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Western Maine Foothills THE

www.centralmainetoday.com

Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving nearly 250,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!

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Turner Publishing Inc., PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 • 207-225-2076 • Fax: 207-225-5333 • E-Mail: articles@turnerpublishing.net • Web: www.turnerpublishing.net

District Governor Visits River Valley Rotary Club

Recent visitors to the River Valley Rotary Club: Past district Governor Bob Laux, District Governor Sheila Rolling, Assistant District Governor Beth Abbott, Club President Joe Sirois

Rotary District Governor Sheila Rollins visited the River Valley Rotary Club in August. In addressing the club, she

Hope Association is very proud to announce the 3 year certification received from DHHS for excellent Community Case Management Services. Catherine Johnson, Executive Director, stated that this service has been instrumental in assisting approximately 35 individuals over the past few years. Case managers Whitney Gray and Courtney Wicker maintain a high level of professionalism and ethical standards. Donna Landry, LSW-Program Manager, ensures that the needs of the individuals and the department of human services are met at the highest standard. These community case managers oversee and support the personal choices of individuals. They may request focus regarding health and wellness that involve activities designed to promote, support and

reminded club members of the many good works performed by local Rotarians and by Rotarians around the world.

The River Valley Rotary Club, formerly known as the Rumford Area Rotary Club, recently celebrated its

River Valley Rotarians Honored by District Governor: Jerry Cohen, Catherine Johnson-Lavorgna, District Governor Rollins, Rich Allen, Charley Leduc.

90th anniversary. Rollins praised the club for its many years of service to its community and for the many donations giv-

en for worldwide projects over these many years. She specifically recognized Jerry Cohen,

Catherine JohnsonLavorgna, Rich Allen and Charley LeDuc for their service during the past Rotary year. n

Congratulations Hope Association

maintain the individuals overall health and wellbeing. Hope Association supports Quality of Life as a service that balances freedom of choices and individual lifestyle, with personal responsibility and system accountability. The focus is always on promoting the participant’s personal

competencies, autonomy, choice and strengths. Community Case Management Services are available in the Oxford, Franklin and Androscoggin counties. Please visit our Website and Facebook page for more information or contact Donna Landry at 364-4561. n

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The Western Maine Foothills

October 2015

www.centralmainetoday.com

Andrea Child, RN, Named Rumford Hospital DAISY Nurse

(L to R) John Ludwig, VP, David Frum, President & CEO, Andrea Child, RN, Joette Carlton, Inpatient Unit Manager and Becky Hall, Director of Nursing

The DAISY Award nurse honorees at Rumford Hospital personify remarkable patient experience. DAISY Award nurses consistently demonstrates excellence through their clinical expertise and extraordinary compassionate care, and they are recognized as outstanding role models in our nursing community. Rumford Hospital presented its most recent DAISY Award on September 22 to Andrea Child, RN. Recently, Andrea worked with a patient who was feeling very overwhelmed. This patient was feeling very de-

feated and insisted it was time to go home. Under the patient’s conditions, it was clear to the nurses and family that going home was not the right choice at this time. Andrea was able to reason with and convince this patient to stay one more night, giving everyone time to make the appropriate arrangements so that the patients could have a safe and smooth transfer the following day. Andrea is truly all about safe, reliable, high quality care for every patient, every day. As a DAISY Award Honoree, Andrea was presented a bouquet of

daisies, a DAISY certificate, a DAISY Award pin, and a hand-carved stone sculpture entitled A Healer’s Touch. Additionally, everyone in attendance celebrated with specially made cinnamon rolls. The significance of the cinnamon rolls is that Mr. Barnes especially enjoyed sharing cinnamon rolls with his nurses, and his family felt this should be a part of the ceremonies across the country. The DAISY Foundation was established in Glen Ellen, California, in 1999 by the family of J. Patrick Barnes who died of complications of the au-

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to-immune disease Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (ITP) at the age of 33. (DAISY is an acronym for diseases attacking the immune system.) During Mr. Barnes eight week hospitalization, his family was awestruck by the care and compassion his nurses at his hospital provided not only to him but to everyone in his family. So one of the goals they set in creating a Foundation in his memory was to recognize extraordinary nurses everywhere who make an enormous difference in the lives of so many people by the super-human work they do every day. n


October 2015

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com CLUES ACROSS 1. Plural of ascus 5. Repents 11. British School 12. Adhesive to catch birds 15. Male children 16. Oil company 17. Intestinal 19. Money slogan 24. 2nd tone 25. In actual truth 26. Belgian-French River 27. Rural Free Delivery 28. Point midway between S and SE 29. Texas armadillo 30. 2nd largest Hawaiian island 31. Pile up 33. Changes liquid to vapor 34. Yemen capital 37. Byways 38. V-shaped cut 39. Painting on dry plaster 42. Daminozide 43. Papa’s partner 44. __ -fi: fiction/ movie genre 47. 1st Soviet space station 48. Latvian capital 49. Come into view 52. Blue Hen school 53. Maine water com pany 55. Picture & word

puzzle 57. Atomic #18 58. Xiamen dialect 59. Being overzealous 62. One who did it (slang) 63. Night breathing noises 64. A minute amount (Scott) CLUES DOWN 1. Race of Norse gods 2. Large pebbles 3. Latin line dances 4. The inner sole of a shoe 5. A French abbot 6. Moves stealthily 7. An alternative 8. 39th state 9. Lotus sports car model 10. River fill 13. Of I 14. Many noises 18. Ghana monetary units 20. Actor Hughley 21. The Cowboy State 22. Jests at 23. America 27. Surprise attack 29. Daddy 30. Extinct flightless bird of New Zealand 31. Express pleasure 32. Cellist Yo-Yo 33. Bronx cheer 34. A more firm

substance 35. Essential oil obtained from flowers 36. Company that rings receipts 37. Largest church in Christianity 38. Capital of Wallonia 39. Heroic tale 40. Send forth 41. The Golden State 43. 1/1000 of an inch 44. Angel of the 1st order 45. Ukrainian peninsula 46. Disregard 48. Colophony 49. Spanish be 50. Military policeman 51. Cleopatra’s country 53. Br. drinking establishments 54. Removes moisture 56. Liberal Arts degree 60. Execute or perform 61. Atomic #77

feel lonely at the top. Make some time to reconnect and hang out with friends this week.

organized this week. Don’t fret, as you need not be in complete control at every moment.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, listen more than you speak in the coming days. You can learn so much more by remaining quiet and taking it all in, and others will appreciate your attentiveness.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, you may be inspired to do something creative but don’t know where to begin. Pisces may be a good source of inspiration. You can work on a project together.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, after an exciting event, life may seem a little mundane for a while. Happiness is what you make of it. Try a new hobby or make some new friends.

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, you can’t seem to focus your attention on one thing this week. However, wandering thoughts may put you in touch with some better ideas.

Page 3

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you may like to tackle projects on your own, but sometimes letting someone else pitch in can provide a fresh perspective and a new way of doing things.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Expand your social circles and you may meet some influential new people, Libra. This can only help your reputation and open up new doors to various opportunities.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 It’s time to get serious about your job-seeking efforts, Gemini. Start putting out feelers and see what is available. Also, fine-tune your résumé to get noticed.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, take control of a situation that comes to light this week. No one else seems capable of taking the reins but you. Chances are you will be an excellent leader.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, while success brings you many things, it can

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you may be unable to keep everything

Thanks for reading our paper!

The deadline for our next issue is November 10th Please send your articles or community news to

articles@turnerpublishing.net. You can submit ads to advertising@turnerpublishing.net.

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The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

The Healthy Geezer

By Fred Cicetti Q. I’ve been seeing lots of references about “restless legs syndrome.” I’ve never heard of this condition. Is it rare? Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) affects about one in ten adults in North America and Europe. RLS is found in both men and women but can begin in children. The percentage of people with RLS increases with age. And, seniors experience symptoms longer and more frequently. Many researchers believe that RLS is underreported. Victims of RLS are often diagnosed as suffering from insomnia, depression or a disorder of the nerves, muscles or skeleton. RLS is a neurologic movement disorder. It

produces uncomfortable sensations that cause an irresistible urge to move the legs. RLS symptoms can be relieved temporarily by movement. Symptoms occur during inactivity and strike most frequently during the evening. These attacks lead to sleep problems. The Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation says there must be five essential features present for a diagnosis of restless legs syndrome: * You have a strong urge to move your legs (sometimes arms and trunk), usually accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations in the legs. * Your symptoms begin or become worse when you are resting or inactive, such as when lying down or sitting. * Your symptoms get better when you move, such as when you walk or stretch, at least as long as the activity continues. * Your symptoms are worse in the evening or night than during the day, or only occur in the evening or nighttime hours.

* Your symptoms are not solely accounted for by another condition such as leg cramps, positional discomfort, leg swelling or arthritis. RLS may be inherited. About half of patients have a family history of the RLS. Also, there is a lower incidence of RLS in Asia than there is in North America and Europe. There are two forms of RLS—primary and secondary. Primary RLS is unrelated to other disorders; its cause is unknown. Secondary RLS can be brought on by kidney failure, pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia, or some medications. Research has shown that there is a relationship between RLS and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Most people with RLS also have periodic limb movement disorder

(PLMD), which causes leg twitching or jerking movements during sleep. There are drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat RLS. These include Mirapex®, Requip® and Neupro®. There are also several drugs approved for other conditions that help alleviate RLS symptoms. It is possible to combat the symptoms in other ways. Walking, massage, stretching, hot or cold baths, vibration, acupressure, meditation and yoga can help. Caffeine and alcohol can worsen RLS symptoms. If you would like to ask a question, write to fred@ healthygeezer.com. n

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SEND US YOUR GOOD NEWS articles@turnerpublishing.net


2

October 2015

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Business

Page 5

Business

Plan and grow your business with monthly Tips on various subjects such as Taxes, Human Resources, and Marketing.

Union Laws Apply to Non-Union Workplaces:

Non-solicitation and non-distribution policies even where there is no union

Submitted by Rebecca Webber No union? Your business still needs to pay attention to the National Labor Relations Act. The issue getting a lot of attention is facebook messages and what can be done about them when employees slam their bosses or employer’s business but there are other issues too, and those apply to non-unionized workplaces as well as places with unions. The Supreme Court has long held that the right of employees to communicate with one another regarding self-organization at the job site is protected by Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act. Section 7 is the part of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) that gives employees the right to self-organization. This part of the NLRA applies to non-unionized workplaces as well as places with unions. Section 8 is the portion of the NLRA that makes it illegal to interfere with the rights set out in Section 7 and describes what are called “unfair labor practices.” Prohibiting union solicitation but allowing other types of solicitation would be called an unfair

labor practice. The right to communicate set out in Section 7 encompasses the right to distribute union literature. The Court has affirmed this right in a variety of settings. See, e.g., Beth Israel Hosp. v. NLRB, 437 U.S. 483, 507 (1978) (holding that a hospital violates Section 8(a) (1) by preventing an employee from distributing union materials “during nonworking time in nonworking areas, where the facility has not justified the prohibition as necessary to avoid disruption of health-care operations or disturbance of the patients”). Limits on distribution policies apply to email as well. An employer may not single out union-related messages for harsher treatment, whether explicitly in its policy or by enforcing a policy only against union communications. For example, if an employer allows employees to send personal messages using company email, it must allow them to send union-related email messages. Similarly, an employer that allows employees to solicit coworkers on behalf of various organizations may not prohibit messages solicit-

ing on behalf of a union. Limits imposed with a union in mind will need to be evaluated in terms of all the non-union solicitation and distribution that often takes place in any workplace. For example, as one court noted, the employer, a hospital, “had permitted use of the cafeteria for other types of solicitation, including fund drives, which, if not to be equated with union solicitation in terms of potential for generating controversy, at least indicates that the hospital regarded the cafeteria as sufficiently commodious to admit solicitation and distribution without disruption.” Beth Israel Hosp. v. N.L.R.B., 437 U.S. at 502-03. The Court did acknowledge that union activity was recognized as possibly generating behavior that was “undesirable in the hospital's cafeteria,” but held that there were “less restrictive means of regulating organizational activity” that were more focused on the precise harm to be avoided. In other words, if the concern is noise, limit noise, but not all union gatherings; if the concern is crowding, limit meetings to less crowded times rather than impose a blanket prohibition.

In another case, the employer allowed a wide variety of solicitations – without discipline – including solicitations at work stations for Girl Scout cookies, ‘beach balm’ suntan lotion, March of Dimes, United Way, Secretary’s Day, and Boss’ Day, and ‘going away’ parties, birthday parties, and other social occasions. In addition, conversation was not limited to just work but included a wide range of subjects unrelated to work, with no resultant counseling. In contrast, an employee soliciting on behalf of a union was disciplined for both discussing and soliciting the signing of a union card. That employer was found in violation of the NLRA. Guidelines: 1. Don’t wait and update/revise/review policies until after union activity has already begun. 2. Decide what the harms are that the policy is intended to prevent: disruption of customer service? Customers seeing disturbing information? Noise? Crowding? Distraction during working times as opposed to breaks or off duty periods? Don’t suddenly have

a concern about noise, though, for example, just at the same time someone first posts a piece of union literature on a bulletin board. 3. Draft a policy that is focused on doing just what is necessary to accomplish those goals and address the identified concerns. 4. Don’t have a policy that allows unlimited exceptions so long as approved by someone in management. 5. Don’t have a policy that forbids union activity, or that is used to discipline an employee for union activity, when other solicitation activity is allowed. 6. Don’t have an access policy that forbids solicitation and distribution in areas where non-union solicitations and distributions have taken place in the past. 7. Do have a policy that limits access solely with respect to the interior of the facility and other working areas; “mixed use” areas or areas that have been used for solicitation in non-union activities cannot be limited in terms of the content of the use by employees and discussion allowed.

8. Do disseminate the policy to all employees, not just the ones engaging in activities associated with unions. 9. Do have a policy that applies to off-duty employees seeking access to the facility for any purpose (or base the limits on criteria like location and whether interfering with customer service). You can have exceptions that allow access by employees in their capacity not as employees but as customers/patients/visitors themselves with that access simply requiring that employees in those capacities follow the same rules as any other customer/patient/visitor. This article is not legal advice but should be considered as general guidance in the area of employment and corporate law. Rebecca Webber is an employment attorney; others at the firm handle business and other matters. You can contact us at 784-3200 (telephone). Skelton, Taintor & Abbott is a full service law firm providing legal services to individuals, companies, and municipalities throughout Maine. It has been in operation since its founding in 1853. n

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The Western Maine Foothills

October 2015

www.centralmainetoday.com

Nutrition Advice for Those With Lyme Disease Jodi Cornelio

Live Long, Live Well Jodi R. Cornelio, AS, BA, MBA Nutritionist, Personal Trainer and Motivational Speaker jcornelio@turnerpublishing.net

Lyme disease – Proper Nutrition Can Help You Feel Better We have all heard the horror story of Lyme disease and hopefully we are all taking preventative precautions to avoid ticks. If you have had an unfortunate run in with a tick and have be affected by this disease there are specific nutritional precautions that you can take to help you feel better and protect and enhance your immune system. Simply put, Lyme disease is a bacterium that impacts your immune system, if caught early enough it can be destroyed with antibiotics and proper nutrition can help. Here are some simple nutrition steps to focus on if diagnosed with Lyme disease. Avoid the following foods: Glutens – Some bacteria thrive on glutens. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley, some processed oats and any food made

with these grains. Wheatbased flours, pasta, couscous, bread, flour tortillas, muffins, cereal, crackers, beer, some oats and most pastries commonly contain gluten. Some unexpected foods containing gluten are broths, can soups, bouillon cubes, breadcrumbs, croutons, fried foods, imitation fish, lunch meats, hot dogs, malt, matzo, modified food starch, some seasonings, some salad dressing, soy sauce, pasta. There are many additives that have gluten in

them as well. Beware of sauces, gravies and seasoned products and basically foods that are in cans or packages. It is always beneficial to check the label or ingredient list on foods before eating them. The label “wheat-free” does not always mean that the foods are gluten free. If there are any concerns or questions, contact the manufacturer to be positive that there is no gluten in the food items. While pure oats are gluten free, many commercially processed

oats have been contaminated by wheat products containing gluten. It is often recommended to avoid oats if gluten-free eating is required. Sugars – minimize or avoid sugars especially if on an antibiotic drug. Sugars can hurt good bacteria’s in the body and breed bad bacteria’s. When reading food labels look for words ending in OSE such as sucralose and high fructose corn syrup. Avoid artificial sweeteners as they are just plain not wise choices and, our bodies were not designed to digest these types of manufactured products. Dairy products – Milk and cheeses and yogurt contain lactose and some bacteria thrive on that too. If taking an antibiotic the calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc found in these foods and in calcium enrich juices and vitamins can bind to the antibiotic and make it less effective. Read the label or ask your pharmacist for a list when in doubt. Yogurt can fool us. When on an antibiotic we are coached to eat yogurt to avoid yeast infections or other digestive upsets. Make sure it has active digestive cultures such as Acidophilus and no sugar added. Beware that calcium and lactose bind with the antibiotic making it less effective so you may choose to stay on the

BETHEL FAMILY HEALTH CENTER Providing healthcare for the entire family since 1979

safe side and take an acidophilus supplement or a pro-biotic supplement that contains 10 – 25 billion CFU s. Alcohol – A drink a day or one glass of wine may be good for the heart and I hate to be the barer of bad news but the fact is alcohol is converted to sugar in the body and it simply not good at building the immune system in this case. Do’s Now that I have taken all the fun out of foods, what can you eat? The answer is. You can eat whole foods in their natural state. Prepare your own food as much as possible. Fresh or frozen vegetables, all meats and good fats like olive oil. Examples of foods to eat are; beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form, fresh

eggs, fresh red meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated), all fruits and vegetables. Gluten free flours are; Amaranth, Arrowroot, Buckwheat, Corn and cornmeal, Flax, Rice flour, Potato flour, Hominy, Millet, Quinoa... And as always get plenty of rest, drink plenty of water, exercise everyday moderately and try to avoid stress. Yoga is a good outlet and great for the nervous and immune system. Live Long, Live well. For additional reading and references see: CDC. org, Mainelyme.org, Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Vol 14, number 3 Fall 2009., The Lyme Diet by Dr Nicola McFadzean ND n

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October 2015

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 7

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Page 8

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

October 2015

Mountain Valley JV Football Travels to Oak Hill

The Mountaine Valley JV football team traveled to Oak Hill in Wales recently for a game against the JV Raiders. Dispite the loss the Falcons played a good game. Photo by Dave Maher.n

                

            

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Historical Societies Visit Museum

Saturday, September 19, 2015 of the Rumford and Mexico Historical Society members at the Past Gas andPetroleumMuseum, located on Black Mountain Road in Sumner, ME. Front Row: Janette Blouin, Jo-anne Kenney 2nd Row: Harrison Burns, Brenda Austin, Jane Peterson, Irene Hutchinson 3rd Row: Herb Peterson, Barbara Burns, Janice Irish, Drucilla Breton, Lewis Irish, Bob Daigle Rear: Elliott Burns,Dennis Breton, David Blouin, David Gawtry

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Another year is winding its way down and low and behold, Medicare Open Enrollment is right around the corner. With all the priorities we have day to day, it is easy to forget that there is an incredible opportunity each year with Medicare Open Enrollment. If you are like the average senior here in Maine, you are likely receiving a daily mailbox full of advertisements trying to sway you to a new Medicare Plan. While the insurance carriers may think it’s an easy decision to make a change, it’s not easy. Doing the paperwork for a Medicare Supplement or Medicare Advantage Plan may be a relatively easy process but it’s not always easy to sort through the pile of options available from year to year. Maine has historically not had that many options available, but in 2016 more companies have come to the state to offer greater benefits. We are not always ready to make the change because what we have may already work just fine.

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Medicare Open Enrollment October 15th - December 7th

Every year is the same, you open your mailbox or grab the stack of pamphlets and flyers off the counter and you sit down to sort through the mess. Marketing companies spend billions to get your attention, and a full mailbox of shiny brochures may do just that. Some of these flyers really stand out, and some may not, of course it’s not until you read them do you see the subtle differences that most plans offer. Many of those plans really are comparable, but everyone has a reason to be on one plan or another. Now that you have sorted through the mess, tossed out what you thought wasn’t interesting, you have likely found a few things that have peaked your interest. Now what do you do? This is the yearly task that most seniors face and for most of you, it’s more than probable that you have given up and you just throw all that paper you get in the mail right in the circular file. But hold on a minute, because doing the status quo for this year’s

Open Enrollment may not be the best choice

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• Much lower premiums and co-pays OK, so now that you know some of the highlights, the real question is what those companies are and what are the details of those new benefits ? While it’s not appropriate to go into details here, there are ways to sort through the mish mash of options and get right to the answers. Here is a short list of items to consider when doing your Medicare Plan review. • Premium: Does my current premium fit my budget? Are there cheaper options? • Co-pays: Does my current plan offer the best and lowest co-pays? • Doctor/Specialists Network: Do I have a large network of specialists and doctors to choose from? • Additional Benefits: Are there additional benefits that a new plan may offer? While the list above is not a comprehensive list, it certainly is the best place to start for

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seniors to considering while contemplating a change. Now I’m sure it’s entirely possible that as you read this you’ll be asking yourself; Why do I need to change at all? Well I submit for your consideration that to ignore the changes in the market for 2016 may just be a lost opportunity. If you really feel paralyzed and fearful that change is dangerous, I suggest that you find an expert to help you sort through the piles of options and make sure that a solid and meaningful Open Enrollment benefits checkup is done. There are many competent insurance agents out there that specialize in the senior market; they spend countless hours training to remain on top of the newest options available. Find an expert today, and take advantage of the changes for 2016. Courtesy of Anthony G. Arruda, CSA, Certified Senior Advisor, Senior Planning Center, Mt. Blue Shopping Center, 207-778-6565.n

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The Western Maine Foothills

October 2015

www.centralmainetoday.com

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First graders at Rumford Elementary School are celebrating the “kick off” of the Pizza Hut Book It program. Children will earn a free personal pan pizza for each month that they reach their reading goal.

Left to right- Elysia Ames, David Frazel, Victoria Hartzel, Ryder Harding, and Riley Windover.

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By Jasmine White, MVHS Junior The drama department’s fall play this year will be Barefoot in the Park. It’s a play about a strict and stand-up lawyer who married a free-spirited women. Together they try to set up her strict mother and their quirky neighbor. It’s a romantic comedy that will keep you laughing. The play will be performed November 18, 19, 20 and 21 at 7 p.m. The audio engineering class went to a recording studio in Portland. They saw the inside of the recording room and were taught how to edit songs and how to use a sound board. After, they went to the House of Music for a tour including the green room, which is where stars hang out between recordings. Casey Glover

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and many others agreed it was a “rocking” experience. The Civil Rights team is working on enlightening students of vocabulary in the LGBTQ community. They are hoping that by helping people understand words like transgender or gender-fluid it will make them more comfortable around people of the LGBTQ community. October 5 is the start of homecoming week for Mountain Valley. This year the dress up days will be Monday is senior citizen day, Tuesday is tacky tourist day, Wednesday will be duo day, and Thursday will be color day. Thursday is the pep rally, the homecoming game will be on Friday and the dance will be on Saturday at 7 p.m. n

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Aging & Disability Resource Center for Androscoggin, Franklin, and Oxford counties 8 Falcon Road Lewiston, ME 04240 Â&#x2021; www.seniorsplus.org Like us on Facebook!

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

News from the Bethel Historical Society

50th Anniversary Planning Underway The Bethel Historical Society was founded at the Bethel Library on May 31, 1966, under the capable leadership of local historian Eva M. Bean (1895-1969). Consequently, in just a few monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time the organization will inaugurate a yearlong celebration in honor of its 50th anniversary! To prepare for this major milestone, BHS staff and members of the Programs, Exhibits and Publications Committee are already at work planning for new exhibits, special programs and fun ways to mark a half century of collecting, preserving and sharing local and regional history from the Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museums on Broad Street. Among the possibilities being discussed are the ever-popular â&#x20AC;&#x153;Antiquarian Supperâ&#x20AC;? (a tradition going back to 1855), a spring program on maple sugaring history, an exhibition focusing on the western Rangeley Lakes

entitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;They Took to the Woods,â&#x20AC;? a musical event/ fundraiser featuring a wellknown participant from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music Without Bordersâ&#x20AC;? concert series, and much, much more. A schedule of BHS Golden Anniversary Programming will be published early in 2016, with frequent updates and additions appearing on the Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page and within its e-News posts. Stay tuned! Annual Fund Campaign Launched Now that the 2015 Annual Meeting is history, BHS friends and members will soon receive a special mailing soliciting support for the Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;50th Anniversary Annual Fund Campaign.â&#x20AC;? This yearly fall fundraiser allows the Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff and volunteers to maintain daily operations at its two Museums and to offer programs, exhibits and research activities that make the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history meaÂŹningful, accessible,

and enjoyable for thousands of adults and schoolage children. To assist the Society in reaching its 50th anniversary goal, a special category of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Golden Anniversary Donorsâ&#x20AC;? is being created for those who either donate $50 or more as a first gift, or who add that much to their 2014 donation. Individuals and organizations falling into this group will be listed separately in the Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next â&#x20AC;&#x153;Report of Givingâ&#x20AC;? (published in 2016) and will also receive a unique, 50th anniversary commemorative thank-you gift with their acknowledgement letter. Anyone not already on the Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mailing list and who is interested in becoming a Golden Anniversary Donor may call the Society at 207-824-2908 or email the main office at info@bethelhistorical.org. Located on Broad Street in Bethel (established in 1768 and incorporated in 1796), the Bethel Historical

Page 11

Society collects, preserves, displays, and interprets the history of western Maine and the White Mountain region of Maine and New Hampshire through exhibits, lectures, events, and publications. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Museums of the Bethel Historical Societyâ&#x20AC;? feature six exhibit galleries and nine period rooms spread throughout two buildingsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the 1821 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Robinson House and the 1813 Dr. Moses Mason House. An extensive on-site research library contains books, manuscripts, maps and photographs available to members and the general public year-round by appointment. The Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museum collection contains thousands of objects that tell the story of the town of Bethel and the surrounding region. Throughout the year, the Society provides a full schedule of high quality events (most free of charge), for people of all ages. n

Physical Therapy Dept. Offers New Services

Two Franklin Memorial Hospital (FMH) physical therapists, Rebecca Gagnon-Pillsbury, MSPT, ATC, CLT; and Heather Patterson, PT; recently completed an extensive three-day course in Pelvic Health Physical Therapy, level 1, offered by the Section on Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health of the American Physical Therapy Association. As a result, they are accepting referrals from primary care providers to treat female patients who have pelvic floor disorders. Through the normal movement and stresses associated with daily living, a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pelvic floor can weaken or carry undue stress, resulting in urinary or bowel urgency, incontinence, constipation, pelvic pain, back pain, or pain with intercourse. Physical therapy can break into those dysfunctional cycles through education, behavior modification, and exercises to facilitate normal coordination of pelvic floor muscles. Patients seeking treatment will have an initial evaluation that includes an extensive history interview, examination of the spine and lower extremities, biofeedback assessment of the

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apy department add the treatment of pelvic floor disorders to the services we provide,â&#x20AC;? said Susan Loughrey, FMH interim director of physical rehabilitation & sports medicine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many women suffer from urgency, urinary and stress incontinence, back pain, and pelvic pain that can have a great impact on their lives. A woman who suffers from these symptoms should talk to her doctor about it; incontinence can be treated.â&#x20AC;? Patterson and GagnonPillsbury plan to also complete levels 2 and 3 offered by the Section on Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health of the American Physical Therapy Association, which will result in a Certificate of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Thera-

py (CAPP). The CAPP is awarded to physical therapists who complete three courses of training in pelvic physical therapy, pass written and clinical testing requirements at each level, and successfully complete a written case report. Other womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health services offered by the FMH Physical Therapy department include: treatment for back pain related to pregnancy and post-partum issues; lymphedema; post-operative breast care; treatment of lower back pain; and osteoporosis. For more information or appointments call 7792620. n


Page 12

The Western Maine Foothills

October 2015

www.centralmainetoday.com

Email Flows John McDonald

The flow of e-mails over the transom here at Storyteller Central has slowed a bit now that our summer visitors‚ (sometimes known affectionately in town as “summer complaints) have packed up and gone home. But people from away are still sending e-mails to me, hoping get answers to one question or another. For example Peter from Virginia e-mailed: “John, We’ve been staying a few weeks in a nice cottage on the grounds of a resort on the coast. While here we first want you to know how much we enjoyed reading your column in the weekly newspaper. After reading a few of your pieces we thought you’d probably be able to

answer a question for us. Several tourist brochures we’ve seen boast that Maine is a fourseason resort‚ yet people we’ve met and talked to, people who live here year-round chuckle, at the idea. Who’s right? Is Maine a four-season resort or isn’t it?” Thanks for the e-mail Peter. I think I’ve seen some of those brochures that boast of our mythical four seasons‚ but after living year-round in Maine for as long as I have I only wonder where these people learned to count. Here in the USA we have freedom of speech and that freedom even extends to our tourist promotion people. You can say - for tourist promotion purposes - that Maine has four seasons. But in fairness you should quickly mention that it is possible to get snowed on in at least three maybe even four of thoe seasons. Then,

of course, there’s “mud season,” for which no use has yet to be found. I can hear some of you now: “John, are

you s e rious? Snow in four out of four seasons?” Listen, here in Maine many of us haven’t trusted the weather ever since the infamous winter of 1816, a year still known in these parts as “The

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year without a summer.” “Are you serious, John, 1816? It’s time to give it a rest - 1816 was over 185

years ago!” I hear some of you saying. Yes it was a while ago, but some of us still enjoy talking about it Here in Maine we learn in history about the year 1816 and how here in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada there was a killing frost and bad snow storms in all twelve

months. Trying to explain the abnormal weather some quacks‚ of the time - yes, they had quacks back then, too - tried to blame the cold weather on poor Ben Franklin and his slick new invention, the lightening rod, that was being installed on top of barns and houses all over the place. As these quacks saw it, lightening was made up of intense heat, Ben’s new invention was interfering with the life of lightening, therefore Ben and Ben alone was most likely responsible for all the heat being lost. Later, when we learned a little more about this crazy planet, it was thought that the cold weather - more than likely - was caused by a number of large volcanic eruptions that occurred on the other side of the

world in 1814-1815 in places like the Philippines and Indonesia. I know it’s a longwinded answer to a simple question, Peter, but sometimes there’s no way around it. In a related e-mail, Will from Newport writes: “John, we’ve just retired to Maine and will be spending our first fall here. What do people around here do in the fall?” Thanks for the e-mail, Will. Most new arrivals like you spend a lot of time in early fall wondering things like: What ever happened to summer? Once you’ve more or less dealt with that question you can get down to doing what you probably should have been doing in the first place: Wondering if you’ve done everything necessary to get ready for winter, which is bearing down on our state like a runaway freight train. Hope you have a nice fall and are all ready when the first snow arrives, which will most likely be sooner than we think. n

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October 2015 Bethel Family Health Center (BFHC) has been a fixture in the Bethel community for 36 years. Starting out on Main Street in 1979, the practice moved to its current location, a converted A&P grocery store, in 1986. Coming out of St. Elizabeth Medical Center Family Practice Residency, NY, together in 1993, Drs. Richard DeCarolis and Kevin Finley have steadfastly served the community for over 20 years. They have recently been joined by Kristen Waitt, a Family Nurse Practitioner, and Dr. Catherine Chamberlin. Nearly four thousand people from more than 25 towns rely on BFHC for their health care, the only medical office within 25 miles. In 2014, they made over 13,000 visits to the health center for services ranging from well child checks and care for chronic diseases, such as diabetes, asthma and heart disease, to setting broken bones, to learning new strategies for managing their emotional health. As a Federally Qualified Health Center, BFHC has the unique mission to serve all members of the community, regardless of age, medical condition, or their ability to pay for services. Over 370 patients benefit from our Affordable Care program, which allows low income patients and their families to receive services at discounted prices, going as low as $10 for a visit. Eligible, low income patients may also qualify for

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

assistance with paying for needed medications. Last year 62 patients obtained free prescriptions for a savings of $252,000. Providing services to the whole person is an important and growing part of Bethel’s mission. Leslie Lufkin, LCSW, who has practiced clinical social work for 25 years, supports patients with behavioral health and substance abuse needs. Dental hygiene services for children are available two days a month at the health center provided by Sharon Smith-Bouchard, an independent practice dental hygienist. Crystal Fitch, a social worker, works with patients to solve problems with medical expenses, obtaining medications, food, housing and transportation, as well as to connect them to legal, elderly, behavioral health, disability and employment services. Telepsychiatry services as well as care management will be offered in the near future. Collaboration with other community, state and national organizations further distinguishes the Bethel Family Health Center. BFHC has achieved recognition as a Level III Patient Centered Medical Home by the National Committee for Quality Assurance and has recently been accepted into the Health Homes program, a statewide initiative to improve the quality of services to MaineCare patients. BFHC staff participate in community collaborations, most recently Mollyockett

Days. The health center also belongs to the Bethel Chamber of Commerce in order to contribute to the overall economic progress of the community and maintains working relationships with Gould Academy, local schools and recreational centers by cosponsoring physical activity and wellness programs. In 1999, BFHC became part of HealthReach Community Health Centers. HealthReach began providing medical care in Bingham and surrounding towns of Somerset County in 1975, 40 years ago. Today HealthReach oversees Bethel’s health center and 10 other Maine Federally Qualified Health Centers which are located in Albion, Bingham, Belgrade, Coopers Mills, Kingfield, Livermore Falls, Madison, Rangeley, Richmond and Strong. The HealthReach administrative team works closely with BFHC and the local advisory board, Northern Oxford Health and Service Council, Inc. to ensure ongoing care and high quality services well into the future. Northern Oxford Health and Service Council, Inc. members represent the towns served by the center. They maintain the health center facility and provide ongoing feedback to the staff from the community perspective. The current Council members are: Eleanor Jodrey-President, Troy Jordan-Treasurer, Jarrod Crockett, Betsy Doyon, Sande Parker-Secretary,

Crossword

Dennis Wilson, and Sarah Tucker. The Council and BFHC are working together on a long range plan to bring additional services to the community. BFHC’s NEWEST MEDICAL PROVIDERS: Born and raised in Maine, our two most recently hired providers are cheerfully settling in at Bethel Family Health Center. At Bethel Family Health Center, Catherine Chamberlin, DO and Kristin Waitt, FNP work alongside physicians Rich DeCarolis and Kevin Finley, as well as clinical social worker, Leslie Lufkin. 3,600 people from Andover, Bethel, Gilead, Greenwood, Hanover, Newton, Upton, Woodstock and neighboring towns visit the health center each year for a variety of medical and behavioral health and dental hygiene services. Catherine Chamberlin, DO “When I started here, every patient welcomed me on behalf of the community and the health center,” shared Catherine. She fell in love with Bethel through her work with Outward Bound and Mahoosuc Guide Service. “I try to be a healthy role model for my patients. I like to run, bike, hike, paddle, ski - most anything that keeps me outside.” Catherine was committed to working in the Family Practice arena. “I love people and relationships and in Family Practice you become part of the patient’s family,” said Catherine. She continued, “ I believe in

Sudoku

Puzzle on page 3

Page 13

treating the whole person, the whole family and the whole community. My philosophy is to discover and pursue wellness through traditional and integrative medicine,” she continued. Catherine recently completed the Maine Dartmouth Family Practice Residency. In 2011, she obtained a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree from Maine’s University of New England. Previously she graduated from Dartmouth College. Kristen Waitt, FNP “All of the patients I have met have been very welcoming and happy to see me; it has been wonderful to get to know them,” stated Kristen.” She has a lifelong relationship with the Bethel-Newry region, which has been her home away from home. Her entire family would visit Bethel nearly every weekend to ski Sunday River, with some summer hiking trips as well. “I am a big skier and a season pass holder at Sunday River. I also love hiking, kayaking and water skiing. I was in some water skiing competitions when I was young. I have cousins and an uncle who rank nationally!” Kristen also sought out a positon in Family Practice. She explained: “As a registered nurse, I discovered that many people do not have access to quality primary care. Because of this, a number of patients have preventable diseases that have progressed uncontrollably because of a lack of early detection. I

wanted to move to Family Practice, a preventive system that works to identify potential issues before they develop. Here at our practice, I have the opportunity to continue working with patients and building relationships.” Kristen graduated from the Family Nurse Practitioner program at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee and is board certified through the American Nurses Credentialing Center. She obtained her undergraduate nursing degree at Boston College in Massachusetts and brings experience from her work in a Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Epilepsy Patient Care Center. Bethel Family Health Center is part of HealthReach Community Health Centers, a group of eleven Federally Qualified Health Centers in Central and Western Maine. Dedicated providers deliver high quality medical and behavioral health care to citizens in over 80 rural communities. To ensure access for everyone, HealthReach accepts Medicare, MaineCare and major insurances. In addition, an Affordable Care Program is available to uninsured and underinsured residents as well as assistance with applications for programs that help with the cost of health care and medications including the Health Insurance Marketplace. A private, non-profit celebrating a 40year history, HealthReach is funded by patient fees, grants and individual donations. n

Puzzle on page 12

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The Western Maine Foothills is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest can call 207-225-2076 or fax us at 207-225-5333, you can also send e-mail to us at: articles@turnerpublishing.net. Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is mailed on a monthly basis to all postal customers of Peru, Dixfield, E. Dixfield, Hanover, Mexico, Roxbury, Rumford, Rumford Center, Andover, E. Andover, Greenwood, Locke Mills and Newry.Founded by Steven Cornelio in 1992.

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Page 14

The Western Maine Foothills

October 2015

www.centralmainetoday.com

Grouse Days

V. Paul Reynolds Ahhh, October. Frosty mornings and flaming foliage. Grouse days are upon us. In Maine, next to whitetail deer, there is no other game species that draws as much attention in autumn from hunters, residents and nonresidents alike. Deservedly. Can you think of any other game bird that so challenges a gun dog and a shooter? The bird man himself, John James Audubon, held the grouse-as-game-bird in reverence: “Sometimes, when these birds are found on the side of a steep hill, the moment they start, they

dive towards the foot of the declivity, take a turn, and fly off in a direction so different from the one expected, that unless the sportsman is aware of the trick, he may not see them again that day.” There can be no doubt, either, that our fondness for this fall game bird has something to do with its sweet flesh. They eat well. There is only one way to prepare and cook grouse, no matter what you hear or read in cook books. Cut up the breast in strips a half inch thick. Lightly sautee them in an iron skillet with butter and garnish with a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Don’t overcook. Sportsmen have been known to parboil a partridge breast in a bean pot or smother the overcooked breast with a creamy sherry sauce. This is a sacrilege, a culinary crime of the first order. Drown a woodcock breast in the bean pot if you must, but grouse richly deserve the respect reflected in

Sally of Seboeis as a pup with me at camp, circa 2000. the cooking adage that less is more. There is an additional reason why the grouse is the hallowed game bird, why the hunt for ruffed grouse has been the subject of so much attention over the years from sporting artists and legendary outdoor writers. It is the time of year, October, when fall foliage is a feast for the eyes and the air is clear and cool in popple swamps and alder

Rumford Elementary Students of the Month

swales. Then there is, for many of us, the main reason to be there picking our way through the thornapples, alder tangles and wire birches, the gun dog: the Setters, the Pointers, the Britts and the German Short Hairs. It is a rare upland bird hunter who doesn’t nurture and treasure a special relationship with his gun dog. Legendary grouse writer Corey Ford captures man’s romance

with his gun dog in “The Road to Tinkhamtown. The old man in the story spends his final hours reliving his days in the grouse covers with his beloved Shad. “... Shad was standing motionless. The white fan of his tail was lifted a little and his backline was level, the neck craned forward, one foreleg cocked. His flanks were trembling with the nearness of the grouse, and a thin skein of drool hung from his jowels. The dog did not move as he approached, but the brown eyes rolled back until their whites showed, looking for him. “Steady boy,” he called. His throat was tight , the way it always got when Shad was on point, and he had to swallow hard. “Steady, I’m coming.” This time of year, especially this time of year, memories of my “Shad” - a soft-haired English Setter named Sally of Seboeis take up residence in my daydreams. She was far from a “finished” gun dog, but she

ABC Quilt Project

The Village Scrappers of Livermore are pictured, from left, Karen Mitchell, Eva Henry, Lucy Henry, Merry Carver, Dee Williams, Carol Edmondson, Sue Israelson, Millie Quinn, Nancy Crosby, Nancy Timberlake and Doreen Maxwell.

Front row: Logan Gerding, Brody Knapp, Victoria Hartzell, Lucas Emery,Lee Carrier, Miles McKinley, and Ausli McQuinn Back row: Tucker Laramee, Robbie Leveillee, Alison Legere, Celeste Dickey, Ali Mazza, Michael Chase, Cora DeVore, Jake Dyment, and Mr. Decker, RES Principal

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wanted to please and took to the hunt with enthusiasm and energy. As a youngster she launched her gundog career at a wonderful pheasant preserve in New Brunswick and, later, the cornfields of South Dakota. Regrettably now, we didn’t hunt her as much as she deserved, but there were some wonderful days in Maine woodcock and grouse covers. Grouse days are always good, but never quite the same when your favorite gun dog can’t be with you. The author is editor of the Northwoods Sporting Journal. He is also a Maine Guide, co-host of a weekly radio program “Maine Outdoors.” His e-mail address is paul@sportingjournal. com . He has two books “A Maine Deer Hunter’s Logbook” and his latest, “Backtrack.” n

The Village Scrappers of Livermore have taken on a portion of the ABC Quilt project. Connie Warren has been the Chairperson for entire state for many years. Through discussions with Connie and our involvement with the project since 1995 we offered to assist with quilt distribution in the western part of Maine. The area includes Hospitals

in Farmington, Rumford and Lewiston. We are also covering Fire & Rescue for Jay, Livermore Falls, Fayette and Livermore. This year we delivered over 70 quilts to these facilities. Quilts and blankets were made for anyone from a new born to a teenager. The ABC Quilts Project originally was formed in 1988, to provide quilts

for babies who were abandoned due to substance abuse or HIV/Aids infections. The program has evolved to include any baby or child in need. We give from the heart out of a generosity of spirit. The giving is without expectation of return. Although each quilt is personally signed by the maker with the message “Love and Comfort to you from…” there is no knowledge of who receives the quilt, nor personal delivery of the quilt to a specific child. This will be an ongoing project with quilts being supplied to these locations as needed. If any other quilt group or individuals would like to be a part of this project please contact either, Karen at kftm@myfairpoint. net or Doreen at dmaxwell@megalink.net. n

FIND THE PHONY AD!!! You could win a Gift Certi�icate to an area merchant from one of our papers! It is easy to �ind - just read through the ads in this issue of The Western Maine Foothills and �ind the phony ad. Either �ill out the entry form below (one entry per month please) and mail to: Find The Phony Ad Contest, P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 or email to: phonyad@turnerpublishing.net. (one entry per household please)

Country Courier: Rachel Price Country Connection: Theresa Shostak Auburn Highlights: Tiffany H. Nickerson Franklin Focus: Charmayne Coffren Lake Region Reader: Michelle Veayo Kennebec Current: Kathy Damon Good News Gazette: No Correct Entries

Western Maine Foothills: David T. Theriault Lisbon Ledger: Arlean Levesque Two Cent Times: Donna Broughton Oxford Hills Observer: Robert Dubois Moose Prints: Peter Pisciotta Somerset Express: Laura Russell Lewiston Leader: Sandra Joly

All of the winners listed have won gift certicates to one of our advertisers. If you haven’t won - keep playing! We get hundreds of entries each month! It’s easy to enter - read through the ads in this issue and nd the phony ad, ll out the entry form found in this paper and mail it in. If you have the correct answer, your name will be entered into a monthly drawing!

You must include all the information requested below to be eligible to win. Note: Turner Publishing will not lend or sell your email address to a third party.

Name: Address: City: State: Zip: ( ) Email Address: Phone: Would you like to receive email noti�ication of local sales and specials___Y___N

Please tell us your age (circle one) 12-25 yrs. 26-35 yrs. 36-45 yrs. 46-55 yrs. 56 yrs. & up

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October 2015

The Western Maine Foothills www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 15

Genealogy Tourism Becoming Increasingly Popular

School children in Belarus welcome members of a family on an Ancestral Footsteps tour to their ancestral village with a gift of traditional bread.

By Victor Block

Planning a visit to Poland, where his ancestors had lived, Bernard Janicki went online and tracked down the parish priest in the village where his mother had been born. When he arrived, the pastor helped him find church records that traced his grandfather’s lineage to 1819, and the maternal side of his family back to 1751. Thus he became one of an increasing number of people who have made genealogy tourism – combining travel with research to trace their family roots -- one of the fastest growing segments of the tourism industry. The wealth of information available online is a good place to begin a trip down memory lane. A few strokes on a computer keyboard can unearth census records, ship

passenger lists, immigration documents and a treasure trove of other data. The National Archives contains a mother lode of in formation. The Family History Center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the world’s largest depository, with records from over 100 countries. Ancestry.com, which claims the title of world’s largest online resource for family history information, includes billions of historical records on its websites. But no amount of knowledge can compete with the thrill of making personal contact with relatives you might not have known exist, or visiting places where your forebears lived and your family roots were planted. Tour companies offer both organized group trips and

individual visits to states and countries where birth, marriage, death and other sources of information await discovery. There even are genealogy cruises for people who prefer to combine a learning experience with the opportunity to take to the high seas. Family Tree Tours takes small groups of travelers to Germany, Poland and Ireland. The company obtains research information from tour members in advance, which is forwarded to researchers on the scene who make contacts and arrange meetings in each family’s village. For more information log onto familytreetours. com. Several firms arrange visits to Salt Lake City, where participants have access to the voluminous records

Scam Alert Bulletin Board

A common scam that targets older Mainers is the medical alert scam. You receive a call from a company claiming a concerned family member ordered a medical device in case an emergency happens or you need help. However, in order to receive the device you need to provide

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your personal information along with a credit card number or banking information to pay a small service fee. Hang up immediately and never give these scammers any information. If a family member did purchase a medical device for you they would personally inform you. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network www.aarp. org/fraudwatchnetwork or 1-877-9083360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention. Social Media Post Link: http://wp.me/ p2ZEti-lsf. 

A couple from Los Angeles on an Ancestral Footsteps tour explores the woods in France where the wife’s grandfather fought the Germans during World War II. available at the Family History Center. When not poring over records or seated before a computer, roots researchers spend free time enjoying extra-curricular activities like attending a rehearsal of the world-famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir and touring the magnificent Temple Square Garden, which sprawls across 35 acres. Among tour companies that offer research visits to Salt Lake City are Ancestor Seekers (ancestorseekers. com) and Ann-Mar Genealogy Trips (genealogytrips. com). The ancestraltravel.net website offers an international inventory of genealogy research tour providers. Another must-see website is cyndislist.com, a free categorized and cross-referenced list of more than 335,000 links to helpful resources. Categories include localities, ethnic groups, religions and more. This can help people planning a trip to locate archives, court houses, cemeteries and other places where they can seek family history information before they leave home. Those seeking the ultimate in a personalized tour may find what they’re looking for at www.ancestralfootsteps. com. A researcher accompanies clients throughout their journey to places where their ancestors lived, attended school, worked and worshipped. Its luxury offerings might even include travel by

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private jet and a chauffeurdriven car. Roots researchers who prefer to combine the pleasures of a cruise with their family exploration also can find inviting alternatives. For example, Legacy Family Tree cruises combine daily genealogy classes taught by experts in the field with itineraries that range from the Caribbean and Panama Canal to Alaska and Australia. When not getting valuable information and assistance relating to their family history hunt, passengers can enjoy the usual cruise ship amenities and activities, plus some surprises like an ice skating rink, miniature golf and classes in wine tasting, jewelry making and other pursuits. For more information, log onto legacyfamilytree.com. People who sign up with Cruise Everything for a genealogy voyage get to help plan the subjects that experts in the field will discuss. Passengers receive a questionnaire several months in advance that allows the speakers to cover the topics of greatest interest. Their

presentations include information about using the Internet for research, photography and sources of helpful records. Participants also may arrange a private appointment with a presenter to get personal assistance. The January 16-23, 2016 cruise will visit several Caribbean destinations, with shore excursions available for those who wish to explore them. For more information log onto cecruisegroups.com. Enjoying a Caribbean cruise may seem to have little in common with searching for one’s ancestral links. It’s but one of a variety of opportunities for those seeking to combine a love of travel with the chance to add branches to the family tree. Victor Block is an awardwinning travel journalist who lives in Washington, D.C., and spends summers in Rangeley, Maine. He is a guidebook author who has traveled to more than 70 countries. His articles appear in newspapers around the country, and on travel websites. n

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The Western Maine Foothills

October 2015

www.centralmainetoday.com

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The Western Maine Foothills October 2015  
The Western Maine Foothills October 2015  
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