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Pembroke Hill School Centennial Campaign 2010-2013


ENDURING EXCELLENCE

STEVEN J. BELLIS HEAD OF SCHOOL

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“This campaign is vital to the future of Pembroke Hill. We must continue to be a school where tuition levels are within reach; where salaries are fair for those whose work makes us extraordinary; where financial aid makes a Pembroke Hill education possible for families willing to sacrifice for it; and where new ideas and innovative programs can be nurtured and developed. A larger endowment is essential for all of these goals to be realized.�

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Pembro ke Hil l S cho o l


From the Centennial Campaign Leadership As we enter our second century, we continue to be inspired by the promise of all that our students can achieve with a Pembroke Hill education. Thanks to the generosity of many people over many years, we are strong and stable, and our beautiful campuses boast a physical plant that is among the best in the region. Now it is our turn to provide what is needed: to ensure Pembroke Hill’s strength and promise going forward.

T

hrough 2013, we celebrate the centennial of The Pembroke Hill School and its predecessors. We

have flourished for 100 years by honoring our past and traditions while growing and innovating in response to a changing world.

Barret S. Heddens III ’71 Steering Committee Co-Chair

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To continue to enhance the excellence that is the hallmark of Pembroke Hill—on every stage, in every classroom, and on every field—we must build a bigger endowment. This larger endowment will help to secure the future of our most important assets—our phenomenal faculty, curriculum, and student body— so that Pembroke Hill can continue to provide a transformative education for generations of students.

Steven J. Bellis Head of School

William S. Berkley Steering Committee Co-Chair

Cen t en n i al Ca mpaign

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OUR FOUNDER’S VISION Vassie James Ward Hill was a woman of vision. She founded the Country Day School PEMBROKE HILL SCHOOL ____

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in 1910 and, together with Lalla Ruth Carr Patton, co-founded Sunset Hill in 1913. She supported the work of pioneering educator

• Individual teachers have a significant and lasting impact on their students; • Participating in the classroom, in the

John Dewey and what became known as the

laboratory, on the stage, and on the

Progressive Movement. Driven by a strong

athletic field is the best way to learn;

belief that the education of young people is Vassie James Ward Hill

• Every child matters;

society’s most important act and that great value must be placed on children and their individual capabilities, Mrs. Hill set out to had ever known. She was successful in her pursuit, and, today, a century later, Pembroke beliefs, which include:

that truly shapes the child; and • Independent education, through its effect

establish schools unlike anything Kansas City

Hill is still grounded in her fundamental

• It is the whole educational experience

on young people and their families, makes an important difference in the welfare of the community at large.

Ann Ward and Hugh Morgan In addition to being a visionary, Vassie James Ward Hill was also Ann Ward Morgan’s paternal grandmother. Ann did not grow up in Kansas City, but visited our campus in 2010 along with her husband, Hugh, and other members of Vassie’s family as part of the school’s centennial celebration. They enjoyed the archives exhibit featuring Vassie, as well as historic material relating to the school’s founding. Following their visit to Pembroke Hill, Ann and Hugh decided to support the Centennial Campaign with a gift to the Vassie James Hill Scholarship Fund, which was created by Vassie’s family in 1954 to support children of faculty. Of their involvement, Ann says, “We are so proud that we are able to be a part of this endeavor and to remember my grandmother and all that she accomplished.” And the school community is grateful for the Morgans’ generosity as well as their wonderful connection to our founder.

In founding Country Day in 1910 and Sunset Hill in 1913, Mrs. Hill set in motion the advancement of education in Kansas City, which forever changed the region’s academic landscape.


$13 Million to Help Ensure the Future Our goal is to raise $13 million by June 2013 to help preserve and advance Pembroke Hill’s academic strength, long-term security, and “endowed” excellence for students today and tomorrow.

A larger endowment is a solid base that can sustain an institution through uncertain times while enhancing it during times of prosperity. CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE

PEMBROKE HILL SCHOOL

Now more than ever, a larger endowment provides a solid base that can sustain an institution through uncertain times while enhancing it during times of prosperity. Income from the endowment can be used as operating revenue or to fund special projects while the principal is left intact, continually invested to support the school in the future.

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A larger endowment helps reduce the pressure on tuition and fees, benefiting all students and families. It also helps make a Pembroke Hill School education accessible by providing more financial aid. A significant endowment enables the school to be more competitive in the hiring of talented teachers while supporting maintenance and improvements to buildings and grounds.

George A. Barton ’69 Jonathan E. Baum William S. Berkley Wendy Hockaday Burcham

Diane Canaday Barret S. Heddens III ’71 Steven H. Hughes ’75 Elaine Drodge Koch

William M. Lyons ’73 John A. MacDonald Henry H. Newell ’82 Carolyn Parkerson

Anne St. Peter Charles S. Sosland ’73 Jon C. Styslinger Linda Walsworth


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CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVES

The $2 Million Hall Challenge

The Centennial Campaign is a community–wide effort to raise $13 million for the school’s endowment by Sunset Hill’s centennial in 2013.

The Hall Family has offered the Pembroke Hill School community an exciting and

Our objective in increasing the endowment is to provide much-needed additional operating support for:

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inspiring campaign challenge. If the community reaches our goal of $13 million by June 2013, the Halls will contribute an additional $2 million, increasing the campaign total to at least $15 million. All cash donations, pledges of five years or less, and irrevocable estate gifts will be counted toward the Hall Challenge.

• Faculty salaries, benefits, and professional development POTENTIAL TOTAL WITH HALL CHALLENGE • Student access and aid • Classroom and curriculum enhancement and innovation

CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN GOAL

$15

RAISED TO DATE

MILLION

$13 $10 MILLION

MILLION


THE HALL FAMILY The histories of Pembroke Hill and the Hall family are deeply connected. In 1910, the year Vassie James Ward Hill established Country Day School, Joyce C. Hall founded Hallmark Cards. Virtually ever since, the Halls have been a part of the life of the school as students, parents, alumni, trustees, grandparents, and leadership supporters and volunteers.

Don ’46 and Adele Hall

In 2010, when the Board of Trustees determined that endowment growth was essential to the school’s future, Spence Heddens ’71, co-chair of the new Centennial Steering Committee knew his first visit would be with Adele and Don Hall ’46. “The Halls have helped shape Pembroke Hill’s vision for years and it was important that we share with them our ideas for securing the future of the school,” says Spence. Following a visit by Spence and Head of School Steve Bellis, a letter arrived from Bill Hall ’63, President of the Hall Family Foundation. It contained details about campaign commitments from the Foundation and members of the Hall family. Steve recalls, “Once again, the Halls stepped forward with a generosity and a commitment that is truly inspiring.”

The Hall family—Adele and Don ’46, Jill ’74 and Don ’74, Laura and Dave ’80, and Margi ’75 and Keith Pence­—and the Hall Family Foundation committed $3 million in endowment support for Hall Student Center and financial aid. In addition, Adele and Don and the Foundation each offered a $1 million campaign topping grant. To meet the Hall Challenge, $13 million must be raised by June 2013. Multiyear pledges and estate plans will be counted toward the Challenge. According to Don ’46, “This school has mattered deeply to my family and to Kansas City. We are pleased to continue to play a role in ensuring that it remains strong well into the future.” The Challenge is generating enthusiasm for the Centennial Campaign and providing a wonderful opportunity for campaign volunteers to discuss estate planning with alumni, parents of alumni, and other potential donors. “Without a doubt, the Hall Challenge has galvanized support for Pembroke Hill’s endowment. The Hall family got the campaign off to a strong start and they are helping ensure a strong finish,” remarked Spence. “We are grateful for their involvement in Pembroke Hill’s second century.”

“Without a doubt, the Hall Challenge has galvanized support for Pembroke Hill’s endowment. The Hall family got the campaign off to a strong start and they are helping ensure a strong finish.” — Spence Heddens ’71 Co-Chair, Centennial Campaign Steering Committee

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DREAM MAKERS

MATTHEW CAROLAN MIDDLE SCHOOL DEAN, ENGLISH DEPARTMENT CHAIR

“Being instrumental in the making of student dreams is real success. Yes, success happens daily in the classroom, but the bar is high and the journey is long. In teaching, success does not come easily or quickly. It is an incessant process that demands incredible patience and skill and dedication. To that extent, I might say there is success in the very process of great teaching.”


Points of Pembroke Hill Pride A Pembroke Hill education prepares young people for the rigors of college and graduate school. It also prepares and inspires students to make a positive difference in the world around them. Students learn in an environment with high expectations and one that promotes character traits such as initiative, integrity, courage, perseverance, resiliency, and respect. The CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN will help provide the resources to ensure this continues to be the case. STRONG STUDENT PROFILE

ACADEMIC SUCCESS

ARTS AND ATHLETICS ACHIEVEMENTS

• Enrollment of 1,165 in Early Years (age 2) through grade 12.

• The median student consistently scores at the 90th percentile nationally on standardized tests.

• 18% of upper school students are enrolled in the Arts Focus program. 118 awards were earned in the 2011-12 Scholastic Art Competition, including 25 gold medals.

• 21% of students are children of alumni and 23% are students of color. • Students come to campus from 73 zip codes. • Half the student body lives in Kansas and half lives in Missouri. • $2 million in financial assistance is awarded to 20% of the student body annually. • More than 82% of upper school students play a sport, and 95% are involved in extracurricular activities, including 22 varsity sports, 30 clubs, math and science teams, student publications, debate, theater, and musicals.

• In the 100-member Class of 2012, 21% received National Merit recognition and 25% placed in the top 2% nationally on the ACT. • Graduates attend top colleges and universities from coast to coast, crediting Pembroke Hill for their excellent preparation and success. • Middle and upper school Science Olympiad teams consistently win the Missouri state competitions and go on to nationals. The upper school team has competed in nationals 23 times in the last 25 years; the middle school team has competed eight years in a row.

• Thirty athletic teams have won state titles since 2000. • The upper school choir performed at Carnegie Hall in 2011 at a prestigious invitationonly concert.

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Our Faculty, Our Foundation Pembroke Hill’s faculty is the heart and soul of the school. Thanks to a student-teacher ratio of 11 to 1, adult interaction with students is broad and deep. The opportunity to affect children extends beyond the classroom as teachers are also advisors, coaches, and club sponsors. Our faculty is committed, compassionate, and talented, and its priority is the individual success of each student. The Centennial Campaign will provide resources for recruitment, retention, and compensation of top educators like our current teachers.

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• 130 members strong • More than 50% with advanced degrees • Eleven holding doctorates • 18 years teaching experience on average • 12 of their teaching years at Pembroke Hill

DURWOOD SCHOLARS PROGRAM At Pem-Day, Stan Durwood ’38 excelled in the arts, academics, and athletics. He was the student Vassie James Ward Hill envisioned when she founded our predecessor schools. The school helped shape Stan’s life and generosity of spirit. As founder of AMC Theatres, he pioneered the multiplex and under his leadership, AMC grew to the second largest motion picture theater circuit in the world. Stan gave abundantly of his time and resources to Pem-Day and

later Pembroke Hill as well as the greater Kansas City community. Though he passed away in 1999, Stan ensured continued support for Pembroke Hill through The Stanley H. Durwood Foundation. In 2010, a significant commitment from the Foundation created the Durwood Scholars Program. The Program provides financial aid to outstanding students. In the two years since the Program’s founding,

Pembroke Hill’s Durwood Scholars have distinguished themselves in a variety of ways and contributed significantly to life on campus. Like Stan, the Durwood Foundation’s trustees, Charlie Egan and Ray Beagle, share a passion for education and for Pembroke Hill. They regularly visit with the Durwood Scholars and follow their progress.

Charlie and Ray feel similarly about making a leadership gift to the school. Ray believes, “There is no school like Pembroke Hill in the Middle West. Its ability to transform lives is remarkable.” According to Charlie, the school ranks with top East Coast institutions. When asked why the school is worthy of support, he states, “Pembroke Hill is an extraordinarily important resource to the community.”


THE STYSLINGER FAMILY AND ALTEC/STYSLINGER FOUNDATION Of Pembroke Hill, Jon Styslinger says, “Pembroke Hill is a great fit for our family. We define success the same way the school does—building character and allowing each student to reach his or her potential. We don’t believe sports, debate, or theater are extracurricular. They are as much a part of a great education as math, English, history, and science. Pembroke Hill provides this total education. My children play a sport and excel, are challenged to reach their highest potential The Styslinger family: Sarah ’12, Temple, Jon, Babbie, academically, and have Matthew ’17, and Jon Jr. ’14 been involved in the arts and theater. I know their lives are different because of the school. And when I say different, I mean better! “We are not from Kansas City and don’t have a lifelong association with Pembroke Hill, but when we moved here we found this outstanding school. It was built by people we never knew and had no way of thanking. The only way we can say thank you and repay that debt is to make sure that for the next family who comes to Pembroke Hill, whether from out of town or in town, we leave a school better than we found it. It is our responsibility. This campaign can be transformational for the school and ensure we meet our responsibility.” Jon, his wife Babbie, and the Altec/Styslinger Foundation were among the Centennial Campaign’s first donors. Their generous commitment, along with Jon’s leadership as former president of the Board of Trustees and a member of the campaign steering committee, have helped shape a campaign driven by vision.

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A COMMUNITY COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE

CAROLYN PARKERSON TRUSTEE

“Pembroke Hill’s greatest strength is the cumulative excellence of our community. Our devoted teachers are as demanding of themselves as they are of their students. Our administration never rests on past successes. Our students are a great source of pride for all. Our parents give of their talents, time, and resources. Best of all, amidst the seriousness and importance of our educational endeavors, Pembroke Hill is fun. It is a positive and energizing place to be.”


Fiscally Sound and Stable Pembroke Hill School continues to operate in the black, as it has for many years.

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Our financial resources are focused on students and instruction, rather than administrative staff. Compared to peer schools, Pembroke Hill has fewer administrators in all areas.

JEANNETTE TERRELL NICHOLS ’43

The school’s fundraising is sound, with parents, alumni, grandparents, and other friends of the school contributing $1.1 million to the Annual Fund each year. In addition, nearly 100 members of the school community have made provisions for Pembroke Hill in their estate plans as members of the Founder’s Circle.

Jeannette Nichols ’43 is delighted to participate in the Centennial Campaign, since the school “has been a part of my life since graduation.” Many of her family members attended Sunset Hill, PemDay, and Pembroke Hill, and she still sees classmates, who “continue to be close friends after all these years.”

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12 2010 Endowment Market Values of Peer Midwestern Independent Schools (ENDOWMENT IN MILLIONS)

$100

$80

$60

$40

$20

0

Data from respective school websites

Hockaday School St. Mark’s School Park Tudor School Mary Institute & Saint Louis Country Day Holland Hall Breck School Blake School St. Paul Academy and Summit School John burroughs School Kent Denver School Greenhill School Pembroke Hill School Colorado Academy

She is thankful to Sunset Hill for what it provided during the turbulent World War II years. She says the school offered a “helpful perspective during the war as it prepared girls for college.” Sunset Hill gave Jeannette and her peers an education that allowed them a “wide choice of competitive colleges nationally.” Jeannette wants the students of today to have the same competitive edge. Her most recent commitment to the school is the latest of many she and her late husband, Miller ’29, have made. In addition to their financial support, Jeannette and Miller were volunteer leaders. President of their respective alumni associations, both were honored by the Alumni Association with the Distinguished Alumni Award.


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ROBERT ’39 AND PATRICIA PARKER FRANCIS For Bob Francis, Pembroke School was more than just a school. It was his life. In 1925, his father, Hugh, cofounded the school with Guy Goodwin, and the Francis family moved to campus. Bob matriculated when he was just four years old.   After the merger of Pembroke and Country Day in 1933, Bob discovered a love of athletics. He played center on the Pem-Day football team, was a member of the basketball team, and was the baseball team’s first baseman. He claims with a laugh that no ball ever

got by him while he was on first. When he graduated in 1939, he was “wellprepared and ready to take on the world.” And he did exactly that—first at the University of Missouri and then during a career in business. As Bob’s career advanced and he moved around the country, his fondness for the school never waned. He retained a sense of pride, gratitude, and familial attachment. The license plate of Bob’s cherry red 1965 Mustang reads PEMDAY and one on another car reads PEM-HILL.

As an expression of his connection to Pembroke Hill and its predecessors, Bob, along with his wife, Patricia, have made provision for a significant commitment to the endowment through their estate plans. Their gift will support faculty salaries. When asked to distill a lifetime of affection, support, and memories into a sentence or two, Bob says he loves Pembroke Hill simply because it is “a great place to be.” Bob and Patricia’s generosity will help ensure the school continues to be a great place for generations of future students and teachers. 


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ABIGAIL LUTZ

Fourth Generation Graduate, Class of 2012 “Pembroke Hill’s greatest strengths are by far the education it is able to provide and the teachers it employs. Working with teenagers is not easy, but every teacher I have had the opportunity to learn from has never given up. They are persistent because they know how capable all of us are to do the best we can as students and people.”

THE POWELL FAMILY For Cappy and Peter Powell ’74, and their sons, Robert ’07 and Henry ’08, supporting the Centennial Campaign is a way to show their gratitude for their time at Pembroke Hill and especially for Robert and Henry’s participation in athletics. The Powells are firm believers in the benefits of playing on a team. In fact, Cappy helped found

the Lower School Sports Council, which provides a variety of team sports for lower and middle school students. Robert and Henry began participating in athletics while they were on the Wornall Campus. Their experiences culminated on the upper school football and lacrosse teams. Touched by how the coaches treated their sons, Cappy and Peter found Pembroke Hill’s coaching staff “supportive of their players as students, athletes, and artists.” It is a reflection of the school’s focus on encouraging students to

participate in any activity they are interested in, guided by faculty who know students as individuals. Cappy appreciates that the varsity baseball coach is also an English teacher. In honor of the school’s athletic program, the Powell family has created the Robert P. Powell ’07 and Henry E. Powell ’08 Endowment, which supports Pembroke Hill’s athletic coaches and the remarkable effect they have on students.


Donor Recognition The Centennial Campaign provides the opportunity to create and name an endowment to honor or memorialize a family member, teacher, or coach, or to associate your family name with Pembroke Hill’s mission. Endowment naming opportunities are available for donations of $100,000 and higher and can be based on your interests and the amount of support you wish to provide. As you consider a gift, it may be helpful to know that 4% of an endowment is spent annually. Thus, a gift of $1 million will provide $40,000 in income each year, and a gift of $100,000 will provide $4,000. Named endowments are listed in perpetuity in Pembroke Hill’s annual report and other publications. The listing includes a description of the endowment’s purpose, the date of its creation, and the individuals or family who created it.

CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN NAMING OPPORTUNITIES FACULTY SUPPORT Summer Faculty Grants Program ........................................... $500,000 Professional Development Endowments .............................. $100,000 Faculty Tuition Remission Endowments .............................. $100,000 STUDENT SUPPORT Endowed Headmaster’s Discretionary Fund ....................... $500,000 Fully Endowed Scholarship Endowments ............................ $500,000 Scholarship Endowments ......................................................... $100,000 PROGRAM SUPPORT Artist-in-Residence Program ................................................... $250,000 Writer-in-Residence Program ................................................. $250,000 Student Leadership Endowments .......................................... $100,000 Community Service Endowments ......................................... $100,000 Curricular Area Endowments (languages, athletics, science, etc.) .......................................... $100,000 FACILITIES Building Support Funds ........................................................... $100,000

PARENT SUPPORT FOR THE CENTENNIAL CAMPAIGN

CHRISTY AND BILL GAUTREAUX Since their arrival at Pembroke Hill with daughters Adrianna ’19 and Estella ’22 nearly 10 years ago, Bill and Christy Gautreaux have made support of the school a priority. They are members of the Headmaster’s Leadership Circle and fans of the Auction. Additionally, Christy volunteers on campus in a variety of ways each year.

Making a commitment to the Centennial Campaign was a logical next step in their giving. More importantly, it is an affirmation of the family’s Pembroke Hill experience. Bill and Christy are appreciative of the friendships the entire family has made, the outstanding teachers who encourage their daughters, and the unique opportunities available to the girls. They are delighted they will help maintain these hallmarks of a Pembroke Hill education.

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ADDITIONAL NAMING OPPORTUNITIES THE GREEN FAMILY The Green family has a long association with Pembroke Hill and its predecessors. Rick is a 1972 Pem-Day graduate, and he and Nancy are the parents of three Pembroke Hill alumni Allison ’02, Ashley ’04, and R. C. ’08. Rick is “very proud of the four school mugs that sit on our shelves” and feels indebted to his Pem-Day education.

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Despite having attended celebrated colleges, the three Green children credit what they learned at Pembroke Hill for what propels them forward in the real world. “There is a definite tie to what we are capable of and what Pembroke Hill taught us.” They list the skills they obtained at Pembroke Hill, most of which are not directly academic, Allison ’02, Rick ’72, Ashley ’04, Nancy and R. C. ’08 Green as being of great help now. For example, they cite small classes as providing close interaction with adults and teaching important people skills. They appreciated the encouragement to participate in a variety of activities including the arts and athletics. And they say that being held to a high standard and being pushed outside comfort zones by the school’s faculty and coaches helped more than anything else. “We have all jumped into the unknown and continue to hold ourselves to the highest standards. We understand what our parents meant when they told us it was cool to be smart!” The Green family is supporting the Centennial Campaign in deep appreciation for what the school meant to them as students and how the school is helping them in their lives after college.

Division Principals ..................................................................... $1 million Academic Department Chairs ...................................................$500,000 Academic/Athletic/Artistic Head Coaches and Directors .....................................................$250,000 WORNALL CAMPUS: Intermediate Building ................................................................ $5 million Primary Building ......................................................................... $5 million Quadrangle ................................................................................... $2 million Dining Hall .................................................................................. $2 million Back Playground ...........................................................................$250,000 Founders Hall Living Room ............................................................................$250,000 Porch ..........................................................................................$250,000 Offices .......................................................................................$100,000 Classrooms .....................................................................................$100,000 WARD PARKWAY CAMPUS: Stadium ......................................................................................... $3 million Quadrangle ................................................................................... $2 million Boocock Middle School Commons .........................................$500,000 Upper School Commons (in entirety) .....................................$500,000 Upper School Student Lounge #1 .............................................$250,000 Upper School Student Lounge #2 .............................................$250,000 Phillips Gym Court ....................................................................................... $1 million Lobby .........................................................................................$500,000 Classrooms .....................................................................................$100,000


THE SOSLAND FAMILY

STEVE QUARLES ’60 Steve Quarles ’60 possesses a deep commitment to human rights, the environment, and great literature. He credits his parents, Samuel ’25 and Marianna ’28, in part for instilling these passions at home, but believes their genesis can be traced to the outstanding education his family received at Country Day, Sunset Hill, and Pem-Day.

exists today, and ready access to the wilderness areas in which he so frequently hikes, canoes, and camps. “I know now that I learned so much more than I had thought or could have expected. I am grateful my parents gave me 13 years at Pem-Day.” Steve notes that, while he attended the school, his mother chaired several Clothesline Sales and his father served on the Board of Trustees, presumably to keep a closer watch on him.

Steve views his family’s school experiences not as separate and individual, but rather as a “common denominator.” He feels Steve is committed the quality of teaching to ensuring future his parents enjoyed in the generations of ’20s was present when Pembroke Hill students Sam ’25, Marianna ’28, and Steve ’60 Quarles he was on campus, and enjoy educational exists today. He says this opportunities and “liberal and liberating resources similar to education” is a reason Samuel and Marianna those that were available to him and his parents. graduated with high honors from the University The support Steve and his wife, Suzanne, will of Michigan and Wells, respectively, and why provide through a significant estate commitment Steve attended Princeton and Yale Law School is a tangible expression of his family’s “collective before pursuing a career in law and government and united school experiences.” The couple does service. He attributes his family’s post-secondary not have children of their own; through their educational and later life achievements to the participation in the Centennial Campaign they learning they received from forward-thinking hope to “do something for other children by heads of school, engaging and nurturing faculties, giving them the opportunity to thrive in the same and the enriching experiences of playing on challenging educational setting our family found at teams, collaborating in classrooms, and selfCountry Day, Sunset Hill, and Pem-Day.” expression through the arts in the company of very special classmates. Steve has “heightened Steve is a partner and former chair of the respect” for the education he was given because Environment & Natural Resources Group of the it “accomplished the uneasy task” of cultivating Washington, D.C. law firm of Crowell & Moring his lifetime interest in human rights and the LLP. In addition, he and Suzanne own Some Day environment without the assistance of specialized Soon Farm, one of the largest horse breeding course materials dedicated to those subjects, farms in Maryland. the inspiration of the student body diversity that

When asked why the Sosland Family, through The Sosland Foundation, decided to support the Centennial Campaign, Charlie Sosland ’73 is unequivocal in his answer. “There are two reasons why Pembroke Hill deserves our support. First, we want to give back to Pembroke Hill for the great education we received, including Jeanne Ryan Sosland ’73; myself; our children, Meyer ’97, Sarah ’99, and Sophie ’03; and my uncle, Neil Sosland ’48. We want future students to have the same opportunity we had. The school, through its alumni, makes an impact on Kansas City and other cities around the globe. The outstanding education we received was a privilege, and it comes with the responsibility to be a good citizen of the world.” The Sosland’s Centennial Campaign commitment is directed toward additional support of the Sosland Scholars Program. For years, the program has made a Pembroke Hill education a reality for outstanding upper school students who otherwise would not be able to attend the school. Charlie ’73, Meyer ’97, Rosa, and Morton Sosland

In addition to their generous gift, Charlie and Jeanne continue to be actively involved in the day-to-day life of the school. Charlie, a former Pembroke Hill board chair, is a member of the campaign steering committee. He meets with fellow alumni and other members of the school community about the importance of Pembroke Hill’s endowment growth. Jeanne is a member of the Board of Trustees and the Alumni Executive Committee, where she is a source of valuable advice and perspective. She is also a long-time field hockey referee and can be found at Pembroke Hill’s field hockey field on autumn afternoons.

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Ways to Give Your gift to the Centennial Campaign will go into “trust” for the institution loved by so many. As an endowment donor, you will support

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CASH Gifts may be made by personal, business, or foundation check. Donations may also be made by credit card.

SECURITIES The gift of appreciated securities can offer attractive tax benefits, including the avoidance of capital gains taxes.

N.B. All cash gifts, pledges of five years or less, and irrevocable estate gifts will be counted toward the Hall Challenge.

TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY AND REAL ESTATE For some individuals, it may be preferable to contribute personal property related to the school’s mission or real estate rather than an outright gift.

ESTATE GIFTS Estate gifts are critical to growing Pembroke Hill’s endowment. Gifts of retirement plan assets, life insurance, charitable trusts, and bequests can be beneficial both to the school and to the long-term goals of the donor. Donors who make provision for the school through their long-term plans are members of the Founder’s Circle.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Doreen Rice, Director of Advancement Pembroke Hill School, 400 West 51st Street, Kansas City, MO 64112 816.936.1224 • drice@pembrokehill.org www.pembrokehill.org

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PEMBROKE HILL SCHOOL

PLEDGES Pledges to the Centennial Campaign may be spread over five years from the date of the commitment. Donors will receive immediate credit for the full amount of the pledge.

Photography: Susan McSpadden

Pembroke Hill in perpetuity. The school’s endowment funds are prudently invested to grow over time. Annually, a small portion of the endowment, 4%, is used to operate the school and support faculty, students, and programs.


Pembro ke Hil l S cho o l

REMAINING COMPETITIVE

SARAH AND JON BAUM Jon and Sarah Baum are the parents of four children—Brian ’08, Carter ’10, Mark ’11 and Meredith ’15—and for years have supported a variety of student activities. Sarah led the Parents Association during Pembroke Hill’s 2010-2011 Centennial Year and Jon is currently the President of the Board of Trustees and helping to lead the Centennial Campaign. Jon believes “the success of the Centennial Campaign will allow Pembroke Hill to maintain and strengthen its commitment to excellence, whether it is recruiting and retaining great teachers, having the needed financial aid resources for our families, maintaining or improving our academic, athletic and art facilities across both campuses and keeping an eye on the future, as respects technological advances and the trend of ever increasing globalization.”

Centennial Campaign

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: Doreen Rice, Director of Advancement Pembroke Hill School, 400 West 51st Street, Kansas City, MO 64112 816.936.1224 • drice@pembrokehill.org www.pembrokehill.org

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Pembroke Hill School Centennial Campaign 2010-2013

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