Page 1

A Product of

M

Maine’s largest direct mail community publication company serving over 200,000 homes and “It’s All Good” News!

A Maine Owned Company

OUNTAIN ESSENGER

River d the Plantations of Dallas, Rangeley & Sandy ry Week to Homes in Phillips, Ran n e a v E c o e s e geley, Direct Mailed Fr and Oquos

75¢ COUNTER COST

Volume 5 • Issue 15 January 15, 2016

Rangeley Friends of the Arts New Boared Members

At their recent Annual Meeting and Pot Luck on December 14, The Rangeley Friends of the Arts (RFA) voted in new Board Members and said “Thank You” to outgoing members. Pictured here L to R: Incoming Members – Caroline Smith, Michele Laliberte, and Dawn Field, missing from the photo is Mary Ellen Simon. Outgoing Members - Paul Ellis, Don Schuman, Sue Downes-Borko, and Heidi Sorensen. The RFA is a non-profit organization bringing the arts to life in the Rangeley Lakes Region; learn about their programs at www.rangeleyarts.org

RFA President Millie Hoekstra is shown here presenting long-time Board Member Paul Ellis with a plaque in appreciation for his extraordinary years of service to the organization. He is flanked by other outgoing members, who all received Certificates of Appreciation for their service. L to R in back: Heidi Sorensen, Paul Ellis, Don Schuman, and Sue Downes-Borko. In front: Millie Hoekstra.

Frank

cerminara

FIREWOOD

Cut-Split-Delivered

•SNOW PLOWING •SANDING •ROOF SHOVELING

SOMEONE FORGOT TO TREAT YOU TO A MASSAGE CUT THIS OUT AND REMIND THEM

Tina Falasco, LMT Rangeley, ME

864-5805

Specializing in Deep Tissue & Neuromuscular Therapy

“A Family Fa Owned Business Since 1978”

2180 Main Street, Rangeley 218 ey

864-2622

Providing people that love Rangeley a place to enjoy for generations! Mark Gordon Cell 207-491-5142 Ofce 207-864-3925 Email: rangeleybuilders@msn.com www.rangeleybuilders.com

Have You Found the Hidden M in one of the ads?


Mountain Messenger

Page 2

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

Skowhegan Savings Bank Gives Grant

Correction

The Skowhegan Saving Bank recently awarded the Rangeley Friends of the Arts a grant of $2,000 to subsidize their music and dance lesson and community theater programs. Shown here is Millie Hoekstra, President of the RFA, receiving a check from Dawn Field, Manager of the Rangeley Branch of the Skowhegan Savings Bank. The funds are part of Skowhegan Savings Bank’s Charitable Foundation that supports local causes. The RFA is a non-profit organization bringing the arts to life in the Rangeley Lakes Region; learn about their programs at www.rangeleyarts.org

Correction: Rangeley’s Carl Trafton goes in for a layup against a Buckfield player during an away game on December 22. The Lakers owned the second half of the game, but could not erase the last two points of a Buckfield lead. Bucks-47, Lakers-45. (Photo by Bill Van Tassel)

Snack Foods that Promote Better Sleep According to the National Sleep Foundation, changes in sleep patterns are a part of the aging process. Many people experience difficulty falling asleep and then staying asleep as they age, and that difficulty can make men and women over 50 feel more tired during the day. But even though difficulty sleeping may be a part of aging, that does not mean men and women over 50 cannot take steps to improve their sleeping patterns. For example, certain snack foods may help to improve quality of sleep, especially when these foods replace less healthy snacking options. While men and women over 50 should always consult with their physicians before making any changes to their diets, the AARP notes that the following

are a handful of snack foods that promote better sleep. · Almonds: Magnesium is a mineral with muscle-relaxing properties, and almonds contain enough magnesium to help men and women get a better night’s sleep. A small amount of almonds before bed might be enough to make falling and staying asleep easier. · Bananas: Much like almonds, bananas provide a substantial amount of magnesium. Bananas also contain the amino acid tryptophan, which many people associate with Thanksgiving turkey. While tryptophan might be most often associated with the sleepiness people feel after eating a holiday meal, it also has been linked to better sleep quality, so a banana shortly before bed might be just what

Rangeley

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

“Off-Road General Store”

Now offering exhaust repairs & custom exhaust work! FULL SERVICE GAS & DIESEL 2599 Main Street, Rangeley • 864-3494 www.domsjeep.com

FEEDS & SEEDS Pet & Animal Feeds

Landscaping Supplies

•Deer Feed •Salt/Grain Blocks •Cracked & Whole Corn •Black Oil Sunflower FIREWOOD •Meaties •Asst. Bird Seed Cut-Split-Delivered •Rock Salt/Paw Thaw •Deer Pellets Patty P tt & Frank F kC Cerminara

2180 Main Street, Rangeley ngeley (Across from IGA))

864-2622

you need to fall and stay asleep. · Cheese and crackers: One more traditional snack may just help you get a better night’s sleep. Cheese and crackers contain tryptophan and carbohydrates, which can induce a better night’s sleep and help you fall asleep sooner. · Cherries: Cherries contain the sleep hormone melatonin, and the AARP notes that recent studies indicated that participants who drank tart cherry juice on a daily basis fell asleep more quickly and slept longer and better than participants who did not. · Hummus: The primary ingredient in hummus is chickpeas, which are loaded with tryptophan, folate and vitamin B6. Folate has proven especially beneficial to older men and women who need help regulating their

sleep patterns, while vitamin B6 helps the body regulate its clock. · Peanut butter: Peanut butter is another snacking item loaded with tryptophan. Spread some peanut butter on a carbohydrate, whether it’s a slice of toast or some crackers, before going to bed, and you may enjoy a better, longer sleep. · Walnuts: Like cherries, walnuts contain melatonin, which can contribute to a longer, more restful night’s sleep. Walnuts also can help regulate stress, which is a leading cause of sleeping difficulty. Many men and women experience difficulty sleeping as they age. But the right foods may just help combat such problems and help men and women get a more adequate night’s sleep. n

Town of Rangeley

The Town of Rangeley is now accepting applications for full-time police of�icer. �e offer a competitive wage and bene�it package for quali�ied applicants. Minimum standards� applicants must be 21 years of age or older, have a high school diploma or GED equivalent; possess a valid driver’s license; have no serious motor vehicle record and no disqualifying criminal history; must have completed the alert test and the �irst two pre-service modules through the Maine Criminal Justice Academy and otherwise must be able to comply with the preentrance standards for the Maine Criminal Justice Academy basic school. Candidate(s) must also be able to complete a criminal background check to departmental standards, polygraph examination, and medical examination. Please submit resumes and applications to the Rangeley Town Ofϔice at 15 School Street, Rangeley Maine, 04970 no later than January 15, 2016 at 4PM. For a copy of our application, please contact Traci Pitt at adminassist@rangeleyme.org. Applications, salary information and questions can be directed either by emailing Traci J. Pitt, Administrative Assistant to the Town Manager at adminassist@ rangeleyme.org or calling 207-864-3183.


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

Scam Alert Bulletin Board

Did you win the lottery? Congratulations! Are you being asked to pay a “processing fee” or a tax to claim your prize? If so, this is a scam. If you legitimately won the lottery, you wouldn’t owe even a postage stamp to collect your winnings. Is the lottery based

Page 3

www.turnerpublishing.net

in Jamaica, Canada or Europe? Remember, foreign lotteries are illegal in the United States and you cannot win a lottery you never entered. Don’t wire money to anyone you don’t know or trust. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam, you can

Do You Sudoku Answer on page 6

stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network www. aarp.org/fraudwatchnetwork or 1-877-908-3360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention. n

THANK YOU FOR READING!

Celebrating 20 years of Community Health and Wellness!

What is your WHY?

x To look better, feel better, achieve a goal? x DO IT FOR YOU!

Mens Pick Up Pickleball

Sundays 9am-11am All abilities and ages welcome!

Here is our HOW!

We are skilled and passionate about helping you with your weight loss and fitness goals. x National Academy of Sports Medicine Trainers x Our beliefs: o No two people are built the same, thus need different fitness/nutrition programs o Thin and Fit are not the same thing o Heathy and thin are not the same thing o Exercise is for more than burning calories o Nutrition is just as important as fitness

Contact us to set up a FREE consultation: 207-864-3055 Fitness@rangeleyhealthandfitness.com

www.Rangeleyhealthandwellness.com

$5 per person

The Rangeley Fitness Center 207-864-3055

www.Rangeleyhealthandwellness.com


Mountain Messenger

Page 4

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

WEATHER FORECAST January 15th - January 20th Forecast from www.weather.com January 17th

January 18th

Tuesday

Wednesday

29°

27°

19°

19°

21°

19°

10°

16°

Saturday January 16th

23°

11°

January 15th

Mostly Sunny

Sunday

Monday

Friday

Snow

AM Snow Showers

Cloudy

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, proceed with caution in a new friendship or partnership. Test the waters before you devote yourself fully. This approach will ensure you made the right decision.

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, do not allow distractions to keep you from completing tasks that need to get done. Use your ability to focus to plow through your to-do list and finish in record time. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, this week you may be tempted to take risks you never would have considered before. Just don’t let excitement get in the way of common sense. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Something totally unexpected will grab your attention in the next few days, Gemini. Trust your intuition to take things slowly and put out all feelers before you forge ahead. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, although you have a plan to reach all of your goals, do not put success ahead of others’ feelings. Be considerate of others even if their efforts are not up to par.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, if the potential to be criticized scares you, you may not be inclined to express yourself honestly. Worry less about what others think of you and be confident in yourself. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, if you’re feeling on edge lately, it may be because you haven’t had a chance to relieve stress. Exercise can be a surefire fix to what ails you, so get up and go. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, an opportunity presents itself in the weeks ahead, and this will be too good to pass up. Embrace the changes that this opportunity offers. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, your social life is bustling, but sometimes it can be difficult to keep up with all of the things filling your calendar. You may want to take a few days off.

January 19th

Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 You can’t always play the peacemaker, Aquarius. Sometimes you just have to let others fight their own battles and then offer support to those who need it. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, there is more going on than meets the eye. You have to pay attention to the subtle undercurrents to figure out fact from fiction.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

JANUARY 17 Jim Carrey, Comic Actor (53)

JANUARY 21 Hakeem Olajuwon, Athlete (53)

JANUARY 18 Dave Batista, Wrestler/Actor (47)

JANUARY 22 Alize Cornet, Athlete (26)

JANUARY 19 Dolly Parton, Singer (70)

JANUARY 23 Richard Dean Anderson, Actor (66)

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Career obstacles may pop up from time to time, but you have the commitment to see things through for the long haul. Keep up that perseverance this week.

JANUARY 20 Gary Barlow, Singer/Composer (45)

CLUES ACROSS 1. Women (French) 5. Hyrax 8. Distress signal 11. Trade 13. Large northern deer 14. The 3 Wise Men 15. Marten of N Asian forests 16. Hoover’s agency 17. Received an A 18. 2nd Islamic month 20. Light brown 21. Clarified butter used in Indian cookery 22. Frankness 25. Argentina’s capital 30. Citizen of Kenya or Zimbabwe 31. Noah’s boat 32. Family of languages in So. Africa 33. Inappropriate 38. Scientific work place 41. Hungriness 43. Say to talk about an annoying topic 45. Sing and play for somebody 47. Strike buster 49. A citizen of Thailand 50. Civil Rights group 55. Honest Company’s

Jessica 56. ‘__ death do us part 57. Malarias 59. Claim against an other’s property 60. Mined metal-bearing mineral 61. Dashery 62. Capacity unit 63. Primary color 64. Indian dress CLUES DOWN 1. Manuscripts (abbr.) 2. Netherlands river 3. Italian island 4. One’s own being 5. More adroit 6. Balkan country 7. Psychologist B.F. 8. Investment group Goldman ___ 9. Double curve 10. The plane of a figure 12. Ocean 14. Public presses 19. Civil Rights activist Parks 23. Cooking container 24. Arctic native 25. Founder of Babism 26. Bashkortostan capital 27. Bulky grayish-brown eagle

Crossword

January 20th

28. Louse egg 29. About sight 34. ___/Tuck: TV drama 35. Black tropical American cuckoo 36. Chest muscle (slang) 37. Expression of disappointment 39. One who assists 40. Antilles island 41. Served food 42. Egyptian Sun god 44. Performed successfully 45. Cavalry-sword 46. Abba __, Israeli politician 47. Jonas __, cured polio 48. The Muse of history 51. Express pleasure 52. Turkish leader titles 53. Castro country 54. Nobleman 58. ___ Lanka


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

Page 5

www.turnerpublishing.net

B•L•U•E•S Buying•Local•Used & Extra•Stuff

PRESSURE WASHER: 5HP, Honda OHV. Excellent condition. $500. 864-5882.

16 FOOT OLD TOWN CAMPER CANOE Royalex very nice. $400.00 Rangeley 864-3966

CRAFTSMAN 12” BANDSAW 1 HP $100.00 Call Chick at 864-5115 Rangeley

CABELA’S FOLDABLE CANOE CARRIER Used Once $60.00 Rangeley FOR SALE WATERFORD 104.MK II WOOD864-3966 STOVE with 9 feet of 6 THULE CAR TOP CAR- inch pipe. Like new $300 RIER SYSTEM Includes 670-8095. - towers, locks, gunnel brackets $95.00 Range- DINNER FOR EIGHT PEDESTAL TABLE With ley 864-3966 butterfly leaves 8 chairs 2001 VW JETTA TDI. asking 1/3 of original Black. 250,000 Miles price. $600 call 864-5334 Automatic. Arizona Car. Needs Fuel injector RESTAURANT/RETAIL pump. Four new stud- SPACE FOR RENT. Dalded snows available. las Hill Road, Range864-3907 Rangeley. ley. Base of Saddleback Mountain. Call 864-3612. Mike

60 HP FORD DIESEL TRACTOR, Bucket loader, 3 pt. Grader blade, will do all your work. $6,000 65 POLARIS, 90 YAMAHA & TRAILER $3000 for all, great family fun. KENNMORE UPRIGHT FREEZER $50.00 Call 670-5442 or 864-9068 FOR SALE A 1/2 Windshield, soft top both new will fit Polaris side by side A.T.V. and wood working tools electric and hand tools all negotiable. Call 639-2879 FOR SALE YEAR ROUND HOME with mountain veiws Rangeley ME, 3 Bedrooms finished basement 1 1/2 baths, attached garage. $229,00.00 Call 3612444 or 864-2909 leave a message

AMF/ALCORT SUNFISH 1970’S VINTAGE SAIL, centerboard, rudder, and mast. You pick up. $200 OBO Call 8643812. WANTED: FILL, also anything compostable as well as containers such as joint compund buckets, any barrels. 864-3878

WANTED BUYING COINS. Primarily in2 BED ROOM APART- terested in U.S. Indian MENT: Nice newly re- head cents and wheat done 2 bedroom apart- pennies. Will consider ment in Rangeley. $675 others. I am a collector Per month plus heat not a dealer. Chuck 207and electric. No pets, 696-8367. no smoking. References and background check WOOD STANLEY IRISH airtight cookstove with required. call 864-3846

water back. Heats house and water, cooks great. $2,000. Water tank and piping available, $200. Call 207-864-5539 around 6pm. Rangeley.

piece. Leave msg 860-9990

MAH JONG. Know the game or want to learn? Wed afternoons. Call Jackie 207-557-2503, FOR SALE SKIS One or email Jackie at pair Atomic beta-Ride jump422@gmail.com. 10-20’s 185cm $150. For more information call FREE CATS for adoption to a good home, all Kevin at 670-6007. shapes, sizes and color. FOR SALE SKIS One Call 864-2000. pair Atomic Beta-Ride 11-20’s with racing PIANO - LESTER Spinbindings 180cm $250. et 64, dark finish, needs For more information call tuning & minor repair. Kevin at 670-6007. 4 0 1 / 2 ” W- 3 1 ” H - 2 4 ” D . Buyer must move. AskBLUE PINE DESK and ing $200. 864-2153 cabinet, pierced tin doors. 3’x6’x6’, custom CLEARED HOUSE LOT built. Make offer 864 overlooking Rangeley -2936 Lake. Excellent views of Rangeley Lake. Cleared FENDER SRV SIGNA- and driveway in. ElecTURE STRATS both in tric and phone on propexcellent shape one like erty. $49,000, call 207new one heavily played 491-8669 for more info. call for more information $3500 for both or $2000 a FOR SALE: 17’ Royalex

PO Box 214 • Turner, ME 04282-0214

email: advertising@turnerpublishing.net • articles@turnerpublishing.net The Mountain Messenger is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest can call 1-207-225-2076 or fax us at 1-207-225-5333, you can also send e-mail to us at: articles@turnerpublishing.net. Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is mailed on a weekly basis, FREE to all postal customers of Strong, Avon, Phillips, Madrid, Rangeley, and Oquossoc and the Plantations of Dallas, Rangeley & Sandy River.

Mountain Messenger’s Important Legal Info CEO/Publisher Jodi Cornelio

Senior Designer Michelle Pushard

Writer/Photographer Bill Van Tassel

Advertising: Betsy Brown George McGregor Michelle Gosselin Maria Holloway

Graphic Design Danielle Emery

Proof Readers Hal Small Office/Billing Tom Tardif

Old Town Tripper Canoe. Great condition – some scratches but no dings or dents. Army Green w/ black molded seats. Low mileage! $1300. OBO 864-3971 FOR SALE: 1984 Honda Motocycle, 700CC, 34,000 miles. $950 8645489 1929 ORIGINAL C.W. BARRETT Rangeley Guide Boat. Documented by professional surveyor: Wineglass Stern, Original Oars, Paint, Last in Rangeley, 1970’s found in Wolfeboro N.H. Brand new load rite trailer! Museum Quality $6,500 O.B.O Call Gary 207-860-9293 RARE 1982 CM450A HONDAMATIC Windshield, crash bar, luggage rack, sissy bar, back rest, cover, new tires and battery. 5,951 miles Excellent Condition $1,800 Strong 6843739

CLASSIFIED AD FORM Send this order form with $15 to Turner Publishing P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282

Name_____________________________________________________ Address___________________________________________________ Number of Weeks_____________________

CityState__________________________________ Zip_____________ Up to 30 words or less


Mountain Messenger

Page 6

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

Crossword Puzzle Answer Puzzle on page 4

Sudoku Answers

Enter the MM Contest and you could win a $10 gift certificate to The Shed in Rangeley. One of the ads in this paper contains our MM Logo. Find the ad with the MM logo, cut it out then mail it to us with your name, address and phone number and all correct submissions will be entered into the drawing once a month or email information to advertising@turnerpublishing.net. Entries must be submitted by the Friday after the newspaper is published. Good Luck! Mail submissions to: MM Contest, PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 One winner per month. Odds of winning depends on the number of correct submissions. For advertising please email advertising@turnerpublishing.net

Everyone’s Talking about the Mountain Messenger! Call today at 225-2076 and see how direct mail can work for your business!

207-864-WRGY (9749) www.wrgy.org • wrgyradio@gmail.com

PO Box 844 • Rangeley, Maine 04970

4-7am 4-7 am 7-8am 7-8

Mon. Mon.

Tues. Wed.Schedule Thurs. 9/27/12 Fri. Sat. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Programming - 10/25/12

9-10am 9-10

10-11 10-11am 11-12 11-12 12-1pm 12-1 pm 1-2pm 1-2 2-3 2-3pm 3-4pm 3-4 4-5pm 4-5 5-7pm 5-7 7-8pm 7-8 8-9pm 8-9 9-10pm 9-10 10-12 10-12 12am 12 am -– 44am am

San San Francisco Francisco Symphony Symphony Chamber Santa Fe Chamber Santa Fe Society of Music Chamber Soc. of Lincoln Festival Festival Lincoln Ctr. Center Mayo Bioneers/ Folk FolkAlley2 Alley2 Health Beat Clinic Radio Celtic General Celtic General Connections Store Connections Store Bluegrass New Jazz Bluegrass Jazz Review2 Archive Review2 Profi les

New New York York Philharmonic Philharmonic

Eclectic Music MixMix Eclectic Music

8-9 8-9am

Sun. Sun.

Doug’s Doug’s Variety Variety Hour Hour Ron Hoar Oldies Hour(50s/60s; (50s/60s; 70s/80s) Ron Hoar Oldies Hour 70s/80s) Eclectic Music Mix Eclectic Music Mix Country Classics Hour Hour Country Classics Eclectic Music Mix Eclectic Music

Bioneers

Mix

Global Village Global Village

Eclectic Music Eclectic MusicMix Mix Bioneers/ Fur Planetary Fur Bluegrass Folk Big Picture Picture Bluegrass Folk Big Planetary Piece Radio/ Piece Science Review1 Alley1 Alley1 Review1 Science Radio Ranch Bioneers Ranch Old Time Time Old Radio Radio

Old Time Time Old Radio Radio

Eclectic Music Music Mix Eclectic Mix

WRGY WRGY Presents Presents

Back Story

Back Story

Philosophy Philosophy Talk Talk

Best of Blues Victrola Best of Victrola Blues& British Beyond Show British Show Dimensions Indie Indie Indie Eclectic Indie Eclectic InforInformant2 Music Music Mix Informant2 Informant Mix mant

Big Vocals BigBand/Mellow Band/Mellow Vocals

Late Night Rock Late Night Rock


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

Page 7

www.turnerpublishing.net

Out with the Old John McDonald

It’s almost another New Year and that means out with the old and in with the new. But here in Maine we’ve never been anxious to part with antiques and other old things. Someone once told me a little about how things in the antique business work. They said back in the 1950s, as many rural homeowners in Maine were installing indoor plumbing, antique dealers from Boston and beyond came to Maine and drove through our small towns with trucks, stopping at almost every farmhouse where they’d offer quarters for those classic ceramic pitchers and bowls, which sat on tables in almost every Maine bedroom. Farm families were so proud of their new bathrooms - with sinks and tubs - that they were tickled to hear that someone wanted those old ceramic things. If this crazy city fella was willing to give them 25 cents each for

them then who were they to refuse? Those quaint pitcher-and-bowl sets eventually became hot items in the antique emporiums of big cities, selling for many times more than what was paid to folks here in Maine. But I originally wanted to talk about public television’s “Antique Road Show,” which is now seen online. The thing I enjoyed about the show is the genuine suspense that was skillfully created by the show’s antique appraisers, as they begin talking about a particular item. They usually begin with a dazzling display of knowledge: “This rare vase is an excellent example of 18th Century Russian ceramic artistry and even has the skilled craftsman’s name - Igor Klutzski - right here on the back, which makes it even more valuable. Klutzski was special pottery maker to Czar Alexander and he made a limited number of these beautiful pieces. Upon hearing this the owner is all smiles. The appraiser will then ask where the owner got the rare

when he walked in the door but after hearing the appraiser go on about all those impressive-sounding details the guy begins to think he can sell the stupid thing and pay off his mortgage or at least buy a nice camp somewhere. Us folks at home are thinking along the same lines and assume the vase is worth a small fortune. That’s when the appraiser can say either, “This unassuming little vase would probably fetch at auction anywhere from $55,000-$60,000 dollars;” or, just as easily, he can say, “Unfortunately, the works of Igor Klutzski have fallen out of favor re-

piece and the owner will say something like: “I bought it about 30 years ago at a yard sale in South Hiram, Maine and I think I paid about 50

cently and aren’t doing too well at auction these days. If you had resold as soon as you bought it 30 years ago you probably would have gotten about $50,000 for it but in today’s market you’d be lucky to get a buck, and that’s being generous.” I sometimes imagine that when they turn off the camera the appraiser quickly flips the guy a buck and then takes the priceless object to a New York auction house where it sells it for $50,000. The appraiser then buys a place in Maine and starts collecting and selling - among other things - pitcher and bowl sets. n

cents for it.” This is where the suspense really starts building because it’s obvious the owner had no clue what the thing was worth

State of Maine Approved Seeds and Clones Available Today With Take Home Educational Course Unlimited Plants Available 12” & Under CALL 431-1181 AND GET STARTED TODAY

Offering a full line of quality Landscaping Services from design to maintenance. 502 Wilton Rd, Farmington • www.cannabisseedbankofmaine.com

BOSS POWER EQUIPMENT

OUTBOARDS

•Camp Checks, Openings & Closings •Patios, Walkways & Flower Beds •Tree Installation •Docks, Built & Installed •New Lawns •Skidsteer & Tractor Work

C

•Hydroseeding •Drip Edges •Rock & Railroad Tie Retaining Walls •Roto Tilling •Excavation •Lawn Maintenance •Sweeping, Commercial & Residential

•Trucking Material (Loam, Bark Mulch, Shale, Sand) •Driveways •Rock Raking •Tree Work, Chipping, Lot and Vista Clearing •Stump Grinding Services

/PXBU.BJO4Ut3BOHFMFZ

Mike

erminara LANDSCAPING

•Fully Insured •Quality Work •Free Estimates

2775 Main Street, Rangeley, ME 864-5343 • www.bosspowerequipment.com

“ We take pride in our work” 864-7321 or 462-3755

Now offering stump grinding services in Rangeley

Thank You for Reading!


Mountain Messenger

Page 8

George Washington By Victor Block: As the pounding of the sheriff’s wooden staff calls the court to order, James Hubbard prepares to defend his client. He is an orphan’s guardian who stands accused of squandering his charge’s estate. Centering his neat wig and smoothing the frilly lace sleeves of his shirt, the attorney bows to the bench and begins to plead his case. This scene is repeated today in the same place where it occurred during the 1770s. That is when James Hubbard lived and practiced law in Williamsburg, at a time that the town served as the capital of the Virginia colony. The actor-impersonator who depicts this historical figure bases his interpretation upon facts that historians have been able to document. For example, he describes having returned to London to study law, and rather sheepishly admits that his wife occasionally agitates him. For those who love living history, James Hubbard plays but a small part in a fasci-

Williamsburg

nating tableau that makes Colonial Williamsburg a perfect place to relive pages from the past. Reenactments, tours led by factually based characters and many other interpretive programs combine to involve visitors in the interest, information and fun. The meticulously restored 17th-to-19th century historic area provides the Colonial and Revolutionary War-era setting in which chapters from our nation’s early years are dramatically revived. For nearly a century, from 1699 to 1780, Williamsburg served as the capital of the Virginia Colony, a vast enclave which stretched west to the Mississippi River and north to the Great Lakes. In its early heyday, the town of about 2,000 residents was the cultural, social and political center of the Colonial world. Before Thomas Jefferson relocated the Virginia capital to Richmond in 1781, he and other patriots, including George Washington and Patrick Henry, frequented its shops, taverns and other estab-

Battle reenactments lishments. After the Revolution, Williamsburg’s importance, and fortunes, declined. That continued until 1926, when John D. Rockefeller, Jr. launched a major effort to restore the setting to its former splendor. The surviving 88 Colonial structures were renovated to their 18th century appearance, and those that no longer stood were reconstructed on their original sites, based upon research and as much documentation as could be found. Today, more than 500 history-touched buildings – imposing public structures and modest houses, bustling taverns and shops where merchants ply their trade – line tree-shaded streets that echo the clip-clop of horsedrawn carriages. Gardens and “dependencies,� including free standing kitchens, smoke houses and privies, add to the atmosphere and authenticity. Along with this historically accurate scene, it’s primarily people who bring historic Williamsburg to life. Character interpreters dressed in Co-

Maine’s #1 Senior Resource • Medicare Advantage

• Longterm Care

• Medicare Supplements

• Final Expense

• Retirement Planning

• Affordable Care Act

• Life Insurance • Part D Rx Plans

Anthony G. Arruda

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

Mt. Blue Shopping Plaza Farmington, ME

207-778-6565

Governors Palace books to prepare authentic dishes on a hearth. Presentations of dance, singing and other activities recall aspects of the lives of the half of Colonial Williamsburg’s population who were black. Costumed artisans use 18th century tools to fashion items similar to those made by their Colonial predecessors. The bookbinder carefully hand-stitches cover boards for a new volume. A shoemaker fashions men’s boots “with good thread well twisted.� Among other historic trades people are basket weavers, a cabinet maker and milliner. The results of their efforts are sold in stores along Duke of Gloucester Street. Leaving no stone unturned, figuratively as well as literally, archaeologists and historians transform research and construction projects into learning experiences for the public. For example, the courthouse where trials take place has been reconstructed as closely as possible to its original design, based upon clues to its former appearance

lonial style clothing, many depicting real-life former residents of the town, converse with visitors in period grammar as they go about their daily tasks. Part of the fun is trying to convince the actors to drop the persona of the person they represent, which invariably fails. I attempted that while dining in Chowning’s Tavern, a reconstructed 18th-century alehouse. My good-natured effort to have Edmund Pendleton, who was a delegate to the First Continental Congress and a leader in Virginia’s move to independence, reveal his true self was unsuccessful. Fortunately, that was not completely true when I handed my waitress a credit card to charge the meal and she asked, “What’s this? We usually are paid in gold.� Not wishing to part with my single gold filling, I was relieved when she agreed to take “whatever this is to see if my master will accept it.� Chefs in several kitchens demonstrate the use of “receipts� (recipes) from 18th-century cook-

found in early documents. Costumed carpenters used tools and techniques of Colonial times to restore the building, as visitors looked on. As a result, James Hubbard and other figures from the past depict life as it once was in surroundings that would be familiar to the people whom they represent. One benefit of such attention to detail is an all-encompassing trip back through time for today’s visitors. They may enjoy a theatrical comedy and a traveling magic show reminiscent of entertainment in the 18th century. Among choices for shoppers are inkwells, silver coffee pots and other souvenirs and gifts hand-fashioned by craftsmen in ways of old. Those interested in legalities may observe Colonial justice in action, and perhaps even play a role in the court proceedings. It’s all part of the immersion in the past available at Colonial Williamsburg. For more information, call (844) 574-2733 or log onto colonialwilliamsburg.com. n

2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Crew Cab Short Box 4-Wheel Drive LT w/1LT

Hight’s SALES PRICE: $33000.00

plus taxes and fees

SAVE $8185.00

• Stock: 31412 • ENGINE, 5.3L FLEXFUEL ECOTEC3 V8 • TRAILERING PACKAGE • 1LT PREFERRED EQUIPMENT GROUP • BLUE GRANITE METALLIC • Power Windows and Door Locks • Cruise Control • MSRP: $41185.00



VIN: 3GCUKREC6EG155738

 



                  

www.turnerpublishing.net


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

Page 9

www.turnerpublishing.net

RANGELEY PUBLIC L I B R A RY Dear Patron, Happy New Year! 2015 is now history, and 2016 is a blank page before us. What will we write in the 2016 pages of the history books? Obviously, much of what happens will be beyond our control. But what about those things we can control? Here at the library, one of the things we plan to write in the history books is that 2016 was the year we upgraded our internet speeds for wireless users. Although our

library has had 100 mbps service for a couple of years now, the hard-wired computers are the only ones which have been able to take full advantage of this. Our wireless users are getting speeds around 30 mbps. These are still very good speeds compared to what most area residents get at home, but we have discovered that with just some simple (and relatively inexpensive) upgrades to our equipment, wireless users can have

access to the same great speeds enjoyed at the library computers. So, if you are a wireless user, this could be your year to get more done in less time. 2016 may also go down in the record books as the year that our patrons reduced their stress levels thanks to our new coloring group on Friday afternoons. Did you know studies have shown that coloring lessens anxiety in adults? It has also been shown to

be beneficial to people with dementia or brain injuries. So, with our Friday afternoon coloring group, 2016 is going to be the year of the mellow library patron. We also hope to record 2016 as the year of the uncrowded library programs - not because we expect less participants, but because we plan to create more space for adult programs. No, we are not putting on an addition, but thanks to a recently-received grant,

New Books in January

Adult Fiction The First Hostage (J.B. Collins series) Joel C. Rosenberg Blackout David Rosenfelt The Guest Room Chris Bohjalian The Bitter Season (Kovak & Liska #5) Tami Hoag Scandalous Behavior (Stone Barrington #36) Stuart

Woods My Name is Lucy Barton Elizabeth Strout Mr. Splitfoot Samantha Hunt Fallen Land Taylor Brown The Expatriates Janice Lee A Taste for Nightshade Martine Bailey November 9 Colleen Hoover The Wedding Tree (Wedding Tree #1) Robin Wells The Light Keepers Abby Geni The Past Tessa Hadley The Castle Cross the Magnet Carter Kia Corthron Spiderwoman’s Daughter (Leaphorn/Chee) Anne Hillerman The Ark: Children of a Dead Earth Patrick S.

Tomlinson (Ark series #1) The Verdict Nick Stone Time of Departure Douglas Schofield The Conqueror’s Wife: A Novel of Alexander Stephani Thornton the Great What She Knew Gilly MacMillon The Girl She Left Behind (Lizzie Snow #2) Sarah Graves I am Your Judge (Bodenstein & Kirchoff #4) Nele Neuhaus Angels Burning Tawni O’Dell The Hours Count Gillian Cantor Killing Trail (Killing Creek K-9 #1) Margaret Mizushima The Scottie Barked

at Midnight Kaitlyn Dunnett (Liss MacCrimmon Mystery) Hunters in the Dark Lawrence Osborne Adult Non-fiction Walking on the Wild Side: Long-Distance Kristi M. Fondren Hiking on the Appalachian Trail The Brain: The Story of You David Eagleman No Baggage: A Minimalist Tale of Love and Clara Benson Wandering When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost Giles Milton his Brain The Lost Tudor Princess: The Life of Lady Alison Weir Margaret Douglas n

we hope to put mobile shelving into the front room so that the shelves can be moved aside during adult programs. This will eliminate the need for the late arrivers to sit between the rows of books in the back during a popular program. Our patrons have always been very gracious about this. In fact, I really don’t remember ever hearing a complaint, but we would like to see you all more comfortably seated. What else will go

into the 2016 history books? Will this be the year that we have a record number of circulations? A record year for donations? The year for the most new patrons? Or maybe it will just be a regular year, but we already know that a regular year in Rangeley is better than a great year just about anywhere else. So once again, Happy New Year 2016! Janet Wilson Library Director

Upcoming Events January 15 Preschool Story Hour 10:00 AM Adult Coloring Group 2:00 PM January 20 RPL Board Meeting 3:00 PM January 21 Preschool Story Hour 10:00 AM OWL Club 2:45 PM January 22 Preschool Story Hour 10:00 AM Adult Coloring Group 2:00 PM

• Propane • Heating Oil, K-1 • On/Off Rd Diesel 1180 Route 2, Ste. 6, Rumford

tel: 562-0972

$10.00 off a delivery of 100 gallons or more when you donate a new unwrapped gift for a child in need. Give gift to your delivery driver or stop by our office! You can now order fuel and pay your bill online.

Fueling Station with On & Off Road Pumps • Rte. 108, Peru with a 24/7 CardSystem dSyste

www.dixelddiscountfuel.com

Gift Certicates Available

SNOW PLOWING We shovel all walkways ROOF SHOVELING

• Weekly Camp Checks • All Winter Needs • Docks Pulled • Camps Closed

, INC. G IN AK ET AR C & E C VI R SE N W LA EY EL RANG 783 • rlawn@localnet.com 864-3 P.O. Box 20, OQUOSSOC, ME 04964 •

2014 Ford F-150

Sam and Amanda Hight (Fourth Generation Hight Dealers)

with The Flannery Family

“We never realized how easy it was to purchase a vehicle. Hight Ford had just what we wanted and gave us more for our trade than we expected.” Visit us at: www.hightford.com Call us at: 207-474-3334


Mountain Messenger

Page 10

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

REAL ESTATE PROPERTY OF THE WEEK

YOUR REAL ESTATE AD HERE

Caryn’s Property of the Week

DALLAS PLT: First time on the market - custom built 3BR log Chalet with lake/Mt views, deeded RL water access, plus snowmobile from your door! Enjoy comfortable floor plan with roomy kitchen, breakfast nook and dining area; spacious living area with gas fireplace and wood stove; loft living area looking out at Doctor’s Island, Bald Mt. Walkout basement with finished family room, 1 car garage. Built-ins, thoughtful details, gleaming wood floors - a MUST SEE!.......$324,000

City Cove Realty 2455 Main St., Rangeley Cell 207-233-8275

Caryn Dreyfuss Broker

caryn@citycoverealty.com • www.realestateinrangeley.com

MLS#1233579 #9027 Extraordinary private, yearround home with over 700’ of prime frontage on the north shore. Built in 2008, custom-built home, architecturally designed, high-end appliances, 6 BR, 6 BA, with gourmet kitchen, granite, open floor plan, stone fireplace. Enjoy expansive southerly views of Rangeley Lake, privacy and 11+ beautifully wooded acres with walking trails. Close to Rangeley Village, skiing, snowmobile trails, golf courses, shopping and restaurants. An heirloom property, indeed. $1,750,000 CALL CAROLYN SMITH FOR MORE INFORMATION

Buying? Selling? Investing? Carolyn Smith

Morton and Furbish Real Estate

2478 Main Street, Rangeley Office: 864-5777 ext. 106 Cell: 491-5800

carolyn@morton-furbish.com www.rangeleyrealestate.com www.morton-furbish.com

52 Kendall Farm Trail, Rangeley H309 The “Ultimate Log Home” sits on over 2 acres of land and has a panoramic view of the Rangeley Lakes Region. The craftsmanship is truly amazing from a stone replace to screen porch that overlooks Rangeley Lake. The space has layout to accommodate large gatherings and still have your own privacy. There is an attached 2 car heated garage plus a 4 car detached garage to insure you have enough storage for all your gear. Open kitchen ows in to living room with a wall of windows to let nature in. Come Home! $577,500 261 Waya-Awi Road, Dallas Plt. H211 This home is the ultimate sporting compound. Snowmobile and ATV access from the back of the lot along with large amount of woods for your deer, grouse, bear and woodcock hunting. Multiple building to house friends and family all with a 2 car garage. $249,500

2485 Main St., Rangeley, ME 04970

Tel: 207 -864 -3900

PLEASE RECYCLE ME

26 Champagne Circle, Rangeley H306 Remodeled cottage only 125ft. from the shore of Rangeley Lake. Unique opportunity to enjoy the lake year round with deeded access in front of your home. The 2 bedroom, all pine interior is set up for year round use and centrally located to all activities in the Rangeley Region. $224,900.

Add a taste of authentic Maine humor to your next banquet, luncheon, conference, convention or company get together. Contact humorist and best-selling Maine author John McDonald

CALL TO MAKE RESERVATIONS WITH JOHN TODAY! Call: 207.899.1868

Email: mainestoryteller@yahoo.com

Add Value to Your Home with these Renovations

Homeowners choose renovation projects for a variety of reasons. Although many improvements are made to increase functionality and comfort of a home, several others are seen as worthwhile investments. These investments can add up to a higher resale value when the time comes to sell a home. Certain projects have a history of providing a greater return on homeowners’ investments than others. The following renovation tips can add beauty to your home and generate great returns when you put the home up for sale. · Invest in your kitchen. Kitchen remodels are a safe bet when it comes

to putting money into improving a home. Residents tend to spend a great deal of time in the kitchen, but a dated, poorly functioning kitchen can detract from the value of a home, even if the rest of the home is in good shape. It’s possible to recoup between 60 and 120 percent of your kitchen remodel investment, especially if the kitchen matches up well with the rest of your home. Homeowners should know that a deluxe renovation may not be necessary, as relatively moderate improvements can create a whole new look for a kitchen. · Look to paint. One of the least expensive improvement materials, but one that has a significant impact, is paint. Neutral,

modern colors can easily liven up any space. If you paint with low-VOC paint, you also can advertise an eco-friendly home, which is very desireable these days. · Put in another bathroom. Multiple bathrooms are an attractive selling point, particularly in older homes that may not have been equipped with more than one bathroom. Finding extra space for a bathroom can be tricky, but consider closets, areas under stairs or even taking some space away from another room. Popular home-improvement television channel HGTV advises that half-bathrooms require at least 18 square feet of space, while full baths need 30 to 35 square

feet for a stand-up shower or bathtub. · Renovate the HVAC system. Aesthetic improvements aren’t the only ones that add value to a home. Many home buyers are eager to purchase a home that has a new heating and cooling system, as buyers understand that furnaces and air conditioning units are substantial investments that can last for years. Other improvements, such as adding attic insulation or replacing older windows and doors with more energy efficient options, also are smart bets. · Add illumination to rooms. A dark home is a dreary home. Adding light can mean including more overhead and accent light-

ing. Under-cabinet task lighting is a nice touch. Inclusion of skylights and sun tubes can bring natural light into rooms that may not have south- or west-facing windows. · Put a deck addition outdoors. Outdoor living spaces have become more desireable, especially as the “staycation” has grown in popularity. Decks and patios can make backyards more appealing. The scope of your investment will depend on the size of the deck and design. Doing the work yourself can cut the cost of decks in half, but only if you have the specific tools or experience to tackle such a project. · Improve curb appeal. Adding attractive land-

scaping and freshening up the entryway to a home can add considerable value to your home, as buyers judge homes by their exteriors. Completely renovated interiors may never be seen if buyers pass up your home because of a less attractive exterior. Classy, subtle changes, like well-placed shrubbery and a green lawn, can work wonders. An inviting front door and welllit entryway also add curb appeal to a home. Before making improvements, homeowners should determine if a given project will provide a solid return on their investment. n


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

Page 11

www.turnerpublishing.net

Spruce Budworm Returns

V. Paul Reynolds Unless you are in your forties you probably have no recollection of Maine’s last spruce budworm infestation. The budworm, which can chew its way through acres and acres of coniferous forest and kill spruce and balsam fir, left its destructive mark on Maine’s softwood stands in the mid 1970s. I remember it well. By the early 1980s the spruce budworm had destroyed more than 20 percent of Maine’s fir forest. The budworm assault has been likened to a “slow-moving hurricane.” Timberland owners had little choice: harvest the defoliated trees immediately or lose the economic value of huge tracts of forest. The result, of course, was expansive and controversial clear cuts the likes of which Maine had never seen. Clear cuts are not pleasing to the eye. Neither is the knowledge that miles

of Maine forestlands that are home to fish and wildlife are being inundated with insecticides. It was a tense era, a clash between economics and environmentalism that led, eventually, to passage of the Forest Practices Act of 1989, which today regulates forestry practices in Maine. Unfortunately, according to experts, Maine is about to undergo another major spruce budworm infestation. The budworm moth can be tracked. It is moving our way from Canada. Will it be a repeat of the 1970s with

sprawling sections of fir trees rendered dead and brown by the voracious budworm? It’s hard to predict the extent of the impact, but we in Maine are expected to see the effects of the budworm within the next 2 to 4 years. Experts say that it is possible, through good preparation, to mitigate the damage, although I’ve yet to see any explanation of how this will be done. At this point, state and private interests are collaborating on a disaster preparedness plan to be unveiled this summer.

Of course, Mother Nature marches to its own drummer, but Maine needs a spruce budworm epidemic about as much as another record-breaking winter. There is a ripple effect when large tracts of forest just perish. Birds and wildlife lose precious habitat. Trout streams lose protective canopies that keep flowing water cool. In rural Maine there are eco-

nomic consequences that can be substantial. Then there is the issue of insecticides. In the 1970s, tons of insecticides were air-dropped across Maine’s fir forest by aircraft in an attempt to “mitigate” the march of the budworms. Not-to-worry assurances were made to the public by state foresters and timberland owners,

but it was a hard sell. One day in June of 1976, as I was casting a fly upon the waters of one of my favorite Aroostook County trout ponds, I saw and heard the drone of a low-flying “delivery” aircraft a few miles to the north. Soon, the glassy surface of this pristine trout pond was disturbed by oily droplets that soon dissipated. It happened only once, but I never forgot the sight and the sick feeling in my stomach. Whether there, indeed, was any side-effects or lasting damage by the insecticide war against the budworm is a question never addressed insofar as I know. The author is editor of the Northwoods Sporting Journal. He is also a Maine Guide, co-host of a weekly radio program “Maine Outdoors.” His e-mail address is paul@ sportingjournal.com . He has two books “A Maine Deer Hunter’s Logbook” and his latest, “Backtrack.” n

What would you rather be doing? Just a hunch, but we don't think it's banking At Franklin Savings Bank, we make it easy for you to bank when it's convenient to YOU!

Introducing ... Franklin eBranch

On the go!

Mobile banking where and when you want it!

Anyone registered to use Franklin eBranch online banking is good to go!

The Franklin eBranch On The Go! app is available FREE for iPhone®, iPad®, and Android® devices, including the Kindle Fire®, from the iTunes App Store, Google Play, or the Amazon App Store. Download the app for your Apple or Android device

Not yet registered with Franklin eBranch? Enroll online at FranklinSavings.Bank

800-287-0752 2

Please send us your Recipes so we can continue to share them, we are almost out and need your help!


Page 12

Mountain Messenger www.turnerpublishing.net

January 15, 2016

You’re never to old to color. Here is a Free coloring page much like the popular Adult coloring books


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

Page 13

P O ST IN G S Yoga C Tuesda lasses Thursd ys, 9:30 AM Star Ba ays, 4:30 PM the Bar rn Yoga. Held n of the in C on Church . FMI: go 639-271 3

G N I T S O P HERE

POSTIN G HERE Cribbage ight! day N Ever y Tues r t at 7 PM Games sta he Rangeley by T Sponsored ankeag Lodge 213. m Masons, Ke nhouse Apar tments. At the Tow

G N I T S PO HERE

an ad in g n i c a l p d in Intereste ger? n e s s e M tain the Moun elio

orn C i d o J l l Ca ail m e r o 6 7 at 225-20 .net g n i h s i l b u rnerp u t @ o i l e n r jco ation m r o f n i e for mor

Congratulations to: Catherine Goodwin. She found the in one of last month’s Mountain Messenger papers and will receive a gift certificate in the mail. Find the in one of this month’s papers and you could also be a winner!


Page 14

Mountain Messenger www.turnerpublishing.net

January 15, 2016


Mountain Messenger

January 15, 2016

Page 15

www.turnerpublishing.net

Business to BUSINESS

Is Your Business In Need of a Website Update?

WE CAN HELP!

“After several years of working on our website internally, we knew that major updates were needed to better assist our customers through our web and its intended message. We sat down with Turner Publishing to have a brainstorming session and within a matter for a few weeks, we had a fresh new site that was user friendly for our customer’s wants and needs.”

BEFORE

AFTER

Shelly-Rae Ouellette, Creative Director J&S Oil Co., Inc.

Both Plans Include Key Words to help increase your web presence All WEBSITES CREATED ARE MOBILE FRIENDLY

We offer a Basic Plan for simple upgrades, new logos, images and layout.

Our Delux Plan includes a fresh new beginning of 10+ pages.

Call Turner Publishing today to learn how we can assist your business in getting better exposure. Call: 207-225-2076 or Email: advertising@turnerpublishing.net


Mountain Messenger

Page 16

January 15, 2016

www.turnerpublishing.net

Ripley & Fletcher 80 MAIN STREET • SOUTH PARIS

Local 743-8938 Toll Free (866) 598-2559

FEATURED USED VEHICLES 2008 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ

#F203A, SPORTS, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, BIG OPTIONS LIST

$11,987

$139

2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS

2010 FORD FUSION SE

#F187A, LOCAL TRADE, POWER OPTIONS, EPA H’WAY RATED 35+

# P0428A,LOCAL TRADE, SERVICE RECORDS, SUNROOF, MANY OPTIONS

$11,987

$139

$12,987

or

$152

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2013 MAZDA 3.1 SPORT

2014 DODGE AVENGER SE

2013 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5I PREMIUM

PRICE

or

MO.

PRICE

or

MO.

PRICE

MO.

#F329A, RATED 40 MPG H’WAY, REAL CLEAN, NICE CAR, MANY OPTIONS

#F409A, ONE OWNER, 10K MILES, ALMOST NEW, SPORTY & LOTS OF OPTIONS

#F287AA, AWD, 22K MILES, ONE OWNER, LOADED WITH OPTIONS, REAL NICE

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT

2006 JEEP GR CHEROKEE LAREDO

2008 HONDA CR-V EX-L

#F331A, 4X4, LOCAL TRADE, SERVICE RECORDS, SUNROOF, ONE OWNER

#G071A, RARE, 4WD, 43K MILES, ONE OWNER, LOADED WITH OPTIONS

#F205BB. 4WD, POPULAR SUV, LOCAL TRADE, LOTS OF POWER OPTIONS

PRICE

$14,500 or

$169

$10,500 or $123

MO.

PRICE

$14,500 or

$13,887

or

$169

$164

MO.

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2013 KIA SORENTO LX AWD

2012 SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5I PREM

PRICE

MO.

#F383B,EXTRA CLEAN, NEW TIRES, LOCAL TRADE, MANY OPTIONS

$19,500 or $229

PRICE

MO.

#F406A,LOCAL TRADE, ONE OWNER, FEATURES LIKE HEATED SEAT & MORE

$19,987

or $235

PRICE

SALE PRICE

$18,987

$13,987

or $223

or

$164

MO.

PER MO.

2012 JEEP GR CHEROKEE LAREDO

#P0371.4WD, LOW MILES, ONE OWNER, WON’T LAST LONG,LOADED

$23,500 or $275

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

2012 GMC YUKON SLT 4WD

2012 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR 4WD

2015 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500LT

#P0415A,BIG SUV, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV, LONG LIST OF OPTIONS

#F304A. 5166 MILES, FEATURES CHEVY OWNERS WANT, LIKE BRAND NEW!!

PRICE

MO.

#F371A, LOCAL TRADE, 37K MILES, NAV, SUNROOF, ALL THE OPTIONS

$34,987 or $409

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

PRICE

MO.

PRICE

SALE SALE PRICE PRICE

$36,500

or

$431

MO.

PER MO.

PRICE

$36,987 or $435

MO.

#E346A, SALE LOCAL TRADE, LEATHER, LOW MILES, LOADED WITH OPTIONS PER

PRICE

MO.

ALL FINANCING SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL, ALL VEHICLES INCLUDE $149 DOCUMENT FEE, PAYMENTS WITH 25% DOWN CASH OR TRADE NO MONEY DOWN TO QUALIFIED BUYERS 3.99% APR, 72 MONTHS FOR 2003 OR LATER, EXCLUDES TAX AND TITLE FEE

www.ripleyandetcherford.com

Mountain Messenger 3 January 2016  
Mountain Messenger 3 January 2016  
Advertisement