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G RAMMA R FOR EV ERY ONE

8.1 Activities: conjunctions For coordinating conjunctions little practice is needed, but students do need examples for reinforcing the functions and for reference. 1. Suggest a sentence that could end with a phrase such as those suggested above, and students add a given number of parts, for example: a. Which do you prefer? (tea or coffee; jam or marmalade.) b. What did you have for tea? (bread and jam; jelly and ice-cream.) c. What happened? (Tom went, but I stayed at home.) 2. Remind students of the function of subordinating conjunctions which link a subordinate adverbial clause to a principal clause. Suggest a principal clause to which students can add subordinating adverbial clauses of different kinds, for example: Marion did not arrive – because she missed the bus. until half way through the show. so Steve went on his own.

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Checklist: conjunctions Beginner level students should now be able to: • name the three common coordinating conjunctions (and, or and but) Advanced level students should now be able to: • explain the use of subordinating conjunctions and give examples • replace the word ‘and’ in sentences that would be better expressed with the use of a subordinating conjunction linking adverbial clauses (see page 167)

Grammar for Everyone  

Grammar for Everyone

Grammar for Everyone  

Grammar for Everyone

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