immersed into the heart of it all at 20th & J in the MARRS Building. From PARKing day to 2nd Saturday, there was always something to enjoy during and outside of work. I instantly fell in love with the contagious vibe of Midtown. The art, the food, the buildings, the culture – the Midtown lifestyle had me in its grasp. A few years later I made the move to Midtown in search of the lifestyle that the urban core prescribes. I wasn’t the only one. Over the past few years many of my friends and fellow Millennials have trickled in from various parts of Sacramento to enjoy the live, work, play environment that “the grid” has to offer. So what does my story mean for commercial real estate and for landlords?

WORKING IN MIDTOWN: STATS FROM OUR OFFICE!

4-5 11%

Watch a Kings game. 20%

2-3 78%

Grab a beer on the LowBrau deck. 80%

Bike. 44%

Walk. 33%

0-1 11% HOW MANY DAYS A WEEK DO YOU EAT OUT?

Drive. 22%

AFTER WORK, YOU’D LIKE TO:

ON A NICE DAY, HOW DO YOU COMMUTE TO WORK?

It identifies a new way to market to prospective tenants and their employees. It means taking your building’s story a step further by marketing real estate as a way to support a desired lifestyle. My story identifies lifestyle branding as a burgeoning marketing tool for commercial buildings and developments. In general, lifestyle brands promote a certain lifestyle and addresses consumers’ core values. They reflect and facilitate people’s ways of living and can reap financial benefits by developing and sustaining an emotional and long-term bond with the consumer. Tenants seek space that offers attractive lifestyles because it contributes to branding their firm, creating a desirable company culture, and recruiting and retaining top talent. Lifestyle branding your commercial real estate goes beyond traditional marketing to tap into consumers true desires. When marketing a building for lease it means going further than marketing the available square footage, rent and parking. It means marketing a building as contributing to a preferred lifestyle – a lifestyle where you can walk to your favorite local coffee roaster, ride your bike to work, or grab a craft beer with friends. It also means finding a tenant that adds value to the community and is symbiotic with the existing lifestyle. At Turton Commercial we have identified that marketing is not all about listing a bunch of facts about a building that could be found at the County Assessor’s office. Anyone can do that. We at Turton take the time to identify the benefits and actualized benefits of your building or space to develop a creative marketing piece with a narrative that resonates with target tenants – a marketing piece that conveys ALL that your building has to offer.


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B u il d ou t w ard. B u il d up wa rd. Bui ld. . . downwa rd?

S A C R A M E N TO’ S GROOVY

UNDERGROUND JON LANG - SENIOR DIRECTOR

3 SUBTERRANEAN JOINTS Worth glancing at for inspiration Growth of a city depends of adaptation and creative thinking. Visionaries once raised the entire city nearly ten feet to avoid flooding catastrophe. At the time, the City’s future hinged on the creativeness and acclimation of its residents; a century later, that line of thinking has not changed. Sacramento’s success still cruxes on the innovation and resourcefulness of its restaurateurs, patrons and business owners. The adaptation of the City’s basements is a great example of that vision.

1872 1851-62

DECADE OF DEVASTATING FLOODS RAVAGES SACRAMENTO

SAC TIMELINE

1850

THE GOLD RUSH KICKS OFF

1849 Pic tu r ed: E mp r ess Tavern

CITY IS RAISED BY 10-18 FEET TO AVOID FLOODING. OLD CITY’S GROUND FLOOR BECOMES BASEMENT SPACE

1860

1870

SACRAMENTO DECLARED STATE CAPITAL

1868

COMMERCIAL BASEMENTS ARE VASTLY UNDERUTILIZED 1880

1890

AS CITY EXPANDS EAST, MOST BUILDINGS MADE WITH FLOOD-PROTECTING BASEMENTS

1900


2

1

E MP R E S S TAVE R N

T H E C O I N-O P

The vaulted brick ceilings are stunning; dimly lit chandeliers and oversized, leather-tufted booths create a moody ambiance to enjoy a sizzling steak and cocktail. It feels as though Empress Tavern has been located in a K Street basement, just adjacent to the Crest Theatre, for nearly a century. The basement, much like the rest of Downtown, benefits from surrounding population and economic growth. It’s location on K Street caters to a mix of theater-goers, sports fans, and Downtown employees seeking a one-ofa-kind experience. The basement at 1013 K Street wasn’t always a beautiful restaurant, though. No more than four years ago, the 7,600 square foot basement was used for two smallscreen theaters. No beautiful architecture, no kitchen, and surely no world-class bar. The design and implementation of the brick ceiling is mind-boggling considering the space was effectively a cold shell when the owners took it over. From K Street, the entry is unassuming, yet unique. Perhaps the secrecy and exclusiveness is what fosters the inital allure. Anyone that has been there, however, will tell you that the food, drinks, great service, and environment is what keeps them coming back.

The Coin-Op is a time warp of good fun - the establishment houses over forty classic arcade-style games, including PacMan, Donkey Kong and Street Fighter, all surrounding a massive communal bar that serves up unique cocktails and food. Yet, the business is a relatively new venture, having opened its doors in 2015 after Marilyn’s Bar and Nightclub occupied the space for nearly 16 years. The Coin-Op is an ode to a simpler time. Classic arcade games were often packed into a dimly lit, windowless room where teenagers dumped hard-earned coins into the machines. Arcade games provided a revolutionary style of entertainment at the time, but also, a source of comradery between adolescents. Now, the Coin-Op has taken on a much different role – some patrons’ visit the bar for nostalgic purposes, others stop by while on a date; millennials may stop by with a group of friends for a drink just to say they’ve been there. Regardless, the Coin-Op elicits a sense of togetherness much like allbut-extinct arcade once did.

3

P R E F L I T E LO U NGE

PROPERTY OWNERS ARE RECOGNIZING THE VALUE IN OWNING A BASEMENT THAT CAN BE MADE INTO A UNIQUE SPACE

2010

2020

HAVE AN EMPTY BASEMENT? CALL JON! 916.573.3302

PRESENT

A lobbyist once said that “legislation is actually negotiated and passed over a drink at the Pre Flite Lounge.” I don’t know if that sentiment is true, but if the walls could talk, they might vouch for him. For last forty years, Pre Flite has been a staple in the Downtown Sacramento dive scene, having been located in a subterranean area of the Downtown Plaza for nearly 40 years, right up until the start of construction on the Golden 1 Center. In 2015, Pre Flite found a new home at 1011 10th Street, a stately building planted between J and K Street. Like their preceding location at the Downtown Plaza, Pre Flite adapted an empty, 2,200 square foot basement (that is only accessible from “Jazz Alley”) into a true Sacramento gem. Once inside, the bar is no-frills; there are no windows, neon lights, and eclectic artwork, or craft cocktails. In fact, if you didn’t know where the front door was a, you’d walk right past it. The grit resembles a dying breed of dive bar in Sacramento, as patrons have an expanded array of contemporary food and drink options. Regardless, the intimacy and sub-culture are what make the bar so intriguing to a loyal group of patrons, and those seeking a new urban experience. Pre Flite doesn’t try to compete, but rather, methodically carve its own niche in a retail market that caters broad, mainstream appeal.


> HIGH DENSITY > TRANSIT ORIENTED > LARGE LOTS

LAND FOR DEVELOPMENT NOW AVAILABLE WITH REGIONAL TRANSIT 13TH & R STATION • 65TH & FOLSOM STATION • POWER INN STATION • CALVINE-AUBERRY STATION • BUTTERFIELD STATION • ROYAL OAKS STATION • SWANSTON STATION • FLORIN STATION • MEADOWVIEW STATION • 20TH & R • RIVERSIDE BLVD • POPLAR AVE • WALERGA RD Tur t on Commer cial - 916 . 573. 3 3 0 0 - Tur t oncom .com


SUBURBAN SPACE FOR LEASE 3101 ZINFANDEL DRIVE, RANCHO CORDOVA

± 1,293 - 4,183 SF OFFICE/RETAIL | + 2,500 2ND GENERATION RESTAURANT

Tu r t o n C o m m e r c i a l - 916 . 573 . 3 3 0 0 - Tu r t o n c o m . c o m


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E nj oy ou r Of f ic ial Turton Commerci a l Sleep Ai d:

T R O U B LE SL EEPING?

READ THIS! SCOTT KINGSTON - VICE PRESIDENT

4

THI NGS

You Need to Know About Doing Deals with Public Agencies Leasing space to public agencies can be extremely beneficial to Landlords. Public agencies are a great credit tenant and are reluctant to move. That said, completing a deal with an agency can be challenging unless you are well prepared and advised. At TCRE, we work with some of the region’s biggest public agencies including Placer County, El Dorado County, the Government of Mexico, the City of Sacramento, Regional Transit, RASA and others. After representing public agencies on a wide range of deals from acquiring office space to purchasing animal shelters to acquiring sovereign consulate facilities, we know it can be tricky to identify, negotiate and sign leases with public agencies in your buildings. Here are a few tips to make it easier:

1

ONGOING ADA COMPLIANCE

Unless completely unavoidable, discourage the agency from hiring the contractor to perform the tenant improvement work in your building. Regardless of whether the improvement project is an allowance, a turn-key build out, or a agency-funded project, if the contractor is hired by the agency, the work is required to be public bid. Public bidding for improvement projects will slow construction by at least six months over the landlord hiring the contractor. If the scope of work is clearly defined and priced, it is usually to the landlord’s advantage to perform the tenant improvement work and increases Landlord revenue through earlier occupancy.

Agencies develop their budgets far in advance of making real estate deals. Agencies usually don’t take into account significant future costs that leases typically include like operating expense passthroughs or increases in common area expenses. It is common in private sector leasing for tenants to pay for those operating expenses exceeding an operating expense base year. With public agencies, however, their budgetary process and constraints make it exceedingly difficult to plan and make payments for future operating expense passthroughs. Landlords pushing for traditional base year structures to their leases makes it tough to get leases signed. Instead, the agencies we work with now request that their monthly rent include all future operating expenses. Provided the terms are calculated correctly, this structure becomes a win-win for both landlord and tenant. The agency receives rent predictability, and landlords factor future passthroughs into the rent. There are important variables, for instance property tax increases thru sale, that need to be fully discussed with your advisor.

CLASS A OFFICE VACANCY RATES IN SACRAMENTO 13% 12% 11% Q3 ‘14

Q4 ‘14

Q1 ‘15

Q2 ‘15

Q3 ‘15

2

TENANT IMPROVEMENT PROCESS

Q4 ‘15

Q1 ‘16

Q2 ‘16

Q3 ‘16


LARGEST EMPLOYMENT INDUSTRIES IN DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

Public Admin 48% Science & Tech 17%

4. GETTING DRESSED FOR WORK, YOU: A) Slip on a pair of fitted pants and an H&M sweater. (+15) B) Step into your cavernous “classic fit” suit and risk getting blown away by a freak wind gust. (-20) C) Roll up one pantleg. (+15) D) Slip into a satin robe Only - a satin robe. (-15)

Hospitality & Food 7% Healthcare 5% Information 4% Other 19%

3

OPERATING EXPENSE & RENT PREDICTABILITY

4

Agencies that are considered “special revenue” – or departments that aren’t funded by the general fund are reimbursed for leasing expenses by the federal government. In return for rent reimbursement, the federal government requires these spaces to be ADA compliant throughout the term of the lease, and will perform ADA audits of agencies receiving rental reimbursement. If the federal government finds the site is not compliant, or has not been brought up to compliance after notification, they can reduce or withhold rent reimbursement to that agency. Prior to lease execution, we recommend that a landlord hire a CASp (Certified Access Specialist) inspector to study the scope of work required to bring the space, the building and the common areas into compliance. Because of this requirement, we suggest that landlords factor in ADA compliance reserves into their rent calculations to accommodate for future compliance expenditures during the term of the agency’s lease. This reduces capital expenditure risk that the landlord would otherwise face - having to perform upgrades that wouldn’t be paid back by the agency’s rent. Most importantly, so long as the space and the property remains in compliance, landlords limit their exposure to the federal government reducing the rent reimbursement to the agency (and ultimately to their landlord). NUMBER OF CALIFORNIA ADA SUITS FILED 10K

105.7%

9,373 7,330

75%

5K

27.9%

2016

2015

% CHANGE % CHANGE FROM 2015 FROM 2011

25%

AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS This one is always the topic that causes the most heartburn. Subsidiaries of the State of California are required to have the ability to terminate their lease. This language is inserted into every lease they sign: “The tenant’s business operations are funded by federal, state, county, local, and/or private foundations. Notwithstanding any provisions in this Lease, if during the Term of the Lease, the funding sources reduce, eliminate, withhold, fail to allocate, or make unavailable to Tenant sufficient funds for Tenant’s continued operations and/or administration of programs at the Premises or to meet the obligations of this Lease, Tenant shall have the right to terminate this Lease upon ninety (90) days written notice of such termination to Landlord.” At first glance, many landlords (and lenders) think this means that they are signing a 90day lease with a rolling right to terminate. But there is some silver lining to this seemingly tough requirement. First, it is rare that a public agency exercises this option. Second, landlords can wrap this requirement with protections that reimburse them for outof-pocket expenses (free rent, improvements and commissions) as well as limited monetary penalties in the event the agency does terminate the lease. Lastly, there are many lenders that have familiarity with and the capacity to underwrite the purchase of, or a tenant improvement project for an agency leased space or building. At TCRE we are very familiar with the various lenders and which are best suited for properties with public agency tenancy. In summary, even with its unique challenges, leasing to agencies can be rewarding. They renew their leases more often than private sector tenants, and their credit worthiness is usually very solid resulting in higher property values. We look forward to advising you on how to structure your next lease with a public agency.

5. YOUR MEETING IS AT: A) Claim Jumper, over Coors Light. (-5) B) Their office, catered by Subway. (-5) C) Your office, catered by Paragary’s. (+15) D) The MARRS Building’s deck. (+15) 6. A SHOW IS HAPPENING NEAR YOU TONIGHT! IT’S: A) A deep house DJ playing in a closed-off street. (+30) B) A reggae group at Ace of Spades. (+10) C) A Jefferson Airplane cover band at the G1c. (+5) D) An Insane Clown Posse show in Marysville. (-35) 7. WHAT WAS THAT LOUD NOISE OUTSIDE?: A) A gunshot? (-20) B) The train passing by. (+20) C) Lawnmowers. (-5) D) The Brew Bike aka “pedalpowered woo-machine.” (+25) 8. YOU ______ SUPPORT SAC REPUBLIC FC: A) Do. (+20) B) Do not. (-20)

150+

Midtown by nature! You should be proud to be so much cooler than everyone else. Here’s an Urban Outfitters gift card, hipster.

70-149

Decently Midtownian. Definitely some areas you can improve in, but you may be more comfortable off the grid.

<70

Stay in the suburbs.


M

A

R


Heller Pacific

R

S 1050 20TH STREET S AC R A M E N T O, C A 9 5 8 1 1

LATTE FOAM. BIKE TIRE. LEATHER SATCHEL. POLISHED CONCRETE. IRON PIPES. EXPOSED BEAMS. TREE SHADE. STRING LIGHTS. HEFEWEIZEN. MUSHROOM QUESADILLA. GUITAR BY THE STEPS. VEGETABLE MARKET. SKINNY JEANS. EXTRA LARGE SLICE. SLIGHT CHUCKLE. COOL BREEZE. BOWTRUSS ROOF. ELECTRONIC BASSLINE. BAMBOO. CURED VENISON. PEOPLE WATCHING. OXFORD WINGTIPS. FLATWEAVE RUG. BRATWURST. RAYBANS. STREET FESTIVAL. ----THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NO DENYING THAT THE MARRS BUILDING IS THE EPICENTER OF MIDTOWN.

CALLING RAD TENANTS! Office or Retail 1,020 SF - 1,093 SF $3.00/SF/Month NNN Turton Commercial Real Estate 916.573.3305 turtoncom.com


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How do YOU piec e t h e ci ty a p a rt?

TH E M I D TO WN-DOW NTOW N

INVISIBLE WALL KEN TURTON - PRESIDENT

B Between Midtown and Downtown, there lies a defined boundary: 16th Street. Ken Turton elaborates on what has historically contributed to this perception and how recent activity has started to blur the line between the two parts of town.

“As a 4th generation native Sacramento business owner, what I like about Midtown is that it offers the best of Sacramento’s past, present and future. My office in Midtown Sacramento is across the street from Sutter’s Fort where Sacramento began over 175 years ago” - Ed Pierini, Pierini Accountancy CPA

The Downtown grid is sliced in half by the geat boundary: 16th Street.

BROOKE: How would you describe the vibe of the Downtown market from a commercial real estate perspective? KEN: It’s changing. Everything south of N Street, north of I Street and west of 16th Street is beginning to blend into a commercial district of continuity featuring a diverse, eclectic culture and very cool properties. No question the R Street Corridor is setting the tone. The C3 District north of N, South of I and west of 16th St is redefining itself. Increasing residential and retail development within these zones is attracting more attention to the vacant, blighted buildings with potential for redevelopment. This has been a market traditionally dominated by government related business and professional law firms, but now all business disciplines are seeking creative opportunities in this district. Within commercial real estate there seems to be a distinct difference between being located in the Midtown and Downtown markets. Would you agree? Do tenants agree? Every pocket within the urban core has its own “Vibe.” I, J, K, L and Capitol Avenue in Midtown have a different vibe than the Sutter District, McClatchy District, and Broadway. The R Street Corridor is completely different than the Capitol district or Capitol Mall or I, J , K and L Streets or Old Sacramento in the Downtown core. The beauty is that

each of these areas provides its own unique amenities, buildings and opportunities to define your brand and business culture. With 10,000 residential units targeted for the urban core over the next 9 years (2,000 already completed or under construction) there is no question there will be continued migration to the urban core and any one of these districts will provide investors with a solid long term opportunity if they make good decisions. The Street Car and revised Light Rail system will provide significant public transportation advantages for all of these districts but particularly Downtown and even West Sacramento. Sure, Midtown is amazing. We all know Midtown has set the bar high. But R Street, Alkali Flats, the Mansion District, Old Sacramento and the Downtown core are all equally as special in their own way and all present great opportunities for both landlords and tenants. What projects are leading the charge in blurring the boundary separating Midtown and Downtown? Mike Heller and Mark Friedman have always set the pace for integrating the Midtown and Downtown markets into one cool experience. You could argue they began the entire redevelopment renaissance with their conversion of the Elliot Building at 16th and J Street which was technically on the Downtown side. They followed that up with MARRS


at 20th and J Street and now Ice Blocks at 16th and R Street. These are without question the categorical leaders in providing the best work experience for employers and employees. From a retail perspective Heller and Friedman are joined by the Cordano Family, David S Taylor Developments, D & S Development and Paul Petrovich. From a residential perspective, no developer or organization has done more than CADA and SHRA and their partners include SKK Development, CFY Development, Ravel Rasmussen Properties and D & S Development. At this point, no one has yet been able to duplicate the full live/work/play success of Heller and Friedman. How do you see the future of the Urban Core? All of the districts I mentioned have unique and highly desirable value propositions. I think the most interesting paradigm shift will occur in the Class A highrise market. A lot of the activity we currently see in the market is coming from these projects and it is going to be very interesting

to see how they reinvent themselves to successfully compete against “work experience” or “lifestyle” based projects in Midtown, R Street and soon throughout the Downtown core. With the City of Sacramento Parking Management system now evening the playing field for those older properties with scant or no parking options, it may actually be much less expensive for creative redevelopment projects to make it in the urban core than Class A high-rises unless they adapt. In addition, we know of many very cool and unique properties available in each urban district that may be available for acquisition over the next 3 - 24 months. Timing and market knowledge are critical to both buyer and seller. There are a myriad of variables both now and in future that influence true value and it is imperative to consult with a knoweldgeable resource before making a decision. Also worth noting is that 40% of our firm’s deals last year were off-market transactions.

D O W NTOW N

MIDTOWN

Simply comparing two street-level images of Downtown (top) and Midtown (bottom) reveals the difference in population, tree coverage, and overall vibe. Downtown is more urban and loud while Midtown is calm and quiet beneath the tree canopy.


PlAnt your

ROOTS

in midtown

Net Rentable - 9,600 SF Parking - 19 Stalls

819 19th street $2,100,000 Tur t on Commer cial - 916 . 573. 3 3 0 6 - Tur t oncom .com

819 19th St - Building 1925 H St- Parking Lot


2110 L

ST. ANTON CORNER RETAIL FOR LEASE 3,100 SF 2ND GENERATION RESTAURANT

H i g h - Visib ilit y

TURTON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE 916.573.3305 | TURTONCOM.COM

Corner Location!


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Dow nt ow n Sac ramen to’s next b i g fronti er!

S O M E TH I N G O LD

SOMETHING NEW JON LANG - SENIOR DIRECTOR

Old Sacramento may very well be Downtown Sacramento’s best kept secret. As a firm that has sold and/or leased over 600 properties in the “Grid” we are extremely familiar with some of the coolest building renovations in the urban core. Rest assured: if you take a tour of the opportunities presented in Old Sacramento you will not be disappointed. A handful of Sacramento’s “coolest” architectural spaces are located in The Waterfront District. However, if the contemporary and eclectic spaces themselves are not enough, you are also surrounded by a myriad of Sacramento’s finest restaurants including Rio City Café, Firehouse, Ten22, and Fats. Complimenting these restaurants is a growing, grab-n-go food base that includes sandwiches, pizza, burgers, and salads. A common misconception about the area is a lack of parking, although, it is actually quite the opposite. With the City of Sacramento’s new Parking Management System, there is always plenty of parking located within a block of any single building in the Waterfront District. Furthermore, one of the City’s most underutilized parking garages – The Tower Bridge Garage - is located at the primary Capitol Mall entrance to the submarket. If you’re a cyclist, you won’t even need parking though. The west end of the American River Bike Trail runs the entire length of the Old Sacramento waterfront! Lastly, and most importantly, the proximity to Sacramento’s most exciting developments is unsurpassed. The Waterfront District in Old Sacramento boasts efficient access to West Sacramento and The Bridge District, Capitol Mall, and the Railyards. A pedestrian walkway connects historic K Street and Downtown Commons; the Tower Bridge links the area to Raley Field. Employees can grab dinner at Rio City Café and walk to a concert. Business owners can host a client for dinner at The Firehouse and then head to a Kings game. Great space, great amenities, great parking, and great location for nearly 37% less than the cost of similar space in Midtown and Downtown! If you are considering relocating in Sacramento, be sure to consider your options at the Waterfront District in Old Sacramento.

GOLDE N 1 CE NTE R & DOWNTOWN COMMONS

WA LK WAY

OLD S A CRA ME NT0

Going clockwise: The Haywood Building, the What Cher House, and The Fratt Building. All three boast floors ready for creative tenants!


BKWLD & WU - 120 K St - Old Sacramento

Old Sacramento

Creatively Reimagined Downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next frontier. Lease a space that embodies Sacramentoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past and celebrates its future. 100% of the amenities, 63% of the cost. Walking distance to Golden 1 Center, Doco, Capitol Mall, Railyards & Raley Field.

turtoncom.com

916.573.3300


300 C A P I T O L M A L L S A C R A M E N T O , C A

CLASS A CREATIVE OFFICE / RETAIL SPACE IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SAC FOR LEASE 7,910 SF Negotiable Lease Rate Turton Commercial Real Estate 916.573.3305 turtoncom.com


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Tu r t o n C o m m e r c i a l R e a l E s t a t e

ABOUT TURTON We a r e a b o u t i q u e f i r m m a d e u p o f f r e s h a g e n t s a n d o u t o f t h e b ox m a r k e t e r s w i t h a p a s s i o n f o r S a c r a m e n t o. We t o r e d o w n t h o s e d i v i s i v e o f f i c e w a l l s a n d c r e a t e d a c o l l a b o ra t i v e w o r k e n v i r o n m e n t w h e r e all information is shared to benefit our clients and t h e i r r e a l e s t a t e . We r e c o g n i z e t ra d i t i o n , y e t e m b ra c e t h e f u t u r e – w e a r e a f i r m c o m p r i s e d o f C R E pioneers that think beyond the scope of work to get t h e jo b d o n e .

craft W e t a k e o u r c r a f t s e r i o u s l y. Q u a l i t y, k n o w l e d g e , a t t e n t i o n t o d e t a i l . I t ’s w h a t w e d o .

Whether tenant or landlord, buyer or seller we combine industry knowledge, know-how and resources with creativity, hard work and a relentless passion to beat client expectations to yield results. Contact us anytime to discuss the perfect property for your firm or how to maximize the value of your own property. Interested in learning about the market or working for Turton Commercial? Let’s grab a coffee at Temple or a beer at LowBrau. Our treat.

creativity Not a word usually associated with commercial real estate. We are changing that.

character W h e t h e r i t s p e o p l e w e w o r k f o r, o r people who work for us, we value p a s s i o n , h a r d w o r k a n d h o n e s t y.

© 2017 This information has been secured from sources believed to be reliable. Any projections, opinions, assumptions or estimates used are for example only and do not constitute any warranty or representation as to the accuracy of the information. All information should be verified through an independent investigation by the recipient, prior to execution of legal documents or purchase, to determine the suitability of the property for their needs. Logos and/or pictures are displayed for visual purposes only and aare the property of their respective owners.


2015 TURTON BACKPACKING TRIP - HALF DOME,YOSEMITE

TYLER + JOSIE JERDE!

LAST WEEKEND - ZOCALO, MIDTOWN

KEN TURTON

PRESIDENT - #01219637 916.573.3300 K ENTURTON@TURTONCOM.COM

AARON MARCHAND VICE PRESIDENT - #01711650

916.573.3305 A ARONMARCHAND@TURTONCOM.COM

QUICK TURTON INFO

OUR SERVICES Landlord Representation Tenant Representation Buyer Representation Seller Representation Building Valuations Market Updates Property Management

CONTACT US MIDTOWN 2409 L Street, Ste 200 Sacramento, CA 95816 916.573.3300 ROSEVILLE 9700 Village Center Dr, Ste 50H G r a n i t e B a y, C A 95746 916.849.1514 TURTONCOM.COM

SCOTT KINGSTON

VICE PRESIDENT - #01485640 916.573.3309 SCOT TKINGS TON@TURTONCOM.COM

BROOKE BUTLER

VP - OPERATIONS & MARKETING 916.573.3301 BROOK EBUTLER@TURTONCOM.COM

JON LANG

SENIOR DIRECTOR - #01934934 916.573.3302 JONL ANG@TURTONCOM.COM

JOHN MUDGETT

SENIOR DIRECTOR - #01765754 916.573.3306 JOHNMUDGET T@TURTONCOM.COM

JOSIE JERDE

SENIOR DIRECTOR - #01344316 916.8 49.1514 JOSIE JERDE@TURTONCOM.COM

TYLER JERDE

SENIOR DIRECTOR - #01814608 916.990.49 49 T YLER JERDE@TURTONCOM.COM

PATRICK STELMACH DIRECTOR - #01964999

916.573.3314 PATRICKS TELMACH@TURTONCOM.COM

COREY LAU

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 916.573.330 4 CORE YL AU@TURTONCOM.COM SCOTT & AARON - SANTA BARBARA


TURTON

Profile for Turton Commercial Real Estate

GRID Magazine  

An in-house magazine publication made entirely by the Turton team.

GRID Magazine  

An in-house magazine publication made entirely by the Turton team.