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75¢ COUNTER COST Logger Hall Of Fame 2015 Recipients Receive Plaques

JACK ROSS AND GAYLON (JEEP) WILCOX were the 2015 inductees.

The Logging Museum in Rangeley (once RLRLM) selects one or two loggers each year for the past 30 years to be honored in an induction ceremony, on the Friday night of the annual two day logging festival, which is held on the last full week end in July. The museum’s committee

makes their choice one year ahead. So this year the program was continued under the new name for the museum, Maine Forestry Museum Jack Ross andGaylon (Jeep) Wilcox were the 2015 inductees. The program and induction was made on schedule, Friday 24th of July, howev-

7 Days Until Christmas

er, the Plaques were not ready in time. Long story but those plaques, were finally ready recently, so we wanted to add this presentation to our publicity to honor our last two inductees, at least as the program has been conducted in previous years. As Jeep said “may-

8 Days Until

Volume 5 • Issue 12 December 18, 2015

be you have kept the best for last” as he tipped his head and eyes skyward and added “to you Jack”. The actual end of the Hall of Fame program is slated to take place Saturday 27 of August, 2016. There will be more said about the final Logger Hall of Fame program as we enter the 2016 Maine Forestry Museum year. However, it has been clear to us for some time that the rate of one or two loggers honored each year didn’t keep up with the number needed to be inducted. Because of age and health issues of most candidates, over these last few years, it has made our selections difficult. It has been becoming clearer now as more than one of our selections are deceased between selection, at the end of one season and the induction the following summer. This is the case here as we

have Jack’s award being received by family. In the photo here we have Jack’s sister, Kathy Stewart, accepting the award for her brother. We would like to add that Jeep also is one of the reasons, or maybe the main reason, why the “Hall Of Fame” program was started in the first place as he was a prime member of the original RLRLM organization. So it may be most fitting even a correct time to finish the individual “Hall of Fame” program with him being one of the final recipients. Congratulations Jeep and also your lost logger friend, Jack. Your names will be added to the list of recipients at the entrance to our museum. Final note…. we are wanting names of anyone that YOU would like see added to the names of truly old time loggers in the final hall of fame event in 2016. What we mean is those that handle pulp and

logs by hand ….. or having just chain saws, and skiders as mechanized equipment. GET those NAMES TO us please now just tel: 207-8643939 and/ or use our e-mail maineforestry@gmail.com . We want to honor all of our woodsmen so make the effort to help with names and contact information. Thanks and spread the word we are seeking names all this coming year! NOTE: The location for the photo was not random …. the GIVING TREE, located behind our war memorial and by the Chamber of Commerce, has a role with Forestry Museum. Mr. Wood Chip and Miss Wood Chip, selected each year at a judged talent contest during Logging Festival have the honor and privilege of lighting the Christmas tree, the Saturday after Thanksgiving, in town wide event. n

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Rangeley Health and Wellness & the Rangeley Rotary to sponsor Winter Senior Socials beginning in January! HELP, Helping Elders Live in Place, a program of Rangeley Health and Wellness, was developed by a group of active volunteers who came together to explore how to help seniors in the Rangeley area live in their homes for as long as possible and remain an active part of the community. This winter HELP will be launching Winter Senior Socials to help seniors counteract the isolation and loneliness that may accompany winter snow and freez-

ing temperatures. Fun activities, hot soup, and a listening ear will be freely provided at Winter Senior Socials which will be held in the Undercroft of the Church of the Good Shepherd every Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm, January through April. Cribbage, chess, checkers, board games, knitting circles, fly tying, sharing stories, music and activities chosen by those participating will warm the heart and be the perfect anecdote to cabin fever. The Food

Pantry will be open for shopping during the afternoon. This program is generously funded by Rangeley Health and Wellness and the Rangeley Rotary. The first Winter Senior Social with be held on Thursday January 7th. Come alone or bring a friend and share a hot meal and good conversation; we would love to see you! If you are interested in volunteering your time or would like to donate a pot of soup or baked goods please call Marge Miller at 864-

5383. Other HELP programs include Neighbors Calling Neighbors, a phone service for home bound seniors, and HELP Adult Respite Care, a day program for cognitively impaired seniors due to open in January. If you would like more information about HELP or any of the senior programs that they provide, please visit our website at www.rangeleyhealthandwellness. com/seniors or give us a call at 864-4397 ext. 4. n

Rangeley’s Young Martial Artists Compete

(Back row: Alex Hathaway, Evan Smith, Anjelica Woodward, Daxxtyn Williams, Eli Morrill, Will Dugan, Isabelle Whittier, Jimmy Hathaway, Casey Burgess Front: Sam Morrill, Ryan Dugan, Dagen Gooding, Owen Dugan, Parker Smith, Adelaide Dea, Ryder Sargent Absent from photo: Austin and Troy Hathaway) PHOTO by Tami McGarvey

As Christmas gets closer, the University of Maine at Farmington’s University Store is once again hosting its annual Holiday Giving Tree. In its tenth consecutive year, the UMF Giving Tree is an opportunity for members of the campus and community to donate items to children and families in need to help ensure everyone has a joyful holiday. New, unwrapped clothes, shoes, winter

On November 8, nineteen Rangeley students traveled to Winslow High School to compete in the 20th Maine Skirmish Grappling Tournament, the biggest martial arts event in the state. Representing “The Foundry Kids” Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, five came home champions and eight more placed 2nd or 3rd. Champions in the Takedown tournament were Parker Smith and Eli Morrill, while Alex Hathaway and Brayden Thompson won the 2nd place Cup. The

Grappling champions were Brayden Thompson and Sam and Eli Morrill, who was undefeated on the day. Isabelle Whittier, Jimmy Hathaway and Adelaide Dea won 2nd place, while Evan Smith took home 3rd place. Daxxtyn Williams, Casey Burgess, Ryder Sargent, Angelica Woodward, Will, Owen and Ryan Dugan, Dagen Gooding, Troy and Austin Hathaway and all the kids fought hard and represented their school and community with great sports-

UMF 10th Annual Giving Tree

wear, toys, books, personal items, etc., from infant to adult, are gratefully accepted. They can be donated at UMF’s University Store located at 238 Main Street in Farmington until Friday, Dec. 18. The store is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday thru Friday. This holiday giving tradition is in partnership with the Franklin County Children’s Task Force, a local non-profit devoted to strengthen-

ing Franklin County families and advocating for and providing services that promote healthy children and families. Store staff works closely with members of the FCCTF to fill the holiday tree with tags that have the Christmas wishes of children and families throughout the area. Members of the campus and local community are invited to take a tag to fulfill special requests. “It’s always so heart-

warming to see the overwhelming response,” said Lois King, longtime UMF University Store employee. “Many of our students have been involved with similar holiday charitable efforts in high school and are so excited to be involved and give back.” Student and community organizations, campus faculty, staff and entire UMF departments generously contribute to the annual charita-

ble event. This year staff from UMF’s Merrill Center has adopted an entire family’s requests and members of the Country Square Quilting Club from the Jay and Wilton area have contributed 27 handmade quilts.

manship. “I am very happy with our results,” says instructor Shawn Smith. “We brought the biggest team other than the school hosting the event, despite the 150 mile round-trip. I think that says a lot about the parents’ commitment to their kids in this community.” New students are welcome anytime. Classes are held at the Rangeley Health and Wellness Pavilion Wednesday at 3 P.M. for ages 5-7 and 4:00P.M. for ages 8 and up. n

Unwrapped gifts are picked up at the University Store by task force staff and will be distributed by members of the Maine Family Home Visitors prior to the holiday. n

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Mountain Messenger

December 18, 2015

Scam Alert Bulletin Board

Purchasing a gift card as a last minute gift idea? Around this time of year thieves hit gift card racks and secretly write down or scan the numbers off the cards. Then they wait a few days and check online or call the toll-free number to see if the card had been bought and activated, allowing them to drain the

funds right off the card before you or anyone else uses it. Tip: only purchase gift cards directly from the featured store or, at the very least, ask the cashier for a card that hasn’t been displayed on the kiosk. Have them scan the card beforehand to make sure it has the correct balance and always

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Do You Sudoku Answer on page 6

keep your receipt. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network www.aarp. org/fraudwatchnetwork or 1-877-9083360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention. .n

Celebrating 20 years of Community Health and Wellness!

Rangeley Health and Wellness Program Receives Gold Level Certiϐication From State

Rangeley Health and Wellness’s Children in Action program is one of 30 schools, doctors of�ices and out of school programs in Franklin County that have teamed up with the statewide children’s health organization, Let’s Go, to reinforce healthy habits such as physical activity and nutrition to communities around Maine. Rangeley’s after school program has been a certi�ied Let’s Go site since 2013 and has just been awarded a gold level of certi�ication, meaning that the program is advancing all of Let’s Go’s primary strategies for success.

Lindsay Richards, �itness director at Rangeley Health and Wellness, has been running Children in Action for Rangeley’s area youth for the last �ive years. In order to keep the attention of the children she mixes up activities while continuing the message of healthy living. The number of children attending varies up to 24 depending on the day. Each day of the week has a different goal with various activities. Monday is “mix it up Monday” and the activities range from games that get the children exercising to learning about healthy food. Tues-

day’s children participate in a team sport such as pickleball or soccer. “Work it Wednesdays” are dedicated to �itness and include physical tests that gauge how many exercises the children can complete. Thursday’s activities focus on nutrition and include food group matching games and children making a healthy snack for them. On Fridays the children are encouraged to bring a friend or family member and share a favorite healthy recipe or game/tradition they do with his/her family. “We start with all of these activities and games that have a message of healthy living. But then once we get done, we will sit down and talk

about the habits that we just learned,” Richards said. For children, it’s still all about fun but the games are more thought out than and

8-year-old would believe. It is part of a statewide movement to expose children to a healthy-living education that organizers hope will set the

tone for a healthy life. For more information on the Children in Action program please call Rangeley Health and Wellness at 8644397.


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WEATHER FORECAST December 18th - December 23rd Forecast from www.weather.com

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

December 18th

December 19th

December 20th

December 21st

December 22nd

Wednesday December 23rd

38°

30°

29°

34°

39°

41°

26°

21°

22°

26°

30°

37°

PM Snow

Mostly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 You probably are not interested in inching along this week, Leo. Though it’s good to attack a project with gusto, don’t rush so much that you make mistakes. VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, you are quite comfortable sharing your thoughts now that you have gotten some things worked out. It’s now much easier to talk about future possibilities. ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, handle some unfinished business and establish clear priorities. Otherwise, you may turn what could be a productive week into something frustrating. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, when you wear your heart on your sleeve for everyone to see, you cannot be shy about expressing your emotions. Friends may be skeptical of you though. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, don’t be shy about sharing unique plans with your loved ones. The support of friends and family members will only restore your confidence in this new direction. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Expect your ideas to take shape over the next couple of days, Cancer. Concrete plans will materialize as you begin to pull thoughts from your imagination. The results will be unique.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Decoding all of the mixed signals coming your way won’t be easy, Libra. The only thing you can do for the moment is to take each signal one at a time. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, you are not in the mood to play games, so you will want to push your romantic relationship to the next level. You will have no problem leading the way.

Rain/Snow Showers

AM Snow Showers

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, expect some support from family members and close friends. Receive their generosity as warmly as you can, even if you’re feeling a bit smothered. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, it can be easy to get swept away by other people’s agendas when you attempt to lend a helping hand. Do your best to pitch in.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS DECEMBER 15 Geoff Stults, Actor (36)

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Opportunities to address your physical well-being present themselves this week, Sagittarius. Make the most of these opportunities to make a significant change.

DECEMBER 16 Miranda Otto, Actress (46)

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, you will ride a creative wave for the next several days. Inspiration will strike when you least expect it. You should have some time for play.

DECEMBER 17 Manny Pacquiao, Athlete (35)

CLUES ACROSS 1. Characters in one inch of tape 4. In a hold 9. Jewish mystic 14. A way to souse 15. A small sharp knife 16. Frogs, toads, tree toads 17. Brew 18. Rowdy carouser 20. Poetries 22. __ salts, remedy 23. Expect eagerly 24. Obstructing the view of something 28. Denotes three 29. Expression of uncertainty 30. Greek portico 31. Bureau 33. Electric battery 37. Vapor density 38. Radioactivity unit 39. Strive to equal or match 41. Cologne 42. Carrier’s invention 43. Highest in degree or quality 44. Female horses 46. Serbian 49. Publicity 50. Actress Lupino 51. Supporting structures

55. Jobs 58. Indian founder of Sikhism 59. Capital of Zimbabwe 60. Woman of charm and good looks 64. Order 65. Draft animal in desert regions 66. Unaccented syllable verse 67. Fail to keep pace 68. Sheath or shirtwaist 69. Moss stalks 70. __ Lilly, drug company CLUES DOWN 1. Exclamation of praise 2. 200 island Pacific nation (alt. sp.) 3. Repeated 4. Hungers 5. School of Business, UCB 6. Bobby __, NHL champ 7. Lease 8. More parched 9. Medieval merchant guild 10. Negative ions 11. Top 12. One of the Gershwins 13. Dekalitre 19. Imitate

Crossword

DECEMBER 18 Brad Pitt, Actor (50) DECEMBER 19 Alyssa Milano, Actress (41) DECEMBER 20 David Wright, Athlete (31) DECEMBER 21 Ray Romano, Comic (56)

21. Gentlemen 24. Dawn 25. A citizen of Chile 26. Bright stars 27. Codfish genus 31. Extremely unrefined 32. Diacritical mark 34. Correspondences 35. Indicates position 36. Small cup 40. 12th Greek letter 41. Capable of being eliminated 45. 12th Jewish month 47. Rechristen 48. In a way, imputes 52. Hydroxyls + 2C 53. Follows sigma 54. Vegetable shrubs 56. South African village 57. Monetary unit of D.R. Congo 59. First Chinese dynasty 60. Divides evenly into (Math) 61. Household god (Roman) 62. Pakistani rupee 63. American time


Mountain Messenger

December 18, 2015

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B•L•U•E•S Buying•Local•Used & Extra•Stuff

TROY BUILT LOG SPLITTER model LS27TB,little used, stored insode, fully maintained, excellent condition ready to use with wheeled crank trailer mount, manuals. 639-5233 after 12:30PM $900

MENT: Nice newly redone 2 bedroom apartment in Rangeley. $675 Per month plus heat and electric. No pets, no smoking. References and background check required. call 8643846

PRESSURE WASHER: 5HP, Honda OHV. Excellent condition. $500. 8645882.

16 FOOT OLD TOWN CAMPER CANOE Royalex very nice. $400.00 Rangeley 864-3966

CRAFTSMAN 12” BANDSAW 1 HP $100.00 Call Chick at 864-5115 Rangeley

CABELA’S FOLDABLE CANOE CARRIER Used Once $60.00 Rangeley 864-3966

TWO SNOW TIRES: 235/65 R16 Glacier Grip II Used one winter, excellent condition $55 each call 864-2709 in Rangeley

THULE CAR TOP CARRIER SYSTEM Includes - towers, locks, gunnel brackets $95.00 Rangeley 864-3966

60 HP FORD DIESEL TRACTOR, Bucket loader, 3 pt. Grader blade, will do all your work. $6,000 65 POLARIS, 90 YAMAHA & TRAILER $3000 for all, great family fun. KENNMORE UPRIGHT FREEZER $50.00 Call 6705442 or 864-9068

2001 VW JETTA TDI. Black. 250,000 Miles Automatic. Arizona Car. Needs Fuel injector pump. Four new studded snows available. 864-3907 Rangeley. Mike

FOR SALE A 1/2 Windshield, soft top both new will fit Polaris side by side A.T.V. and wood working tools electric and hand tools all negotiable. Call 639-2879 FOR SALE YEAR ROUND HOME with mountain veiws Rangeley ME, 3 Bedrooms finished basement 1 1/2 baths, attached garage. $229,00.00 Call 3612444 or 864-2909 leave a message 2 BED ROOM

APART-

AMF/ALCORT SUNFISH 1970’S VINTAGE SAIL, centerboard, rudder, and mast. You pick up. $200 OBO Call 864-3812. WANTED: FILL, also anything compostable as well as containers such as joint compund buckets, any barrels. 864-3878 WANTED BUYING COINS. Primarily interested in U.S. Indian head cents and wheat pennies. Will consider others. I am a collector not a dealer. Chuck 207696-8367. WOOD STANLEY IRISH airtight cookstove with

water back. Heats house and water, cooks great. $2,000. Water tank and piping available, $200. Call 207-864-5539 around 6pm. Rangeley.

RESTAURANT/RETAIL SPACE FOR RENT. Dallas Hill Road, Rangeley. Base of Saddleback Mountain. Call 864-3612. FOR SALE SKIS One pair Atomic beta-Ride 10-20’s 185cm $150. For more information call Kevin at 6706007. FOR SALE SKIS One pair Atomic Beta-Ride 1120’s with racing bindings 180cm $250. For more information call Kevin at 6706007. BLUE PINE DESK and cabinet, pierced tin doors. 3’x6’x6’, custom built. Make offer 864 -2936 FENDER SRV SIGNATURE STRATS both in excellent shape one like new one heavily played call for more information $3500 for both or $2000 a piece. Leave msg 860-9990 MAH JONG. Know the game or want to learn? Wed afternoons. Call Jackie 207-557-2503, or

The Mountain Messenger is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest can call 1-207-225-2076 or fax us at 1-207-225-5333, you can also send e-mail to us at: articles@turnerpublishing.net. Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is mailed on a weekly basis, FREE to all postal customers of Strong, Avon, Phillips, Madrid, Rangeley, and Oquossoc and the Plantations of Dallas, Rangeley & Sandy River.

Mountain Messenger’s Important Legal Info Operations Manager Dede Libby

Advertising: Dede Libby Betsy Brown George McGregor Michelle Gosselin

FOR SALE: 1984 Honda Motocycle, 700CC, 34,000 miles. $950 864-5489

PIANO - LESTER Spinet 64, dark finish, needs tuning & minor repair. 401/2”W-31”H-24”D. Buyer must move. Asking $200. 864-2153

1929 ORIGINAL C.W. BARRETT Rangeley Guide Boat. Documented by professional surveyor: Wineglass Stern, Original Oars, Paint, Last in Rangeley, 1970’s found in Wolfeboro N.H. Brand new load rite trailer! Museum Quality $6,500 O.B.O Call Gary 207-860-9293

DINNER FOR EIGHT PEDESTAL TABLE With butterfly leaves 8 chairs asking 1/3 of original price. $600 call 864-5334

email: advertising@turnerpublishing.net • articles@turnerpublishing.net

Senior Designer Michelle Pushard Graphic Design Danielle Emery

FREE CATS for adoption to a good home, all shapes, sizes and color. Call 8642000.

FOR SALE WATERFORD 104.MK II WOODSTOVE with 9 feet of 6 inch pipe. Like new $300 670-8095.

PO Box 214 • Turner, ME 04282-0214

CEO/Publisher Jodi Cornelio

email Jackie at jump422@gmail.com.

FOR SALE: 17’ Royalex Old Town Tripper Canoe. Great condition – some scratches but no dings or dents. Army Green w/ black molded seats. Low mileage! $1300. OBO 8643971

Writer/Photographer Bill Van Tassel Proof Readers Hal Small Office/Billing Tom Tardif

2002 BLUE HARLEY FATBOY motorcycle trade for land or down payment on land/camp in Rangeley Plantation or Oquossoc area’s. <9k mileage. Tons of extras & chrome. Rick 3291696 or rdbois1@gmail. com. CLEARED HOUSE LOT overlooking Rangeley Lake. Excellent views of Rangeley Lake. Cleared and driveway in. Electric and phone on property. $49,000, call 207-491-8669 for more info.

RARE 1982 CM450A HONDAMATIC Windshield, crash bar, luggage rack, sissy bar, back rest, cover, new tires and battery. 5,951 miles Excellent Condition $1,800 Strong 684-3739

CLASSIFIED AD FORM Send this order form with $15 to Turner Publishing P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282

Name_____________________________________________________ Address___________________________________________________ Number of Weeks_____________________

CityState__________________________________ Zip_____________ Up to 30 words or less


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December 18, 2015

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Crossword Puzzle Answer Puzzle on page 4

Sudoku Answers

Enter the MM Contest and you could win a $10 gift certificate to The Shed in Rangeley. One of the ads in this paper contains our MM Logo. Find the ad with the MM logo, cut it out then mail it to us with your name, address and phone number and all correct submissions will be entered into the drawing once a month or email information to advertising@turnerpublishing.net. Entries must be submitted by the Friday after the newspaper is published. Good Luck! Mail submissions to: MM Contest, PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282 One winner per month. Odds of winning depends on the number of correct submissions. For advertising please email advertising@turnerpublishing.net

Everyone’s Talking about the Mountain Messenger! Call today at 225-2076 and see how direct mail can work for your business!

207-864-WRGY (9749) www.wrgy.org • wrgyradio@gmail.com

PO Box 844 • Rangeley, Maine 04970

4-7am 4-7 am 7-8am 7-8

Mon. Mon.

Tues. Wed.Schedule Thurs. 9/27/12 Fri. Sat. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Programming - 10/25/12

9-10am 9-10

10-11 10-11am 11-12 11-12 12-1pm 12-1 pm 1-2pm 1-2 2-3 2-3pm 3-4pm 3-4 4-5pm 4-5 5-7pm 5-7 7-8pm 7-8 8-9pm 8-9 9-10pm 9-10 10-12 10-12 12am 12 am -– 44am am

San San Francisco Francisco Symphony Symphony Chamber Santa Fe Chamber Santa Fe Society of Music Chamber Soc. of Lincoln Festival Festival Lincoln Ctr. Center Mayo Bioneers/ Folk FolkAlley2 Alley2 Health Beat Clinic Radio Celtic General Celtic General Connections Store Connections Store Bluegrass New Jazz Bluegrass Jazz Review2 Archive Review2 Profi les

New New York York Philharmonic Philharmonic

Eclectic Music MixMix Eclectic Music

8-9 8-9am

Sun. Sun.

Doug’s Doug’s Variety Variety Hour Hour Ron Hoar Oldies Hour(50s/60s; (50s/60s; 70s/80s) Ron Hoar Oldies Hour 70s/80s) Eclectic Music Mix Eclectic Music Mix Country Classics Hour Hour Country Classics Eclectic Music Mix Eclectic Music

Bioneers

Mix

Global Village Global Village

Eclectic Music Eclectic MusicMix Mix Bioneers/ Fur Planetary Fur Bluegrass Folk Big Picture Picture Bluegrass Folk Big Planetary Piece Radio/ Piece Science Review1 Alley1 Alley1 Review1 Science Radio Ranch Bioneers Ranch Old Time Time Old Radio Radio

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WRGY WRGY Presents Presents

Back Story

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Philosophy Philosophy Talk Talk

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December 18, 2015

Mountain Messenger

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Chester Greenwood Day Events Winners

Madison DeLuca’s gingerbread house submission winning first place in the youth category.

Nancy Doherty’s gingerbread house winning first place in the adult category.

Sunshine and warmth helped set the premise for a great day for all who attended the 39th Annual Chester Greenwood Day with one of the biggest turnouts to date. A large number of floats adhering to this year’s “Favorite Characters” theme made for a colorful and exciting parade

winning first place in the youth category and Trae and Joyanna Jones winning second place. Adult winners are Nancy Doherty in first place and Robyn Belcher in second. Thank you to all who participated in this year’s events helping make it another fun and successful day. n

with Barclaycard winning first place in the float contest followed by Comfort Inn & Suites in second place and Franklin Savings Bank in third. Mt. Blue High School’s Interact Club won the youth float contest and an honorable mention went to New Hope Baptist Church for their

float. The annual Chili Challenge was another delicious success with John Bachelder’s chili winning first place and Dee LaPlant’s coming in at second place. Several brightly-decorated Gingerbread Houses were submitted for the Gingerbread House Contest with Madison DeLuca

Trees. Sure, they're beautiful and give us oxygen, but some trees are your enemy, just biding ding their time until heavy wet snow and/or ice causes them to come crashing through the living g room window. And don’t forget about those se trees and limbs near your power lines running ing to your house, they are a big reason for power outages – so keep your lights on and your heat going. If you're unsure about a tree's ' health or hazard, call for a free evaluation. Call today because old man winter is just around the corner (shhhh). Tree Pruning, Tree Removal, Brush Control, Hazardous Limb Removal, Emergency Storm Damage and clean up and Utility Line Clearance (power lines)

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Thank You for Reading!


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Health Foundation Support Expands Care for Uninsured The Maine Health Access Foundation (MeHAF) announces the award of $672,887 in grant funding to three health care systems to expand access to quality health care for people who are uninsured. Awardees for the Access to Quality Care program include Franklin Memorial Hospital, MaineHealth CarePartners (Knox County), and Penobscot Community Health Care. “People without health insurance face significant challenges in accessing health care services to maintain their health,” said Dr. Wendy Wolf, MeHAF’s president and CEO. “We want everyone in Maine to be able to have an ongoing relationship with a trusted doctor or other primary care

provider. This kind of relationship supports better communication between provider and patient and more robust coordination of specialty care, including behavioral health services and other care. Our goal with the Access to Quality Care program is to ensure that people who are uninsured experience better, more coordinated care that can result in better health outcomes.” The three awardees have developed specific strategies to meet the health care needs of people who are uninsured. Franklin Memorial Hospital will use a community resource coordinator to coordinate transitions of care for people without insurance, linking them to primary care providers and to other

services in Franklin County. MaineHealth will implement its nationally-recognized CarePartners program in Knox County to expand access to care. Penobscot Community Health Care will coordinate care for persons with chronic pain or opiate addiction by linking patients to high quality primary care and collaborative care management teams. In Franklin County, Tracy Harty who is based at Healthy Community Coalition, is the project’s lead and is currently getting systems in place, developing a universal referral form, connecting with community resources, and contacting patients who are uninsured and seeking primary care services in the Emergency Depart-

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Memories from Social Security John McDonald

Have you ever received those reports from Social Security? They’re the ones that tell you things like how much you’ve earned each year during your entire working career, and how much you can expect to get each month when you finally retire. I don’t know if it’s because I’m a baby boomer approaching retirement (no one’s going the other way), but each year I get more curious about these reports. When I got one the other day I made a pot of coffee and sat down to read the whole thing from cover to cover and then went back and reread some parts two or three times. In the part of the report that gives your earning history, they list the amount you earned in a particular year that was subject to Social Security withholding, but they don’t tell you where you worked in any given year. The first amount listed for me was for 1959

when – according to the folks at Social Security – I earned about $120.00. I thought for a minute, then remembered that the first job I got that required a Social Security card was as a dishwasher at Blueberry Cove Camp in Tenants Harbor. Back then I knew a little about Social Security, but didn’t care much about it. When you’re a suave, sophisticated 15-yearold it’s hard to imagine ever becoming a doddering retiree. The cook at the camp – and my boss – was named Thelma Wall. She came from the flinty hills of Vermont, and it didn’t take long to realize that she was every bit as flinty as the hills she came from. Thelma ran her kitchen like the field marshal of a great army. I ranked very low in her army. Her daughter was named Dijobee (don’t ask what it means or why she was named that because I never found out) and she operated as Thelma’s chief of staff. My schedule had me come in around 8 a.m. just as everyone was finishing

breakfast. I had to wash all the breakfast dishes and then hang around to help Thelma and Dijobee get ready for lunch. I ate my lunch on the job and then did up all the lunch dishes. Once they were done I was off until three in the afternoon when I would come back to help with supper. The best ‘benefit’ offered to me was the meal allowance. Thelma might have had the grace and

charm of a timber wolf, but she could cook like an angel. I also learned pretty quick that she particularly favored those who liked her cooking, and I had no difficulty showing that I couldn’t get enough of it. During the first hour of my new job Dijobee showed me how to prewash the mountain of dirty breakfast dishes and load them into a large metal rack.

The rack was then lowered into a sink of scalding water for the sterilization process. The camp’s kitchen was a dishwasher-free zone, and all dishes had to be washed by hand. If Thelma came by my sink and saw the smallest speck of food on a single dish she would take the whole rack up and dump all the dishes back into the pre-wash sink while saying, “It looks like

these will have to be done again.” Who would have thought that a dry, bureaucratic document from Social Security would bring back memories of old Thelma, but it did. Now I can’t wait for my next Social Security report. Who knows what memories it will jog? n

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December 18, 2015

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REAL ESTATE PROPERTY OF THE WEEK

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179 Sturtevant Pond Road, Magalloway Plt. H402 This 2700 square foot home sits on a 500 acre body of water that is filled with trout and salmon. Located in the Western Mountains of Maine and only 2 miles from the New Hampshire border. The 450 feet of water frontage has deep water access and is great for all water recreational activities with a nice docking system for your boat. The home has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, attached 2 car garage and many custom features. Very private with excellent fishing and hunting out your front door. $449,500 PRICE REDUCED!

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9 Ways to Improve Curb Appeal Homeowners who want their homes to make strong first impressions must prioritize curb appeal. Homes with strong curb appeal sell well and can impart a welcoming feel to all visitors. Improving curb appeal need not be expensive, and the following are a handful of ways to improve the appearance of your home. 1. Install a bold-looking door in a vibrant color or one with a custom design. This helps the

home stand out from other properties in the neighborhood. 2. Edge the driveway to create a distinct border between the driveway and the lawn or other landscaping features. This helps homes appear neat and well kept. 3. Use outdoor lighting to make a home more inviting. Outdoor lighting also makes properties safer to traverse at night.

4. Clean a home’s exterior to remove mildew or discolorations from the siding, driveway, patio, and other outdoor elements. 5. Improve landscapes with fresh plants and seasonal color. Homeowners without the time to plant can consider container gardens, which don’t take much time to assemble but still add appeal to a home’s exterior.

6. Prune planting beds and add new mulch to restore color. 7. Add shutters and accent trim to a home’s exterior to improve on the beauty of the house. 8. Install new fencing or give a fresh coat of paint or stain to an existing fence. 9. Replace concrete paths with tile or stone walkways to make entryways more impressive and inviting. n


December 18, 2015

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Disclaimer: Not a contest just a regular coloring page

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December 18, 2015

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Page 13

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December 18, 2015

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Inspiring High School Girls

MVHS Girls TALK participants learned about STEM careers on a cruise on the MMA research vessel, The Discovery. MMA generously hosted the program for an overnight.

The transition between middle school and high school can be a difficult one for teens. They leave the security of a familiar building and staff and begin the final stages of their public education in a different environment. They are no longer the oldest students rather they become the youngest. Mountain Valley High School has a four-day summer program to help freshmen girls make connections with the new environment and mentors to help them with the transition. Girls TALK is in its fifth year and older girls serve as mentors. Participants also interact with women on staff at MVHS and volunteers from the community. This year’s Girls TALK kicked off an explanation of the acronym: Team building, Aspirations, Leadership and Kindness. The young women played games and participated in improv activities to get to know each other and begin to build a team. They explored the meaning of healthy relationships with Diane Gallagher, Safe Voices; and French teacher Marie Russell. Katie Billings, an MVHS alumna who attends Dartmouth,

lead Katie Talks about preparing for an academically-challenging school and life after high school. In addition to a variety of activities at MVHS, the students traveled to Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) to explore STEM (science, technology,engineering and math) fields for females and to spend an overnight on a college campus. They experienced a cruise on the research vessel,The Discovery. MVHS alumna Allycia Lecompte graduated from MMA and served as the “in the know” tour guide for the group. Freshman Keziah Conley said, “Going to MMA was a ton of fun. Being on the boats and being able to touch all the creatures is something new and different.” Freshman Aleksa Pierce liked “riding on the navigation vessel at MMA. I loved driving the boat. I learned how to tell what direction I’m going using the sun.” One of the freshmen may have walked away with a future career direction. Mackenzie Arsenault said, “Being able to tour MMA was the highlight of Girls TALK for me. I really enjoyed getting a better understand-

Girls TALK participants paused in beautiful Castine for a picture. They include (front row, l. to r.) Mackenzie Downs, Taylor Henry, Abigail Harding, Kylee Pelletier, Aleska Pierce, Vanessa Cote, Katelyn Gross, Alyvia Lee, Brooke Carver, Haley Akers, Leigha Carrier, Larissa Laskey and Alexis Chapin (middle row) Kennedy Hamner and Alexis Phillips, (back row) Breanna Soucey, Natasha Munzner, Mackenzie Arsenault, Gena Elliot, Ariana Viger, Faith Riddick, Kaziah Conley, Autumn LaPointe, Alyssa Akers, Kendra Murphy, Alicia White, Ashlynn Young and Allycia Lecompte, MVHS alumna and MMA tour guide.

ing of marine biology.” Freshman Taylor Henry checked out how the college students live and reported, “The dorms are really neat.” One favorite aspect of Girls TALK is “Manhunt.” Manhunt is not a video game rather it is a cross between hide and seek and capture the flag. It is played at night during the “sleep” over in the school’s library and involves getting to know the high school after dark. Freshman Gene Elliot liked “Manhunt because I learned my way around the school.” Freshman Kat Sinclair added, “Manhunt was the best! I enjoyed it because we worked together.” Another favorite aspect of Girls TALK was the social connections that were forged. Freshman Autumn LaPointe explained, “The highlight of Girls TALK was to bring us closer together and to have fun. It was a

great experience for us rising eighth graders.” Freshman Larissa Laskey added, “For me, it was getting to know girls that I would have never talked to before - upper class men.” The mentoring students offered advise about how to navigate the transition to high school. Senior Natasha Munzner said, “Do your best! Your future depends on what you do the second you step foot in the school. You can be whatever you want if you work hard!” Sophomore Hailey Akers added, “Honors classes can sound scary. But if you keep your focus and do your homework, it’s not hard. Get involved in a sport or club. Junior Abby LaBrash advised, “The teachers are really helpful. If you ask for help, they will work with you.” Girls Talk is a combined effort of several MVHS staff members. Li-

brary/Media Specialist Mary Gamble coplanned the program with Barb Radmore, program director of Western Foothills Kids Association. Deb Carver, MVHS social studies teacher; and Gretchen Fall, social worker; rounded out the planning committee. In addition to the adults, several students stepped up as student leaders. They included Abbie Blauvelt, Brooke Carver, Katelyn Gross, Abigail LaBrash, Alyvia Lee, Natasha Munzner, Kendra Murphy, Jillian Provencher, Alicia White and Ashlynn Young. Technology teacher Jeff Bailey and English teacher Natalie Simmons led improv activities along with fellow Teachers Lounge Mafia teacher, Dan Ryderfrom Mt. Blue High School. Other contributing MVHS staff included Marie Russell, French teacher and Kristen Provencher, health

teacher. Gamble said, “We were lucky this year to have funding support from the RSU10 Gear-UP grant as well as supportive funding from the 21st Century grant/WFKA After School Program. Maine Maritime Academy was incredibly gracious in offering lodging and meals for 29 students and 6 chaperones. Girls TALK participants included Hailey Akers, Alyssa Akers, Mackenzie Arsenault, Leigha Marie Carrier, Alexis Chapin, Keziah Conley, Vanessa Cote, Mackenzie Downs, Gena Elliot, Kennedy Hamner, Abigail Harding, Taylor Henry, Autumn LaPointe,Larissa Laskey, Kylee Pelletier, Mariah Pelletier, Alexis Phillips, Aleska Pierce, Ashlie Anne Powell, Faith Riddick, Katianna Sinclair, Brianna Soucy, Ariana Viger, Sydney Woods and Destiny Young. n

Help Us Stay Current With Your Good News! articles@turnerpublishing.net


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December 18, 2015

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Participate in the Sugarloaf Summit Snowshoe Shuffle

This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sugarloaf Charity Summit kicks off with the Snowshoe Shuffle on Wednesday, December 30 at 10 a.m. All proceeds from Charity Summit events benefit the Maine Cancer Foundation and the Martha B. Webber Breast Care Center. According to organizers if you can walk, you can Snowshoe ! The shuffle route is about an

hour-long gentle route through beautiful trails at the Sugarloaf Outdoor Center, offering spectacular views of Sugarloaf Mountain. Individuals are welcome and teams of coworkers, family, and friends are encouraged to join in on the fun. Registration is $25 per person and includes a day pass to the Outdoor Center. New this

year is a family package ($25 for each adult and children are free) and a group package (register three and get the fourth participant free). Costumes are welcome and a tradition. Prizes will be awarded to the top fundraisers and best costumes. The Sugarloaf Charity Summit, which will include the Sugarloaf Charity Ball on January

30, raised more than $200,000 last year. Now in its sixteenth year, Summit organizers hope that after this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events the collective total will exceed $2.2 million. For more information and to register go to www.sugarloafcharitysummit.org. Maine Cancer Foundation, established in 1976, improves the

health and well-being of Maine people. A grantbased organization, the Foundation supports scientific laboratory and clinical cancer research, professional and public education, and patient support programs throughout Maine. www.mainecancer.org Franklin Memorial Hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Martha B. Webber Breast Care Center provides time-

ly access to stateof-the-art screening, diagnostic, clinical, and care-support services, provided by a multi-disciplinary team of experts. Services are available in two convenient locations in Farmington and Livermore Falls. www.fchn.org/ FMH/services/breastcare n

Candlelight Service at Reeds Mill Church

Reeds Mill Church on Reeds Mill Road will hold its annual Candlelight Christmas Service on Sun-

day, December 20th at 3:00 in the afternoon. Warmed by the woodstove under the soft light of the original

kerosene lamps, worshipers will gather in this wonderful, historic church to celebrate the Christmas season

with the singing of favorite carols and the reading of the Christmas story. As the sun sets, the church will

be aglow with candlelight. This is the last chance to come to Reeds Mill Church this year. The doors

wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t open again until July next year. For directions or more information, please call Ginni at 639-2713. n

Elizabeth (Betty) Coulombe 1921-2015

Elizabeth (Betty) Coulombe, 94, a lifetime resident of Jay,

passed away Sunday, December 6th at Montello Manor in

Lewiston where she was a resident for one month. She was born March 18, 1921 in Jay, the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Hreha Gaydos) Stoklas. Elizabeth was a 1939 graduate of Jay High School. On November 26, 1942 in Brunswick, she married Jerome F. Coulombe. After WWII, they purchased her fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home on Otis

Street and lived and raised their family there until 1976, when they moved to Barker Street. Betty was a dedicated wife, mother and homemaker. She was an excellent cook and will be remembered by her family for her Slovak foods and pastries. Betty also enjoyed playing scrabble. She was a communicant at Saint Rose of

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Lima Church in Jay and was a member of Daughters of Isabella. She is survived by her daughters; Margaret Lindholm of Belgrade, Eileen Barreca of Lewiston and Kathleen Rogers of Sabattus, brother, Louis Stoklas of Jay, daughter-inlaw, Gail Coulombe 10 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Jer-

ry in December of 2003, after 61 years of marriage, her son, Robert Coulombe, her sister Mary Viger, her half-brothers John Gaydos and Joseph Stoklas, her half-sisters; Margaret Piela and Anna Pagurko and granddaughter, Diane Munroe. Messages of condolence may be sent to the family at www.finleyfuneralhome.com. n

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