Page 1

Western Maine Foothills THE

www.centralmainetoday.com

Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving over 200,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!

A Product of

Western Maine’s Only Direct Mailed Newspaper.

Directly mailed to the residents of Rumford, Mexico, Dixfield, E. Dixfield, Greenwood, A Maine Owned Company

Bryant Pond, Roxbury, Peru, Andover, E. Andover January 2016 • Volume 18, Issue 6 • Just Good News Since 1992

Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: articles@turnerpublishing.net • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net

Forestdale Christian School Hits the Slopes

Hanna Young of Oxford learns to ski with Mt Abram instructor Glenna Oliver.

Little Red Hen Sophia Mason of West Paris boards the magic carpet assisted by Mt Abram lift attendant Barry Nevel. Following her is instructor Steve Mahoney.

& Sushi Restaurant 100+ BEERS & FULL BAR OVER 30 BEERS ON DRAFT

ValenƟne’s Specials

Take your Sweetheart Out for Breakfast Friday, February 12th

Hanna Young of Oxford learns to ski with Mt Abram instructor Glenna Oliver.

20% OFF 2 ENTREES FROM 5ͳ7PM Sat/Sun, Feb 13 & 14

10% OFF BREAKFAST AND FREE COFFEE

with the purchase of 2 entrees from 8am-11am Skiers and Snowmobilers Welcome! Conveniently located on Rt 2 midway between Sunday River and Black Mountain ski areas and just off the ITS #12 snowmobile trail.

369-0810 HOURS: Mon- Fri 8am-7pm, Sat & Sun 7am-2pm

Check out our Weekly Specials Featuring: Korean Sushi Vietnamese

NEW SPECIALS EVERY WEEK! on Monday/Tuesday’s ORDER A MEAL ($12.95 or more) and receive A PORK DUMPLING APPETIZER at 1/2 OFF

SENIORS GET 10% OFF

Eat in or Take Out Open Every Day Hours 11AM-10PM. Delivery Anywhere in Farmington Gift Certicates Available located at: 103 Narrow Gauge Square, Farmington • 778-0790

Order online at www.thaismileandsushi.com

Diner & Bakery 12 South Main St., Andover

Welcome Snowmobilers! Warm up with hot soup & chowders.

5:00pm-8:00pm Reservations Required. 3 Course Meal. Choice of Prime Rib, Seared Scallops, Maple Glazed Salmon or Rosemary Pork Roast. $17.99 pp.

Hours: 6:30am-2pm Wed -Thurs 6:00am- 8pm Fri • 6:00am-2pm Sat 7:00am-2pm Sun • Closed Mon & Tue

392- CAKE (2253)


Page 2

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

Noyes Mountain Indiegogo Campaign Launch A true community effort, the Western Foothills Land Trust (WFLT) will launch its Noyes Mountain Indiegogo Campaign on the first day of winter, December 22nd. This is the first crowdfunding campaign the Land Trust has launched. The campaign will be located at www.indiegogo.com/campaigns/noyes-mountainpreserve. The campaign goal is to protect the mountain

Elsemore Dixfield Family Medicine Committed to caring for the whole person and treating the whole family, our practice offers specialty services such as obstetrics and pediatrics in addition to primary care. We provide high quality, continuous care, close to home in a warm and welcoming setting. MEET OUR FRIENDLY TEAM

Care for the Whole Person, Whole Family WHY CHOOSE ELSEMORE DIXFIELD? • Your entire family can be seen in one location eliminating the need for multiple health care providers or facilities. • With you every step of the way through primary, obstetric, pediatric and geriatric care.

Anne M. Johnson, M.D. Family Medicine: Accepting Obstetric and Pediatric Patients

Gary S. Rivard, D.O. Family Medicine: Accepting New Patients

• You become part of our family, and we become part of yours. Strong, long term patient-provider relationships help keep you and your family healthy. • We emphasize whole person, whole family preventative care. CONTACT US

by raising $270,000 towards the purchase of the 295 acre Noyes Mountain parcel in Greenwood. The purchase will forever protect the iconic view of the undeveloped mountain that frames the northern view down the reach of Norway Lake, a view that is enjoyed by at least 8000 vehicles traveling on Routes 117/118 according to MDOT statistics every day. The purchase will also protect public access to magnificent views from the 1,500’ summit, dramatic ledges, 1000’ of stream habitat, 14 acres of working fields, and 280 acres of working forestland in a large block of woodlands providing significant habitat for wildlife. The Noyes parcel also provides habitat for rare plants and two rare natural communities. The Trust will provide trails for bikers, horseback riders, runners, snowshoers, skiers, rock hounds, and hikers. The Trust will continue to allow hunting. In addition, the Trust will provide public programs like bird walks and snowshoe walks and will manage the natural resources conscientiously. The Trust will keep the land in current use tree-growth taxbasis. Executive Director Lee Dassler worked with Zizi Vlaun of the Center for an Ecology Based Economy (CEBE) to build an Indiegogo campaign for WFLT. Norway videographer Jack Gentempo has filmed and edited a 4-minute video for the campaign. The video includes footage from hikes up the mountain, from Route 117, from Main Street in Norway, and from the viewpoint at Roberts Farm Preserve. The video features people from the

community and will resonate with everyone in the Oxford Hills. In the video Andrea Burns from Norway Downtown speaks about the importance of protecting our built and natural environment and the link between conservation and economic revitalization. WFLT Director Lee Dassler talks about the Land Trust and the parcel’s conservation and recreation significance. Dyk Eusden, Bates Geology Dept., speaks about the geological origins of the mountain and resultant gems and minerals found on site. Norway Lakes Association volunteer and summer resident Susan Jacoby spoke about the Lake Pennesseewassee watershed and the relationship between Noyes Mountain and the lake. The Hodgkin children, who live at the base of the mountain on Richardson Hollow Road chime in about the recreational benefits of protecting the mountain: running up, running down, sliding, skiing, and snow shoeing. The campaign runs for 60 days and will culminate after this year’s Mellie Dunham Snowshoe Festival which will be held during the Great Maine Outdoor Weekend February 12-14. The Trust is counting on the local community to spread the word to people who care about the preservation of wildlife habitat, treasure significant views, and value access to recreational trails. With community support, the Western Foothills Land Trust will protect the summit of Noyes Mountain for generations to come. For more information about the campaign, you can visit their website at wfltmaine.org n

Thank You

Thank you to the Front Porch Cafe in Dixfield. Sammie Angel and clint take pride in supporting Hope Association Mission and Values. They recently recognized the career path, all

the hard work and professionalism of all our direct support professionals. Congradulations to Gerry Ramsdall as the winner of the drawing for a Gift Certificate to Front Porch Cafe.n

If you would like to learn more about Elsemore Dixfield Family Medicine or schedule an appointment, please call us. 207-562-4226. Stephanie F. Sinclair, M.D. Family Medicine: Accepting Obstetric and Pediatric Patients

Joline Stevens, F.N.P. Family Medicine: Accepting New Patients

46 Weld Street Dixfield, ME 04224

207-562-4226 OFFICE HOURS 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday www.rumfordhospital.org

Left to Right: Catherine Johnson ED of Hope Association, Sammie Angle, and Clint


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, it’s a good time to be thinking about family. Consider delving more deeply into your genealogy. Research your roots, and you may be surprised at what you discover. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 All that hard work you have been putting in will finally start to pay off, Taurus. It’s quite possible you will receive some good news soon. Don’t forget to go out and celebrate. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, major changes could be coming your way and they likely involve your home life. Get ready for a big move or some major renovations to your home. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 This week your thinking could be even sharper than ever. It’s a good time to make plans that affect your future, including those pertaining to education or employment.

Page 3

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 If you let your imagination take over, you just may find others are more receptive to this creative way of expressing yourself, Leo. Use every trick to your advantage.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, the hectic pace you have been keeping may be catching up with you. It will be difficult to keep this up for much longer, so start to pare down your responsibilities.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, a recent project of yours could bring about some deserved recognition. It doesn’t matter if it is at work or home, being honored can feel good.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 You may receive a call, text or email today that turns your life in a new direction, Pisces. Just wait for all of those doors to open for you.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, if you feel inspired to express yourself in creative ways this week, go for it. Others may appreciate your sense of humor and may commend you for making them feel better.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, a new visitor or someone from your past may put you in touch with another who could make a difference in your life right now. Changes will spring up rapidly. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Your thoughts may shift to more positive horizons, and your resulting optimism will prove attractive to others. Spread good cheer to as many people as you can. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Listen closely during all conversations, Capricorn. You can always jot down notes later if you really need to remember something in particular. Paying attention this week is crucial.

JANUARY 24 Ed Helms, Actor (42) JANUARY 25 Alicia Keys, Singer (35) JANUARY 26 Wayne Gretzky, Athlete (55) JANUARY 27 Rosamund Pike, Actress (37)

JANUARY 28 Sarah McLachlan, Singer (48) JANUARY 29 Marc Gasol, Athlete (31) JANUARY 30 Christian Bale, Actor (42)

Crossword CLUES ACROSS 1. Engine additive 4. Soluble ribonucleic acid 8. Subdue 10. One long, three short 11. Morally bad 12. With collapsible shelter 13. Central church parts 15. Summer shoes 16. Intestinal 17. Transgressors 18. Meeting expectations 21. Clutch 22. Autonomic nervous system 23. What you can repeat immediately after perceiving it 24. Favorite summer sandwich 25. An accountant certified by the state 26. Cologne 27. Norma Jean Baker 34. Galaxies 35. Bluish greens 36. Detected

37. Having 3 dimensions 38. Made level 39. The destroyer (Hindu) 40. Uncovered 41. Ooze slowly 42. Aerie 43. Point midway between S and SE CLUES DOWN 1. Having beautiful natural views 2. Fanafuti is the capital 3. Shrub used for hedges 4. Polishing tools 5. Slow down 6. Christmas carols 7. & & & 9. Sound of sheep or goat 10. A long flag, often tapering 12. Atomic #73 14. Schilling (abbr.)

15. Female sibling 17. Long sandwich 19. In a way, necessitated 20. Mayan people of SW Guatemala 23. Cleaned up 24. Prohibit 25. Upright cupboard 26. Cyclone center 27. Metric linear units 28. Young male 29. Securities market 30. City across from Dusseldorf 31. Animal disease 32. Mount of __ east of Jerusalem 33. Get free 34. Variable stars 36. One point N of NE

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? Winter’s coming and the time to plan for cold weather guests is now.

This winter, our highly trained vermin can shovel out the all necessary pathways beneath your home, allowing easy access for a variety of small critters to ravage all your food and still manage to chew every last bit of electrical wiring available for the next 8 months. We’re small, and it may take a while, but we’ll get the job done.

Varment Ventures http://picsphotosimages.blogspot.com/search/label/comic

Thanks for reading our paper!

The deadline for our next issue is February 9th. Please send your articles or community news to articles@turnerpublishing.net. You can submit ads to advertising@turnerpublishing.net.

RADCO

399 South Rumford Rd, Rumford, 207-240-0794 • radco399@gmail.com credit cards accepted Advanced Dentistry With A Soft Touch!

KAY Advanced

Dental Concepts 32 Main Street Livermore Falls, Maine 897-4444 - 778-6383 www.drkay.com yvonne@drkay.com


Page 4

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

Woodpeckers at the Care Center Carleen Cote Among the woodpeckers of Maine are the hairy, downy, pileated and, two not usually thought of as woodpeckers, the yellow-shafted flicker and the yellow-bellied sap sucker. All species have resided at our Care Center. They are a joy to care for, very vociferous and quite the characters. Several years ago I received a call from a woman who excitedly told me she’d found a nest that had been blown from a tree by high winds. I instructed her to put the young birds in a strawberry box or basket and hang it in a tree, then watch to see if the female retured to care for them. Her response

was, “Are you kidding? These birds will never fit in a basket!” That afternoon, her daughter delivered the birds to me: three chubby, raucous flickers. I fed them a specially-prepared diet, and their twittering and calling filled the house with song. Very soon, they were feathered out and ready to be moved to the aviary. I continued to hand-feed them, however, and added a container of food to start the weaning process. They were subsequently joined by a young robin that screamed for food whenever it spied me out in the yard. The flickers would join in the screaming, reminding me that they, too, were ready to be fed! In no time, the young birds were weaned and ready for release. On release day, one of the flickers flew away, never

to return. The robin and remaining two flickers stayed in the area, returning several times a day screaming for refills on a plate I’d set out. One of the flickers would fly to me as soon as I stepped out of the door, as if to urge me to hurry a little faster with the food. Soon, their visits became less frequent and eventually stopped. Once we received two pileated woodpeckers. These rescues were deemed necessary as cats were reported prowling around their nest which was 60 feet up in a tree. The birds were a delight to work with. Their diet, feeding schedule and weaning were the same as those of the flickers and, after their release, they also remained at the center, flying around and screaming to be fed. The male left earlier; the

female remained longer and continued to beg for food. She then began searching for her own worms, her pecking resonating throughout the neighborhood. However, her targets were not hollow, rotting trees, instead, they were the roofs of the house and garage, the tops of the gates, power poles and even our heads! She would fly into the garage and up to the attic, where she destroyed the window screens. She had become so destructive that, reluctantly, we knew we had to move her to a more wooded area. We caught her and placed her near friends, who promised to watch out for her and provide food to supplement her search for worms. However, the bird had no intention of relinquishing her association with humans. She continued to

Pileated woodpecker.

beg for food and search for worms – in a picnic table! At last, her visits diminished, but her rata-tat-tat continued to be heard as she searched for worms – in the forest! Note: Carleen and Donald Cote operate the Duck Pond Wildlife Care

Center on Rt. 3 in Vassalboro, Maine, a non-profit facility, supported entirely by the Cotes’ own resources and outside donations. Call the Cotes at 445-4326 or write them at 1787 N. Belfast Ave., Vassalboro, ME 04989n

Dimension Lumber • Log Cabin Supplies • Planed & Rough Lumber • Custom Sawing & Planing • Bridge Materials • Rough Hemlock Beams • Spray Foam Insulation

STANDARD

6” V-MATCH for .52 cents a linear foot When Available

85 Jug Hill Rd., Livermore Falls • 897-9973

WINTER IS HERE! • Test Battery • Winter Tires Mounted and Balanced • Antifreeze Check Authorized emergency roadside “you call, we haul!”

SALES & SERVICE

GET ON B

OARD!

364-3700 • 1-800-270-3701 486 PROSPECT AVE - RUMFORD TOP OF THE FALLS ON ROUTE 2 GREAT DEALS ON USED CARS, TOO!!!

CALL FOR UPCOMING CLASSES! Tractor Trailer • Class B • School Bus DRIVER TRAINING COURSES

Join the Professionals w/ A Good Paying Job.

High Job Placement Rate

Permit Preparation • Air Brake Adj. Certification Hazardous Material and Tanker Endorsement VA Approved • Maine Certified Instructors Loaded Trailers • Defensive Driving Competency Based Curriculum

Region 9

377 River Road, Mexico, ME 04257

A Good Paying Career is Right Down The Road

364-3764 • 369-9058 • 369-0150 email: bigrig377@region9school.org

From left: Gerald Tinggueelyy, MD F M ; Ti T m Da Davi vis, is, PAA C; Dee eedr draa Be Berk rkey rk ey,, RN ey R ; and d poodi diat a rist Zac acha hary ry Blakeman, DPM. Bl

Wound Care Specialty Services

F

ranklin Memorial Hospital’s outpatient wound care services offer a complete review of you and your wound, followed by a carefully designed treatment plan with some of the most advanced treatment options available.

Dr. Gerald Tinguely, a physician assistant, and registered nurses trained in wound care, provide advanced therapies for vascular, diabetic, non-healing, surgical, traumatic, and infected wounds, as well as a variety of ulcers needing wound care. Services are provided on the hospital’s second floor. Podiatrist Dr. Zachary Blakeman, who practices at Franklin Health Orthopaedics, also provides wound care services. The medical practice is furnished with a podiatry chair specially designed for treating patients with wounds of the foot and ankle. If you have a wound that isn’t getting better, contact your primary care provider to see if wound care specialty services are right for you.

111 Franklin Health Commons Farmington, Maine

Hospital-based Wound Care Services: 779-2539 Podiatry Wound Care Services: 778-9001

www.fchn.org


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

PBIS Team Recognizes Students

The PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention and Support) team recognized Mountain Valley High School students for their positive behaviors at a school-wide assembly. Team member and Freshman Academy teacher Marsha Burns explained, “At MVHS, we have four keys to success – be safe, be respectful, be responsible and be involved. These students have demonstrated through their actions that they understand these behavior traits. They earned at least one blue card during the trimester.” Blue cards are the way teachers at MVHS recognize students for positive behaviors. For example, teachers may send a blue

card home when a student helps another student or when a student makes a choice to support a positive school climate. Then Burns announced 25 randomly-drawn students from among those who received at least one blue card. The seniors were Kyle Bartlett, Valerie DeRoehn, and Kayla Lauzier. The juniors included Chelsea Allison, Natalie Inglis, Kaleb Knapp, Julia Perry, and Cole St. Laurent. The sophomores are Emma Casey, Vanessa Cote, Chris Glover, Katelyn Gross, Jonathan Hodge, Alyvia Lee, Harley McNally, Alexa Phillips and Cara Shackley. Finally, the freshman named included Jacob Blanchard,

Bryce Cormier, Wendy Ducas, Cameron Gallant, Eric Hodsdon, Larissa Laskey, Tylar Pickering, and Skyler Santillo. The students received a gift certificate for food at Subway, MacDonald’s or Pizza Hut. In addition to Burns, members of the PBIS team include librarian Mary Gamble, guidance secretary Debi Briggs, social studies teacher Dan Hodge, substitute education technician Leanne Virgin, and assistant principal Al Cayer. Michael Phelps, who works for the Fitch Company, is a community member on the team. Special education director Clarissa Fish supervises the program for RSU 10. n

Bonnie White Receives President’s Award

Otis Vance, Interim Director and Director of Financial Services presents Bonnie with The MCHP President’s Award.

Maine College of Health Professions graduated 42 nursing students in a ceremony at Lewiston Middle School. This is the first class to graduate under this new program. Bonnie white, daughter of Joseph and Rebecah White of Rumford received the MCHP President's Award for the senior student attaining the highest academic achievement in nursing. It was presented by Otis Vance, interim Director and Director of Financial Services for the college. Bonnie is now employed by Rumford Hospitaln

What would you rather be doing? Just a hunch, but we don't think it's banking At Franklin Savings Bank, we make it easy for you to bank when it's convenient to YOU!

Introducing ... Franklin eBranch

On the go!

Mobile banking where and when you want it!

Anyone registered to use Franklin eBranch online banking is good to go!

The Franklin eBranch On The Go! app is available FREE for iPhone®, iPad®, and Android® devices, including the Kindle Fire®, from the iTunes App Store, Google Play, or the Amazon App Store. Download the app for your Apple or Android device

Not yet registered with Franklin eBranch? Enroll online at FranklinSavings.Bank

800-287-0752 2

Page 5

READER RECIPE Chocolate Coconut Kisses Set Oven at 350° Butter Cookie Sheet Sift together; 1 1/2 Confectionary Sugar 1 Tblspoon Flour Beat 3 egg whites until soft peaks, then beat sugar mixture in, 2 tbls at a time. Add a teaspoon of Vanilla. Mix in 1/2 cup of shredded, and 1 6 of package chocolate bits. Arrange by teaspoonful on cookie sheet. Bake until dry (12 to 15 mins) coolslightly and remove from pan. makes 40-50. Sent in by Stacy Hustus of Farmingdale

If you have a recipe you would like to share with our readers, email it to articles@ turnerpublishing.net

Roger Whitehouse Recognized Roger Whitehouse was recognized by the River Valley Rotary Club as its Rotarian of the Year at the club’s annual Christmas party. Committee chair, Jerry Cohen, and club president, Joe Sirois, presented Whitehouse with a plaque honoring his community service, commitment to

his community and to the work of Rotary. He received wild applause and a standing ovation from club members. He was recognized for his generosity with many donations to many causes and for unselfishly giving of his time and effort to community and club projects.

Whitehouse has served as the club’s president and continues to be dedicated to doing the club’s public relations work. Very committed to serving his community in many many ways, Roger Whitehouse lives Rotary’s motto of ‘Service Above Self.’ n


Page 6

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

Spruce Budworm Returns

V. Paul Reynolds Unless you are in your forties you probably have no recollection of Maine’s last spruce budworm infestation. The budworm, which can chew its way through acres and acres of coniferous forest and kill spruce and balsam fir, left its destructive mark on Maine’s softwood stands in the mid 1970s. I remember it well. By the early 1980s the spruce budworm had destroyed more than 20 percent of Maine’s fir forest. The

budworm assault has been likened to a “slow-moving hurricane.” Timberland owners had little choice: harvest the defoliated trees immediately or lose the economic value of huge tracts of forest. The result, of course, was expansive and controversial clear cuts the likes of which Maine had never seen. Clear cuts are not pleasing to the eye. Neither is the knowledge that miles of Maine forestlands that are home to fish and wildlife are being inundated with insecticides. It was a tense era, a clash between economics and environmentalism that led, eventually, to passage of the Forest Practices Act of 1989, which today regulates forestry practices in Maine. Unfortunately, according to experts, Maine is

about to undergo another major spruce budworm infestation. The budworm moth can be tracked. It is moving our way from Canada. Will it be a repeat of the 1970s with sprawling sections of fir trees rendered dead and brown by the voracious budworm? It’s hard to predict the extent of the impact, but we in Maine are expected to see the effects of the budworm within the next 2 to 4 years. Experts say that it is possible, through

good preparation, to mitigate the damage, although I’ve yet to see any explanation of how this will be done. At this point, state and private interests are collaborating on a disaster preparedness plan to be unveiled this summer. Of course, Mother Nature marches to its own drummer, but Maine needs a spruce budworm epidemic about as much as another record-breaking winter. There is a ripple effect when large tracts of forest just perish. Birds

and wildlife lose precious habitat. Trout streams lose protective canopies that keep flowing water cool. In rural Maine there are economic consequences that can be substantial. Then there is the issue of insecticides. In the 1970s, tons of insecticides were air-dropped across Maine’s fir forest by aircraft in an attempt to “mitigate” the march of the budworms. Not-to-worry assurances were made to the public by state foresters and timberland owners, but it was a hard sell. One day in June of 1976, as I was casting a fly upon the waters of one of my favorite Aroostook County trout ponds, I saw and heard the drone of a low-flying “delivery” aircraft a few miles to the north. Soon, the glassy surface of this pristine

trout pond was disturbed by oily droplets that soon dissipated. It happened only once, but I never forgot the sight and the sick feeling in my stomach. Whether there, indeed, was any side-effects or lasting damage by the insecticide war against the budworm is a question never addressed insofar as I know. The author is editor of the Northwoods Sporting Journal. He is also a Maine Guide, co-host of a weekly radio program “Maine Outdoors.” His e-mail address is paul@ sportingjournal.com . He has two books “A Maine Deer Hunter’s Logbook” and his latest, “Backtrack.” n

Statues John McDonald

All fifty states are allowed two statues of famous persons in Statuary Hall in The U. S. Capital building in Washington, D.C. Can you name

Catch it at... FOOD - SPIRITS - CATERING

 Daily Specials  TUESDAYS Homemade Chicken Pie with Stufϐing, Gravy, Peas and Cranberry Sauce Monday-Friday 11am to close Saturday 4pm to close Closed Sunday

137 Rumford Ave., Rumford

364-2050

Maine’s two famous persons? I bet you can’t. I wasn’t sure, so I looked it up. Maine’s two famous persons are William King, Maine’s first governor and Hannibal Hamlin, Lincoln’s vice president. But they might not be there long. That’s because back in February, a state senator introduced a bill that aimed to evict at least one of the statues – the one of William King – with another famous native son deemed more worthy of the space.. Sen. Garrett Mason, RLisbon,wants to see Civil War hero Joshua Chamberlain take King’s place in the hall, and he thinks Gov. King’s time is up. It’s not known if King’s statue will be returned to Maine or if a suitable place will be found for it. Hopefully it won’t suffer further indignities by being posted for sale on Craig’s List or eBay. Mason’s bill asks the Maine Arts Commission, the Maine State Museum and the Maine Preservation commission to study the whole question and do a survey and let leg-

islatures know what they recommend. Fortunately, Gov. King won’t be offended by his possible eviction because he’s dead. In fact one of the main requirements for getting your statue into Statuary Hall is that you be deader than a doornail. The free-spending legislature ended up funding a study to examine this whole issue — like it does — to the tune of $3,000. Basically, the question is: Does anybody want to replace one — or both — of these statues? And if so, with whom should we replace them? So, this week the Maine Arts Commission sent out a survey asking people those exact questions. They worked so fast they even had , time to come up with a list of 10 possible replacements, which are on the survey. You can write in your own suggestions, if you want. The whole thing was done so fast it makes you wonder if they’ve been looking for an assignment like this for a long time. What if the Arts Commission survey produces

so many great replacement suggestions that the legislature decides to ask the Statuary Hall people if we could have a “Mainer of the Week” on display in the hall. Then everyone would be satisfied that their favorite historic Maine figure is getting the recognition he or she deserves. If the other 50 states adopted the same plan They’d have dozens of

For More Information SWAIN Contact BROOK APARTMENTS Stanford Management SOMERSET APARTMENTS Call 207-562-8455 TTY: 711 Rumford, ME

* One and two bedroom apartments available* * DESIGNED FOR YOUR NEEDS!!!! * Must be at least 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. Some income guidelines apply. Rental Assistance Available Very low income households have priority.

For More Information Contact Stanford Management

Call 207-369-0301 TTY: 711

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

different statues coming and going every week. All that activity would sure make statuary hall a much more attractive destination. Here’s the list of favorites so far: •Joshua Chamberlain •Henry Wadsworth Longfellow •Percival B. Baxter •Winslow Homer •Leon Leonwood Bean •Molly Molasses •Rachel Carson •Margaret Chase Smith •Frances Perkins •Edna St. Vincent Millay If you have a favorite Mainer that you think should be cast in bronze or carved in stone and placed on display in Statuary Hall, make sure you let the arts commission know – mainearts.com Who knows where all this will lead? n


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

December Students of the Month Rumford Elementary School

Page 7

River Valley Rotary Club News The guess speaker at this weeks River Valley Rotary Club’s Fellowship meeting was Becky Hall, Fellow Rotarian and Director of Nurses with the Rumford Community Hospital! She gave her Classification ( spoke of who she is and how she became a Rotarian 4 years ago!) Becky grew up in the are and went to school at Dixfield and graduated from DIRIGO High School in the 1980’s as Becky Knowlton who went on to college to be a

teacher then after teaching for a couple years went back to school to become a nurse and later went to work at Rumford Community Hospital where she worked in the operating room and worked her way up to Director of Nurses! Also, Becky Hall accepted a box of books donated to the Children’s Ward at the Hospital by the Rotary Club and the HOPE Association as part of their joint Literacy Project! n

Front row: Sylvia Pitts, Dexter Rice, Evan Farnum, Rebeka St. Laurent, Morgan Robin, Piper Robin, and Kaitlyn Albanesi Second row: Lilly Amaya, Vivian Rice, Tyler Skillings, Kylie Robin, Kelcee Aleck, Olivia Grasruck Missing: Layla Buotte

Richmond and Harrington Achieve Prestigious Eagle Scout Rank

Joe Sirois, River Valley Rotary Club President with Becky Hall, Fellow Rotarian and Director of Nurses at Rumford Community Hospital.

Becky Hall and Catherine Johnson-Lavorgnia, Past President of the River Valley Rotary Club and Director of HOPE Association (who headed up the Literacy Project) and Joe Sirois, River Valley Rotary Club President

Owen Daniel Richmond (left) and Keith Crockett-Harrington of Troop 565 Bethel show the Eagle Sign after having received their Eagle Award at the Eagle Scout Court of Honor held on January 6 at the West Parish Congregational Church in Bethel. Both Scouts achieved well over the 21 required merit badges to achieve Eagle Scout Rank. Richmond’s Eagle Service Project was Trail Improvements at Bucks Ledge in Woodstock in 2015 and Harrington’s Eagle Service Project was the 2014 construction of the Hanover Picnic Pavilion located between the Town Office and Gardner Roberts Memorial Library. Over 100 family and friends were present as Scoutmasters Dean Richmond and Tom Deluca led the ceremony and presented each of the young men with their Eagle Award. Members of Troop 565 including Brendon Stearns, Dylan Richmond, Kory CrockettHarrington and Carter and Bryce Richmond participated in the ceremony. Nancy Stearns, mother of Eagle Scout Brendan Stearns, read the Eagle Mother’s Poem At Turner Publishing and Eagle Scout Marcello Deluca read The Eagle we publish 20 papers monthly, all available Scout Poem. District Representative Fran Head and spokespersons for Senator Susan Collins and RepreFREE ONLINE! sentative Bruce Poliquin each recognized the two new Eagle Scouts with presentations of American flags and other gifts. The Eagle Scout Rank is the highest rank of the Boy Scouts of America and the title of “Eagle Scout” is held for life. Only 5% of Boy Scouts achieve this honorable rank. Congratulations Owen and Keith on your achievement.

www.turnerpublishing.net

MAKE $300 - $400 A WEEK BY SIMPLY DRIVING YOUR CAR!!!!

SHORT ON CASH? NEED HELP WITH GAS?

We are offering to pay you to drive a minimum of 200 miles monthly to work, school, church or practices with our specially designed AD on your vehicle. No out of pocket costs. We also offer free wrapped cars. Email (farahdesk2@gmail.com) for more information.


Page 8

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

NHS Bottle Drive is a Big Success

The National Honor Society at Mountain Valley High School ran a bottle drive to raise money for their convention. The money raised that day is going toward the NHS convention fund so that the members can organize food boxes and other such projects that benefit the state. NHS member Kelli Trenoweth replied to the question “Why is fundraising important to NHS?� by saying, “It is very important because we do a lot of service projects and to do these service projects you need money.� NHS chapter president Joshua Maillet said, “Convention is important because not only do we organize service projects that benefit our state, our country, and maybe even the world but it gives everyone the feeling that we are actually making a difference.� As mentioned by

Trenoweth, the money raised by the bottle drive plays a big part in making that difference. In total, the bottle drive turned out $506.79. Trenoweth commented, “I feel like the bottle drive was very successful because we made a lot but it didn’t take a lot of time to do.� Thanks to the support of our community, NHS can fund the projects and conventions that make the world a better place. NHS members that participated in the bottle drive are Jon Adley, Andrew Arsenault, Holden Blauvelt, Alecia Bolduc, JT Greene, Krysta Hodsdon, Josh Maillet, Abigail Mazza,Travis Palmer, Sydney Petrie, Ashley Russell, Kayla Sinclair, and Kelli Trenoweth. Other participants included NHS faculty advisor Chris Carver and freshman volunteer Willow Wind. n

The bottle drive participants depicted in the photo from left to right starting in the back row are Kelli Trenoweth, Abby Mazza and Sydney Petrie. In the middle row from left to right are Kayla Sinclair, Andrew Arsenault, Holden Blauvelt, Travis Palmer, Alecia Bolduc, Josh Maillet and Krysta Hodsdon. In the third row from left to right are Willow Wind, JT Greene, Ashley Russell and Jon Adley.

                

Rotary Club’s Guest Speaker now a NAMI Maine volunteer (National Alliance on Mental Illness); facilitate a Family/Peer NAMI support group in Rumford, a Family to Family teacher and chairperson of the new

The gust speaker at the River Valley Rotary Club Fellowship meeting Monday, December 21, 2015?was Dottie Adams, retired SAD#43 elementary teacher from Hanover;

NAMI Western Mountains, ME ! For information about any of NAMI Maine’s programs, call NAMI Maine at 1-800-464-5767 or visit www.naminmaine.org. n

Left to right Dave Diguay, V. P., Dottie Adams, Joe Sirois, Club President

2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 4-Wheel Drive LT w/1LT

Hight’s SALES PRICE: $33000.00

plus taxes and fees

SAVE $8185.00

            

WE WANT YOUR GOOD NEWS!

articles@www.turnerpublishing.net

• Stock: 31412 • ENGINE, 5.3L FLEXFUEL ECOTEC3 V8 • TRAILERING PACKAGE • 1LT PREFERRED EQUIPMENT GROUP • BLUE GRANITE METALLIC • Power Windows and Door Locks • Cruise Control • MSRP: $41185.00



VIN: 3GCUKREC6EG155738

 



                  


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 9

Roger Whitehouse Receives His Second Paul Harris Award Named after Rotary's founder, the Paul Harris Society recognizes Rotary members and friends of The Rotary Foundation who contribute $1,000 or more each year to the Annual Fund, PolioPlus, or approved global grants. The purpose of the Paul Harris Society is to honor and thank individuals for their generosity of annual support to The Rotary Foundation. “I have been inspired watching Rotarians jump at the chance to be charter members of the Paul Harris Society. I am experiencing a truly historic moment.” – Yale Jones, Paul Harris Society Coordinator for District 5520 WHAT YOUR GIFT SUPPORTS With your gift you’re promoting peace, fighting disease, providing clean

Left to right: Roger Whitehouse and Joe Sirois, current River Valley Rotary Club President

water, saving mothers and children, supporting education, and growing local economies through grants that: •Bring peace-building seminars to 200 teachers and 1,300 students in Uganda. •Distribute insecticidetreated mosquito nets and medical services that help prevent malaria in Mali. •Train teachers who are establishing an early childhood education center in South Africa. •Provide water filters, toilet blocks, and hygiene training to prevent fluorosis in a community in India. •Fund a scholarship for a medical professional to research treatment to minimize mortality rates among premature babies in Italy. •Protect children around

the world from polio. Rotary Direct, Rotary's recurring giving program, makes it easy to join the Paul Harris society. JOIN TODAY For more information contact your district Paul Harris Society coordinator, district leader, or fundraising staff at the Rotary office that serves your region. If you have questions, email Rotary’s Support Center at contact.center@ rotary.org or call 1-866976-8279. RECOGNITION Rotary districts often honor new members of the Paul Harris Society by creating certificates for them and presenting them with their insignia at a district or club event in a way that is culturally appropriate and comfortable for each member.n

New Norway Medical Office Name Revealed David Preble, Western Maine Health Board Chair, announced the naming of the new medical office building on 8 Pikes Hill in Norway at the ribbon cutting ceremony on January 7, 2016. The new building has been named the William L. Medd, MD Health Center in honor of the long time physician who has practiced in Norway for nearly 42 years. Dr. Medd and his wife, Marge, settled in Norway in 1974 with friends Dr. Don and Hilary Ware establishing the Oxford Hills Internal Medicine Group. Dr. Medd has served on the Western Maine Health and Stephens Memorial Hospital boards for decades and was instrumental in bringing the Maine Medical Center/ Tufts University School of Medicine Rural Clerkship program to Stephens Memorial Hospital. Dr. Medd has also served in numerous medical staff leadership and committee roles.

Also announced was the naming of the James E. Eshleman, DO Conference Room within the new health center in honor of long time family medicine physician Dr. Eshleman who has practiced in the community at Oxford Hills Family Practice for 43 years. Dr. Eshleman has also held various medical staff leadership roles and has served on the Western Maine Health and Stephens Memorial Hospital boards. The new health center is specifically designed to allow the practitioners to use the Patient Centered Medical Home model; the most current approach to delivering primary care. Additionally, the health center will include the relocated Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation program as well as a law drawing room for patients using the facility. Patients of Oxford Hills Internal Medicine and Western Maine Family

Caption (left to right): Mary Longstaff, Practice Manager of Oxford Hills Internal Medicine, Brian Nolan, MD, Oxford Hills Internal Medicine, Timothy A. Churchill, President of Western Maine Health, William Caron Jr., President of MaineHealth, David Preble, Western Maine Health Board Chair, William L. Medd, MD, Oxford Hills Internal Medicine, James E. Eshleman, DO, Western Maine Family Medicine, Lisa Miller, MD, Western Maine Family Medicine, Kyle Philips, Practice Manager of Western Maine Family Medicine, and David Holt, Norway Town Manager. Medicine will be seen at the William L. Medd, MD Health Center beginning January 11. The new health center is state of the art, yet has architectural features that in-

Great Winter Apparel and Footwear For The Whole Family!

STORE WIDE UP TO 40% OFF

Bargain Basement Down Stairs... Savings up to

70% OFF Original Prices

Mon-Thur. 9AM-6PM Fri. 9AM - 7PM • Sat. 9AM - 5PM 364-2581 • 1-888-231-3553 86-92 Congress St., Rumford FOX RACING • NORTH FACE • NIKE • CHAMPION • AND MUCH MORE!

W OOLRICH • C OLUMBIA • H AGGAR • B URTON • U NDER A RMOUR

B ILLABONG • U NION B AY • R ED W ING • C ARHARTT • N EW B ALANCE

LEVI • M ERRELL • SORE OREL

clude historical elements representing local manufacturing of the past such as dowels, tinker toys, snowshoes and toboggans. Representatives from MaineHealth, Stephens

Memorial Hospital, Oxford Hills Internal Medicine, Western Maine Family Medicine, Town Manager, David Holt, SMRT, and Landry/ French were on hand for

the celebration. Western Maine Health is a member of MaineHealth. Visit Western Maine Health online at www.wmhcc.org.n

Maine’s #1 Senior Resource • Medicare Advantage

• Longterm Care

• Medicare Supplements

• Final Expense

• Retirement Planning

• Affordable Care Act

• Life Insurance • Part D Rx Plans

Anthony G. Arruda

Mt. Blue Shopping Plaza Farmington, ME

207-778-6565


Page 10

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

Spirit of Giving in the River Valley

The majority of students at Mountain Valley High School depend on receiving breakfast and lunch at school. For these students, the holiday break is a challenge. Through the spirit of giving throughout the River Valley, some students went home before the holiday break with a little extra. The Rumford Police Department, Catalyst employees in the utilities department, MVHS student council and MVHS staff donated food, small gifts and money. After sort-

ing through the generous donations, 14 families received overflowing baskets of food and gifts. In addition to the food baskets, Oxford Federal Credit Union provided four gift bags containing a sweatshirt and gift card. Principal Matt Gilbert posted the news on the school’s Facebook page. After delivering some of the baskets, he said, “It’s an incredible feeling to be able to help our students and their families. That’s what Christmas truly means. I am so thankful that I work in a

community that pitches together and cares for each other.” School secretary Peggy LaPointe, who helped organize the baskets, said, “It is great to be part of such a kind and caring family at Mountain Valley High School!” Student council advisor Brenda Cayer added, “What a wonderful community I live in. I am grateful everyday to have raised my boys here.” Thanks to generosity in the River Valley, families will have a brighter holiday. n

Rumford Urgent Care A walk-in clinic for the treatment of minor injuries and illnesses

Rumford Hospital Urgent Care is an alternative care option when a patient’s primary care provider is not available. Rumford Hospital Urgent Care provides care for:  Colds

 Skin rashes

 Flu-like symptoms

 Tick bites

 Sore throat

 Women health

 Ear aches  Minor cuts  Minor burns

issues  Sexual diseases  Urinary problems

 Sprains

Illnesses and injuries not treated in Urgent Care include abdominal pain, chest pain, neck pain, headaches (including migraine headaches), head injuries, bleeding issues, broken bones, and children 3 months or younger. The Rumford Hospital Emergency Department is available at all times for Urgent Care back up services.

Holiday baskets are ready for delivery thanks to the Rumford Police Department, Catalyst employees in the utilities department, MVHS student council and MVHS staff. Oxford Federal Credit Union also provided gift bags.

Rumford Hospital Receives National Recognition LO CAT IO N

Rumford Hospital 420 Franklin Street, Rumford O P EN

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Enter through the Patient Pick Up/Drop Off area near Cafeteria Entrance, take elevator to Specialty Clinics on second floor. PAYMENT P O LICY

Accepted Payments

• Cash • Major credit cards: Visa, MC, AmEx • Debit cards • Personal checks • Most healthcare insurances Co-payments are due at the time of visit. Charges for services not covered by insurance are the responsibility of the patient (or parent/guardian if the patient is a minor). Billing or Payment Questions: 1-888-869-3101

369-1127

www.rumfordhospital.org

www.turnerpublishing.net

Rumford Hospital recently announced it has been recognized by iVantage Health Analytics and the National Organization of State Office of Rural Health (NOSORH) for overall excellence in Quality, reflecting top quartile performance among all acute care hospitals in the nation. Rumford Hospital’s President and CEO, David Frum, shared, “We are extremely honored to be recognized by the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health for overall excellence in Quality. I could not be more proud of our staff for the work they have done to achieve this high level of recognition.”

The rankings have been designated by the Hospital Strength INDEX™, the industry’s most comprehensive and objective assessment of hospital performance. In partnership with NOSORH, iVantage Health Analytics has developed a data-driven program designed to identify excellence across a broad spectrum of indicators relevant to hospital performance and patient care. The Hospital Strength INDEX™ captures performance metrics for more than 4,000 acute care hospitals, including over 1,300 rural and Critical Access Hospitals. Leveraging data from public data sources, INDEX aggregates data from 66 indi-

vidual metrics into three major categories and 9 pillars to derive a single strength overall rating for each facility. “These top quartile performers should take great pride in this recognition. It showcases their commitment to continuous performance analysis and improvement. On this occasion of National Rural Health Day, it’s an honor to celebrate their achievement as they continue to serve their communities despite the many market, regulatory and financial pressures they face.” said Michael Topchik, senior vice president of iVantage Health Analytics. n


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 11

Annual Four Chaplains Ceremony NewsBites From the desk of Connie Jones‌

The Expo Franklin County Mark your calendars now and make plans to attend the Aging Well Living Well Expo Franklin County on Thursday, February   $0 WR  30 DW WKH .LQJÂżHOG Elementary School. (Snow date is Friday, February 19). Come for a free morning of learning and just plain old get-together. If you are an older adult who understands the importance of living a healthy, active lifestyle, then the Aging Well Living Well Expo is a “must attendâ€? event. There will be: ‡:RUNVKRSVLQFOXGLQJ o Zumba Gold – ZumbaÂŽ fuses Latin rhythms and easy moves to create a G\QDPLFÂżWQHVVSURJUDPWKDWZLOOEORZ you away. Exercise you’ll want to do everyday and feel good about doing it! o Frauds and Scams: How to Protect Yourself – the basic rules of how to protect yourself from being caught offguard and falling victim to a current or future scam. o Healthy Cooking – we are what we eat! How to eat healthy as we age. ‡.H\QRWHDGGUHVV$JLQJ&RXUDJHRXVO\ and Outrageously – Let’s take aging by storm! This presentation will acknowledge that it takes courage to age well, and will share tips on how to do that. Then, we’ll turn to the outrageous side – let’s add a bit of pizzazz to the aging process, a little zing! Come enjoy a discussion on how to age well, with courage and vim and vigor. ‡([KLELWRUVÂśERRWKVRIORFDOSURYLGHUV displaying a variety of services and information of interest to you. ‡ &RQWLQHQWDO EUHDNIDVW SURYLGHG by the Orange Cat Cafe) and snacks throughout the morning. Plan this morning out for yourself, bring a friend, and enjoy. To register, call SeniorsPlus at 1-800-427-1241. You must pre-register for this free event. Aging & Disability Resource Center for Androscoggin, Franklin, and Oxford counties 8 Falcon Road Lewiston, ME 04240 ‡ www.seniorsplus.org Like us on Facebook!

The Rumford Napoleon Oullette American Legion Post #24 will be performing the annual Four Chaplains ceremony Sunday, February 7, 2015 at 3:00 pm. The public is invited and a light meal will follow the ceremony. The Mexico

Police Explorers will be providing the the color guard and the Boy Scouts will present the life jackets in memory of the heroic chaplains. Local religious leaders will be reading the biographies of Reverend George Fox, Rabbi Alex-

ander Goode, Reverend Clark Poling, and Father John Washington. The chaplains provided comfort and calm when the USS Dorchester was torpedoed by a German U Boat on February 3. After seeing the chaplains give up their life jackets to

others, a survivor said� It was the finest thing I have ever seen, or hope to see this side of heaven.� Come learn about these fascinating Chaplains of different religious background whose focus was to serve others. n

Valley Rotary Club Announcement The River Vally Rotary Club Runner held their annual holiday meeting this year at the ‘Thai Smile Two Restaurant’ Tuesday night December 8, 2015. During this meeting the Club announced the ‘Rotary Club Citizen of the Year 2015’ which was Patty Duguay of BYRON. Patty was nominated and selected *Because of her dedication and participation in community affairs both within and outside her job with the River Valley Community Healthy Coalition! * The many times she participates in Rotary functions. * Her undying devotion to help those in need of health care! * For doing so much in the community at large. *She is forever offering to help and ask what else she can do! Seems to have a single determination to make the community a better place to live! *Itwas an easy choice

left to right joe Sirois, Club President, Roger Whitehouse, and Jerry Cohen.

for the committee once this person’s name came up as a nominee! Seen in the photo left to right Jerry Cohen, Fellow Rotarian and past President 2014, Dave Duguay, Vice President and husband to

Patty Duguay, Patty Duguay, and Joe Sirois, current Club President Also during the night ceremonies the ‘Rotarian of the Year 2015’recipient was Roger Whitehouse, owner and designated broker of Riverside Realty in Mexico Maine.

Selected for all that he does in the community as well. And for working on projects worldwide such as ‘Crutches 4Africa’ and international projects such as helping to in ‘Polio’ throughout the world! his ‘spirit of given’ rubs off on all who know him! n

Clinical Social Worker Joins Farmington Family Practice

Franklin Health Farmington Family Practice is pleased to announce that Brent Laflin, LCSW, a licensed clinical social worker has joined its clini-

cal staff to provide behavioral health services for patients. Having clinical social workers alongside health care providers is a new integrated model being used at all four Franklin Health primary care medical practices. Social workers deliver behavioral health services on the spot—rather than by referral—providing immediate assessment and diagnosis and brief solution-based therapy for patients of all ages. They also provide patient education and support and com-

RIVERBEND FIBERGLASS FABRICATIONS AND REPAIRS Over 30 years experience in Fiberglass

•Truck Hoods •Snowmobile Cowls •Canoes

•Boats •Campers •Some Plastics

If it is made from Fiberglass we can build it or repair it. We can also repair some plastic parts 16 Carter Rd. US RT #2 Dixďƒželd • 562-7103 rbf@roadrunner.com

plete referrals to case management and other services as needed. Laflin received his master’s degree in social work in 2010 at the University of Maine, Orono. He earned his bachelor’s of fine arts degree with honors from the University of Southern Maine in 1993. Laflin has extensive experience providing outpatient therapy and case management services. “Adding a social worker to the team in a primary care setting removes barriers and improves access for

patients. They now have immediate support from a group of health professionals who work together to coordinate care so our patients can be as healthy as possible,� said Dr. Kendra Emery. “We believe that this collaborative approach improves continuity of care and produces better health outcomes at lower costs for our patients.� In his spare time Laflin sings and plays guitar and mandolin for anyone who will listen. For appointments call 778-3326. n

I Can Help!

Over 20 years experience treating soft tissue injury and pain

Excellent References

KENNETH W. RICHARDS, B.S., L.M.T.

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES • SPORTS INJURIES CHRONIC & ACUTE PAIN Neuromuscular Massage Therapy

Over 35,000 treatments! “Specializing in Pain Relief�

783-3393

637 Minot Avenue Auburn

Licensed Massage Therapist

778-4990 236 Broadway Farmington


Page 12

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Janaury 2016

Falcons Over Cougars

(Left to Right) Dirigo players Emma Lueders, Kaicey Conant and Sabrina Daoud battle for the ball with Mountain Valley. Lueders had 8 points and 12 rebounds in the loss to the Falcons. Sabrina Daoud added 6 points in this outing for the Cougars. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

Falcon junior Emily Laubauskas had 5 rebounds and 3 steals in a strong defensive game by Mountain Valley against Dirigo last week. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

Bingham Area Health Center

Mountain Valley’s Ashley Russell had the game high 18 points in a January 15 game in Rumford. The Falcons are strong this year with a record of 12-1, and they tamed the Cougars from Dixfield 49-27. Teammates Sydney Petrie had 8 pts. 8 rebounds, while Liza White added 7 pts. And 12 rebounds. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

State of Maine Approved Seeds and Clones Available Today With Take Home Educational Course Unlimited Plants Available 12” & Under CALL 431-1181 AND GET STARTED TODAY

502 Wilton Rd, Farmington • www.cannabisseedbankofmaine.com &ƒÃ®½ùEçÙݛWك‘ã®ã®ÊěÙKÖÖÊÙãçÄ®ãù •  • •

&ƵůůƟŵĞ͕ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞĚ&EWƚŽŵĂŶĂŐĞƐŽůŽƉƌĂĐƟĐĞǁŝƚŚďĂĐŬͲƵƉƐƵƉƉŽƌƚĨƌŽŵĂƉŽŽů ŽĨŇŽĂƚƉƌŽǀŝĚĞƌƐ ǀĂŝůĂďůĞDĂƌĐŚϮϬϭϲ >ŽĂŶƌĞƉĂLJŵĞŶƚĞůŝŐŝďŝůŝƚLJ

>®‘›Äݛ—½®Ä®‘ƒ½^ʑ®ƒ½tÊÙ»›ÙKÖÖÊÙãçÄ®ãù

• ϮϬ ŚŽƵƌƐͬǁĞĞŬ ƚŽ ǁŽƌŬ ƐŝĚĞͲďLJͲƐŝĚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĞĚŝĐĂů ƉƌŽǀŝĚĞƌƐ ƚŽ ĚĞǀĞůŽƉ Ă ĐŽŵŵŽŶ  ƚƌĞĂƚŵĞŶƚƉůĂŶĂĚĚƌĞƐƐŝŶŐƉŚLJƐŝĐĂůĂŶĚďĞŚĂǀŝŽƌĂůŚĞĂůƚŚĐĂƌĞŶĞĞĚƐ ŝŶŐŚĂŵƌĞĂ,ĞĂůƚŚĞŶƚĞƌƐĞƌǀĞƐϮ͕ϲϬϬĂƌĞĂƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐŽĨĂůůĂŐĞƐĨƌŽŵŶŽƌƚŚĞƌŶ^ŽŵĞƌƐĞƚŽƵŶƚLJ͘ dŚĞ ŚĞĂůƚŚ ĐĞŶƚĞƌ ǁĂƐ ĞƐƚĂďůŝƐŚĞĚ ϰϭ LJĞĂƌƐ ĂŐŽ ĂŶĚ ŝƐ ŶŽǁ Ă EY ĐĞƌƟĮĞĚ WĂƟĞŶƚͲĞŶƚĞƌĞĚ DĞĚŝĐĂů,ŽŵĞƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐŵĞĚŝĐĂů͕ĚĞŶƚĂůĂŶĚďĞŚĂǀŝŽƌĂůŚĞĂůƚŚƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ͘ ŽŶƚĂĐƚ͗ZĞĐƌƵŝƚĞƌ͕,Z,͕ϭϬtĂƚĞƌ^ƚƌĞĞƚ͕^ƵŝƚĞϯϬϱ͕tĂƚĞƌǀŝůůĞ͕DϬϰϵϬϭ ;ϮϬϳͿϲϲϬͲϵϵϭϯͮ&Ădž͗;ϮϬϳͿϲϲϬͲϵϵϬϭͮŽŵŵƵŶŝĐĂƟŽŶƐΛ,ĞĂůƚŚZĞĂĐŚ͘ŽƌŐͮǁǁǁ͘ŝŶŐŚĂŵ,͘ŽƌŐ

ĐŽŵƉĞƟƟǀĞĐŽŵƉĞŶƐĂƟŽŶ͕ŵĂůƉƌĂĐƟĐĞĐŽǀĞƌĂŐĞ͕ƐŝŐŶͲŽŶďŽŶƵƐ͕K

For More Information WHITNEY BROOKSIDE HOMES Contact Stanford Management Call 207-562-8455 TTY: 711 Me 04221 Whitney Brook Ln., Canton,

* One bedroom and handicap/disabled apartments* * DESIGNED FOR YOUR NEEDS!!!! * Must be at least 62 years or older, handicap/disabled, regardless of age. Some income guidelines apply. Very low income households have priority. Rental Assistance Available

For More Information Contact Stanford Management

Call 207-369-0301 TTY: 711

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 13

Franco Center to Host 2nd Annual Family-Friendly Super Bowl Party The Gendron Franco Center, on the corner of Cedar and Oxford Streets in Lewiston, will host its second annual Super Bowl Party on Sunday, February 7, starting at 4:00PM. This is a familyfriendly event with a cash bar, a delicious menu of food items on sale at the Heritage Clubhouse Cafe, great prize raffles from many local businesses, fun activities for kids, and a

chance to watch as it all goes down on a 10-foottall screen. Doors, bar and café will open at 4:00PM. for a pregame “tailgate dinner” before or during the Super Bowl 50. There is a $5 cover at the door and children 5 and under are free. The event is sponsored by Federal Distributors. Guests of all ages are encouraged get comfortable and bring a favorite chair (beanbag, folding

chair, camp chair) and/ or blankets; some guests are wearing Patriots Pajamas or other favorite team wardrobe items and will share décor and memorabilia. For more information, contact or visit the Box Office, visit www.francocenter.org or Like the Franco Center on Facebook. Call (207) 783.1585. Box office hours are Monday thru Friday, from noon to 4 PM n

Roger Whitehouse 357-2820 Sally Arsenault 357-0120 Rachel Auger 357-8780 Diane Paterson 357-4646 Lousie Horne 557-5555 Dave Belanger

357-6150

Fax (207)396-0900 info@riversiderealty.org

152 River Road, Mexico, ME

The people pleasing agency. Serving all your real estate needs.

SEARCH FOR HOMES ES MLS SEARCH COMMERCIAL

The

A Product of

GO TO

RIVERSIDEREALTY.ORG

(207) 369-0100

MULTI FAMILY LOTS & LAND CAMP & COTTAGES

RUMFORD - RESIDENTIAL #1716MLS #1208842 $64,000

PERU - RESIDENTIAL #1719MLS#1210811 $69,000

RUMFORD - COMMERCIAL

#1724MLS #1096033 $54,500

DIXFIELD - RESIDENTIAL #1725MLS #1214593 $129,000

MEXICO - RESIDENTIAL

MEXICO - MULTI #1727MLS #1215497 $45,900

MEXICO - MULTI #1728MLS #1215499 $45,500

RUMFORD - RESIDENTIAL #1731MLS#1216560 $96,170

RUMFORD - MULTI #1734MLS #1219086 $129,000

CARTHAGE -RESIDENTIAL

RUMFORD - RESIDENTIAL #1738MLS #12222575 $119,900

DIXFIELD - RESIDENTIAL #1740MLS #1223833 $139,989

WESTERN MAINE FOOTHILLS

Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!

Directly mailed to the Residents of Peru, Dixeld, East Dixeld, Hanover, Mexico, Roxbury, Rumford, Andover, E. Andover, Bryant Pond, Greenwood, Locke Mills, and Newry Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: articles@turnerpublishing.net • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net

CEO/Publisher Senior Designer Jodi Cornelio Michelle Pushard Ofϐice/Billing Designer Tom Tardif Danielle Emery Product Development Production Leader Denise Scammon

Advertising Betsy Brown Michelle Gosselin George McGregor Maria Holloway

Writer/Photographer Bill Van Tassel Proof Reader Hal Small

The Western Maine Foothills is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest can call 207-225-2076 or fax us at 207-225-5333, you can also send e-mail to us at: articles@ turnerpublishing.net. Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is mailed on a monthly basis to all postal customers of Peru, Dixeld, E. Dixeld, Hanover, Mexico, Roxbury, Rumford, Rumford Center, Andover, E. Andover, Greenwood, Locke Mills and Newry.Founded by Steven Cornelio in 1992.

#1726MLS #1215496 $29,500

#1647 MLS#1142765 #1658 MLS#1147763 #1672MLS#1154248 #1673MLS#1154256 #1684MLS#1157371 #1705MLS#1206213 #1706MLS#1206219 #1743MLS#1226104

Rumford Rumford Rumford Rumford Canton Canton Roxbury Rumford

#1736MLS #1219090 $82,500

LAND LAND LAND

.83 Acres .28 Acres 3 Acres 4.791 Acres 4.82 Acres 37+/- Acres 1.2 Acres 1.8 Acres

$19,500 $15,500 $37,900 $21,000 $16,500 $31,500 $22,500 $29,500

#1751MLS#1227827 #1755MLS#1230723 #1774MLS#1241073 #1779MLS#1243129 #1780MLS#1244450 #1781MLS#1244551

Rumford Rumford Phillips Roxbury Peru Rumford

.48 Acre .48 Acre (commercial) 2.35 Acre 10. Acres 92. Acres 24. Acres

www.turnerpublishing.net

$15,000 $85,000 $13,000 $30,000 $80,000 $40,000


Page 14

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

New Year’s Cheers That Won’t Derail Your Weight Management Goals Jodi Cornelio

So you’re on track with your New Year’s resolutions to manage your weight and it’s been a long week and you just want to kick back and enjoy a cocktail with friends without blowing your diet. By making the right beverage choices you can. Let’s look at some ingredients that can sneak up on you and derail your good nutrition intentions. It’s typically the mixers, syrups, juices and sodas that really get people into calorie trouble adding hundreds of unnecessary cal-

ories. Do you know that the average American gets 21% of their daily recommended calories from beverages according to a study performed by the U.S. Beverage Guidance Panel. They are not necessarily referring to alcohol. Alcohol accounts for a small portion of these calories at 96 calories per 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits. Paying attention to what you mix your cocktail with is the secret. Here are the secrets at avoiding cocktail calories. •Choose 100% pure or freshly squeezed orange juice, grapefruit juice, lemon or lime juice. 100% cranberry with no sugar added is a good choice. Tomato and V-8 juices are good choices as well, high in fiber and low in calories.

•Use club soda or seltzer water over tonics. Tonics have just as many calories and sugars as soda. There are many flavored seltzers that can add an extra jazz to your beverage. Find one you like and add a fresh lemon or lime squeeze for extra flavor. •Stay clear of cream, liqueurs, grenadines or sweet

and pretzels can add up to unwanted calories. •Avoid any beverages loaded with syrups, sodas or sugars. These along with the alcohol can lower blood sugars making you feel hungry and bring on food cravings. •Avoid drinks that have several shots in one glass. A Long Island ice tea has 7 alcohol ingredients and 700 calories. •Avoid after dinner drinks as most are loaded with sugar and a dessert wine has approximately 40 calories more than a simple table wine. Save a little of your before dinner drinks to end the meal if you really enjoy something after dinner. •Wine coolers and fancy flavored bottled drinks like hard lemonade, just say NO.

They sound light but they can have anywhere from 190 to 300 calories in one 12 oz. bottle. Plain wine is a better choice but still is not exactly a diet drink. It does have far less calories than a cooler at 100 calories per 5 oz. To really cut back on the calories and stretch your 5oz. allotment of red wine add club soda, crushed ice and some fruit and you can enjoy a homemade guilt free sangria that is fun and light. •Going out with the guys for a beer after work. Make it a light beer. There are some pretty good choices of low carb light beers out there. Try one and you don’t have to have a six pack. Moderation is always key. Enjoy your New Year! Live Long, Live well n

sex hormones lower HDL levels. Female sex hormones raise HDL levels. Draw your own conclusions.) What can you do to control cholesterol? Diet Cholesterol is in all foods from animals, so reduce your intake of meat, eggs and dairy products. Cut back on fatty foods such as snacks, desserts and anything fried. Eat vegetables and fruit. Exercise Regular physical activity increases HDL cholesterol in some people. Weight loss can help lower your bad cholesterol. Smoking Smoking lowers HDL cholesterol levels and increases the tendency for blood to clot. Alcohol People who consume moderate amounts of alcohol (one to two drinks per day for men and one

drink per day for women) have a lower risk of heart disease than nondrinkers. However, alcohol can be unhealthy. For example, a small about of alcohol can make a big increase in triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are a fat in your blood that should be kept in check. Whether you should drink a moderate amount of alcohol is definitely a question you should ask your personal physician. Medicine Get your physician’s advice, too, about drugs to lower your cholesterol. If lifestyle changes don’t help you, you may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol level. If you would like to ask a question, write to fred@ healthygeezer.com. n

vermouths. They can double the calories in a cocktail. If you like that rosy red cocktail with the fancy glass that is typically laced with grenadine, try making your own. You can get the same look and a sweet taste with fewer calories by boiling down pomegranate juice and adding stevia to sweeten. •Sip your cocktail and make it last. Perhaps having a glass of water handy will help you pace yourself not to over drink. •Pay attention to moderation. From a weight management stand point, your resolve can be really strong when you are sober, but after a few drinks, you may find yourself mindlessly overeating snack foods or whatever is in the pantry. Chips, nuts

The Healthy Geezer

By: Fred Cecitti In the last installment of The Healthy Geezer, we focused upon triglycerides. This column is a companion piece about cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fatlike substance in blood. You need it to produce cell membranes, protect nerves, and make hormones. The body can make all the cholesterol it needs. Most cholesterol is made by your liver. You also get cholesterol from foods such as meat, eggs and dairy products. Too much cholesterol is dangerous, because cholesterol can lead to blockages in your blood vessels.

Cholesterol is transported through the bloodstream in packages called lipoproteins. Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) deliver cholesterol to the body. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) remove cholesterol from the bloodstream. LDLs are often described as “bad” cholesterol; HDLs are called “good” cholesterol. If there are too many LDLs in the blood, they will combine with other material in your bloodstream to manufacture plaque, a waxy crud that builds up on the inner walls of the blood vessels that feed your brain and heart. When this build-up occurs, you have a condition called “atherosclerosis,” which is commonly referred to as “hardening of the arteries.” If a clot forms in blood vessels narrowed by plaque, it can block blood flow, which can cause a

heart attack or a stroke. The recommended levels of cholesterol are as follows: Total cholesterol level should be less than 200 mg/dL. (“Mg/dL” stands for milligram per deciliter.) “Borderline high” is defined as between 200 and 239 mg/dL. You’re risking heart disease if your reading is 240 mg/dL or more. LDL cholesterol level should be less than 130 mg/dL. “Borderline high” is between 130 and 159 mg/dL. There’s heart-disease risk if your reading is 160 mg/dL or more. HDL cholesterol levels

FIND THE PHONY AD!!! You could win a Gift Certi�icate to an area merchant from one of our papers! It is easy to �ind - just read through the ads in this issue of The Western Maine Foothills and �ind the phony ad. Either �ill out the entry form below (one entry per month please) and mail to: Find The Phony Ad Contest, P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 or email to: phonyad@turnerpublishing.net. (one entry per household please) You must include all the information requested below to be eligible to win. Note: Turner Publishing will not lend or sell your email address to a third party.

Name: Address: City: State: Zip: ( ) Email Address: Phone: Would you like to receive email noti�ication of local sales and specials___Y___N

Please tell us your age (circle one) 12-25 yrs. 26-35 yrs. 36-45 yrs. 46-55 yrs. 56 yrs. & up

The Phony Ad is: Tell us what you think of this publication:

should be at 60 mg/dL or higher to cut the risk of heart disease. You’re at high risk for heart disease if you have a reading less than 40 mg/dL. If your total cholesterol level is high because of high LDLs, you may be at higher risk of heart disease or stroke. If your total level is high only because of a high HDLs, you’re probably not at higher risk. Some physicians use the ratio of total cholesterol to HDLs. The ratio is obtained by dividing the HDLs into the total cholesterol. The goal is to keep the ratio below 5 to 1. (Interesting fact: Male

We have DECEMBER’S Winners of the Phony ad Contest ATTENTION: Is a University Diploma or Degree holding you back?...

“Get an Accredited College Degree IN 5 DAYS without even stepping foot into a college classroom or even doing coursework” “No need to take admissions exams, no need to study. Receive a college degree for what you already know! Earn an associate, bachelor’s, master’s or even a PHD degree without opening a single book. Even if you struggled or barely made it out of high school.

www.ofcoursethisisthephonyad.com

Congratulations!

Country Courier: Corinne Ryan Country Connection: Melody Walton Auburn Highlights: Monica Miller Franklin Focus: Lois King Lake Region Reader: Christine Tamborini Kennebec Current: Joan Pushard Good News Gazette: Brenda Webber Western Maine Foothills: Arlene Hayes Lisbon Ledger: Jonathan P. Schmidt Two Cent Times: Dana Jones Oxford Hills Observer: Virginia Labbe Moose Prints: Melissa Teer Somerset Express: David Burns Lewiston Leader: Joseph Carter

All of the winners listed have won gift certicates to one of our advertisers. If you haven’t won - keep playing! We get hundreds of entries each month! It’s easy to enter - read through the ads in this issue and nd the phony ad, ll out the entry form found in this paper and mail it in. If you have the correct answer, your name will be entered into a monthly drawing!


January 2016

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 15

Williamsburg

Battle reenactments. By Victor Block: As the pounding of the sheriff’s wooden staff calls the court to order, James Hubbard prepares to defend his client. He is an orphan’s guardian who stands accused of squandering his charge’s estate. Centering his neat wig and smoothing the frilly lace sleeves of his shirt, the attorney bows to the bench and begins to plead his case. This scene is repeated today in the same place where it occurred during the 1770s. That is when James Hubbard lived and practiced law in Williamsburg, at a time that the town served as the capital of the Virginia colony. The actorimpersonator who depicts this historical figure bases his interpretation upon facts that historians have been able to document. For example, he describes having returned to London to study law, and rather sheepishly admits that his wife occasionally agitates him. For those who love living history, James Hubbard plays but a small part in

George Washington a fascinating tableau that makes Colonial Williamsburg a perfect place to relive pages from the past. Reenactments, tours led by factually based characters and many other interpretive programs combine to involve visitors in the interest, information and fun. The meticulously restored 17th-to-19th century historic area provides the Colonial and Revolutionary War-era setting in which chapters from our nation’s early years are dramatically revived. For nearly a century, from 1699 to 1780, Williamsburg served as the capital of the Virginia Colony, a vast enclave which stretched west to the Mississippi River and north to the Great Lakes. In its early heyday, the town of about 2,000 residents was the cultural, social and political center of the Colonial world. Before Thomas Jefferson relocated the Virginia capital to Richmond in 1781, he and other patriots, including George Washington and Patrick Henry, frequented its shops, taverns and other establishments.

BOSS POWER EQUIPMENT

OUTBOARDS

After the Revolution, Williamsburg’s importance, and fortunes, declined. That continued until 1926, when John D. Rockefeller, Jr. launched a major effort to restore the setting to its former splendor. The surviving 88 Colonial structures were renovated to their 18th century appearance, and those that no longer stood were reconstructed on their original sites, based upon research and as much documentation as could be found. Today, more than 500 history-touched buildings – imposing public structures and modest houses, bustling taverns and shops where merchants ply their trade – line tree-shaded streets that echo the clipclop of horse-drawn carriages. Gardens and “dependencies,” including free standing kitchens, smoke houses and privies, add to the atmosphere and authenticity. Along with this historically accurate scene, it’s primarily people who bring historic Williamsburg to life. Character interpreters dressed in Colonial style

Boothby Perry, LLC. L. Clinton Boothby, Esq. Alan J. Perry, Esq. Victoria J. Silver, Esq. Kendall A. Ricker, Esq. Danylle M. Carson, Esq.

• Divorce & Family Law • Real Estate: Transaction & Litigation • Probate Administration

2775 Main Street, Rangeley, ME 864-5343 • www.bosspowerequipment.com

clothing, many depicting real-life former residents of the town, converse with visitors in period grammar as they go about their daily tasks. Part of the fun is trying to convince the actors to drop the persona of the person they represent, which invariably fails. I attempted that while dining in Chowning’s Tavern, a reconstructed 18thcentury alehouse. My good-natured effort to have Edmund Pendleton, who was a delegate to the First Continental Congress and a leader in Virginia’s move to independence, reveal his true self was unsuccessful. Fortunately, that was not completely true when I handed my waitress a credit card to charge the meal and she asked, “What’s this? We usually are paid in gold.” Not wishing to part with my single gold filling, I was relieved when she agreed to take “whatever this is to see if my master will accept it.” Chefs in several kitchens demonstrate the use of “receipts” (recipes) from 18th-century cookbooks

• Small Business/Corporate • Estate Planning, Probate & Trusts • Personal Injury

22 School House Hill Rd., Turner Phone: 207-225-5044

Governors Palace to prepare authentic dishes on a hearth. Presentations of dance, singing and other activities recall aspects of the lives of the half of Colonial Williamsburg’s population who were black. Costumed artisans use 18th century tools to fashion items similar to those made by their Colonial predecessors. The bookbinder carefully handstitches cover boards for a new volume. A shoemaker fashions men’s boots “with good thread well twisted.” Among other historic trades people are basket weavers, a cabinet maker and milliner. The results of their efforts are sold in stores along Duke of Gloucester Street. Leaving no stone unturned, figuratively as well as literally, archaeologists and historians transform research and construction projects into learning experiences for the public. For example, the courthouse where trials take place has been reconstructed as closely as possible to its original design, based upon clues to its former appearance found in early

documents. Costumed carpenters used tools and techniques of Colonial times to restore the building, as visitors looked on. As a result, James Hubbard and other figures from the past depict life as it once was in surroundings that would be familiar to the people whom they represent. One benefit of such attention to detail is an allencompassing trip back through time for today’s visitors. They may enjoy a theatrical comedy and a traveling magic show reminiscent of entertainment in the 18th century. Among choices for shoppers are inkwells, silver coffee pots and other souvenirs and gifts hand-fashioned by craftsmen in ways of old. Those interested in legalities may observe Colonial justice in action, and perhaps even play a role in the court proceedings. It’s all part of the immersion in the past available at Colonial Williamsburg. For more information, call (844) 574-2733 or log onto colonialwilliamsburg. com.n

• Propane

• Heating Oil, K-1 • On/Off Rd Diesel 1180 Route 2, Ste. 6, Rumford

tel: 562-0972

$10 off coupon with the purchase of 100 gallons of fuel. Offer expires February 22, 2016 You can now order fuel and pay your bill online.

Fueling Station with On & Off Road Pumps • Rte. 108, Peru with a 24/7 CardSystem dSyste

www.dixelddiscountfuel.com Gift Certicates Available

Scam Alert Bulletin Board

It’s cold out there! Let’s turn on the freeze! A security freeze safeguards a person’s credit report and it is one of the most effective ways to protect you from identity theft. Without access to your credit report, an identity thief is unable to obtain credit in your name, thereby great-

ly minimizing the potential damage from the theft. In Maine, turning the freeze on and off is absolutely free. This is a great proactive step you can take in the ght against fraud and identity theft! Call the Maine Bureau of Consumer Credit Protection for more information:1- 800-3328529. Be a fraud ghter! If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network www.aarp. org/fraudwatchnetwork or 1-877-9083360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention. 

Add a taste of authentic Maine humor to your next banquet, luncheon, conference, convention or company get together. Contact humorist and best-selling Maine author John McDonald

CALL TO MAKE RESERVATIONS WITH JOHN TODAY! Call: 207.899.1868

Email: mainestoryteller@yahoo.com


Page 16

The Western Maine Foothills

Janaury 2016

www.centralmainetoday.com

Ripley & Fletcher

Local 743-8938 Toll Free (866) 598-2559

80 MAIN STREET • SOUTH PARIS

FEATURED USED VEHICLES 2012 FORD FIESTA SE

#F423A. LOCAL TRADE, SERVICE RECORDS, ECONOMICAL TO DRIVE & OWN

or

2008 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ

2010 FORD FUSION SE

#F203A, SPORTS, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, BIG OPTIONS LIST

# P0428A,LOCAL TRADE, SERVICE RECORDS, SUNROOF, MANY OPTIONS

$11,500

or

$135

$11,987

$139

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2013 MAZDA 3.1 SPORT

2014 DODGE AVENGER SE

2010 FORD MUSTANG COUPE

PRICE

$9,977

$117

MO.

PRICE

MO.

PRICE

or

MO.

#F329A. RATED 40 MPG H’WAY, REAL CLEAN, NICE CAR, MANY OPTIONS

#F409A, ONE OWNER, 10K MILES, ALMOST NEW, SPORTY & LOTS OF OPTIONS

#P0435, LOCAL TRADE, V6, POWER OPTIONS, BLACK INTERIOR & MORE

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2007 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L

2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT

2008 ACURA TL 3.5

##GO14B, 4DR, 3RD ROW, SUN ROOF, MANY POWER OPTIONS, REAL KID MOVER

#F331A, 4X4, LOCAL TRADE, SERVICE RECORDS, SUNROOF, ONE OWNER

#GO71B, LOW MILES, LOCAL TRADE, SUNROOF, HEATED SEATS & LOTS MORE

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2012 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5I PREM

2012 JEEP GR CHEROKEE LAREDO

PRICE

PRICE

$13,500 or $158

$8,987

or

$106

MO.

MO.

2013 KIA SORENTO LX AWD

#F383B,EXTRA CLEAN, NEW TIRES, LOCAL TRADE, MANY OPTIONS

$19,500 or $229

PRICE

PRICE

$14,500 or $169

$10,500 or $123

MO.

MO.

#F406A,LOCAL TRADE, ONE OWNER, FEATURES LIKE HEATED SEAT & MORE

$19,987

or $235

PRICE

PRICE

$14,987

$17,500

$176

or

or

$205

MO.

MO.

#P0371, AWD, LOW MILES, LOADED, ONE OWNER, PERFECT WINTER SUV

$25,300 or $275

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2014 FORD TAURUS SHO AWD

2014 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT

2014 FORD F150 LARIAT CREW 4X4

#P0445A, UNLIMITED, 4WD, SOFT TOP, ONE OWNER ONLY 17K MILES

#P0443A, ONLY 26K MILES, ONE OWNER, NAV/GPS, HEATED SEATS, LOADED

PRICE

MO.

#P0431 . ONLY 19K MILES, LOADED, NAVIGATION, LEATHER, EVERYTHING

$31,500 or $381

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

PRICE

MO.

PRICE

$31,500 or $381

MO.

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

PRICE

MO.

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

PRICE

$39,987

MO.

LARIAT CREW

#E346A, LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS SALE

PRICE

ALL FINANCING SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL, ALL VEHICLES INCLUDE $149 DOCUMENT FEE, PAYMENTS WITH 25% DOWN CASH OR TRADE NO MONEY DOWN TO QUALIFIED BUYERS 3.99% APR, 72 MONTHS FOR 2003 OR LATER, EXCLUDES TAX AND TITLE FEE

www.ripleyandetcherford.com

The Western Maine Foothills January 2016  
The Western Maine Foothills January 2016  
Advertisement