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Swine & Stein Attracts a Big Crowd

Participants in the annual Gardiner Beard And Moustache Competition. Photo by Bree Candland, whatbreesees.com.

The Colwell Brothers Band performs during Swine and Stein in Gardiner. Photo by Bree Candland, whatbreesees.com.

On a brisk, windy October day over 1,500 people made their way to downtown Gardiner for a day full of music, food, fine beers and more. The sixth annual Swine and Stein, Gardiner’s eccentric version of a traditional Oktoberfest, was held on Saturday, October 10, 2015 and hosted by Gardin-

Also popular were the butchering demonstrations from Leon Emery of Emery’s Meat and Produce. Both sessions in Johnson Hall were packed with folks who watched how to turn a half pig into all of your favorite cuts. The interactive discussion also included exploring new cuts of pork, how they might be best prepared, and where exactly they come from. Those who were looking to take their Oktoberfest experience to the next level took advantage of Swine and Stein’s new VIP ticket option. This premium admission included unlimited tastings throughout the day from the dozen Maine craft beers which were on tap in the main beer tent as well as access to some of the finest specialty and small batch brews around at “Beer U.”

er Main Street. The event featured a wide selection of Maine craft beers, vendors and local eateries featuring a variety of pork and other delicious dishes as well as an eclectic mix of music from some of Maine’s best bands. In addition to beer, pork, and music, attendees expe-

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rienced a number of unique activities, including a rubber chicken fling, frozen T-shirt race, and the 4th annual Maine rock, paper, scissors championship. The annual Gardiner Beard And Moustache Competition returned to Swine and Stein for its second year with over 20 participants coming from Benton to Boston, several returning from last year’s contest. The Maine Facial Hair club was well represented as well as a member of the Boston Beard Bureau who took home the judges choice award. Kids were also able to get into the facial hair fun by making their own fake beards out of feathers and other supplies at the craft tables. Children were also invited to paint pumpkins and visit baby goats and pigs at the petting zoo.

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The “Beer Geeks,” passionate beer experts from Gardiner’s new Craft Beer Cellar, were on hand to help guide VIPs through the finer points of delicious malt beverages. “We wanted to expand our beer offerings,” says Patrick Wright, executive director of Gardiner Main Street. “The VIP option was a great addition to Swine and Stein this year and we hope to expand upon it for next year’s event.” Just around the corner and up the hill from the event, Lost Orchard Brewing welcomed guests to their Crooked Halo Cider House on Church Street for an open house. Samples of their hard cider varieties were available as well as tours of their renovated church facility. Crooked Halo varieties were also available in the Swine and Stein beer tents. “We were delighted to offer varieties from locally made Lost Or-

chard Brewing at Swine and Stein,” says Wright. “People were very excited to try their hard ciders for the first time.” From beer pouring to kids’ activities, a lot of work happens behind the scenes at Swine and Stein. This year over 50 volunteers contributed time out of their day to help make the event run smoothly. “Without the help of the volunteers from our community, this event would not be possible.” says Melissa Lindley, Gardiner Main Street program coordinator. Swine and Stein is an annual event organized by Gardiner Main Street, taking place on the Saturday of Columbus Day weekend. The date for the event in 2016 will be October 8th. To learn more about Gardiner Main Street and its mission to revitalize downtown Gardiner, visit www. gardinermainstreet.org. n

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November 2015

ROCK THE NIGHT AWAY Thursday, 11.26.15 9 PM–5 AM

Pre-Black Friday festivities featuring live music, food trucks, carolers, Mr. & Mrs. Claus, giveaways, light show, and more. Shop ‘N Stay packages available at the Augusta Comfort Inn and Best Western!

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The Kennebec Current November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 3

Harlow Gallery Successful Moose Hunt Welcomes Wes McNair

Wes McNair The Harlow Gallery poetry series “The Bookey Readings� is pleased to present an evening featuring Poet Laureate Wes McNair, one of Maine’s, and the nation’s finest poets. The event will be held at Harlow Gallery, located at 160 Water Street, Hallowell and will begin at 7PM on Friday, November 20. Refreshments are served. A $3 donation is appreciated at the door to benefit the Harlow Gallery. McNair's reading will take up the theme of praise and celebration. Offered in the season of Thanksgiving, it will put aside life's conflicts and imperfections, gathering participants around the common table

selected for a United States Artists Fellowship as one of America’s “finest living artists,� and in April of this year received the PEN New England Award for Poetry, given for his latest collection, The Lost Child. This is the 8th evening and last of the 2015 poetry year at The Bookey Readings at the Harlow. We are honored to have Wes McNair close out this fantastic year of spoken word with us. A new schedule of great poets will begin again in April of 2016. During the reading guests will enjoy “A Survey of Computer Use in Art� on view November 6 - 28, 2015 at the Harlow Gallery. The exhibition features the work of over 34 Maine artists, demonstrating some of the diverse ways in which computers, software or other digital tools are being use to create art in Maine. Gallery hours are Wednesday - Saturday, 12 - 6pm and is free and open to the public. For more information about The Bookey Readings at the Harlow Gallery, contact Jay Franzel at JayFranzel@yahoo.com. n

of poetry to share one of poetry's oldest inspirations: gratitude. How do you sing the praises of cigarettes, or reveal the blessings of a stroke, or celebrate a troublesome family dog? McNair finds a way in these poems of a grateful heart. Poet Philip Levine has called Wesley McNair “one of the great storytellers of contemporary poetry.� Wes McNair is Maine’s 4th Poet Laureate. He has won grants from the Fulbright and Guggenheim foundations, two Rockefeller Fellowships, two NEA grants in creative writing, and an Emmy Award. He has twice been invited to read his poetry by the Library of Congress. He was recently

Christmas Concert

Carol Bailey’s String Band and Chorus will present a Christmas Concert Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 10:30 a.m. at the First Baptist Church of Gardiner, 47 Church Street, Gardiner.

The ensemble from the Litchfield Senior Center is directed by Mrs. Pat Bailey. The group is composed of about 20 seniors, most of whom learned their instruments since retirement.

The concert will consist of well loved musical selections of the season and is open to the public. Handicapped accessible. Contact person is Dawne Mcgrath @ 582-1145. n

21St Annual Christmas Craft Fair

The Randolph United Methodist Church will be sponsoring its 21st Annual Christmas Craft Fair at the Laura E. Richards School on Brunswick Avenue, Gardiner on November 14th from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm. There

Zachary Morrison Bowman, a Gardiner resident, had his first moose hunt within District 6. This bull moose was shot in a broccoli field in Limestone, ME. The moose weighed 861 lbs, 23 point and 54 1/2 rack.

are over 50 tables with lots of unique crafts available for everyone’s shopping needs. This craft fair is anticipated every year in the area and there is always a waiting list of crafters who would like to participate.

We do not have vendors, homemade crafts only. Coffee, donuts and lunch will be available, cookie walk and pie by the slice. Come have lunch. There is plenty of free parking with no admission charge. n

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The Kennebec Current Page 4 www.centralmainetoday.com

Business

Religious Accomodation in the Workplace Submitted by Rebecca Webber The key to avoiding conflicts in this area, and preventing litigation, is discussing the requested accommodation with the employee making the request and trying to sort out possible solutions as well as understanding what the actual conflict is. Not only are employees less likely to turn to litigation as a solution if they feel heard, but the law in the area of religious accommodation requests is much like the law when facing a request for an accommodation for a disability. Investigators at the Commission and judges in the courts will be looking first to see if the employer sat down and discussed the request, the basis for it, and how it might be handled. Unlike accommodation requests in the disability area, requests for accommodation in the area of religion may be rejected if there is “more than de minimis cost.” That is, if the cost is much more than minimal, the employer probably does not have to provide the requested accommodation. The question is

whether the accommodation would impose an “undue hardship” and more than minimal cost falls into that category. Knowing where that limit lies, however, is pretty tricky and there is no clear guidance, meaning that the conservative approach to avoiding litigation is to try to work something out if possible and to have plenty of conversation about it (documenting each effort to come up with a solution). Keeping that overarching approach in mind, below are some examples to illustrate how to handle issues in this area: A supervisor comes to upper management and says that some of the employees are fasting for a holiday and they are concerned that the employees may become weak or dizzy, thereby creating a safety issue. How do you respond? If the supervisor actually observes a physical problem or slow down in production it is ok to step in and address the work place behavior. Making assumptions about fasting or prohibiting it is problematic, however. These concerns

often arise because a supervisor knows that an employee practices a certain religion that can include fasting (as several religions do) and the supervisor’s concern is generated by knowing what religious views the employee has. In contrast, that same supervisor isn’t usually going to every employee and asking each if they had a good breakfast, are on a fad diet, or engaging in some other diet that could also make an employee weak or dizzy. The bottom line is to avoid assumptions based on knowledge of an employee’s religion and focus on work conduct and performance. This article is not legal advice but should be considered as general guidance in the area of employment and corporate law. Rebecca Webber is an employment attorney. You can contact us at 784-3200 (telephone). Skelton, Taintor & Abbott is a full service law firm providing legal services to individuals, companies, and municipalities throughout Maine. It has been in operation since its founding in 1853.

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Business Motivation

It might sound odd, but money is not the root of great motivation. We all share a desire to get better and better at something that matters. Whether you're a great artist, athlete, software developer, or sales professional, you need room to grow. The best way to tap into intrinsic motivation, according to author Daniel Pink, is to take the issue of money off the table and put the focus on the work itself: "The more prominent salary, perks, and benefits are in someone's work life, the more they can inhibit creativity and unravel performance." - Courtesy of Personal Selling Power, www.sellingpower.com.

Year-End Business Tax Planning

As usual, the Section 179 “expensing” deduction is set for a drastic reduction. And, as usual, business owners probably can make year-end plans for equipment purchases with the expectation that a higher deduction amount for 2015 will be enacted. Typically, purchases of business equipment are depreciated over several years, so the amount you spend can be deducted gradually from business income. However, the tax code allows some purchases to be deducted in full right away. Example: Brett Benson spends $20,000 on equipment for his manufacturing company this year. Brett can expense (deduct) that $20,000 to get an immediate tax benefit, rather than spread the tax savings over several years. Generally, an immediate tax savings is more valuable than a future tax savings. By the numbers For the expensing deduction, two numbers are critical. One is the maximum amount you’re allowed to deduct. The other is the phaseout amount: the

amount of equipment you can purchase before losing the expensing benefit. The phaseout provision essentially restricts this tax break to small and mid-sized companies because giant firms buy so much equipment that they lose the ability to expense any equipment outlays. The tax code currently calls for the expensing deduction to be capped at $25,000, with a dollar-for-dollar phaseout beginning at $200,000. Thus, if your company buys $210,000 worth of equipment, the excess $10,000 reduces the expensing limit from $25,000 to $15,000. In truth, those $25,000 and $200,000 numbers are not realistic today. Congress has repeatedly passed tax laws with higher limits: In recent years, expensing up to $500,000 worth of equipment has been permitted, with a phaseout starting at $2 million of annual purchases. All signs point to a repeat performance for 2015. Both Houses of Congress already have indicated willingness to extend some expired tax breaks, in-

cluding the $500,000 and $2 million limits for expensing business purchases. Therefore, you should go ahead with purchases of equipment that truly will help your company become more productive, even if this year’s total tops $25,000. New and used equipment will qualify. Make sure to have equipment placed in service by year end, in order to get a deduction for 2015. Similarly, the “bonus depreciation” tax break has expired but likely will be restored for 2015, judging by Congressional activity. Under this provision, which applies only to new equipment, purchasers can take a 50% first year depreciation deduction, followed by depreciating the balance of the purchase price over several years. Both expensing and bonus depreciation tax breaks reduce the cost of capital and increase cash flow for small companies, so you should consider their impact when planning equipment purchases. - Courtesy of Austin Associates, PA, CPAs

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The Kennebec Current November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 5

Hermits to the Woods

V. Paul Reynolds In re-reading The Maine Woods by Henry David Thoreau, I got to thinking about hermits. They fascinate me. Let's face it.There is not a Maine outdoorsman worth his salt who hasn't at least entertained a fantasy about pulling the societal plug and really getting off the grid. It's one thing to lose yourself in the woods for a week with nothing but a knife, some matches, and a compass; it's quite another to disappear for 27 years like Christopher Knight, the Hermit of North Pond. You have to really enjoy your own company to pull off a stunt like that.

Knight, who has been both reviled and "legendized," didn't really measure up to the Daniel Boone image, however. He stole from others to survive. But at least he created no burden to the taxpayer - at least not until he was processed by the state judicial system. Now take Henry David Thoreau. The legendary Massachusetts hermit of Walden Pond took to the Maine woods, it would seem, for some of the same reasons that tugged at the Hermit of North Pond. Thoreau sought solitude and isolation. Thoreau became a famous naturalist-philosopher; Knight wound up in jail, and, not only is he not a philosopher, he's not sure why he bolted from society in the first place. Thoreau showed up on my radar when I was a college student probing for the meaning of life. Liberal professors convinced

Henry David Thoreau me that, when it came to American thinkers, Henry David walked on water. Fifty years later, I am not so awed by the Hermit of Walden Pond, even if he is the darling of the environmental movement and those bent on civil disobedience. His writing does impress, as well as

his knowledge of plants, but he would not have been my choice as a canoe companion for an extended foray into the Maine woods. To be blunt, Thoreau seems to me to have been a foppish, elitist snob, and, in all probability, a bigot. Here is his reaction to hav-

ing witnessed his Indian guide slay a moose for the hide and the fresh meat: “This afternoon’s experience suggested to me how base or coarse are the motives which commonly carry men into the wilderness. The explorers and lumberers generally are all hirelings paid so much a day for their labor, and as such they have no more love for wild nature than wood-sawyers have for forests.” Can't you just see his smug expression and aristocratic nose tipped in the air? There were other examples in his writings of a man who did not consider his Indian guide to be his equal. Critics suggest that Thoreau was philosophically inconsistent, "a man fond of paradox." Indeed!

In the essay "Henry David Thoreau, Philosopher" Roderick Nash writes: "Thoreau left Concord in 1846 for the first of three trips to northern Maine. His expectations were high because he hoped to find genuine, primeval America. But contact with real wilderness in Maine affected him far differently than had the idea of wilderness in Concord. Instead of coming out of the woods with a deepened appreciation of the wilds, Thoreau felt a greater respect for civilization..." Nash was being polite. For Thoreau, the buginfested fir thickets and tangled alder runs along the East Branch were not quite the same as his socalled wilderness near Walden Pond. n

Vendors and Crafters Wanted Vendors and Crafters sought for the Gardiner Lions Holiday Fair on Saturday, December 5th at their club house be-

hind the old Gardiner Armory on Brunswick Avenue. This is a wonderful country fair with a bake

table, silent auction, white elephant table, lunch on the premises, talented craftsmen, vendors and a book signing

by a local artist. Tables are $25 or 2 for $40. For more information contact Terry at 4857100 n

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Kitchen will open at 9. Hot and cold beverages and variety of foods. Free Coffee! First Congregational Church of Pittston Arnold Road, Pittston, take Route 27, South from Randolph

Green Street UMW Christmas Fair The North Manchester Meeting House Church, 143 Scribner Hill Road, Manchester, will host its annual

Craft Fair on Saturday November 28, 2015, from 9:00 am - 2:00 pm. Lunch served 11:00 am-1:00 pm. n

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FIND THE PHONY AD!!! You could win a Gift Certiϔicate to an area merchant from one of our papers! �t is easy to �ind - �ust read through the ads in this issue of Kennebec Current and �ind the phony ad. Either �ill out the entry form below (one entry per month please) and mail to: Find The Phony Ad Contest, P.O. Box 214 Turner, ME 04282 or email to: phonyad@turnerpublishing.net. (one entry per household please) You must include all the information requested below to be eligible to win. Note: Turner Publishing will not lend or sell your email address to a third party.

Name: Address: City: State: Zip: ) Email Address: Phone: ( �ould you like to recei�e email noti�ication of local sales and specials___Y___N

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Country Courier: Sara Marston Country Connection: Kristen Watkins Auburn Highlights: Debra Nickerson Franklin Focus: Jamie Grimes Lake Region Reader: Kathy Lawerson Kennebec Current: Shannon Russell Good News Gazette: David A. Small

Western Maine Foothills: Kate Chiasson Lisbon Ledger: Judith Crafts Two Cent Times: Theodore Helberg Oxford Hills Observer: Joshua Walsh Moose Prints: Michele Maria Somerset Express: Rachel Northcott Lewiston Leader: Deb Bolduc

All of the winners listed have won gift certicates to one of our advertisers. If you haven’t won - keep playing! We get hundreds of entries each month! It’s easy to enter - read through the ads in this issue and nd the phony ad, ll out the entry form found in this paper and mail it in. If you have the correct answer, your name will be entered into a monthly drawing!


The Kennebec Current Page 6 www.centralmainetoday.com

November 2015

Damariscotta’s Popular Pumpkin Fest Bill Van Tassel

In its ninth year, the Damariscotta Pumpkin Fest 2015 drew huge numbers of people during the week-long event. In addition to the largest pumpkin contest the event features dozens of artistically decorated pumpkins, a parade, a pumpkin-boat race, a pie-eating contest, a rolling pumpkin derby and other activities. On Saturday, October 10, Main Street businesses were fronted by huge pumpkins from 300 to 1200 pounds, displayed in all sorts of colors and designs. From, Tigers, Lobsters and Bugs to Telephone Booths, Rainbows and a wide of assortment of abstract, mixed-media arrangements. Anyone would have their curiosity satisfied by this unique collection of huge pumpkins and artwork. WGME weatherman, Charlie Lopresti, is a giant pumpkin grower, had his

Photo by Bill Van Tassel

gourd, carved by Charlie Krause, into a Sunflower. Other artists like Jacques Vesery and Deb Arter have done the Pumpkin Fest for years. Vesery had two entries this year, a rainbow made of various sized pumpkins and a British phone booth filled with dozens of the orange gourds. The largest pumpkin prize went to Edwin Pierpont with a gourd that weighed 1,727.5 pounds. Some rain delay found many of the artists doing their carving and decorating on Saturday, the day of the Pumpkin Parade. In addition to the pumpkin boat race and derby, Parade day attracts a large crowd, Main Street and the Elm Street Plaza were packed as visitors from as far away as Vancouver, Canada and Rhode Island. The Canadian group had me take their photo with pumpkin carver, Charlie Birchmeier. Plenty of musical entertainment was happening downtown, and local non-profits were doing some fundraising with food and games for children. Additional photos on page 7.n

Photo by Bill Van Tassel

Photo by Bill Van Tassel Photo by Bill Van Tassel

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The Kennebec Current is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box 214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit articles of interest can call, 1-800-400-4076 (within the state of Maine only)or 1-207-225-2076 or fax us at 1-207-225-5333; you can also send e-mail to us at: articles@turnerpublishing.net. Any views expressed within this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper. This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication. This paper is mailed on a monthly basis to all postal patrons of Bowdoinham, Dresden, Farmingdale, Gardiner, Hallowell, Pittston, Randolph, Richmond, S. Gardiner, and W. Gardiner. Founded by Steven Cornelio 1992.

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Page 7

Gardiner Food Co-op Awarded Grant Exciting news for the Gardiner Food Co-op & Café has arrived in time for National Co-op Month. The recently opened Gardiner Food Co-op has been awarded a $53,995 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Local Food Promotion Program to promote and increase sales of Maine’s locally grown foods. The grant will allow the Co-op to upgrade existing refrigeration equipment to new, energy efficient, remote refrigeration units and promote and feature local producers by literally showcasing them in the new cases.

About the Grant: Earlier this month Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the USDA was awarding nearly $35 million in new funding through four grant programs to support local and regional food systems. Strengthening local food systems is one of the four pillars of USDA’s efforts to revitalize rural economies and communities. Purchases of locally produced food have surged to nearly $12 billion under Secretary Vilsack’s leadership, while the number of farmers markets has exploded to more than 8,500 from 5,274 in 2009.

These grants are administered by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) and Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). Under the current Administration, AMS and FNS have partnered to boost affordable access to local, fresh and healthy foods, which creates a gateway to opportunity for small and mid-size producers and benefits the health of all Americans, regardless of income levels. The Gardiner Food Coop is one of 160 organizations nationwide to have been chosen in this year’s Local Food Promotion

Program. The Co-op will use the funds to modernize, improve and increase its available refrigerated square footage for local foods. It will also donate its well-used cases to the County Co-op and Farm Store in Houlton, another new Maine co-op with a need for refrigeration. The new upgraded cases will anchor programs that promote local producers as key partners for the Co-op. Gardiner Food Co-op celebrates the amazing food produced locally. This grant will help the Co-op realize its mission to promote local foods and sup-

Drug Take Back Day Nearly 2.5 tons of unused or expired prescription drugs were collected from communities throughout Kennebec County late last month as part of the tenth Drug Take Back Day. Statewide more than ten tons were collected. Spearheaded by Healthy Communities of the Kennebec Area (HCCA) in partnership with law enforcement agencies, the initiative has been held twice a year since Sept. 2010, but secure drug drop off is available year round. “While Drug Take Back Day highlights ongoing efforts to encourage residents to safely and responsibly dispose of potentially dangerous unused or expired medications, area residents can

also take advantage of permanent collection sites located at the Kennebec Sheriff’s Department and police departments in Augusta, Gardiner, Oakland, Waterville, Winslow and Winthrop,” said Joanne Joy, executive director of HCCA. An additional site is located at the Department of Public Safety and two sites are located at the Togus Veterans Administration. “These drop boxes allow residents to anonymously and conveniently dispose of prescription drugs anytime during the year,” she said. Residents who are unable to travel can call the Kennebec Sheriff’s Office and a deputy will pick up the drugs. The volume of drugs collected on Drug Take

Back Day is an indication of how serious the problem is in Kennebec County, said interim Kennebec County Sheriff Ryan Reardon. “Removing nearly 2.5 tons of prescription drugs out of homes in Kennebec Valley translates into that many fewer drugs that can be abused by family members, taken accidentally or stolen. It is a major safety issue. In addition, outdated drugs can break down and be very hazardous,” Reardon said. They also pose an environmental problem. “Drugs that are thrown in the trash or flushed down the toilet can end in runoff from landfills and eventually get into our rivers and streams,” he said. All medications col-

lected are taken to an instate incinerator for safe disposal. According to a 2013 report on substance abuse trends in Maine prepared by Hornby Zeller Associates, Inc. for the Maine Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, in 2011 one in seven high school students reported misusing a prescription drug at least once in their lifetime. In 2011, lifetime prescription drug misuse rates was highest among adults between the ages of 26 and 35; nearly one in ten adults reported to have misused prescription drugs within their lifetime. The next Drug Take Back Day is tentatively scheduled April 22, 2016.n

Scam Alert Bulletin Board

Be on the lookout for scammers claiming to be from the IRS saying you failed to pay taxes or owe money from back taxes. These fake agents may become threatening and aggressive, demanding you make an immediate payment through a wire transfer or prepaid

credit card to avoid arrest. Here’s a tip: the IRS reaches out to taxpayers regarding any tax issues through the mail only and will never request an immediate payment over the phone. Be a fraud fighter! If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. Contact local law enforcement or the AARP Fraud Watch Network www. aarp.org/fraudwatchnetwork or 1-877908-3360 to report a scam or for more information on scam and fraud prevention. Social Media Post Link: http://wp.me/ p2ZEti-lsu 

port local producers. By doing so it will strengthen the connection between customers and local producers through new educational programming such as “Farmer of the week” tasting events and other nutritional workshops. The Gardiner Food Coop & Café is a community owned grocery and café. The Co-op provides access to local, organic, fair-trade, and bulk foods

for all income levels. Its Café space is available for community events and as a place for food education. Anyone interested in learning more about the Co-op or this grant, becoming a member-owner, or keeping informed of their events, should contact Shawn Menard, General Manager at 207-629-FOOD (3663), email Info@GardinerFood.Coop, or visit www. GardinerFood.Coop. n

Riverfront Holiday Event 2015 Saturday, November 28th

Santa’s Castle Opens

Visit Santa Santa arrives at 1:00 Market Square – 1:00 – 6:00pm

Santa’s Workshop

Write a letter to SANTA/ Make a Craft Old Federal Building -1:00 – 6:00pm Entertainment on the street, Caroling, Baton Performance, Music, and lots more!

New this year, LASER LIGHT SHOW! Holiday Tree Lighting Key Plaza 5:00p.m.

Fireworks

Eastside Boat Landing Waterfront Park 5:15p.m.

Holiday at the Fort 1:00-4:00p.m. Old Fort Western Hay Wagon Rides. 1:00-4:00p.m

Christmas, Decorative Paper Cutting, Letters to Santa, Reading of the “Twas the Night Before Christmas”, Bon Fire and more!

Build Your Own Perfect Gift Certificate Package! $80

Half Hour Massage Pedicure Hair Cut & Style H A I R T A N N I N G

M A S S A G E & N A I L S

$90

One Hour Massage Gel Manicure Pedicure

$115

One Hour Massage Gel Manicure, Pedicure Hair Cut & Style

Half Hour Massage.......$30 One Hour Massage....... $50 90 Minute Massage...... $75 Gel Manicure................ $25 Pedicure....................... $30 Hair Cut & Style........... $20 Hair Cut, Style, Wax..... $25

TANNING HOURS

Monday: 8:30-6:00 Tuesday: 9:30-7:00 Wednesday: 2:00-7:00 Thursday: 8:30-6:00 Friday: 10:00-7:00 Saturday: 8:30-3:00 Sunday: CLOSED

11 Lorette Lane, Augusta • 207-480-1461


November 2015

The Kennebec Current Page 8 www.centralmainetoday.com

Festival of Trees Coming to Waterville

Trees will be auctioned off to benefit Spectrum Generations Meals on Wheels, Hospice Volunteers of Waterville and House in the Woods. The Sukeforth Family Festival of Trees is set for November 20-22 and 27-29 at the Hathaway Creative Center on Water Street in Waterville. This fundraiser will benefit Spectrum Generations Meals on Wheels program, Hospice Volunteers of Waterville area and House in the Woods. Local organizations and businesses will participate by donating a fully

decorated tree along with presents to go underneath it that will be displayed throughout the event. Admission is $2 with children 12 and under having free admittance. Raffle tickets (50 cents each) will be for sale for attendees to get their chance at winning one (or more) of the fully decked out trees to take home for the Holidays. “You can expect to see a great family tradition being developed here” said Spectrum Generations’ committee member, Nick Cloutier. “With all of these great new develop-

ments happening in Waterville, this is the perfect time to start a fun Holiday event that brings our local communities together not only for the holidays, but also in support of three great non-profits. It’s a win-win for everyone.” The event is expected to bring in between 8,000-10,000 people in its first year over the double weekend and has already seen great support from local businesses and community members. There will also be a café set up with holiday treats, visiting hours with Santa and performances by local

school choirs. If you’re an area business who would like to be involved or if you would

AFC Welcomes Chip Eastman

Chip Eastman, former owner of Reitze Electric of Augusta has recently joined the Augusta Fuel Company team. At AFC Chip will be helping to

grow the AFC Electrical brand, both residentially and commercially. Chip is a Master Electrician and brings almost 15 years of field experience with him. Marc Lacasse, AFC President & CEO says “as a former business owner, Chip really understands how to merge quality workmanship with fantastic customer service. He’s a great addition to our team.” In his early career, Chip spent three years serving in the US Army as a light infantryman, followed by 5 years in the IBEW elec-

trical apprenticeship program. Most recently, Chip has been working at the Capital Area Training Center at Cony High School as the Electrical Construction Instructor where he has enjoyed teaching students the ins and outs of electrical work. Outside of work, Chip enjoys anything outdoors: hiking, fishing, skiing and shooting. He is also an avid runner. His favorite distance to run is 50 miles and he is currently training to compete in his next Ultra Marathon, the Vermont

100, by running 50-75 miles every week! Since 1888, AFC has worked to provide the best home and commercial comfort solutions, with a professionalism and reliability that is unmatched. They provide heating oil and propane products as well as heating, plumbing, electrical, home cooling and commercial HVAC services for the Central Maine area. They can be reached by phone at (207) 623-3851 or found online at AFCCOMFORT. COM.n

like more information please contact Annette Sukeforth Marin at 3133216 or visit the event

Facebook page at facebook.com/sukeforthfamilyfestivaloftrees. n

Elks Scholarship Available

The Elks National Foundation Most Valuable Student scholarship is available to high school seniors who are United States citizens. Applicants do not need to be related to a member of the Elks. Males and females compete separately and are judged on scholarship, leadership and financial need. Completed applications must be turned into the applicant’s nearest

Elks Lodge no later than December 4, 2015. Applications for the 2016 contest are available on the Elks National Foundation’s website. For complete Most Valuable Student scholarship contest details including the application, visit www.elks.org/enf/scholars. For more information: Contact the Scholarship Chairman at the Lodge, nearest to you. n

! r e n i d r a G

DOWNTOWN

Maine’s Best Kept Secret

What's On Tap At Your House?

Pasta’z

Bringing Nostalgia to Every Home

Come and see our Maine made primitive furniture and accessories along with LED lighted picture canvases, pillows, curtains, rugs, candles, �lorals to accent any country or primitive decor, and a touch of antiques through out the shop

Italian Cuisine Tuesday through Saturday from 4:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. For reservations, please call 582-8222 304 Water Street, Gardiner

335 Water St. • Gardiner • (207) 446-0143

��cross from the �ost �f�ice� Sole Proprietor-Kim Pierce Candleinthewindow88@yahoo.com

Hours: Wednesday through Friday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm • Sunday 9:00 am to 3:00 pm Closed Monday and Tuesday

Plein Ayuh:

The Creative Realism of Ken Carlson Shop Monkitree for a great selection of Maine-made pottery, jewelry, textiles and more.

ART - CRAFT - DESIGN www.monkitree.com

Christmas Open House November 11th-15th

263 Water St. Gardiner 512-4679

Opening November 13th

Let Us Show You How Easy and Affordable Making Your Own Beer and Wine Can Be Providing Quality Supplies for Your Homemade Beer, Wine, and Soda 325 Water Street, Gardiner (207) 588-BEER www.MainiacBrewing.com

280 Water Street (Mail) P.O. Box 777 Gardiner, ME 04345 BOX OFFICE HOURS T-F, 12:00p-3:00p 207-582-7144 www.johnsonhall.org


The Kennebec Current November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Daniel A Curran, Sabattus L/CPL Marine Rifleman - Vietnam War To our Dad/Pepere, you have seen so much in your life as a veteran and we are thankful for all those every day things you teach us and the time we spend with you. Love, all your family.

Robert Slattery - Sweden, ME

Timothy J. Fogg

Served in the United States Army from 1983 - 1987 guarding the border between east and west Germany. I am proud of him and the sacrifices he made to protect our country!

CW02 USMC 1993-2013 Thank You for Your Service. Semper Fi

Page 9

Randy smith SGT MAJOR Randy and I served together - 69th Signal Corps - 30 years plus served.

Bobby Richard Sr.

SGT Robert Locklin

Edward L. Roy

Leo R. Asselin

Louis Bourgoin

Ernest C. True

United States Navy

Army Ranger

Cpl. U.S. Army - Korea

P.F.C

SP-4 Specialist 4th Class

SGT E-5

“Now go cut some wood.”

12th Calvary Vietnam 1967-1968

Our family “Hero” - A friend to all he meets.

Died In Vietnam June 2, 1969 - 19 yrs. old

RIP Dad B. Thanks you for your service - Love your family

Thank you for your service! We love you! Your family

Robert (Bob) Bartlett

Robert C. French

Robert H. White

Alfred E. Cavanagh

Scott Rodrique

Donald S. Williams

Spe. 1st Class - Army (WWII)

SN

Sgt. U.S. Marines

Corporal in the Army Air Corp

SFC

NAVY

Thank you Lord for Daddy coming home safely.

Thank you for serving Daddy. Love Vickie and Family

So proud of you. Love and miss you dad.

Sweetest man I know. Love your wife Kathy French

Killed in Action - Chey-Lie Vietnam, December 1965

We honor you for your service and the fine gentleman that you are.

Joey C. Billings Sr.

Lloyd Billings

Keith J. Daniels

Colin Plummer Hurd

Robert W. Wentworth Sr.

Gary Curtis

PFC Army

1st Lieutenant

1st Seargent

Seaman 1st Class

Thank you for your service. We are so proud of you!

Your service to your country will not be forgotten. Love and miss you.

“Thank you son, for all you have done for your country.” Love Mom

My brother served this country and gave the ultimate sacrifice in Vietnam on May 9,1970. I love and miss him so much! Some day we will meet again.Sis

Thank you for your 20 years of service Dad.

Graduated from Waterville High School, died in Vietnam in 1967.

Daniel Joseph Paradis

Richard W. Rioux

John E. Boynton

Nick Nason

Debra C. Couture

Gregory Couture

82nd Airborne

PFC Army

Specialist #4

United States Marine Corps

Capt. USN 1987-2012

LT, USN 1971-1993

I Love Dan very much and I am very proud of him.

Thank you for your service. Love your wife.

Thank you for your service

Thank you for your service

Army Specialist

Army Specialist

Thanks for your years of service to our country! It is very much appreciated

Thank you for your strength and dedication to this counrty, Love you.


The Kennebec Current Page 10 November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Hawaiian Luau and Lighting of Niagara Falls

Free ME from Lung Cancer hosted a Hawaiian Luau dinner and live auction on October 17th at Le Club Calumet. The live auction raised more than $25,000 to support the Foundation’s mission ~ research, education and community support. The event was emceed by Michael Fortin of The Power Mixers D.J. Service. Dave Eid, Sports Director for WGME Channel 13 and a Board Director was keynote speaker. Tina Charest, Owner of Charlamagne’s Downtown Augusta, and Randy Begin were the auctioneers. Deb Violette, President and CEO and Roger Pomerleau, Marketing Director unveiled the Foundation’s

thermometer indicating that they are half way to funding their first research grant. Violette said that one research grant costs $100,000 to fund. Entertainment was provided by Hula Hands of Portland. For more information on how you can help visit Free ME from Lung Cancer’s website at www.freemefromlungcancer.org or call Deb Violette, President and CEO at 215-9035. This year Free ME from Lung Cancer is helping Make Some Noise for Lung Cancer Awareness and has joined forces with the Niagara Falls Parks Department to recognize Lung Cancer Awareness on Monday, November 16 at 10pm. The Falls

Photographs by Sergei Chaparin Photographer

will be illuminated on both the American and Canadian sides. White is the awareness color for Lung Cancer. November is Lung Cancer awareness Month. Lung cancer, often referred to as the “Invisible Disease” is generally asymptomatic. Medically es-

tablished Early Detection Screening for lung cancer has been a topic of studies, debates and controversy for over 50 years. In 2012, the National Cancer Institute published the National Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines. Lung Cancer is the

leading cause of death from cancer, killing more people than breast, colon, liver, kidney, prostate and melanoma cancer combined. Every five minutes a women is diagnosed with lung cancer and 50% of those who are diagnosed today will not survive one year.

For more information on how you help contact Deb Violette, Presidentand CEO a 207-215-9035 at deb@ freemefromlungcancer. org The Falls can be viewed at https://www. marriottgatewayonthefalls.com.n

Melissa Hackett, FNP to Join Richmond Area Health Center In November, Melissa Hackett, FNP will be joining the medical staff at Richmond Area Health Center. Melissa received a Master of Science in Nursing degree at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in 2011. Previously she obtained an undergraduate degree in Biology and Biotechnology from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA. Melissa grew up in the

Richmond area and is looking forward to returning to the community to provide primary care services. She has special interest in the promotion of healthy lifestyle habits and the integration of complementary and traditional medicine to improve overall wellness. She brings experience working as a registered nurse in a hospital setting as well as serving in the capacity of a nurse practitioner in a neurology

practice, including hospital inpatient consultations and management of acute neurological complaints. Melissa will be working alongside physicians Linda Hermans and Elizabeth Rudenberg, nurse practitioner Tom Bartol, and clinical social worker Louise Gephart to provide primary care and prevention services for 2,600 residents of Richmond, Gardiner, Litchfield, Dresden, Bowdoinham, Pittston,

and surrounding towns. Richmond Area Health Center is part of HealthReach Community Health Centers, a group of eleven Federally Qualified Health Centers in Central and Western Maine. Dedicated providers deliver high quality medical and behavioral health care to citizens in over 80 rural communities. To ensure access for everyone, HealthReach accepts Medicare, MaineCare and

major insurances. In addition, an Affordable Care Program is available to uninsured and underinsured residents as well as assistance with applications for programs that help with the cost of health care and medications including the Health Insurance Marketplace. A private, nonprofit celebrating a 40year history, HealthReach is funded by patient fees, grants and individual donations.n


The Kennebec Current November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

THANK YOU VETERANS.

MOTOR MALL OF AUGUSTA

“AS WE EXPRESS OUR GRATITUDE WE MUST NEVER

465 Western Avenue, Augusta

FORGET THAT THE HIGHEST APPRECIATION IS NOT

1-888-693-5856

TO UTTER WORDS BUT TO LIVE BY THEM” - JFK

Veterans, First Reponders, Firemen, Law Enforcement, EMTs, and Active Military (all branches)

Page 11

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limit one coupon per person, per transaction. customers MUST PROVIDE proof of military service or other qualifying employment.

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2008 HYUNDAI TUSCON IS: VETS SALE:

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2011 GMC SIERRA 1500

SLE EXT CAB 4X4 Z71

26,495

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2011 GMC SIERRA 1500

27,990

$

SALE PRICE

SLE CREW CAB 4X4 Z71

27,999

$

SALE PRICE

2011 GMC ACADIA AWD SLT 1

#N5410B, MR, PW, PL

SALE PRICE

29,975

$

SALE PRICE

P5305. BASE, LINER, TOW, RUNNING BOARD

32,299

$

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

2010 GMC TERRAIN SL P5229, TILT, A/C,

32,995

$

SALE PRICE

17,990

$

30,495

$

2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 SL CRW CAB 4X4

P5306. ALLOYS, LINER, TOW, FOGS

P5312, LINER, TOW, ALLOYS, FOGS, RUNNING BOARDS

22,995

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SLE CREW CAB 4X4 Z71

2012 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLE CREW CAB 4X4

$

30,495

$

2012 GMC SIERRA 1500

P5311 PC5309, FOGS, ALLOYS, LINER, TOW, RUNNING BOARDS,

SLE EXT CAB 4X4 Z71 P5179, SIDE RAIL, STEPS, LINER, TOW, ALLOYS, FOGS

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2012 GMC SIERRA 1500

SLE EXT CAB 4X4

2013 GMC SIERRA

SLE EXT CAB 4X4

P5309, ALLOYS, TOW, LINER, FOGS

PT5218, LEATHER, ALLOYS, TOW, LINER, FOGS,

P5175, ALLOYS, LINER, TOW, FOGS, RUNNING BOARDS,

8,995

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2013 GMC SIERRA 1500

SLE EXT CAB 4X4

10,995 $ 9,995 $ - 1,000

WAS: $

32,575

$

2012 GMC SIERRA 1500 SLT CREW CAB 4X4 Z71 P5307, LINER, TOW, ALLOYS, LEATHER, FOGS, RUNNING BOARDS, TONNEAU COVER

SALE PRICE

33,585

$

*Must present advertisement at the time of purchase to receive sale prices and discounts. On select in-stock units. Tax, Title and State Fees extra. Graphics of vehicles are for illustration purposes only and may vary slightly from actual units.

2008 Suzuki SX4 Sport 4CYL, FWD, 37K MILES, MANUAL, #P5246

2008 Hyundai Tucson

AUTO, 79K MILES, 4CYL, #N5647A

AUTO, 67K MILES, FWD, #X5050A

8,995

SALE $

2012 Dodge Avenger SXT

SALE $

9,995

2010 Chevrolet Impala LTZ AUTO, PW, PL, CC, #K6071A

#J5162A

12,995

SALE $

2012 Mazda5 Touring 4 CYL, 41K MILES, CC, A/C, CD, #K5169A

SALE

13,997

SALE

12,997

$

2013 Hyundai Sonata

14,990

13,600

SALE $

2013 Dodge Avenger

SALE

FRONT WHEEL DRIVE, TILT, #N4338A

SALE

2013 Ford Focus

PW, PL, CC #P5160

13,990

2010 Toyota RAV4 LIMITED

15,990

$

13,990

SALE $ 4 CYL, 4X4, TILT, A/C, P/W, REMOTE ENTRY, #N5399A

12,950

$

2013 Nissan Altima 2.5S

POWER WINDOWS, A/C, #K5205A

FRONT WHEEL DRIVE, A/C, #S5832B

SALE $

2012 Hyundai Elantra

10,990 SALE $11,995

2013 Nissan Altima 2.5S

FACTORY CERTIFIED

2012 Ford Focus SE SE, Auto, PW, PL, A/C, 6,200 miles #N5356A

$

#N543A

PW, PL, CRUISE, #N5517A

SALE $

2010 Toyota Corolla LE

SALE $

2009 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 80K MILES, V-6 CYL, 4X4, A/C, #J5282A

16,990

SALE $

17,495

SALE $

SHOP US ONLINE AT WWW.CHARLIESMM.COM

All sale prices include doc fee.


The Kennebec Current Page 12 November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

A User’s Guide to Useless Information John McDonald

Soon after my latest book, “John McDonald’s Maine Trivia� came out, I started receiving emails from people who insisted that they knew from useless information and my book only skimmed the surface. Many of the e-mails then listed what the sender thought was more useless than anything I’d ever written. And since the book is still available and fortunately, people are still buying it, I’m still

getting “trivia-related� emails. Having written a weekly column for the past fifteen years and hosted a weekend talk show for over 20 years, I like to think I know more than the average person about useless information. Taking up the challenge, I began to go over some of my old columns looking for possible “useful information� title contenders. Right off, I came across a column I wrote on words and their meaning where I informed readers that the word “fez� was Turkish for “hat.�

How useful is that little gem, I ask, unless you happen to be a Turk or a Shriner on convention? I remember writing a column on the phases of the moon and soon afterwards received a very nice e-mail from a retired English teacher who informed me that our planet’s only satellite is “the Moon� and therefore it should always be capitalized. But she didn’t stop there. She went on to say that the natural satellites of other planets are just called “moons� (lower case) because each has been given a proper name, e.i. Dei-

mos, Amalthea, Hylperion, Miranda, Larissa or Charon, etc. Where would we be without English teachers? Well, for one thing I’d be lacking that little nugget of “moon� information, that’s where I’d be. After the moon column ran I received an e-mail from a former typesetter at the Portland Press Herald. He asked: John, Do you know where the phrase “lower case� comes from? Assuming I didn’t (even though, in fact, I did) he explained “lower case� came from print shops that would set type by hand. The small letters, those used

most often, were kept in the lower type cases and the larger, or capital letters, were kept in upper cases. See why you should read this column every week? Where else are you going to learn about these important things? Something as innocent as a fish story can stir a reader into action. After writing about an old Maine fish story that my Grandfather loved to tell I received a brief e-mail from a reader: John, Did you know that “pnigophobia� is the fear of choking on a fish bone? Well, I didn’t then, but I do now. I’ll see if

I can get that into the next edition of “Trivia.� Sometimes, readers can get a little crazy with their “informative� e-mails. For example, I once did a column on the U.S. Postal Service which, for some reason, inspired someone to email me to say: John, I enjoyed your column on the postal service and just wondered if you knew what the letters Z-I-P in ZIP code stood for? Not wanting to keep you in suspense I’ll tell you that the letters stand for “Zone Improvement Plan.� I’m sure some reader will find a use for that little nugget before the day’s out. n

Reader Recipe Ed’s Apple Bread

• 2 or 3 Mac apples peeled sliced pieces • 1/2 cup white sugar or brown sugar (optional) • 1 1/2 or 2 cups flour • 1tsp. Baking soda • 1tsp. Vanilla extract or almond extract (optional) • 2 Eggs • 1 stick butter (melted) • 2tsp cinnamon • 1/4 cup tap water (use as needed mixing ingredients) • 1/2 cup raisins (optional)

Preheat oven to 350Âş. Combine all ingredients in large bowl. Mix well. Greased 8x8 pan pour into pan. Bake 1 or 1 1/4 hour. Convection oven works best turn pan around inside oven around even bake. Serve warm or cool on rack when done. ENJOY!

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The Children’s

"AKE/VENS -ASONRY (EATER THERMOTECHMASONRYCOM 7ESTERN!V -ANCHESTER    

377-2121

�isco�er� �useum’s 2015 Whimsical Auction

75 Main Street, Winthrop ME 04364 *Each office is independently owned and operated.

Thursday, November 19th, 6p.m.-8p.m.

Tickets to this event are 100% deductible $30

per person - $50 per couple 6 tickets for $150/8 tickets for $200 For tickets, visit or call the museum at 622-2209

The Children’s Discovery Museum is located at 171 Capitol Street, Augusta or you can visit them at www.childrensdiscoverymuseum.org

1235543

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www.coldwellbankerthomas.com / info@coldwellbankerthomas.com

www.turnerpublishing.net


The Kennebec Current November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Page 13

Chicken Soup on an Autumn Night Out Jodi Cornelio

I recently attended the Androscoggin Home Health and Hospice Autumn Night Out Gala. I was seated at a table with a group of friends, some I knew and some I just met that night. I was impressed by the conversation around healthy eating choices as we discussed ways to make homemade chicken soup, thus so appropriate on a cool autumn night. The thing that tickled me the most is that we all used organic chick-

en and vegetables. All locally grown garden fresh vegetables and organically raised chicken. It is nice to see that more and more people are planting gardens and enjoying the canning season. Yes it is time consuming growing a garden but the rewards are plentiful. One of the best Christmas gifts I get is from my friend’s mom who lets me fill up a box of can goods from her cellar. We have a name for every vegetable and it all starts with “Mammy,â€? Mammy Beans, Mammy pickles, Mammy carrots and so on‌. When I make my chicken soups it has TLC from Mammy all year round.

Hopefully if you’re not a gardener you have a local source to get vegetables to take you through the winter that have not been tainted with pesticides. The food that we eat can be tricky if you are trying to stay healthy. Sometimes it is hard to know what has been chemically treated and what kind of pesticides are being used in our foods. And what is GMO? GMO is genetically modified organism. From Wikipedia, GMO is: a genetically modified organism, also known as a transgenic organism, is any organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques (i.e. geneti-

cally engineered organism). en.wikipedia.org. So how do we know which foods have GMO? We don’t really unless they are labeled as such. In grocery stores and in health f o o d stores m a n y p a c k aged items may say no GMO so there is help out there. Really, to be on the safe side buying meats and vegetables from local farmers is a good option as you can always ask them if they use pesticides or any GMO’s.

Curves of Gardiner Introduces New Class Card

Curves of Gardiner announced today the availability of a new Class Card that offers five workout classes at a special introductory price. With the Class Card, customers can try any five Curves classes, including Curves Workouts with Jillian Michaels and the new Specialty Classes, while experiencing Curves at a pace that works for them. "We're excited to offer the new Class Card to the Gardiner community to showcase the wide variety of classes and personal coaching that Curves offers every

member," said Jessica Clark, Curves of Gardiner manager. "The Class Card is an ideal way to experience Curves to see if a membership is right for them." The Curves Class Card is $25 and expires 60 days after purchase. Curves offers a variety of classes for every fitness level. Curves Signature Classes available with the Class Card include: Curves Workouts with Jillian Michaels Introductory Level, Level 1 and Level 2 Classes as well as Curves’Arms, Core &Legs, Body Balance, and Stretch & Strength classes.

The CHOICE is Yours AND YOU CAN CHOOSE EXCELLENCE

For more information about Curves of Gardiner, or to make an appointment for a tour

please contact: Jessica Clark at 582-6461 or visit www.curves.com.n

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Many farmers have grass fed beef that they market

and also raise organic chicken and pork. Deer and

moose season is upon us, so if you are from a hunting family, you can’t get any more organic then that if you are lucky enough to land your prey. And if you are vegetarian, vegetable soups with brown rice and beans is a good alternative to chicken soup and provides a good source of protein and nutrients. It’s heartwarming the things you learn on an autumn night out! Live Long, Live Well.n

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The Kennebec Current Page 14 November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

Barcelona: A Banquet for the Senses

Gothic neighborhood. Photo courtesy of Dreamstime. com/Pere Sanz.

By Victor Block The maze of twisted streets is hemmed in by medieval Gothic buildings along with hints of the Roman Empire that once held sway there. Nearby, a virtual outdoor museum of fanciful, multi-hued structures rewards the imagination of passers-by. The only color of interest to other visitors to the city is the tone of tan they hope to get from the sun. If any place offers a banquet for the senses, it is Barcelona, Spain. Its location overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, beguiling mixture of ancient and modern architecture and colorful street life would satisfy the claims to fame of most urban centers. In Barcelona, they’re just for starters. How many municipalities can boast of beaches within city limits? Barcelona has a 2.5-mile stretch of inviting sand along the Mediterranean. Each section has a different character. Some attract the volleyball and bikini crowd; others appeal to a more sedate clientele.

The city’s Gothic neighborhood is one of several intriguing areas that beckon visitors, and that have remained largely as they were centuries ago. During the fourth century AD, when present-day Barcelona was part of the Roman Empire, this quarter was enclosed by Roman walls. Here and there are reminders of that time. Barcelona also has a collection of world-class museums, including those dedicated to two of the greatest artists of all time. Pablo Picasso began to acquire his skills when he moved there as a youngster with his family. The Picasso Museum displays his paintings, drawings, etchings and engravings. Joan Miro was born in Barcelona, and the museum devoted to him holds the largest public collection of his art. Even people who don’t stop by there are introduced to a work by Miro, although they may not know it. A brightly colored abstract mosaic by the artist that is set in the pavement of the popular street

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Las Ramblas. Photo courtesy of Dreamstime.com/Pere Sanz.

called Las Ramblas goes unnoticed by many people strolling down that avenue. Actually, “the Rambles” consists of five streets laid end-to-end. More market than motor vehicle thoroughfare, it’s lined with cafes, flower stalls, bird shops and vendors selling a variety of other goods. Located just off Las Ramblas is a building – one among many – that was designed by the worldrenowned architect whose work is the primary attraction that draws many visitors to Barcelona. The Palau Guell, an elaborate house constructed for a wealthy industrialist in the late 19th century, was designed by Antoni Gaudi, whose fanciful creations explored the interplay between architecture and nature. They’re distinctive for swirling turrets, undulating roof lines and other imaginative shapes in a whimsical variety of bright colors. Examples of Gaudi’s playful imagination also come alive at the Casa Batllo. That building’s wavy stone and glass façade is

decorated with fragments of colored glass. The arched roof, irregular oval windows and sculpted stone adornments suggest that Gaudi’s goal was to avoid straight lines completely. Skeletal-shaped columns have prompted locals to nickname the building casa dels ossos (house of bones). Among Gaudi-designed monuments sprinkled throughout the city like jewels, one stands above all others in its inspiration and magnitude. If ever there was a work in progress, it is the Sagrada Familia (Holy Family) Cathedral, his most celebrated masterpiece whose construction began in 1882. The goal now is to have it completed by 2026, the 100th anniversary of Gaudi’s death. Construction of the massive cathedral has progressed under direction of several architects, who have continued to follow his dramatic vision. A very different architectural treasure welcomes visitors to El Poble Espanyo (the Spanish Village), an open-air museum that

An example of Gaudi Architecture. Courtesy of Dreamstime.com.

offers an introduction to the country’s cultures and architectural heritage. Strolling along winding streets and squares occupied by outdoor cafes provides immersion in the atmosphere of a Spanish town – but one which brings together 117 outstanding architectural gems from throughout the country. They range from a copy of an entrance gate into an 11th century town to a 15th century house in La Mancha that is adorned by balconies from which residents once watched bull fights. Adding to the realistic setting are restaurants and cafes that offer fare ranging from traditional tapas dishes to diet-busting multi-

course meals. After feasting on the architectural and other riches of Barcelona, what better way to end a day than to chow down on cuisine representative of the area of Spain where it is located, as well as that of the entire country. If you go: For more information about a visit to Barcelona, log onto barcelonaturisme.com. Victor Block is an awardwinning travel journalist who lives in Washington, D.C., and spends summers in Rangeley, Maine. He is a guidebook author who has traveled to more than 70 countries. His articles appear in newspapers around the country, and on travel websites. n

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Maine Humorist, Gary Crocker hosts Maine State Credit Union’s eighth annual Heart & Humor Harvest Italian Dinner and Live Auction. More than 250 community members raised over $21,000 for three dozen food organizations in Central Maine during this year’s event.

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The Kennebec Current November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

“Plein Ayuh”

The Creative Realism of Ken Carlson

Monkitree, 263 Water Street in Gardiner will present an exhibition featuring the work of Ken Carlson entitled Plein Ayuh: The Creative Realism of Ken Carlson from November 13-January 9, 2016. The blank page offers a challenge to Ken Carlson and faced with the challenge, Ken is determined to have fun. Just as a jazz performer creates fresh melody over a repeating cycle of chord changes, Ken takes a familiar landscape and offers

something surprising. Familiar scenes of Gardiner become less familiar and more wondrous in the hands of Ken Carlson. His experience as an illustrator and cartoonist has had an impact on Ken Carlson’s painting style. Often working plein air, he frees himself to play with a landscape he is familiar with- adding elements, skewing perspective, tilting structures. Ken imbues buildings and landscapes with character. Whether it is a feed store

bowing under the weight of its years or a new gazebo tilting toward a nearby sculpture, you can sense these structures have feelings. Ken drew editorial cartoons for the Kennebec Journal from 1985-2002. He enjoyed watercolor color painting off and on over the years. Or so he thought, “I took my first workshop with Tony van Hasselt, then the fun began and I started painting Plein Air, or as I like to say, “Plein Ayuh.” In addition to the opening reception on November 13th, there is an additional opportunity to view the work with the artist present during Artwalk Gardiner on December 4th from 5:308:30pm. Monkitree is a fine art and craft gallery located at 263 Water Street in historic downtown Gardiner, Maine. n

Church Fair

The Green Street United Methodist Church, 13 Green Street, Augusta, will host a Church Fair on December 5, 2015, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Luncheon at noon. There will be craft items, baked goodies, candy, jams, pickles, Grandmother’s Attic, Christmas decorations and jewelry. Also theme baskets for silent auction. n

A Product of

Page 15

Maine Artists Featured in New Exhibit at Harlow Gallery

"River Park" by Bruce Armstrong of Manchester. “A Survey of Computer Use in Art”, an exhibition featuring the work of over 34 Maine artists, will show the various ways in which computers, software or other digital tools are being use to create art. The exhibit will be on view at the Harlow Gallery, located at 160 Water Street in Hallowell from November 6 through 28. The exhibition is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday 12-6pm ”A Survey of Computer Use in Art” resulted from an open call for Maine artist who use computers, software or other digital tools to make their art and was juried by Petrea Noyes and Harlow staff members, Allison McKeen and Deborah Fahy. Out of 95 submissions, 58 works of art will be included in the final show. "Computer-generated art

or the computer as another tool with which to create? The computer can't make the art, it can only make possible what the artist creates with it. This exhibition has asked artists throughout the state to submit work that has been conceived or made possible with the use of a computer or even physical parts of a computer. The work selected for this show is very diverse both in subject, dimensions, construction and color - from very abstract pieces and digital collages to more traditional works. Once thought of as not a true creative medium, a computer as yet another tool for the artist is gaining acceptance.” - Petrea Noyes Participating artists by town include: Augusta: L. Hubbard, Gary Levine, Mary Becker Weiss, Students from Cony High School and University of

Maine; Bangor: Gabby Farley; Bath: Valerie Michael; Belgrade: Karen S. KellyPhilbrick; Falmouth: Annie Darling; Farmingdale: Richard Fortin; Farmington: Channa Schroff; Gardiner: Allison McKeen; Hallowell: Karen Jordan Allen; Hampden: Andrea Rickards; Hermon: Bradley Chelberg; Jefferson: Suzanna Lasker; Liberty: Kerstin Engman; Lincolnville: Petrea Noyes; Manchester: Bruce Armstrong, Ethan Guillemette; Millinocket: Benjamin Hutchins; Northport: Terry Hire; Old Town: Christiana Becker; Orono: Megan Ogden, Jim Winters; Owls Head: Rick Perry; Pittston: Scott Minzy; Portland: David Wade; Richmond: Ruthanne Harrison; South Portland: Damir Porobic, Jeff Woodbury; Waterville: Peter Jude Hubiak; Winthrop: Carol-Lynn Rossel.n

MEDICARE Health Questions? We’ve Got Answers!

Did you get a letter from your Health Insurance Company? Want some help understanding your options? Maybe you just have questions about how Medicare works?

Call Ruth LaChance 207-215-6685 Turner Publishing invites our readers children to send in their “Letters to Santa” to be published in their local Turner Publishing paper. All letters will be published for all our readers to enjoy.

Local Medicare Health Insurance Expert

Serving People in Kennebec, Lincoln & Androscoggin Counties

There is no charge for having the letters published and they will be run exactly as they are submitted, misspellings and all.

Add a taste of authentic Maine humor to your next banquet, luncheon, conference, convention or company get together.

“Letters to Santa” is a great keepsake for parents, grandparents and the children themselves. Mail your letters to: “Letters to Santa” PO Box 214, Turner, ME 04282. Letters will not be returned but may be picked up at the Turner Publishing office in Turner. All entries must be received by November 23, 2015.

So get your children to write a letter to Santa (which will be forwarded to the North Pole...) to share with all your friends and family.

Contact humorist and best-selling Maine author John McDonald

CALL TO MAKE RESERVATIONS WITH JOHN TODAY! Call: 207.899.1868

Email: mainestoryteller@yahoo.com


The Kennebec Current Page 16 November 2015 www.centralmainetoday.com

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The Kennebec Current November 2015  
The Kennebec Current November 2015  
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